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Full text of "Duluth Evening Herald"

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hSDULUTH evening^hera 




TWENTY-FIFTH YEAR. 



SPECIAL MAIL EDITION FOR: TUESDAY MORNING, SEPTEMBER p, 1907. 



(ON TRAINS, FIVE CENTS,) TWO CENTS. 



MURDERER, STRUCK DUMB 
WHEN FOUND GUILTY FIVE 
YEARS AGO, SPEAKS AGAIN 



Has Been Confined in 

Insane Asylum Since 

Verdict 



Recovered His Voice Sud- 
denly and Commenced 
Yelling Loudly. 

He Will Now Be Sent 

to Prison For 

Life. 



Norrlstown. Pa., Sept. 16— Jacob 
Pestndorfer, an inmate of the State 
Asylum for the Insane, spoke the first 
word that he has uttered in five years, 
yesterday, and in consequence he will 
be removed from the asylum to the 



CHANGED 
HER^MIND 

Mrs. Earle Says She Will 
Not Get a Di- 
vorce. 



Ferdy and His "Affinity 

Seem to Be Up 

Against It 



Paris, Sept. 16.— Ferdinand Plnney 
Earle cannot marry his "atfinity," Ju- 
lia Kuttner, after all. 

Mrs. Earle has decided not to get a 
divorce. Earle lacks grounds to suo. 



SECRET IS 
REVEALED 

By Duluth Uncle That 

Results in a Happy 

Marriage. 

Romance in Real Life 

Narrated by New York 

Chauffeur. 



New York, Sept. 16. — Romance in 
real life has ju.'^t been revealed by a 
remarkable narrative of Harry Morris t 
Gordon, a chauffeur, who, after ' imr,^ 
wandering about the country for . |* 
years with a woman believed by him 
from infancy to have been his sister, 
found that they were not related, i 
anrf recently married her. 

He was a boy of 10 on a Car- 

retsville (Ohio) farm when there 
was born to those whom, until a 
year ago, he believed to be bis par- 
ents, a daughter, christened Beatrice. 
Gordon's favorite companion was 
Ball Morris, whom he had been j MKS. CASSIE CHADWICK. 




A DARING 



SEA TRIP 

Nineteen -Year -Old Boy 

Makes a Perilous 

Voyage. 

Sails From Nova Scotia 

to New York in 

Knockabout 



reared to call his uncle and who had 
taken a liking to him. Mrs. Gor- 
don had died when the boy was 13 
jears old, and later his supposed 
J father went to Australia, whence, 

Eastern penitentiary, where he will . So if his wife refuses to help him he 'several years ago, news of his death 

spend the remainder of his life. Pesen- I has no way of serving the matrimon- reached thid country 

dorfer, five years ago, killed his father- i ial ties, he and Miss Kuttner must stay 

in-law, Henry Gauschi, a dealer In ! apart. 



New York, Sept. 16.— The members of 
the Larchmont Lacht club are still 
talking of the remarkable achievement 
of one of their members, George P. P. 
Bonnell, in navigating a three-ton 
knockabout from Nova Scottla to New 
York in eight days. He covered 1,100 
miles in a boat drawing but twenty 
inches of water. 

Bonnell is 19 years old, and the sec- 
retary to the president of the Windsor 
Trust company at No. 65 Cedar street. 
He lives at No. 87 Hamilton place, and 

was formerly a civil engineer with the 

His' 



MRS. CASSIE CHADWICK, 
NOTED WITCH OF FINANCE. 
HAS LOST HER EYESIGHT 



TOO MUCH 
FORJUDGE 

Witnesses Prove That One 
Girl is Two Per- 
sons. 



Discharges Prisoner So 
As to Settle the Re- 
lationship. 

Chicago, Sept. 16.— The extraordinary 



Stricken With a Nervous 

Collapse, Leaving Her 

Blind. 



Prison Officials Say That 

Her Condition is 

Serious. 



Do Not Believe She Will 

Live to Serve Out 

Term. 



Columbus, Ohio, Sept. 16.— Mrs. Cassler 
M. Chadwick, noted witch of financOr 
who, posing as Andrew Carnegie's na- 
itural daughter, swindled Ohio and East- 



Prison. 



music boxes, in Chestnut street, Phila- 
delphia. 



"My gracious," Earle remarked, ner- 
vously, in discussing his wife's plans 



There were circumstances connected for a divorce, "suppost; she shouldn't 
with the murder which made Pesen- get it." In such a case he admitted 
dorfer btlieve that he would be ac- ' he saw no alternative but for Mrs. 
quitted. When the jury brought in Earle to return to him. 
a verdict of murder in the first de- This is Just what Mrs. Earle is count- 
gree Pet^jndorfer was rendered speech- i ing on. She says openly she does not 
less. Froni that day until yesterday j think "Ferdy" knows his own mind, 
he did not utter a word. Alienists who ' She expects him to tire of "Affinity" 
examined him declared that the blow ! Kuttner and seek a reconciliation, 
had rendered him insane, and instead j Then, tco, she is beginning to see In 



of being hanged he was sentenced to 



what an unfortunate position her con- 



It was necessary for the children, 
when the home in Ohio was broken 
up, to try conclusions with the 
world. Harry Mt)rrJs Gordon went 
to Fort Wayne, Ind., where he was 
an apprentice and rivet boy for 
bridge builders. His sister, Beatrice, 
went to Chicago. 

Gordon made hi.vi way to San Fran- 
cisco. He was one of the survivors 
of the City of Chester, which sank 
off the California coast. Alaska and 
the Klondike appealed to him and 
for nine years he was in the frozen 
north during which time he gradu- 
ally lost all trace of relatives and 



HORSEWHIPS A 
WOMAN IN AlJTO 



(Continued on page 3, first column.) 



imprisonment for life. 

While sitting in his room yesterday | templated renunciation of her husband 
Pesendorfer was heard yelling at the : will place her little son. 
top of his voice. When ketptrs arrivc-d j Under the influence of Earle and i 
he was saying excitedly: "1 can talk j Miss Kuttner she seemed willing to 
again; I can talk again." He was ! se-ek a divorce. Just before she sailed 



highly tlated, and did not sttm worried 
when tC'ld that he would have to spend 
the remainder of his days in prison. 



WOMAN TO WED 
EX-JAIL INMATE 



Pardoned After Serving 

Four- Year Term for 

Embezzlement 

"Worcester, Sept. 16.— Miss 



she said she believed the "affinity " 

would make "Ft-rdy ' a good wife and 

hoped there would be little delay in 

the proceedings. 
She changed her mind following a 

conference v.-ith her father, M. Flsh- 

bacher, the rich Paris publisher. The 
! divorce proceedings, she says herself 

have been indelinitely postponed. Her 
' father is authority for the statement 
; that they will never begin. 
i M. Fishbacher does not feel as kind- St. Paul, Sept. 16.— (Special to T-e 

ly toward Earle as the latter se^ms to Herald.)— One hundred and ten men, 
Replying to Earles expressed 1^^^^^.^^^ ^^ ^^^ ^^^^ ^^ ^jj ^^^ ^^^^^^ 



BOILERMAKERS 
REACH ST, PAUL 

One Hundred Men Ar- 
rive From East to 
Break StriRe. 



Contractor Angry Because 

Motor Ran Down 

His Horse. 

New York, Sept. 16.— John Llddle, 
a wealthy stone contractor, horse- 
V'-hlpped Mrs. Martha I. Miles of 
Riverside drive, on the corner of 
Seventy-third street and First ave- 
nue. He then threw a lighted cigar 
at her. It caught on (he breast of 
the woman's open-work waist and 
she was badly scorched before she 
could throw it oft. 

The attack was provoked by the 
accidental running down of the horse 
v.'hich Liiddle was driving ^by Mrs. 
Miles' chauffeur -a" her autonnrbile 
and Liddle'8 canta^e turned out of 
Central park, at the Seventy-second 
street and Fifth av>nue entrance. 

Both Liddle and Frank Worteseck, 
another wealthy contractor, with 



Pennsylvania Railroad company, -n'sjcase of Tillie Tolan has proven too 

Who Has Been Stricken Blind in ' cWef vrevRrHtionfoTthecT^^^^^^ ^^^ ^ cieland, of the mun- , 

u"aL%rom ms officS i icipal court. Tiliie Tolan, a girl of em banks and capitalists out of mil- 

Bonnell had his boat, which he named [22 years, engaged to be married to '"ons in loans on bogus securities, was 

the Old Glory, built at Dighy, Novai^jj^ organist of the Methodist church, stricken with a nervous collapse at Iha 

Scotia. It was from a design ovt - ..itended wps seized on a ' P^-nitentiary today, which has left her 

Charles D. Mower and was construct- . wnicn sne ctiie.iuea, was beizeu on » * 

ed by William L. and Ralph Oliver. street car a week ago by John Klimo- bund. 

The boat cost $5,000, and for its size vjcz and accused of being his runaway Her condition is serious, and it is the 

Is oneof the mo.st expensiv-e ever built.|^^..jg ..^^^^^„ ^^^^^ shouted for the opinion of the prison physicians that 

elel"enS;sTe..m'and'twJn\;^"^t'?ni police, and Klimovic. was arrested. j «he will never live to serve out her 
the water line. Polished mahogany ca- j "i never saw the man until two days j ten years' sentence, two years of whiclv 
bin and cockpit, a deck laid in one- 1 ^^ ^^ ^j^^^^ j ^^5^^,^^^^.^^ j^^ ^^^^^^ ^^.^jj^^^.^j, ghe has now completed. 

inch strips of pine, a self-bailing cock- „ • , ,« m , « .1, 1' ' 

St, white enamel cabin sides and plush "le, said Miss Tolan to the f ^hce. , /M.fr 

and mohair interior are a few featur-a : Klimovicz was examined by a physician l||||| |-f«| I |||A/\ 
of the splendid little craft. Every de- .^nd found to be sane. i l/l/U I LLLil/nJ 

tail was planned t-y./^f ^^"/'••.J^!! -She is my wife, and if she Is not 1 

knockabout has a null of pme pianos ■ •' - 

framed with oak and without butts, am willing to serve the rest of my Ufe 

: —'in jail," said Kiiraovicz. He said ho 

(Continued on page 3, s eventh column.^ | carried her in Grand Rapids and they 

[lived together four months, then she 
idisapi)eared. He produced a photograph 
I that was one apparently of Miss Tolan. 
I In court Miss Tolan was accompanied 
! by her father and mother and the Rev. [ 
Errickson, pastor of her church, j 
limovicz was there with nis rnother- 
i in-law, Mrs. Zamales, alleged moiherl 

— ' — • jof Miss Tolan, and his sister-in-lav.', 

•> !• f\ Miss Zamales, alleged «ster. | 

Antl-TOXin Relieves Pa-i„SL''?o,r,|-'»h??L"„"To'i;e'f.^„tar,nrHerald.,_Th. op^mg c,re„,o„,e. Of 

1 extended and cried, "We have found the sovereign grand lodge of the In- 

iyou at la^tl" Miss Tolan repulsed h°r dependent Order of Odd Fellows wft» 

j with the words. —I never saw you be-; central Presbyterian church 

fore in my life. ' | . ^ "• „ . t^ . _„ 

Mrs. Zamales then pleaded with hor ibis afternoon. F. A. Day. secretary 

t~but Miss Toian shook ner head nnl to Governor Johnson and Mayor SnUth 

of j said, "You are all crazy!" made brief addresses of welcome. These 

ho= Kllmovic? took the strmd and sworo were responded to by George W. Scher- 

' er, grand master of 

(Continued on Page 3, .sixth column), ^grand lodge; D 



DOCTORS CURE A 
CASEOFLOCKJAWli 



tient \Vho Had a 
Severe Case. 



AREJ/ELCOMED 

Opening Ceremonies of 

Grand Lodge Held at 

St Paul. 

,1 St. Paul, Sept. 16.— (Special to Tlio 



New York, Sept. IG.— A case 
virulent tetanus, or lockjaw, 
been cured by doctors of Willams- 
burg, at the Brooklyn hospital. Six 
wetks ago, Mrs. Annette Koesting of 
Williamsburg was apparently in the 



believe 

Tui^d^hJm oV'wife^£iittng!'^t'he'F''^^^ striking boi.lermakers on the St. Uvhom he was driving at the time, and ^ 

man empliaticaily repeated his prevl-'Paul lines involved in the present labor who aided in the attack, were later | first staget* "(f lockjaw from a wound 
ous statement. j troubles, reached St. Paul this morning convicted in the Night court bv Mag- j from a rusty naii. Her agony was 

His daughter corroborates his chaise, !,.,j,fl ^prp ^^jj^^^ ^,, ^}^^ (jj.p^^ j^^.,j.,^^,^.„ I, g^j.^^p Corrigan .and fined $10— the so intense that she wa.q removed to 
alleging that in moments of anger her ; j^^^j^ street shops Other boi;ermakrs ' limit for the technical charge of dis- j the hospital, and physicians said her 
husband raised his hand against her, ^^e coming and it is considered p-ob- orderly conduct, on which they were ! case was hopeless. Nevertheless. Dr. 
Clara , but he always overwhelmed her '«vith m^^j^ ^^iHt the committee of operating' ai rested In finding them guilty, I Henderson of the house staff injected 



Leach one of the richest women in ' klndne.^s afterwards and that she never 

Worcester, confirms the report .^^^ ce^^^^ to loveh^.nu 

she is to marry John W. Maher, a 

real estate dealer, who was recently 

pardoned from the county jail, where 

ho had been serving a four-years' 

sentence for embezzlement. 

Miss Leach and her fiance have 
striven to keep the engagement a 
secret. The marriage is to take place 
in St. John's Catholic church, Oct. 8, 
the pastor, the Rt. Rev. Mgr. Thomas 
Grifhn, a friend of the bridf, ofRciat- | 

i»g. I 

Miss Leach's friends are much sur- 
prised. !>he has t.een a devout at- I 
teniiant at St. J-.-hn's church, to l 
which sht. has made liberal donations. 
She is interestetl in every so.'iety | 
connected with the church and chari- 



APPRAISERS 

FILE REPORT 

Of Inventory of Property 
of Pope Manufactur- 
ing Company. 

Hartford. Conn.. Sept. 16.— A hearing ; 
table organizations, and is president i ^jj ^Y\e■ matter of the confirmation of 
gf the Associated Bc^ard of Trinity j Albert L. Pope as temporary re- 

colleee and one of the charter mem- . ^ ' ^ T. . '. ■ I 

b.rs of the Catholic Women's club. ' eel ver of the Pope Manufacturing coin- I 
She entertain." iavishly and h. . had pany in Connecticut, was assigned fori 
many admirers. Miss Leach is also . today before Judge Case of the su- j 
an accomplished musician. ' perior court. The appraisers, John R. 

Five years ago Maher was associ- | Hilis, and Frederick C. Billings, filed | 
ated in business with his father. He ' [heir inventory of the lands, buildings, i 
transacted st»me business for RoUin | plant and machinery, e<iuipmem, tools,; 
G. White, a wealthy retired business 1 and patterns, showing a gross value of , 
man. and White complained that he |i, 061,000. j 

had been defrauded of st^veral thous- . j^ making the inventory the receivers 
and dollars. Maher was convicted, i acting under the advice of counsel, 
He served three <.f the four years. ! have made no accounting of the book 
and wa-s then pardoned. Since then j accounts, bills receivable, stock on | 
he has tried to live down the past, hand, or in propss of manufacure, ma- 
and has been successful. He is now : serial, etc. 

In the r-^al estate business with his ^ ^s to the book accounts, bills re 
father, and doing weil. 



officials of the five railroads will send ; Magistrate Cornpan said they both anti-toxen every day A month 
them to the big Soo line shops at 1 deserve<l to go to the workhouse, and pas.«ed without apparent results. Dut 
Shonham and to the Great Western ' that he would gladiy send them there, the treatment began to show s^ns or 
shops at OeUvein. starting the work at The attack on Mrs. Miles was wit- [success about a week ago. Friday, 
thest points before re-establishing n )r-^ nessed by the occupants of a dozen the woman was allowed to leave her 
mal conditions at more distant shops. ' fashionable turnouts. I bed. 



TWENTY YEARS 
IN PENITENTIARY 



Pronounced on Robert 

Hartzeii for Arson 

and Theft 



T^f;^**-*A-ffi*«****««**-«**««**-.V-*i¥^^*^ #****'***#****«*-;Yi¥'^-*«^^* , Allentown, Pa 

FEEDING A USELESS DOG. 

PUBLIC:— "Not Much Chance for Me as Long as That Dog 1$ Around." 



Sept. 16. 



the Minnesota 
S. Whitemore, grand 
patriarch, and Miss » Rose Whiting^ 
president of the Rebekah assembly of 
Minnesota. 

This afternoon the cantons who ex- 
pect to compete in the prize drills are 
being inspected at the down town base- 
ball park, and tonight the visitors will 
be .iccorded a reception at the state 
Capitol. 

MiZNER DISCHARGED. 



Court Declares He Gave the PlaintiFfi 
What They Deserved. 

New York, .Sept. 16.— After a hear- 
Twenty ing in the West side court, Magistrate 



,«,.■•^-'V;Y.■?l^:M»^i■^'./■^l■3a'^^;V.■3^■V4KA»-v.^^ -V-V -'»-''. -M»^.VrV'*'^-'t'-'-''-*irV'3V^-^-'^*^'?4-^''**"''' '''**'''' 



SUCCESSFUL LIFE NOT 

ALL WORK, SAYS HILL 



New York. Sfpt. 16.— James J. Hiil. the 
great bui'.ilcr In dS.scussing suicess in 
life, has prepared this statement for pub- 
lication. 

"1 have always lived the life of a m.in 
endeavoring to be usefully bu.sy. I «nean 



ceivable, stock on hand or in process 1 
of manufacture, which includes about 
200 cars ready for sale, the appraisers 
await the orders of the court. 

GOTHAM ARTIST 



b Caught in His Scheme of Measuring 
Shapely Girls. 

New York. Sept. 16.— An incident which 
to dn>p business cares entirely, in the j threatened to involve a prominent family 
evening and to unite work, rest and rec- j ^^^ technical arrest of a well-known 

roatloii in reasonable proportions. 1 ani , , , , 

fond of both hunting and fishing, and ; artist, who advertised under the name of 
upend a short vacation each summer on 1 Capt. Marsh.ill for girls to enter the 



a salmon river in Labrador. 

"The w<w-king days and working hours 
are those in which there is necessary 
work to b€ 
may require 



I'nited States Secret service. Hundreds 

answered and were met at a hotel by 

done, wli.atever time that I Capt. Marshall, who insisted on measur- 

Spare hours are well spent ] ing them. Many submitted, but others 



One girl told her landlady, who 



upon the .«tudv of history, lit^ture and 1 r.fused 

art. Whatever any al>le mind of great; ; «..,i < i . 1 ,1 

genius ha,- given for the Instruction or^rote to th.ef V\ llkje. who put a local 

injoyinent of the world is worth while. '^^P*"'!' ."'J'-" ^*'^ 'i^* ""*^ trapped Mar- 

••Th. home is the center and anchor 1 f hall." His relatives were brought to 

of Ufe for bl>th\hildren and parent.. It ',\^;^*^^i^[td'[o\^nfe^ t*he .toT'^'" 
gives happlne.ss to the one and forms I ^""^P*^"*^" ^o coniesb int sioi>. 



the character of the other. All after-life 
Is built upon the home life. From it the 
first and b'st and most lasting educa- 
tion Is drawn. 

■"The best advice to a young man. as 
It appears to nie, ig also very old and 
simple. Get knowledge and understand- 
mg. I»etermine to make the most possi- 
ble of yourself by doing with the best of 
your powtr sutli useful work as conus 
your way." 



not prosecuttd. 



was 
He was 



ARCHBISHOP COMINO. 
New York. Sept. 16.— The steamer 
Moskva of the Russian volunteer fleet, 
which is due Wednesday, from Libau. 
has a distinguishing passenger in the 
person of Archbishep Platon, who comes I be several weeks l^ater 



NEBRASKA DEMOCRATS 
POSTPONEBIG BANQUET. 

Lincoln. Neb.. Sept. 16.— The Demo- 
cratic executive committee today 1e- 
cided to postpone the date of the ban- 
quet to 'ie held in Lincoln. Sept. 24. 
for the reason that It wishes to havo 
two gatht rings of Democrats in Lin- 
coln, before the close of the prescit 
campaign. The state convention will 
bo ^eld Sept. 24, and the banquet will 
■ The banquet 



here to succeed Archbl.shop Tikhon as 
head of the Russian Church of North 
America. 



will be made a representative gather- 
ing. Democrats. from all sections of the 
country being invited. 





ilso received a sentence of twenty 
years. Hartzeii was sentenced on only 
four charges, the court holding the 
other cases open against him. 



LEAVE THE HOSPITAL. 



j years in the penitentiary at Philadel- ; Cornell decided that thf^re was 

i phia was the sentence pronounced hj-e not sufficient evidence to hold Wilson 

* today on Robert Hartztll, who pleaded Mizner, the divorced husband of Mrs. 

% iu t t t fh V. f Charles T. Yerkes, on the charge of 

v^wtJ^.>t^^^iJ^;».-5K»S^':t'^'fi*'«^^^ Mizner was arrested on the 

■^^^^^ ^.^^^^ |and theft. Hartzeii, v.ith Daniel U. cyn-iplaint of Henry W. Knight of 161 

Adams, was arrested recently chartred ' East Thirty-seventh street^ and Brin- 

ton C. Varden (»f 210 We«t Forty- 

pum- 
of the 
part 
proprietor, vn me mix-up jviiigm was 
tossed into the fountain which 
adorns the green room, and spent a 
few moinents among the turtles and 
crocodiles therein. 

"I don't think that the evidence 
would warrant me in holding the 
prisoner," said Magistrate CornelL 
"The facts s«*m to show that the 

Twelve of the Twenty Injured in Canaan complainants \>ere too fresh and got 

..... M u I J ' oniv what they deserved. 

ACCiaent Are Much improved. l Atlzner declared the trouble wa» 

Hanover, N. H., Sept. 16.-Twelve ! caused by his ordering a ct^rtaln 
,,._.. . 1 . woman to leave the hotel 

of the twenty persons taken to a 

hospital suffering from injuries re- 
el ved In the railroad accident at West 
Can.aan, yesterday, which caused the 
death of twenty-five persons, had 
recovered sufficiently to leave the 
hospital today, but eight persons 

still remain in the hospital. None of i ., ^ -^^ r. 4 ■ 

the injured are in a dangerous con- j ris, the divorced wife of Dr. Benjamin 
dition. The body of an unidentified 1 p. Harris, was the first witness today 

in the trial of Amasa C. Campbell for 

killing her former husband. 

Mrs. Harris identifitd a number ol 
letters that had been written by Dr. 
Harris. 



DIVORCED WIFE 

Of Dr. Harris Takes the Stand in the 
Anasa Campbell Trial. 

Chicago, Sept. 16. — Mrs. Ellen Har- 



Ixiy, abeut 18 years of age, who died 
during the night, remains in the hos- 
pital. 

PRIEST ON TRIAL. 

Ludwig Szczygiel is Accused of Murder- 
. ing Two Starzyuski Brothers. 

Pittsburg, .Sept. 16.— Attired in the 
regulation clerical garb, Ludwig 



TWENTY-FIVE HINDUS 

WILL BE DEPORTED. 

Ottawa, Ont., Sept. 16.— Hon. Frank 



COAL MINE SHUT DOWN. 



Szczygiel, the Polish priest, accused ; Oliver, minister of the interior, has 

of killing Andrew and Stephen I received a telegram from A. S. Mun- 

,...,,. . , .V, I ro, health officer at Vancouver stat- 

Starzyuski, in their restaurant on the j„^ ^,^,,j ^^ ^^^ ^^ Hindus who^rrlved 

South side, a little over a month ago | by the Monteagle there are twenty- 
today, was today placed on trial in j five old and sick men, who will be 
the criminal court here on the charge | ^eport^ed. There ^ar^e^ none^^ of ^^hexn 

of murder. • , ^y^^ party. At present they are llvinif 

Szczygiel, looking pale and hag- i in tents, but express their intention of 
gard, pleaded "n(vt guilty" to the ' building houses, 
charge. The work of selecting a jury 
was then begun. The pri-soner wa.s 
formerly an assistant pastor of a 

Roman Catholic church in Chicago. | 

As he had no money with which to ! Chattanooga, Tenn., Sept. 16.— With 
employ counsel, two attorneys were j the closing of work Saturday night the 
appointed by the c-ourt to defend him. ' Georgia Iron & Coal company inde- 

j finitely shut down their plant at Ris- 

WOULD SELL AEROPLANE. j ing Dawn. The furnace gave employ- 
Berlin, Sept. 16.— William Wright of j ment to 600 men. Two reports are 
Dayton. Ohio, and his associate in ne- j afloat as to the cause of the shutdown, 
gotiating the sale of the , Wright | one being the adverse legislattijn by 
Brothers' aeroplane to Germany, has j the last legislature of Georgia against 
arrived here and been well received | mining operators and the oth^r attrl- 
by the chiefs of the military halloon j butes the shutdown, to disagreement 
division of the army. ' | among the company officers. 

» » 



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THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 16. 1907. 



WEATHER FORECAST— Probably 
showers this afternoon or loriijjrht; 
slightly pooler tonight; Tuesday 
partly cloudy. 




UI-Ml-lM W. 8«>«nor ft. 




OUR SUITS 

—AND— 

OVERCOATS 

in the novelty fabrics are 
not to be matched in any 
Other Duluth store. 

Suits at $iO up to $35 
Overcoats $10 to $50 

At $20 An Innsnally Fine .Assort- 
ment Our Own Hand Made Gar- 
ments. 



Top Coats, Raincoats— all Kinds of 
Slylisli Outer Garments— 

$10 to $30 



BEARS STILL 
IN CONTROL 

Both the Metal and Cop- 
per Shares Are 
Weak. 



North Butte and C. & A. 

Will Reduce Their 

Output 



The bearish copper market, both in 
the metal and the shares, continues 
an4 there are no indications of higher 
prices for either at the present time. 
All of the news is bearish. 

It was rumored today that as soon 
as a conference has been held between 
otncials of the Mexican g^overnment and 
the Greene-Cananea company, a 60 per 
cent reduction in the production of the 
company's mines will be inaugurated. 

Tins was but one of the bearish in- 
fluences on today's copper share mar- 
ket. The reduction in the North Butte 
and Calumet & Arizona productions 
were others. 

London spot copper was weaker 
throughout the day. It was reported 
that the foreign visible supply had 
decreased 1.478 tons. 

The shares opened with little 
change from Saturday, but became 
ea.sier as tiie-se.ssion progressed. There 
was an occasional rally to the open- 
ing level but the tendency was down- 
ward and the close was weak. The 
market was rather listless, although 
tliere was good trading in some of the 
leading issues. 

Heavy trading In Greene-Cananea 
was a feature of the day and the mar- 
ket on this stock held fairly firm 
around $9.50 and $9.37 Vg. The htgb 
pri-e of the day was $9.62 Va and tjje 
stock closed at $9.25 bid and $9-37 »/^ 
asked. 

North Butte opened at $47, declined 
to $4"). 50 and closed at $45.75 bid and 
$46 asked. Amalgamated opened at 
$59.87'/^. went as high as $61. de- 



clined to $58.50 and closed at $5S.75 
bid. 

Butte Coalition opened at $16, de- 
clined to $15.75 and closed at $13. 62'/^ 
bid and $16 a^ked. Calumet & Ari- 
zona opened at $112.50, declined to 
$110 and closed at $110 bid and $112 
asked. Anaconda opened at $37.5*1, 
ctdvanced to $37.75, declined to $37.tt.;Vi 
anU closed at $37.50 bid. 

Superior & Pittsburg sold at 
$10.62V2. declined to $10.25 and closed 
at $10.25 bid and $I0.37Vi asked. 

Globe Consolidated sold at $7.25 and 
$7 and clo.-^ed at $6.75 bid and $7.12V^ 
asked. Derm-Arizona, at $6.25 and $6 
and closed at $6 bid and $6.12V2 asked, 
Copper Queen of Idaho at $1 and 'i9c 
aivd closed at $1 bid and $1.12la ask^d. 
and Cliit" at $1.12>^ and closed at $1 bid 
and $1.12V^ asked. 

Keweenaw closed at $5.87Va bid and 
$6.12^2 asked, Hancock at $6 bid and 
$6.25 asked. Warren at $4.75 bid and 
$5.25 asked, Calumet & tfunora at $10.bO 
bid and $11 asked. Carman at $3.50 bid 
and $4 asked and Butte & Superior a.t 
$1.87»2 bid and $2 asked. 

Black Mountain .sold at $4 and closed 
at $4 bid and $4.12Va asked. 
* « * 

Directors of the North Butte Min- 
ing company and the Calurtiet & Ari- 
zona Miiung company got together 'n 
Duluth .Saturday afternoon and decid- 
ed to reduce the production at the prop- 
erties of these companies, 50 per cent, j 
These reductions are brought about by' 
the poor demand for copper and the \ 
controversy over prices between the 
producers and the consumers. f 

North Butte, in which Duluth has al- ' 
I ways been vitally interested, has been 
jprod"ucing from 1,100 tons to 1,150 tons a' 
I month and' the production will be cut I 
[about 550 tons a month. Calumet & 
I Arizona, who.se mines are at Bisliee, 
I will cut its monthly production down 
1 to alx>ut 700 tons. This plan will go 
I into effect at once. 

I There were pre.sent from the Copper 
'country at the meeting, Charles Briggd, 
[president of the Calumet & Arizona 
company; Gordon R. Campbell, secre- 
;tary; Peter- Ruppe, treasurer, and 
I Thomas Hoatson, director. 
I * « • 

I Exports of copper from the United 
i States are showing an Irregular Call- 
' ing off. The following table indicates 
1 the course of exports covering the last 
j five years: 

I 1907. 1906. 1905. 1904. 1903. 

■January ....17.<J39 15 J07 21,245 29,t>S5 10,478 
i February .. 9,174 15,801 17,&t)8 17,073 8,9.15 
" 16,403 21,073 22 852 12,941 

16,330 24,121 13,983 13.670 
19 260 23.7.">8 14.7r2 9,lW 
WVU 22.l»96 16,279 8,6«W 
18.309 IS. 178 19.49*) 8,405 

August U.-&S 20,433 22,ti92 24,906 10,*3S 

; September 14,119 19.755 20,569 12.000 

October 17..528 17.7S4 26.586 13,101 

Kovernber 18,451 13.1s6 22.294 14.597 

December 14 8.55 18,158 19,847 15,857 



I Mann 13,432 

April 17,363 

May 9,ij;}6 

June .. .,..16.470 
July 14,774 




CARBOLITE PLANT 
NOW RUNNING 

Power Plant Continues 

to Furnish Current 

Without Hitch. 

After long months o-f wailing, the 
'American Carbollte comi>any al West 
I>uluth received power from tlie 
Ort-iit Northern company this morn- 
ing,, and their big plant was put In 
operation, with a ptu'tial force. 

The force will '>t added to from 
time to time uTitil the big plant is in 
full blast, and it is .said th^re are 
orders enough aJiead to keep it going 
at. capacity for many months to come. 
The l>:-ginning of operaUona at the 
plant is a source of considerable sat- 
tefaction to West Duluth r>eople, as 
the industry Is one of considerable 
magnitude. 

General Manager Coleman of the 
Great Northern Power company said 
today that the plant is ruiming along 
smoothly, supplying all of the palrons 
■without crowding, and the machinery 
is standing well under the "actual 
test. 



One Cent a Word F^ch In.si-rtion — Xo 
Atlv<'rLi.>eineiit Le8.s Than 15 Cents. 

MASSAGE - MISS MARIA GRINDER- 
eng, gradutititi massimse troui Dr. 
Arved.son'.s institute. Stockholm Swe- 
den. Burrow.s Bldg., Rm. 300. Zenith 
phone, 1736-X. 

Fashionable hair dressing, manicuring, 
scalp and face treatments. Miss Kelly, 
opposite Glass Block, upstairs. 

WANT.ED - IMMEDIATELY, RKLIA- 
b!" girl or middle-agt^d lady, for gen- 
eral housework. Fare paid. Mrs. J. 
M. Vo^el, Iron River, Wis. 

FOR SAL.E— CHIC.\GO COTTAGE OR- 
gan ;niU3t be »y\d al onre; owner.s 
leaving city; slts^htly used; goes di 
quite a reduction. Apply al 5015 Colo- 
rado street. 



Total ....110,746 '205,460 239,863 247,735 138.435 

* * « 

Directors of the Anaconda Mining 
comp:»ny are scheduled to meet this 
month to take action on the ijuarterly 
dividend, and the expectation is tiiere 
will be a reduction in the rate. 

• • • 

Disp.atrhfS from Ottawa, Ont., st.ate 
that the Silver Bar mine at Cobalt has 
p«s.s('d into the hands of J. F. Killorin 
of Duluth and E. P. Stone and asso- 
liat^'s of Siiginaw. Mich. E. P. Stone 
lias been- felectod president of the com- 
pany and Charles MoRae of Sudl»nry is 
s^'cret.iry. Tlie head office will bo re- 
moved from Ottawa to Sudbury. The 
n\ine was formerly controlled by Riii il- 
do McCoimell of, Ottawa and J. E. Bar- 
rett of Renfrew, Ont. 



Barker Funeral. 

The fimeral of Prank A. Barker, who 
died Saturday at St. Luke's hospital, will 
ge held tomorrow at 2:15 o'clock from St. 
Luke's Episcopal church. Interment will 
bo at Forest Hill cemetery. 




FOR RENT— OCT. 1 TO COUPLE WITH 
no children small furnished cottage 
htilf a block from car line. Inquire 18 
Orange street, Duluth Heights. 



WANTED— CHECK ROOM BOY. ST. 
Louis iiotel. 



WANTED-ALL AROUND HARNESS 
maker. Apply 55<J9 Grand avenue. West 
Duluth 

SITU.\TIO.V WANTED— EXPERIENCED 
stenograpiier wants position; compe- 
tent for law work. Address B 13. 
Herald. 

PERSONAL— SPANISH LESSONS BY A 
competent teacher; commercial meth- 
od Address B. 14, Herald. 



Jones Re.s:ileiiee Is Sold. 

Stephen W. Jones has sold his re.sid-'noe 

at 240 East Thud street to N. F. Hugo. 

I for $17,500. The house la a new one and 

'was built by Mr. Jones. The sale was 

I made through the office of George R. 

Laybourn. 



FOR RBNT-FROM OCT. 1 TO MAY 1. 
comfortaWi" t"urni.'»hed flve-room cot- 
tage on Park Point, within walking 
distance to central part of city. In- 
quire 1122 Minnesota avenue. Old phone, 
121-L. 



DELEGATES BACK 
FROM MEETING 

Letter Carriers' Conven- 
tion at Canton Attended 
by Local Men. 

R. G. Malcolm, J. F. McDonald and 
"W. E. Treskin have Just returned 
from Canton, Ohio, where they repre- 
Bented the Duluth Lettercarriers' as- 
eociation at the big national conven- 
tion. The convention wsis In session 
last week at the Ohio city, and there 
were many carriers in attendattce. 

Tlie letter carriers from nearly 
every city In the country were rep- 
rest^nted by delegates at the con- 
vention, and it was a most successful 
meeting. 

Many rnatters of importance to the 
letter carriers of tlie whole c^Juntry 
•were taken up and discussed at the 
oonvention. and the Duluth delegates 
return with many new ideas for the 
betterment of the local association. 

They will report on the prt>c?^ings 
of the convention at the next meet- 
ing of the local association. 

^ PROSECUTIONS 

Of state Capitol Grafters Will Be Begun 
in Few Hours. 

Harrisburg, Pa., Sept. 16. — Crim- 
inal suits growing out of the state 
capitol .scandal are almost certain to 
be brought within the next twenty- 
four hours. Attorney General Todd 
arrived here this afternoon frorn Phil- 
adelphia to confer with James Scarlet 
and other lawyers a.s.soriated with him 
In the preparation of the.se cases. At 
this conference it will be decided how 
many of the eighteen persons and 
firms mentioned by the capitol inves- 
tlgatioi^ commission in its report to 
Governor Stuart shall be prosecuted. 



WANTED— BUNDLE BOY AT S. H. 
Knox & Co., 5c and 10c store. 

IgRIGINAL SWEDISH MASSAGE GIV- 
1 en by Mrs. C. Van Vick. 431 East Second 
street. Zenith. S.35. 



LADIES' TURKISH BATH AND HAIR 
dressing parlors. 24 West Superior 
1 street, upstairs. Knauf Sisters. 

\ THE SPALDING TOILET PARLORS 
Manicuring, massage, shampooing 
Room and 'phone 19. 



BIRTHS. 

CARL.SON— A son was born to Mr. an<i 

Mrs. Otto Carlson. 1413 West First 

street, .Sept. 3. 
BELCHER— A daughter was born to 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Belcher, 1377 East 

Third street, .Sept. 6. 
BEALS— A daughter was born to Mr. 

and Mrs. M. Beals. 17 East Fifth 

street, Sept. 7. 
KAIINE.S— A son was born to Mr. and 

Mrs. Henry Karnes, 329 West Fifth 

street, Sept. 11. 
EMANUEL.SON— A son was born to Mr, 

and Mr.s. Oust Emanuelson, 1110 West 

Third .street. .Sept. 9. 
LAR.SON— A son wa.s born to Mr. and 

Mrs. Johan Larson, 103 East Eighth 

street. .Sept. 13. 
WILHEjLM— A son was born to Mr and 

Mm. Robert H. Wilhelm, 521 West 

Fifth street, .Sept. 9. 
HECTOR— A daughter was born to Mr. 

and Mrs. Louis Hector, 2'24 East Eighth 

street, Sopt. 13. 
ELVERHOL — Twin daughters were 

born to Mr. and Mrs. Ole Elvorhol, 2113 

West Seventh street. Aug. 24. 



Thonuvs Kane l.s I'aroled. 

Thomas Kane has been paroled from the 
state asylum for insane at Fergus Falls. 
jIn a notice to the probate Cijurt the hos- 
pital authorities state that Kane ha.s Im- 
proved very much in the two weeks ne 
has tieen at the liospit;\,l. Tiiey ask that 
the local authorities keep in touch with 
him and notify the hospital If there 
should be any need of his return to Fer- 
gus Falls. Kane was taken in custody 
while flourishing a revolvi-r on the street. 
He had been employed as a guard on the 
range. 

To Conduct K.xaiuination. 

J. N. S<'hoemaker of St. Paul, secre- 
tary of the United Stales civil .service of 
the Eighth district, will be in Duluth 
on Wednesday of this week to take 
charge of the examinations at tlte fed- 
eral building. Examinations fur ilie po- 
sitions of st'-nographer, typewriter, car- 
rier and scver.il other.s will be given. 
Secretary Grabarkiewicz ha.s already re- 
ceived ten applications for the carrier 
examination. 

CuniinL^siuners Named. 

Judge Morris of the federal court has 
reappointed James A. Brown United 
States cOfiimlssioner. and Lever Leverson 
d'PULy United Stales commis.sioner at 
Fergus Falls. Halver RassniusSt.-n was 
appointed United State.s commissioner al 
Moorhead, by the court. 



\l 



r£>; 



"Cornet Dress for Women." 

Gidding^s Informal O pening Began Today 
The Establishment Fairly Glows With Newness 

The smart tailored suits which we are now showing are hailed with 
delight by women who value the possession of new fashions which 
are fairly in advance of the general adoption. They clearly reflect the 
unusually clever accomplishments of the most noted Fasion authorities. 

The showing is a» magnificent one, (magnificent is a strong word, we know, but we 
hav^e the stocks to back the assertion). The models are of uncommon excellence 
and the fact that they are "Gidding" garments guarantees Style, Fit, Quality, Var- 
iety and Service. Not a single point on which we fail! They are not "cheap" 
productions and the value does not consist entirely of the first a])pearance, for they 
are tailored so faithfully that they are certain to retain their shape and the maxim, 
that the best is ultimately the cheapest, holds true. 

Fifty-Inch Fitted Coat Suits 

One handsome work of tailor art is Pirate Blue Imported Broadcloth, with 
the wide shoulder effect carried out by means of black velvet epaulets, heavily 
braided in military style. The inserted vesting is of gold and silver ov-er baby 
blue, in the Persian effect. Price $79.50. 

A handsome 50-inch Fitted Cutaway is of claret red or sable brown Im- 
ported Broadcloth, heavily braided with silk tailor and soutache braids of 
self-toae. The vestings are of the Persian persuasion. The skirts amply 
full and trimmed with the wide French bands. Price $65.00. 

Stylish Modified Prince Chaps, in deep sea green, sable brown, mahog- 
any, Burgundy and the staple blues and blacks. Nobb}?- models with 36- 
inch coat, gusset side seams, vertical side pocket and Persian trimmed 
collar. One of the smartest popular priced models of the season — $39.50. 
Same style as above, similar cut, in fine serges at $35. 
(A large selection of otlier popular priced suits at 
from $25.00 to $35.00.) 



mx 



Smart Runabout Dresses 



The Autumn sea.son is ushering in many "Dresses" for street and afternoon 
reception wear. These are something that milady has worn very little during the 
past few years and perhaps a little word-sketching of a few models will help the 
imagination and thus prove interesting. One is a clever combination of brown 
taffeta and broadcloth. The Dolman sleeve effect tends to the obliteration of the 
arm-hole. The dainty cream lace undersleeves and yoke give contrast and light- 
ness to the ensemble — price $59.50. Another is a jumper Dress of blue or brown 
Henrietta, pi|>ed with emerald green and set off by lace yoke and undersleeves — 
price $35.00. Wool Batiste Dresses are very pretty and serviceable. We have 
some attractive ones at $25.00. 

The U Irresistable and Gossard Corset Demonstration 
Opened With Brilliant Success Today 

The women who visited our Corset Department today were much impressed 
with the novel and exclusive features of these Corsets, and .sanctioned them as 
absolutely the only Corsets which embody every essential of true elegance, symmet- 
rical beauty, refined' taste and poetic attraction — in synopsis, the only ideal foun- 
dation for a perfect costume. 

The Three Triumphant Achievements In These Corsets Are As Follows: 

1st. These corsets positivel}' hold their shape until 'worn out — the old corset 
retaining tlie same graceful lines as the new corset. 

2nd. They do not break over the hip — which is a universal weak point of 

all back-laced corsets. "TLju !d?<2 Ik Ffh ^ 

3rd. They will make short waists a full inch longer. JP^ *»vd j^i ^^^T 



Duluth, 






3f. ii. CItllilittg tc (Exr. 



General Utility Suits for 

Misses. The Popular 

"Fluffy Ruffles'* Suits 

For young women at- 
tending school or col- 
lege, tills news is of in- 
terest. To mothers fit- 
ting j'oung folks out for 
fall and winter, the 
showing is of value. No 
other store devotes such 
time and energy to 
young girls and young 
woiuen.s apparel. With- 
out boast, it may be 
truthfully said this st^re 
is the Duluth fountain 
head of style for girls' 
clothing. 

Tailored suits in 
cheviot, serge and 
broadcloth, 30-inch 
coat styles — straight 
cut or slightly cutaway, 
with gusset side scams. 
Colors, red, navy, 
brown and green; sizes 
14 to 18 — $19.50. 

Handsome models in 
dull striped mannish 
material— $16.50. 

A full line of misses' 
and children's cc^at, 
sweaters and headwear. 



Cincinnati. 



* 



terment will be matle at Calvarj' 
tery. 



cenid- 



WllI Wfd lliursday. 

Announc^'nu•nts have ix-on received of 
the weddini? of "Charlotte Julia Baar.sch <>f 
Pr. ."ton. Minn., to Gu.s C. Persons. Tho 
w.'.Ming will occur at Preston, Minn., 

Thurj>day, Sept. 19, and Mr. and Mr.s. ,. ^ .^ , 

Persoivs will be at' home In Duluth after afternoon from St. Paul. 



come up here in the freighi I the fire and killed two Italiau.s, names ' shrewdness and a white man g:oes to 

rhe Huroriic brought up a Kood unknown. : pri.son for the .same thing, and there 

list, notwith-standiug the late- ,,..„, ,^0.. 

DIPLOMATS 



boat m.ay 

bu.sine.ss. Th 

pa.s.senger list, iiotwith-standiiig 

ness of the season for tourists. 



you are. 



Sept. 



Now Couapan.v Incorporates. 

Articles of iiicorpoiutiou of the Youngs 
River company ha\«e been filed with the 
register of deed.s. Th-' company is in- 
coriMirated with $40(7,(WO capital, and the 
incorp<jrators are C. F. Piper, J. L. ' 
Washburn and L. I.- Feetham. 



Lieut. Soutti Coinins;. 

Lieut. H. D. South, in charge of the 
marine recruiting stations in Minnesota, 
is expected to arrive In the city tins 

He will swi^ar 
in two recrnits who were secured at the 
local station during last week. The le- 

o^ulting business is reiwrted as being ex- „^„„„„, „»„.■,, , „* n, c /> * , . 
ceptionally dull. It will probably be bet- j '^^P'^^sentatives of the five Central A 

ter when the nieii begin to return f roui ; erican republics did not conrinue today 



From Central America Adjourn Confer 
ence For a Day or Two. 



the harvest fl<'lds in a couple of months. 



Death of l-Yank Itorker. 

The deaiii of Frank .\ Barker, for- 
merly of San Francisco and Boston, oc- 
curred Saturday at St. Luke's hospital. 
He leaves a wife, a daughter and two 
sons, all of whom are at .San Francisco. 



Sinclair Is Here. 

John A. Sinclair, son of H. W. Sin- 
clair of Fairmont, and a graduate of the 
law department of the University of Min- 
nesota, has come to Duluth to enter the 
practice Of law in the office of Wash- 
burn. Bailey & Mitch«»ll. The Fairmont 
Sentinel, in it.s last l.ssue. had many nice 
things to say about him. 

"Seeking Prairie Chickens. 

Mart Adson, William Billstein. J. D. 

] Morrissey, F. E. Berry and J. Spear 

have gone to Mcintosh, Miiui., armed 

wlfh guns, in quest of the elusive prairie 

chicken. 



Dissolves Partnership. 

Judgment in the district court dis- 
solving a partnership, appointing a re- 
cilver and ordering a sale of the prop- 
erty and distribution of the proceeds, 
ha.s been filed In the case of Charles T. 




=^ 



IPEIBSOi^L 



There are 120 Indian owners of the 
leases in the Glenn pool getting $1,872,- 
f25 a year. This makes an average of 
$15,6iJ0 each on royalties alone. This 
is more money than a cabinet officer 
of the United States or a justice of the 
supreme court receives as salary. The 
Washington. Sept. 16.— Diplomatic | beauty of it all is that the Indian 

in- doe.s not have to work to get the 
money. The Indian agent comes 
around and hands it to him. 

Just for .^pecui.ition some statistician 
was figuring the life of the Glenn 
pool with the life of other oil pools, 



I their meeting for the purpose of arrang- 
ing a permUnent peace conference to b-: 
held in Washington. It was necessary 



Naughton. tli,- opper .slock broker, 



for Minister Godoy. charge d'aftaire;5 and he came to the total of $35,000,000 
of the Mexican embassy, to attend the which will be paid out to the Creeks In 
celebration at the Jamestown exposi- royalties before thn pool pas.ses the 
tion, this being Mexican day. .Sen jr .stage, of marketable production. That 
Corea, minister of Nicaragua and Senor will make every Indian rich. And the 
Toledo, minister of Guatemala, have re- , beauty of it is, that the roy^ilty Is in 
Dion against Alphonse Socia, Charles • left yesterday for the" West. He will | ceived their instructions authorizing the shape of an annuity on the month- 
Tyo and J I. Barrett. John A. Keyealvtsit the principal mining camps In Ne- j them to proceed with the preliminary ; ly payment plan. The Itidian cannot 
has been appointed receiver. Under the ivada, Arizona. Montana and California, {conference and to .sign the protocol ar- 1 anticipate his royalties. He cannot 
oourfs order he will make a .sale of | Mrs. Henry Busse of Sault Ste. Marie, ! ranging for a permanent . conference. : s^-ll them The government looks after 



Ifpays to advertise In The Herald. Ask 
J. M. Gidding & Co. 



DEATHS. 

AD.A.M.'^Kl -Helen Adamski, infant of 
Mr. and Mrs. John Adamski, died 
•Sept. 14 .at. 50t) East Ninth street. 

HOOD— William Stanley Hood, aged 2 
years, infant of Mr. and Mrs." W A. 
Hood, died Sept. 13 at 4427 Cambridge 
street. 

DAUGLRL— John J. Dauglel, Infant of 
Mr. and Mrs. John Dauglel, died at 
121 St. Croix avenue. Sept IH. 

MiCAKTHY- Mrs. Maud M. McCarthy, 
aged 44) years, died at lUG East First 
street. Sept. 13. 



FUNERAL DIRECTOR. 

M. J. Filiatrault. Both 'phones. W. Dul. 



FLORISTS AND DECORATORS. 

EisHiErr3nosT'i2pwEST"''s^ 



CARD OF THANKS. 

WE WISH TO EXTEND OUR MOST 
heartfelt thanks to the l>oya of Knud- 
sen & Ferguson for their kindnes.s to us 
during our late bereavement by the 
death of our son Vernon. 
MR AND MRS JOHN J. DANGEL. 



VLsiting His Brother. 

Capt. E. G. Falk of the First regiment, 
Minnesota National guard, and president 
of the Philippine Veterans' association, 
has »>-»-^'^-»'^--'-5l^'^3-^j-)sisi;^lS years old. residing In Butte. 



divide what does remain, equally be- 1 jjrs. W. S. •"hadwiok, who recently "^*^"'^' ^"'^ ''■ ^^^ representatives at anybody who ever lived, 
twoen the men. Any surplus will be 1 ^as removed from the ho.spital to her Jamestown return tomorrow, as is ex- 
divided equally ' ' '"' 
and Tyo. 



between Dixon. Socia 1 home upon recovering from the effects of pected. another session then will 



Ian opeiation. is seriously ill as the re- 
I suit of a nervous trouble. 

E. H. Berh^r of Bovey, Minn., is a 



held at the state department. 



•^ei ME-NS C0RSF:T BILI^. 

i Pall Mall Magazine: S:nce corsets are 

Cotirt Sustaln.s Demurrer. j E. H. Be7l;*.r~''of Bovey, Minn., is a ^ TO INQUIRE INTO WRECK 'generally regarded as exclusively destln- 

Notice has been filed with the clerk jgLiest at the McKay. . CsmiLun Vt ^ent tfi — Followi-nir th<» I ed for feminine wear, it may come aa 

Duluth & Iron Range Railway com- | George Hunter of Tower is a guest at ^^i^^t^i^ },^^ ^.^^^^^^^-^^^J^l^^'^^fL^,^^^^ 



panv in the action brought against it | tjje ."41 Loui.s. 
And the Iron Queen Mining company 1 Mrs. Georg 
by Mlkki Hlvanen. 



left for the .scene (ft the accident on a 
Baum left last evening , .special train litis afternoon. 



for .Saginaw. Mich., to visit her parents | 

,.,.„ . > . n ^°I, about a month , ^ ' IT PAYS TO BE AN INDIAN. 

Will Adopt Boy. Mr. and Mrs. John Turge returned 1 „, , ,, m . » ^t.- 

Mr and Mrs Edward Holdren of this yesterday from a week's visit in 1ulsa.(L T.) correspondence Chi- 
clVy have petitioned the dl.strlrt court i Southern Minnesota. ,^^ , , ^ago Inter Ocean: The tremendou.s 

for permisBion to adopt Homer Gra- 1 M's, E- }'' ■ A. Peake of Chester tor- , production of oil m the Glenn pool is 
velle a 14-year-old boy whose parents . raf;e ^efttjiday for a_visH at Milwau- { making the. Creek Indians as rich as' 



are dead and who has been cared forjkce. Chicago an d other poln t.s. 

at the Children's home. It is clatrrMtd 1 

that the boy was abandoned by his rela- 
tions and that his nearest -relative, a 



brother. W. 
street. Mr. 
apolis. 



Falk's home is in Minne- 



Templo Elnianuel. 

Day of atonement (,Vom Kippur) ser- 
vices will be held at Temple Emanuel. 
Seventh avenue and Second street east, 
as follows: Evening service Tuesday 
night at 7:30 o'clock, subject of sermon, 

"Out or Darkness Into Light;" morning 
service Wedne.sday morning at 10 o'clock; 
afternoon service at 2 o'clock; memorial 
service at 3:30 p. m.. subject of sermon, 

"Immortality;" concluding service at 4:3C 
p. m. 



Mont., is willing that .he be adopted by 
the Holdrens. 



The GIdding Rstabllahmcnt 

Was a very popular rendezvous for 
well dressed women throughout the 
day The drawlpg attractions being 
the Informal dpening and the Gossard 
corset demonstrations. • • • 



Louise EnjellnK Dies. 

Louise Sophiiv Ebeling. aged 15 years, 
died at the family, residence, 820 Lake 
avenue north. The funeral will be held 
tomorrow at 2 p. m. from the residence. 
Interment will" be made at Forest Hill 
Cheap RaU. j cemetery. Deceased had been afflicted 

We can save you money on shipplnjj with lung and throat trouble for some 



your goods to Western points. Call or 
write. Duluth Van & Storage company. 



Child Dies .Suddenly. 

Helen Rueb. the infant daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Casper Rueb. 471 Mesaba ave- 
nue, died suddenly la.st evening after a 
brief illness. The child, a little girl of 
but three years and three months, had 
been well until yesterday, when she was 
taken with severe pains and convulsions 
and died shortly after being taken ill. 
The funeral will be held tomorrow morn- 
ing at 10 o'clock from the residence. In- 



time and death was due to this cause. 
She was the daugW^er of Mr. and Mrs. 
John H. Ebelinp, and had a large circle 
of friends among ht^r schoolmates and ac- 
quaintances. 



On Last Trip 

The steamer Huronic of the Northern 
Navigation convpany entered the local har- 
bor at noon today on her last regular 
trip to the Hea^d of the Lakes. The pas- 
senger schedul«, which lias been in effect 

since last Mav, will be at>andonecl after - . , , 

this trip of the Huronic, although the fatally wounded. 



i the Osages. A citizenship in the Os- 
! age nation is now worth about $25,000, 

but the Creeks are coming fast. 
The average daily production in the 

Glenn pool is 125, OW barrels, one-tenth. 
j The oil is worth about 41 cents a bar- 
i rel. 



many a smart 
is much larger than that of the 
' average smart woman. This is, never- 
j theless a fact. 

, A le.iding corsetiere. who supplies most 

lof them puts down a good customer's 

'bill at £150 a year. I.iet no one imagine 

thaf it is only fops who wear them. 

The majority of we.'irers are military 
men, who, I learn, require a greatter 
amount of padding than ejvilians. Oth- 



Indian. 



TRAGEDY AT A 
MINING CAMP 

Two Persons Killed, Two 

Fatally Wounded at 

Crownburg, Kan. 

Pittsburg, Kan., Sept. 16. — At 
Crownburg, a new mining camp in the 
northern part of this county, late last 

night, two persons were killed and two 1^ make — _ 

fatally wounded, the re.sult of a grudge; stand all the chances of failiffe. 

.- .J 1 *v. T*.,ii».. ^i„«»„ «# *v,^ ^i.. "It's like this," said one of the oil 

held by the Italian miners of the dis- j ^^^ ..^0^ h^ve to take all the blame 

trict against a mine boss Charles • for everything. If an Indian sells a 
Gardner, a mine bos.s, and his sister, 1 lease three or four times the govern- 
Mrs. George Rexford, were waylaid on I ment says the Indian is not responsible, 
a lonely road while returning home 1 but If you sell a lease twice the gov- 
by a number of Italians and shot and ernment says you are a swindler. The 

Gardner returned Indian gets complimented on 



jers are ordinary well ilres.-^ed men. given 

j to manly sports, and by no means eftem- 

' Inate. 

j A man's figure has to be gradually 
coaxed into shape and is first of all put 

! Into a soft silk cors'^t with scarcely any 
rrut„ j..„ »u T j„ , -ibones. uaiH he attains by d<'gr<»es to the 

This gives the Indiap lessors of j fyn j^j^^ ^^f t^e perf»-ct ngure. This 



the 10.500 acres comprising the pool process usu.ally takes thrfo months, and 
$.5,125 a day. This amounts Ho $1.872,- 'five special makes (rf corsets are employ- 
625 a year. This is the royalty which led in the develoimient. or perh-aps It 
is paid aa long as the oil is in the ! would be more accurate to say the "ro- 
ground. Then there is the money for ; ^^^fUJ'^J^" ^^ "'"^ 

the lease and the bonus which fre- 
quently runs $5 and $10 and sometimes 
$20 an acre. This is all profit for the 



The corsetiere to whom I am Indebted 
for this information is loud in praise of 
her male clientele. They are not fidgety, 
they have good tatste. and no matter 
what other bills they leave unpaid she 
_. _ -, . ^. ^ « ,i. '" always sure of iK^r money, possibly 

The Indian never gets the worst of It ! because few men would dare fa<;e a sum- 
In the oil game because the govern- | mons from such a q-.'.irter. 

ment sees that the Indian gets the ■ ■■■ 

full benefit of the market price. It's PROCRASTINATION AND IDEALa 
the white man who Is putting up his . Truth: A man is much less apt to fall 
to develop the country and I '" '"^'« *^ ^7. than at 22, and a woman 



money 



country 
the Indian rich who has to 



] is much less Ilk<'Iy to be fallen In love 
with at 25 than at 30. 

The damsel, therefore .who makes up 
her mind that the proper age for her to 
marry is 25. and the proper age for her 
husband 28. and who acta up to this Ideal 
in her youthful day.s, runs a grea.t risk 
of achieving something quite different 
from her ideal. 



his 



It pays to advertise in The Herald, 
tho Oak Hall. 



4 



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mmmmtm 




THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD : j HONDA Y, SEPTEMBER 16, 1907. 



mm Mi@ 




Special Sale of 

Cravenettes 



$13.50 and $12.50 
Cravenettes selling for 



$9.85 



$20 and $18 
Cravenettes scU/g for 



$14.85 



$25 and $22.50 
Cravenettes selling for 



$19.85 



This season of the year is always 
mixed — rain today; cold tomorrow, 
sunshine the next day. To meet 
all conditions of weather get a 
cravenette. It's rain-proof and a 
smart fall overcoat in sunshine. 

Mallory's fall cravenette hats are 
sold exclusively by us. 



Wi adm->on (Sit Mendenhall 



FALL WAGE 
INCREASE 

Great Lakes Sailors to 

Get More Pay 

Soon. 



New Scale to Go Into Ef- 
fect After Octo- 
ber I. 



hands will get a SIO raise to $40 a month, kins, 1; Ionic, Townst-nd, 2; Ream, 2:30; I provement has be*n made to the fair 
second cooks $34 to $37.50 and able sea- | Caledonia, 4; Turret Court, Clark, 5; L»a „-,,,, „/!« and UuiJddnes durintr the 



After the first of next month the regu- 
lar fall increase of wages for the deck- 
hands, wheelmen, watchmen and others 
of the lake beats, will go into effect. 
For some time the wages on the boats 



toa, 4:1.", Cambria, wiiakback, i:2u; 
•Schlesinger, Wells, 5; Griffin, Harvey 
iJrown, G; Wood, Armour, 6:30. 

Detroit — Up: Winnipeg, 'J Saturday 
night; Chamberlain, 10; Sylvania, At- 
lantis,- K':4(t; Ketcham, Saunders, 31; Kas- 
, kill, midnight; Weston, 1 Sunday morn- 
ling; Simla, Kensington. 1:30; Gogebic, Bi- 
iwabik. Hand. 2:30; Masaba, Venus, 3; 
Cole, 4:30; Sonora, L. C. Smith, Presque 
Isle, 5; Frick, ti;40; Gratwick, Jollet, 7; 
Maunaloa. 7:15; Earling, 8:a0; Northern 
Queen, Jenks, Wright, 9; Hecker, Minne- 
apolis, 9:40; Princeton, 11:40; Matoa, noon; 
! Goodyear, Midland Queen, Neilson, Bell, 
; 12:40 p. m. ; Sonoma. W. A. Rogers, li'jD; 
Alaska. Degraff, 1:40; Curry, 2; Paine, 3; 
L Hanna, 3:30; L^iy and consort Italia, 
Amazon, Andrews, 4; Chicago, 4:20; Major 
Pratt, Athens, 5; Nye, Republic, 5; Ball, 
6:40; William Mills,. 7; Rappahannock, 8; 
Mahoning, 8:3ti. Down: Midland King, 
10:20 Saturday night; Oceanic, 10:40; 
Trevor, 11; Angeline, midnight; Mil- 
waukee, I. J. Bc.yce and barge, 12:20 Sun- 
day morning; Massachusetts. 1:40; Sny- 
der, 2;W; Tacoma, 3; Bessemer, Manila, 
4:30; Butler, Harvard. Bryn Mawr, Mary- 
land, 6; Popi. 6; Marion, 6:30; Sherwin, 
8; Benton, 9; Reis, 10:40; Cadillac, 11; 
Rend, Kirby, Hartnell, 11:30; Owen, Lew- 
iston, noon; Chemung, Rockefeller, 
Krupp, Clvde, 12:40; Scottish Hero Dal- 
ton, Huron, 1:40; Three Brothers, 4; Ot- 
invfu. and -barges, 4:20; Yosemite, Chili, 
4:40; Venezuela, Granaila, Mariana, 5:30; 
Watt, Martha, 6; Mcintosh, Antrim, 6:30; 
Neptune, Magnetic,^8; Frank Peavey, Jj;15. 



The Sault Passages. 

Sault Ste. Marie, Sept. 16. (Special to The 
Herald..* — I'p: Tionesta. 9:30 Sunday 
j night; Portage, 10; Frontenac. 11; Rees, 
have been Increased foe the fall season 'midnight; Coulby, 1:30 Monday laorning 
and the same rule will be in effect this J^'ij^^^l^' 
year. 

Oilers, firemen, wheelmen and watch- 
men will get an increase of t\^>, making 
their wages for the last two months and 
a half of the season $60 a month. I>eck- 



FAIR OPENS 
ON FRIDAY 

Annual Show of St. Louis 

County Agricultural 

Society is Ready. 

With Favorable Weather, 

This Fair Promises to 

be Best Ever. 



Fayal township, on the Miller trunk 
road, has threatened to kill him. 
He wants Berra placed under bond 
to keep the peace. Berra stayed in 
jail over Suriday, as he oould not 
get surely for bail. 



BEGIN WORK ON 
. BOVEY CHURCH 

Fifteen Thousand Dollar 

Catholic Structure is 

Started. 

Bovey, Minn., Sept* 16.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— Work has been started 
upon the foundation of the new Catho- 
lic jchurch to be erected here at a cost 
of $15,000. 

The foundation for the pastor's resi- 
dence IS completed, and the walls of 
the church will be reared as soon as two 
buildings on the lots are moved. TJie 
church will be one of the handsomest 

oers of the St. Louiis Agrricutural so- 1 °" J^^^ "".^P^^- . . , , „,;„i„oii,r 

,. . . ^ ,1 The edifice was mtended originally 

uuuiuy .^ .«.„.»«, ,« ^, .^^^^^ ^^''^ ^^"® " '" ^^^ "^'^y of j for Coleraine, but the authorities of 

2; Corona. Maia, Chris- ' pre-parlng for the annual county fair, j the church decided not to build there 
U.piierT's; Bartow, 4; Warner, Warriner, I which begins here next Friday, and I as it is against the rales of the church 
Wilson, Joshua Rhoades, Sylvania, 6; SI- i ,.,.,vtinn^ fnm- dnv« wi.K fax, to t>">l^ where a clear deed cannot be 

mon Langell, Interlaken. Moore, 7; Sul- -^Ul con'tinue four days. With fav- | ^^^^.^^^ Citizens of Bovey presented 
tana 7:30. Down: Peshtigo 9:50 Sunday ; orable weather the ocwning fair prom- : the church with three fine lots for a 
?.S Srch Vr/rTliawiS iS^^^^ to b^ tlie most successful in the j site. 

Wisconsin. 12:3o Monday morning; Per- , history of the society. Great im- 



Hibbing, Minn., Sept. 16.— (Special 
to The Herald.) — It is up to the wea- 
ther man to do his duty. The ofH- 



men on barges an increase from $50 to i Salle, Widener. Saxonia. Spaulding. 7; ^^••'^""^« ^^ buiiddngs during 



the 



$65 a month. t Reynolds, 8. i ^i^T^v: ^I^.^^^-^'^^.k^ '^^ ^'t";"^ 

This fall increase in wages Is accord- Up: Codcrus, Nyansa, Moore. Iroquois, ! stand has t>een more .han doubled, 
ing to the agreement m.-ide by the trans- I930 Saturday night; Doric, 10; Street, L.u- ; additional bam room has been pro- 
portaticn companies with the seamen lhe[zon, Godfrey. 11; Big Mather, midnight; vided, an exhiblti<Jli building ertcivd, 
first of the year. iSill, 12:;^0 Sunday morning; Fitc.i. Mait- i aiapja.v boo'ths provided, a building 

As the risk of the lake sailor is con land, Helena, 1; Paris. 230; Davock. '- ^^ display of iive stvxk has been 
siderably greater during the fall months ^'eter White, 3:31-; Sahara, 4; Russia, 5; i ^^,-.^,1 ^nn the erouiuls and race track 
and in many cases the work harder it fccrsica, 6:30; Wilbert Smith, 7; E. U Wai- ,adae<. ana tne gromxis ana race iraoK 
has been found necessary to make the i lace, Nt-w York, 8; Stanton, 9; Siemens, : greatly improvea. 

wages for the last few months a little tMaida, Hay ward, 10; Hill. 11:30; D. R. ! Ck)nsiderable attention has been 

higher than during the summer months. | Hanna, Northern King, noon; Alva, Ful- j given to the racing course, and if u* hr.th r.innoK vt.B»*.rfiav Ht. h^e dt.t<^r- 
The fall season is generally much more ton. Roebl.ng, 1:30; Manitoba, 2:30; Supe- the weather is fair i-t will be the '!!:,„?,, ,'i>:!..:l.l°r^;v,"r„!if^^^ 
disagreeable and it is harder to get men. trior CUy; Falmoant, Melrose, 4; HemlocUi"! fg^^test track iii the state 

Usually there is a different class of 4:40; Leafield, S:."*; Fairbairn, 6:30; Qi)- ^ ,,w ^^t month Secrelarv God 
sailors on the lake boats during the fall chrlst, Shaughnessy, 7; Una, 8-20. Down: L ' f'^ ^'^'^ ^^^ mon.m secretary Kjoa 
months than during the rest of the year. Wells, Dundee, 9:40 Saturday night. I ^'^^^ , . j v, i *i_ , e 

They are known as "winter sailors" and Wcod, 10:^0; Colgate, Edenborn; Jenney, 1 exhititors, and he gives the Infor- 
only work during t' " ' 



FAREWELL SERMON. 

Rev. L F. Andree Retires From Pulpit 
to Resume His Studies. 

Aurora, Minn., Sept. 16. — (Special to 
The Herald.)— Rev. E. F. Andree, pastor 
of the Aurora and Biwabik Methodist 
churches, preached his farewell sermons 




Tne Demonstration 

of 

"REDFERN CORSETS" 

— The corset beautiful makes the beautiful figure 

Miss Adelaide McCau- 
ley of New York^ expert 
corsetiere, is now with us, 
and will give free fittings 
of this celebrated corset 
all this week. No ob- 
ligation to buy, but we do 
want you to get acquaint- 
ed with this superb cor- 
set. 

With every faciHtv that 
the latest Twentieth Cen- 
tury machinery can devise 
to make corsets perfect, 
with the most expert force 
of the largest and oldest corset factory in 
America, is it any wonder that a woman vvho 
onct wears a Redferiv never changes! 




Local Custom Officials 
ment in Morning 

"Superior is not 
known or designat 
last or westernmost 

rior,' said an official at ~the Duluth 
customs house today in reference to the 



mined to resume his theological and 
classical studies, saying that he wishes 



expect that the Western branches of the 
federation will aid so that they will have 
a fund of $700 a month to draw on. 



EVELETHNOTES. 

Eveleth..Minn., Sept. lG.-(Special to The 
Herald.)— Matt Prettner, a local saloon- 



A DARING SEA TRIP. 



(Continued from page 1.) 



has been astegning spa.ce for l^.^'^^^/^y^^^^;^;^^^^^^- ^''^^^^ 



dine, to open a saloon there. Incidentally 



This gives it great strength. 

Bonnell had never t>een out of sight 
of land in a sma:l boat before. He had 
with him a seaman. Frank Schnurr, 
47 years old, of Stapleton, S. I. De- 
spite the entreaties of friends they 
started from Digby for this port. Pray- * 

Hoiy 
daring. 




•article in the morning paper. 



Vessel Moveinenta. 

Chicago — Arrived: Boston, R 



"The statement made was very mislead- | Cleveland — 

ing to the vessel masters," continued the p^jsi^.y oivmi 

official, "and therefore should be tor- UjpJ'^j.* gupeDo 



Mills. 
Cleared^ light, E. E. Thompson, Duluth. 
Arrived: John Mitchell, 
mpla. Cleared, light: Palh- 
'lor 
rected. The customs department has j"'E7^;^,ja^a"- Arrived: Whitaker, Grcver. 
never settled the matter of which was the ij^j^yj^js^jj Raleigb Tokio, Berlin, Aurora, 
furthest inland. Duluth or Superior, and ^ g,.;£.con Marcia Iron King, Iron Queen, 
Superior Is not the official last port onli^.j.^ Erie. L<.ndon. Zenith City. Chicago, 
the lake. . , ^ IStrathcona, Po;nt Edward. 

•When it comes to distances inland,! Manitowoc— Arrived: Scranton 



The committee of ladies In charge gj^y^ch in Aurora last Sunday, 
[ the Women s bmlding say space 

DIES OF INJURIES. 



of 

is being assigned very rapidly now, 
as the opening day c>f the fair ap- 
pi-oachcs, and that the big building 
v.ill be filled from cellar to garret 
with the handiwork of the housewife. 
President Ainsley reports that there 
is a great interest in the fair mani 



Morris Stein of SpartK. and Max Green- 



Aastrian. Hurt in Adams Mine Saturday, 
Succumbs After Reactiing Hospital. 

fest, not only in this county, but in i Evelcth, Minn., Sept. 16.— ^Special to 
adjoining counties, and that he looks ^pj^^ Herald.)— Frank Turek, an A 



encount- 
and- 

fled 

hour, 

again, 

go 

ith- 

boat 

>\puld hardly 

1, * ,- , u - , , , r I During ihe eight days the Uld Glory 

btrg of EveUth, engaged in a duel of ' ^,,„ Jl,.^„. i „,.»cki^ ..„^.„ i., ^-1. 
words that ended in the use of fists in f"^"^ se\tral notable^ runs. In one 
Sparta, S.uurdav afternoon. Both men instance she made eight miles an hour 
are engaged ip business in Sparta and for eight hours. Boiinell crossed the 
have hatl various tiffs that came to a Bay of Pundy to Gannet's Rock, one of 
head Saturday. ■ the worst points on the coast, and the 

■ ' course from Westpcrt to Isle Au Haul, 

TWO KAPROD^ RDIFF^ :^35 mlles, he covered in thirty hours. 

toj inv lini\U\/i\J UatLI J. ] From Muscle Ridge channel to Port- 

^ • land the eighty miles was m.ide In 

^" ' Two Harbors, Minn. 



SECRET IS REVEALED. 



tConiinued from jage 1.) 

friends. Gordon ^ took a voyage on 
a New Bedford whaler, worked in a 
gawmill and after other experiences 
returned to San Francisco with Klon- 
dike gidd and went to Chicago, where 
he sought his sister, Beatrice. 

He traced Miss Gordon to the dry 
goods house of Marshall Field & Co., 
where she was employed as a sales wo- 



Duluth is further than Superior, as the; AshYand-Arrived: Ionia. P^ord, Cnoc- for great crowds to attend. '" " '/ ^ •"" " '■"'Tl "" ','" \*^^ 'if'^SI^ JW'nn Sept. 16.-(Spec>al twelve hours. In twelve hours more 

dock at the blast furnatie is in Duluth, |taw Cleared: Lumber. Warren. Frlant. st Louis cc»anty is one of the big-jStnan. employed m the Adams mine. | o TTie Hera Id.)- A Chinese re^^^^ Cape Ann had been sounded. While 

and this is further inland than any dock ,r:ahoon. Saginaw. gest and richest counties in the state; 'died at the More hospital Saturday ; Lahore hoKl block in thl^ near fut .ri as ^^^^^'^'^ ^^^ ^''^ *'»>'s Bonnell and hie 

on the Superior side. . . , MarrjueUe - Arrived: PeU>r ^ h^te, j fj^^ ^^^^^ naturally expect something I ,,ight. He was fatally injured late in soon as the quarters ca^ be ^p^^^^^^ companion were entirely out of siffht 

above the ordinary, and uhey will not | ^he afternoon, his body being cut Irt'titted up. *^^^V*"^- , . • / ^ 

be disappointed. ! many parts, when he was brought to! J^^n Warren expects to resume charge The young navigator said that not 

The AgricuituraJ society has ex- 'the hospital the doctors saw that all f^ ^^% Commercial hotel and caJe with- once on the trip was ;ie afraid. He had 

pended a large sum of money to hope ot aiding him was over. Hej^gg^^'^ork of -.„„_.;__ .., . ,.„ _, the utmost confidence in UJd Glory. 



If a vessel, whether light or loadf d, i^jyanza, Frtmtenac. Cleared: Parent. Du- 
; has Superior clearance papers and after j^^h- Poe, Murphy, Renssalaer, Cleveland, 
I the arrival here is ordered to IDuluth, the iTcanda Erie. 



local cu.'^toms officers will accept the 
p>apers, and vice versa. 
"Superior is actually only a substation 



Uganda, Erie. 



Port of Duluth 



Arrivals: Waldo, Zimmemi.an. Lake | make the coming fair a success, and was an old employe. - 



^tSAif^r?^^c*^^ri:i^^Lsriii^^hif^^ '« -- »--^^"« ^ ^^^^ 

tVw.rt. fiistrirt " A.» B. Wolvm. Goulder, Morrow. F. W. direction. 



shore district 



HUNDREDS OF MEMBERS. 



iOlchrist. Admiral. City of Bangor. Mili- 
nokett. Garretson. Uranus, H. B. Haw- 
good. Sahara, light, fc»r ore, lower lakes; 
Wawatam, Eddy. Pennington. Amazonas. 
Chieftain, Grampaian, Thomas Aflams, 
Roumania, Crete. Carnegie. Sinaloa, Pen- 
dennis White, Holmes, Co^'le, H. S. Sill. 
'j. W. McK.ire, coal. Lake Erie; Delaware, 
Monteagle, North Shore, merchandise. 



Coal Dock Workers Hold Meeting— Elect 
Officers Soon. 

A successful meeting of the new union | Huronid; Lizzie Madden, Charles Wall. 

, , , , .., , „„,^^j.^,. : Gettysburg, light, for lumber, Lake Erie. 

of coal dock workers was held yesterda> j Departures: La Salle, H. A. Hawgood, 

afternoon «t Columbia hali in the West Townsend. Shaw, Saxona, Widener, 

man. That was seven years ago and; end, and a large number of members was Ward Ames, Gayley, J. H. Hoyt. Cuddy, 

from that time the two lived under I ^r,^,.n^-i ^ n ri-s!.,,^ ^in.. r.r^^u^^n* .,f I- "• Wade. George_ Peavey. Wilkenson 



VIRGINIA'S NEW 
MILL SOON READY 



ballasting the tracks to i -^(.y^r d'd she refuse to tack " he 

the new Duluth & Iron Range passenger L^.A .■wr'«...rif a^^,,,.-! nor^L aA„ T« 

Frank Tutzl, another employe of the station is now under way. ^^'?;. ..^^ ^^'"^ around Cape Ann In 

Adams mine, had his right leg broken I f blinding rain^ storm, and the boat 

Friday afternoon. He was taken to the , ?>^ws^^x^.>^^>^^/v^^^^.>s^wN^v>N^w^/^,^^^v^^s^^^ behaved noLly. 

More hospital. At the ' last report he ) dam/^co ikt ddtcc ji t. v. ., , .r ^ ^ 

was out of ilai-iger and on the road :o I KANULb IN BRlLt* f ' JV^i^^'H?. P;'^*; ^,T'?^^ V'-^l^'^'^y' ^P^^ 

■ »r ^^u-u- c.r u-v.^^^.^u^.n■r^-^/>■f^J^■^^ profanity WOn t CUre them. Doan S OlHt^ 

V. . 1 ^1 », . 1 V. I „ „,. . ,„ nunt cures itching, bleeding or protrud- 

Patrick Gieason, who was struck by i Bovey.— Wires are be:ng strung to Ta- ing j.iles after years ot suffering. At any 
the Iron Range train, has been dis- ; conite from the new electric light plant ; drug store. 
[Charged. He has returned to his pc ' '~ " —v..,,. ...;.. ^ ;_,. 



i sition in the boarding car, as cook. 



the same roof. Gordon who was a | ^^ Srnitic?na?'SshT^^^^^^ 

skillful mechanic, turned his attention I charge of the meeting. - , J Sust B WolVin^" S^I.ca^a Steinb?e?: 

noia me nrsi ^^^^ Hebard. J. H. Reed, Waldo, Ball 



to automobiles and became a chauffeur ; It had been planned to 



In various cities of the West. The cou- ! tlect-on of officers and geneff^l orsa".- g j , j^ ^^. gusauehan- 

ple were in San Francisco at the timo ! fat.on ^cererr^nies yes^ter^Tay. ^b^ 



of 

all 



the earthquake and lost Practically , J-.^^^ J^^J^^^^t there w^^^^^ ^„^^^. spaldlng."c;rrarr'grain. 

they owned. I wr" nostn^md ^biigaie, me ^'ecuon g^^^^. ^ Warren^ Cahoon. lumber. 

rga 

;lec 



Will Begin Sawing Lum- 
ber About Tenth of 
Next Montli. 



Virginia, Minn., Sept. 16.— (Special to 



LOOKS OVER RANGE. 



THE REAl, IRELAND. 
The accepted Irish type of the mas- 
see — 'the stage Irishman — may be 

but he 



1 was postponed. 



Mr. and Miss Gordon then collected. Another meeting of the organization will i,""^"^"""^-^- ^- > V^' o^' ^ 
what they could and made their way be held tomorrow evening at t*ie same i ■}-*J5 i*^ • . i-^Ke huore 



SOLD TO LOCAL MEN. 



across the continent to New York. Qor- I hall, and officers will be elected. Several 
don obtained employment as a chauf- ' hundred have now become members of tiie 
feur, and Miss Gordon obtained a po- ! union, and It will soon be one of the 
Bition in a Fifth avenue dry goods es- j etrongeat at the H ead o f the Lakes, 
tablishment. They rented rooms in a 
boarding house in West Thirty-eighth 
street. 

The couple were surprised one day to 
receive a visit from their Uncle DaJl, 
whom neither had seen for fifteen years. 
He is now living in West Duluth, Minn. 

"Why don't you two get married?" 
the visitor exclaimed suddenly. 

Then, with little more preamble, he 



Tonawandas; G. L. Craig. F. A. 

. 1; 
Lake Superior ports. 



Health in the Canal Zone. 

The high wages f>aid mjcke It a mighty 



G. 



restrained, however, by the fear of fevers , , . ,. • ■, 

and malaria. It is the knowing ones— ! machines, besides a 



! in Bovey, which will furnish light for 
Bovey, Coleraine, Taconite and Holman. 
The last wire was strung Saturday in 
Bovey. 

Virginia.- The McDonald brothers of „^,,„. _ „„,„ ,>,„ r>,,fi^w>i, 
this city, well known drill conirae-tors, 'i-^iUSine, says the Outlook, 
have received word of the death of their snnacks also of indolence, thriftless- 
Wicrnncin trnnmalttfr Hae R»0n lncn»rf. mother in Kincardine. Can. Norman Mc- ness, a tendency to driijk and even a 
iruCUIUin irUllllldlier IKU DCICII liupcu- Donald and Murdock McDonald left at lack of certain primar>' virtues. 

\n6 fhP flrP SlinnllPC ! ^'^'^^ f^"" i"^i>ica!dine. Dan McDonald is i Fortunately tht«e failings are not 

HIS UIC vrc juppuo. I in Michigan, and an iinsucxessful effort characteristic of the Irish people a3 

Virginia, Minn., &rpt. i6.-(Sp€Cial was made to apprise him of his mother s k ^.j^^,^. j„ ^^^^^ quarter of the 

to The Herald.)— In order to better | t^„,' ,„^ x>^„ ir n r^i^^o^^ ^r-^^\^ globe Irish men and women have 

Coleraine. — Rev. E. C Clemans, presid- ~^, f^^-^^c^^i.,,^ v.n^^ n-^^i^^^c 4» 

acquaint himself with the iron ore sup- , ing eider of the Duluth conference of the I'no^^n uiemseixes naru ■vvorKers, ir 

' — displayed the same 

is becai^se of the 
tural oppression and 

, V I , - .- . because of unsanitary 

company will be ready to start Oct. | W'!v ^1^° *^^ f^'^^t .^°^_?^*^3f.^_ „^'.*:'^ ! Hibbln^.-J. H.Neison. grand represen- I dwellings and insufficient food 
10. 

band saws, two horizontal band re- ^j.^^ f^^^^J^ ^^e Commodore mine and de 

e the best of satisfac 

tinn 

contains four bolters and four lath 




temptation to cur young artisans to Jom eawe and two gang edgers. It is di- , t^ey giv 

the force of skilled workmen needed to ^,^1 connected to the lath mill, which tlon 
construct the Panama canal. Many are r^.t.;,"^,^. *^„. >>^u^.o or,.i fr., r lath "''"• 



TRACHOMA ON RANGE. 



building by the Toledo Shipbuilding com- 
told them at^unknown chapter in their .pany on Its own account has been sold :o 
lives. , j James E. Davidson of Bay City and G. A. 

"We learned all this a little more Tomlinson of Duluth. The vessel is 521 
than a year ago." said Gordon today, ft^.^ u,ng, 58 feel beam and 30 feet deep. 
"My uncle had known it all the time, she will 'be delivered 



,„^.^,,^, ,, ,^ „.^ „,,v.v,w,B u..rc.— horizontal band 

A. TomlinSOn and J. E. Davidson j Uiosewho* have 'used EVectric'BiUer.^ "who i saw. The whole will be operated by a 
„..,-. I go there without this fear, well knowing monster engine of 1,000 horse power. 

rUrCnaSe New Meamer. i they are safe from malarious influence | A large sorting shed, 400 feet ini,, . ,_. i»_*j4l 

with Electric Biters on hand. Cures blood ' length has been erected adjoining the Prevalence 01 DlSCaSe RepOlted tO DC 

S?- h/iVed In Te o^d va?d"s S^Se WoFrylng Hcalth Authorities. 

Guaranteed by all druggists. 60c. '»^'ll *>« phed.in the old iards of the J s ,«.,^,;.,, ,„ 
- If 1 company, while the timber will be [ Hibbing, Minn., bept. 16.— (Special to 



Detroit, Sept. 16.— One of two steamers ' poison too, biliousness, weakness and all 

stomach, liver and kidmy troubles. 



^._ .,, . • . , ,„u* ,ot Mesaba ore has been spending sev- ; tative from the Hibbing 'lodge and Judge i Aa to drink, contrary to the gemeraJ 

The mill contains two upright ^ral days in this locality. He is using S. Lekve Ic-ft Saturday for Minneapolis I j^j^n ^, irishman spends a 

' io attend the sessions of the sovereign : ,*"*^' ^, . , • p, 

grand lodge of the Odd Fellows. < i^^ average on It tlian does tne ling- 

Deer River.-Owing to the complaints ' ^=«h"^^" Z^^^'''*^'' '^''^^\^^' ^ij''^^' 
of some of the residents. Miss Milly Rob- nian spends more on beer than on 
inson has resigned as teacher of the , S'Pints;. the contrary being true of the 
Island lake school in District No. 5, after ' Scot. 

teaching one day, and she has hired tc | Furthermore, and even more sur- 
the Sixth district. She will be assigned prising to many, statistl<« show the 
^r °.^^ ""l the schools In the north end ■ j -^^ ^ ^ j^.^, criminally inclined 
of^the district where she tayght last , ^^^^^ ^^^ ^^^ inhabitants of Great 

Biwahik.-Mrs. Hugh M.'^ Glass Friday j ^^--tf I": '"n/^Vr^nlT; i^ l%inrt 

evening entertained in honor of her ^;ls- mora Ity, the stranger in Ireland to 

- invariably surpri.sfcd by the rectlttwe 



but he did not consider it necessary [ navigation next season. 

to tell me. He said that I was left on 

the doorstep of my supposed parents. 

who were then living near Rensselaer. 

Did., when I was only 3 months old, 

and that I had been adopted 



at the opening of 



ON MAIDEN TRIP. 



PEARLS INCREASE IN PRICE. piled i" ^hejiew yards tramways j^he Herald.)-Regardless of the efforts : {^[j^ MJss^£ina^OHara^^^^^^ ^^ ^^^^^^ 
London Tribune: A good deal has been are now being ou.it upon wnicn "'« ^f t^e health authorities to prevent the | About twenty-five guests attended. Re- j in 1841 Ireland's population was 
said about the high prices at a recent luimber wil be conveyed. ,..o<, ' enread of liachoma a virulent disease j f'"esh"ients were served a.nd a most de- . estimated at 8.100,000; in I'.Ol, at 4.- 
salc of jewelry In 'auction rooms, and, One side of the new sawmill was epreau oi .lacnoma a viiaiti.i "'"^^'^ | Ughtful evening spent. ' 000 000 Thus in sixty y€>are the pop- 
surprise has been expressed that one especially aranged for the manufac- of the eye, from spreading among tne - - • ..-,-. .. -. , ""u,vw. sua j j .—>' 
pearl necklace alone should have sold for ture of long timbers. The machinery Austrians on the 
£6..^. iji [He old mill was too short for this disease has assumed 

A representative of the Tribune had an nurDO^e and it was the desire to get lions, giving employeio ui lauwi a.iv* , u»:-tiut-u lu ir.i.v.>Tr iv. ^u.^.^.., •».*,„ ...<..-, i^„^i,..^ t^^ ™~,i 

interview on the subject with A. G. Ma- fh J v.etter Drice that long timbe^r^ bring evervoie more or less concern. It Is self and fan.ily will leave this week. j as quantity is involved. TMe «m - 

gmnis. joint ni_anag:pg_ director of a gold- !ll!.^'*;"f^?T:^„"!fl/?/.l? ^j^TS., t"! ^2™.!;f th" t wfthfn the oast two I Virgmla.-J. A. Haley, the Duluth res- j grants have generally been m life'8 



,. ,. I iigntiui e\enmg speni. 000 OCO. Thus in sixty yeaj-a the pop- 

>m spreading among tne j coleraine.-F. E. Johnson, the archl- j u^atlon fell by ntariy 4.000,000. Amer- 
the range it is said, the tect and building superintendent, who "T ^^^ '^c/n what Ireland has lost. 
isumeu alarming propor- has an office in the Kreiger block, ha^ P^ ^'^^]"" ^"^^ a^? nuaJitv as well 
employers of labor and decided to remove to Duluth, and him- | ^"^ this ^^ not ^ aJI, quaJity as we^i 



^\T The' VeTterprice that loiig tim'l^Vbri"ng eVeryoiTe more or less concern. It is | self and family wUl leave this week. 
i^^donln^MS^G^S: married and! Ward Ames Left WItil CaFgO Of IfOn Ore , S^ S ^i?^?fr^^l^''TS^y' "'lit ^ ^^ tS the decislc^ to build the, reported that within the past 



of those who have 



are living happily in this city. They 
have written out the story of their 
romance and published it In pamphlet 
form. 



Saturday. 



"BEST m?.terials BEST combined"— 
that's "WHITE LILY" soap. All grocers. 



leaded with a big cargo of 
jnew steamer Ward Ames of 

Steamship company cleared Saturday j a^ the_ price. Bulwe ha^e in stock here~a 

" " number which are far more valuable. 



- - ,— -.- ,,, ' .V, „„ oi-,.r,-,-i,-o- nn'mh*.,.' rif f-as .= t^urant man, passed through the city . full vigor; mc«t 

Mapinnis said that £6,K0 was by no means new mill. .months an ala.rming numoer oi cas-^s p^iday enroute f^r his farm near Ashawa remained have tK^en physically, men 

an exceptional sum frr a pearl necklace. ' When the new mill is in operation . has developed. As Ih^V _^e jjonnnea , .,^.1^^,.^ j^^ ^.ju hunt and fish for a couple 



FALLS DOWN STAIRS. 



iron ore the '"1 have had the identical necklace !n it is the expectation of the company : almost wholly to the Austrian boaramg 

tne Acme "^^' ^'^^'^ '^'^ morning," he continued, to manufacture about 600.000 feet of camps which the health authorities 

, ^_. .._,... I '^"d I certainly do not think it was dear u^mY^r dailv 400000 at the new mill; are keeping under a close watch, it is 



evening from the local harbor on her 

maiden trip down the lakes 

passed down the harber and out of the 

canal she was w^ll saluted oy the other f^or, nmt ficof^, ar..^ tAiir^-^ , ^^ ^,.. „♦ on 

ships in the harbor and %he returned .^r^-,^'!^,'-.,.f^5'^'^* ^"'^ i.iO.i'OO are not at all 



lumber daily, 400,000 at the new mill; are keeping 
and 200.000 at the old, while the six not feared the 



disease will become 



.„ „K» At the Paris exhibition of IfiOO we had a lath machines of the concern will pro- ! epidemic 
•^'* ^-^^ ■ white pearl necklace on show the price duce about 600,000 lath each twenty-four 
of which was £SO,(W. Such prices as hours. 



these. 
The Ward Ames carried a cargo of 10,- 



Mrs. Rose Kambiin Breaks Her Nose loi gross tons of ore. but, it id said 

anH Arm I that this is not as much as she ir.ay be 

ana Arm. expected to carrv when there is a better rouna inen iney must maicn. jMot one 

Mr« Rose Hairb'in ..f 71" Wp«t cs^rnT,^ d' '^f t ofwater lii the connecting channels i" a thousand is perfectly round^ Thi^n 
Mrs. Rose Han.b.in of .L \\ est Second | ^ ^ , ^^ j^ present time. As It 1 necklaces are usually made so that the 



uncommon. 

"The reason that pearls brlnj; in such 
enormous prices is that fl: e specimens 
are scarce. First, they must be perfectly 
round, then they must match. Not one 




THREE INDULGE 
IN FREE FOR ALL 



GOING AFTER FUNDS. 



TO MUCK FOR JUDGE 



(Continued from page 1.) 



tally and industrially deficient. 

Aleanwhile the burden of taxation 
has enormously increa-sed. Is it sur- 
prising, theji, that, with the excep- 
tion of France. Ireland's birth rate 
should be now the lowtat In the 
world? 



has been ill for several days, and is still i^: vvolvl'n, the hrst-one to be launched a yt-'Y.^- ^ „ ^ , ^ 

In a very weak condition. This mom- ^^.^^ years ago, and the J. C. Wallace. "endoubtedly the price has gone up 
Ing she stumbled an* fell dt-wn a fight They' have a total carrying capacity a: j during the last ten years, and It is still 
her nose and sustain- O"* triP tQual to twelve of the iake boats going up. This Is due partly to an In 
racture of lierrlKht I <>f fifteen years ago. The company .s one , creased demand. Then the company 
-e was summcrned and C't those largely controlled by the A. B. which took over the Ceylon pearl fisherie, 



of stairs, breaking 

ing a comjound fract 

arm. The ambulance was summoned and ,,, , , 

Fhe was !ak«n to St. Mary's hnsplt.-il |^Volvln peopie. 



Careful Housewives 

WHEN 
PUTTING 



AWAY 
STOVES 



6-5-4- 

SELF SHINI^fc i 

SIOVE LliSlA 

' 23/ 



mpany 

rics 

about a year ago Is closing them down for 

twelve months to enable the oysters to 

1 TuCTUcn on Strike. j recuperate. Therefore, during the next 

' Ashtabula, Sep:. 15.-Owmj; to a strike I V^'a^ or s-.- very few new pearls will tome 

of tug firemen, all of the Grtat Lakes i '"to the market. 

Towing company s tugs were laid up at 

Ithe dc>cks. and the harbor was ccnsequcnt- 

jly without towing service la.st week. 

'There was a misunderstand. ng on ^.c 

I part of the firemen in regard to wages, 

■and the men returned to v.ork next day. 

All the tugmen have a contract for the 

full season. 



Always give them a coat of 

6-6>4 to make them rust proof. 

It shines Itself, !s •pplled like palnl, is better 
than any ename! for stoves, pipes or wire screens. 

h nukes old stoves took like new. 

For s»l« t>y K- -y ■ .i -...-■ (_t... . , f ,a Hardwire. 

a. j-..it,i»on. J&lka 
*a<< 1. i-reiiuuU. 



Dulutfa H«rdw»t« Co t-. .1. *v a-, o. a. j_li..,on. Joitaara 
^ Mo:. y» o» * Wail* ca.. Ji. Ftabur^ .- , . j— «w 



Passed Detroit, 

Detroit. Sept. IG. — (Special to The Her- 
ald.)— Up: Maricopa, 9 Sunday night; 
Mataafa. Pontiac. 9:15; Argo, barge, 
Bunsen. Manda. Merida, 10; George King, 
barges, 10:40: Tug American Eagle, barge 
11; Empire City, whaleback. Volunteer. 
11:30; Roman, whaleback, M.dland 
Prince, Ltimbermr.n, barges. 12; School- 
craft, barge, 12:40 Monday mm-ning; 
Grammer, &:15: C>ttawa, 6. Down: Weeks, 
9 Sunday night; Calvin. 10; McDoiigall. 
10:40: Barth, barged. 11; Black, whale- 
back, 12. Rand, barges, 2 Monday morn- 
ing; Walsh. Cornell. Holley. 3:30; Malie- 



he married the girl in Grand Rapids! 

and she was his wife. It was just aj 

, , ,, . ,j.,, If- ;4 year ago since she disappeared. Mrs.! 

Secretary of Miners union win VISIl zamales te&tlfietl that MIss Tolan wai; 

UinA* Alt nnnAkir Dan<i» '^^^ daughter and Miss Zamales swore' 

Mines on UOgeOIC Kange. ^^^ ^^jan was her sister, and the wil^; 

Eveleth. Minn., Sept. 16. -Special to The , of Kllmovicz. v, v ., - ,^ ' 

Herald )— John McNair, the local presl- ] "She has a mole on her back, said - 

Ident of the Miners union, has been as- Miss Zamales. "How far down?" asked! 

(signed to work in the Hibbing office ol ; the court. "About a foot," was the j 

... _ ! the federation. This is one of the appai- ^^p]y Miss Tolan refused to be exam- 

Intoxicated Miners Rc-f^itHi^S!£:€i'";^o.^a.e .. s... a. .0.^.] 

ft the Gogebic range to secure additional ; ashamed to acknowledge it," said Miss! 
funds. He leaves this week for Michi- Zamales to Miss Tolan. Joseph Kil- 1 
gan. Only Secretary Moveria will remain ' movicz, brother of the defendant, tes- ! 
here to look after the federation's inter- : tified that Miss Tolan was his sister- ' 
ests. President McNair expects to go to . in-law. Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Tolan j 
Hibbing this afternoon , .i, ^. . . 1 swore they were the father and mother' 

The union men in th e Eveleth district ■ ^^ ^^^ ^^^.j ^^^ ^.,^^ ^^^^^ ^^ Michigan ; 

and they came with her, an Infant, co 



turning From Work 
Get Into Fight 



Always the 
Same 




Eveleth. Minn., Se.pU 16.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— While returning frpm 
work, late Saturday night, John 
Macek, Anton Morercst and Matt 
Milkr, Aiistrians, became engaged in 
a free-for-all fight in front of the 
union headquarters. The three men. 
were intoxicated, and when arrested 
by Policeman Nordi. were fighting 
and rolling In the mud in the street, 
near Jackson street. ' They were 
taken to jail about mildi.igiit. They 
succeeded iif^ securing bail for $J0 
each man, as the charge against 
them was drunkenness, The cases 
will com.e before Judge Prince Mon- 
day. The men arrested are union 
men. 

Tony Berra was arrested Saturday 
afternoon on complaint of George 
Bionig. Bionlg alleges that Berra, 
who fai a neifl^bor of hla in tlM 



Diarrhoea 

When 70U want a quick cure without 
any loss of time, and one that is followed 
by Ko bad results, use 

Chamberlain's 
Colic, Cholera and 
Diarrhoea Remedy 

It never &ils and is pleasant to take. 
It is equally valuable for^ children. It is 
famous for its cures over a large part of 
the civilixed world. 



Chicago. She was not married and had [ 
never been in Grand Rapids. The 
photograph of Kilmovicz's wife was in- ; 
troduced. 

"This is an exact likeness of Miss' 
Tolan," said the Judge. Pastor Errick-| 
son swore that he had known Miss: 
Tolan for ten years. She was not mar- t 
ried and had attended his church every 
Sunday for many years.* 

Judge Cleland threw up his hands; 
and said: "This is too much' for me. 
Klimovicz acted in good faith when, 
ihe accosted Miss Tolan, arfd I Willi 
discharge him. The relationships will 
have to be settled out of court." 

Miss Tolan went away with the 
Tolans and the Zamales denounced the 
ingratitude of their alleged relative. 
Klimovicz says he will bring other legal j 
proceekllriCB. i 



I 



We Can 
Help You 

Why don't you try us? See our 
smart and effective woolens. In- 
spect our finished garments. 

Who Are 
We? 

We are the Big Medium Priced 
TailorB, that guarantee satisfaction 
and save you at least $tO on every 
suit or overcoat. Yours to serve, 

MELLIN & CO. 

404 West Superior St. 



■^ 



i 



> 





t\ 



i 




wmmmmm' 



■I WH' ill 



IMI.1W I 




THE DULUTH EVENING HERAE^b. MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 1907. 




Duluth 



"Get the Habit" 



Superior 



WST A HINT OF SOME OF THE AT- 
TRACTIVE VALUES WE ARE OFFERING 

IN OUR C0RT~hW^SUirR6dM 

We are now ready to show you the latest, most correct and fashionable 
garments for the fall season of 1907. 

See the Swell Tailored Suits in 
Tight-Fitting. English Walking 

Prince Chap Military and 

Cutaways and Long Coat Styles. 

See the grand values w^show at $25, $35 and $50. 
See the New Coats — these early fall days make one almost a neces- 
sity. There are sfune handsome models in 52 and 54-iiich lengths, half or 
full lined, either tight-fitting or in loose styles that are very handsome. 

See the Long Capes, with their stylish full sweep — made up in plain 
black or colored broadcloths or in a handsome plaid broadcloth. You'll 
take to them at once. 

SCHOOL DRESSES 

Ff)r children, made of all wool serge, sailor style, in reds, blues and 
browns. A sw '11 stvlish little dress for girls from 6 t^j CC f\f\ 
14 3cars — and tlic i)ricc is only «P«i/» VV 

NEW WAISTS FOR FALL 

Our lines are most comprehensive — Silk, Wool, Linen, Chiffon or 
Nets. Stylish, silk waists at $5.00, and runnuig from that up to $18.50. 
We have them in fancy silks in plain colors or blacks. 

SILK WAISTS 

Black taffeta, tucked front and back, long sleeves, with ^he Gibson 
shoulder, made from a^ soft, reliable silk, is a value we ' C/C C/1 
want you to see '. ^U« Jv 

WOOL WAISTS 

Made of batiste cloth, tucked front and back, perfectly tailored, all 
colors and blacks, usually gt)od value and a leader in -CO QQ 
the line ^Z« ^0 

SEE THE NEW MILLINERY 

If that New Hat Question is bothering you at all, as to what it shall 
be and as t(.> how much y(ju"ll have to pay for it, don't let it worry you 
any more, but come and spend a half houY with one of the millinery 
salesladies and she will covince you that you can easily suit yourself 
without going any further and that you won't have to pay more than $5, 
$6 or $7.50 for one either, that has both style and distinction about it. 

BLACK DRESS GOODS 

To attract you to our splendid line of these sombre-hued fabrics, we 
offer this: A 52-inch black all-wool serge (and serges are considered 
very good this fall); this one is our 98c quality, but tomorrow 
we'll make the price, a yard , 

COLORED DRESS GOODS 

A dollar is a popular price to pay for the material. We have made spe- 
cial efl'orts to meet this demand, and we invite you specially tf -f f\f\ 
to come and see what we can offer you at that price, a yard. . . . ^i •1/1/ 

KNIT UNDERWEAR 

Our fine stock is now complete and we are showing values in Union 
Suits and separate garments which can't be beat anywhere. The prices 
run from 250 {•, $1.50 a garment and from 50c to $7. 50 for Union Suits. 



TO DIVIDE 
THELEAGUE 

Old Northern League 
1VIII Probably be Re- 
organized. 

"Spike" Anderson is Bid- 
ding for Duluth 
Franchise. 



FIND .MORE 
BAD_CHECKS 

Range TowAs Victimized 

by a Clever Pen 

Artist 

Suspect at Nibbing Tells 
Good Story and 
- Escapes. 



75c 



SAY BILL IS 
ALL RIGHT 



PECULIAR 



ACCIDENT 



City Officials Deny At- Miner Claims Injuries by 
tempt to Pad Expense Flying RocR From 



Account. 



Another Mine. 



Claim City is Not Try- Damage Case Results 



ing to Hold County 
Up. 



Relative to the complaint of the coun'.y 
to th.' effect that thh- city health depart- 



From Accident at Fifth 
Avenue Crossing. 



A victim of one of the most peculiar 

ment bill recently pr..sentcd to the county I ^f^'^«"^=* ^^''^ ^^^'^ happened in the 
Iff exorbitant. Cily Clerk «'h«nHio .« „p ! Northern Minno.sota 



A. W. Kuthnow, who repre.sented- 
Duluth at the meeting of the North- 
ern Copper Country league at Witmi- 
pt*g. yesterday, returned liiis morning 
from the Canadian city. President 
Glass and John D. Cuddihy of Calu- 
met, who reprtjsented the two Cop- 
per country towns In the league, 
continued on their way to the Michi- 
gan country. 

At the meeting yesterday, the busi- 
ness O'f the league was closed up, a 
circuit coniniilteo appointed, the 
magnates agreed that a diasulution 
of i^artnership was better for both 
the Copper country and the western 
end of ihe circuit, and an adjourn- 
ment was taken to Dec. 15, when | 
the magnates will get together agaiu j 
in Duluth to decide up jn the course i 
for iii-xt year. The meeting was in 1 
every way a harmonious one, the j 
l)est of feeling existing all around ! 
despite the unsettled course o^f the i 
league during the year. I 

The circuit comtnitiec, consisting of 
A. H. Pulford of Winnipeg, A. W. j 
Kuehnow of Duluth, John D. Cudd.hy 1 
of Calumet and John C. Mann of 
Houghton, will begin immediately . to 
line up the situation for next year, 
and they will i-epjrt^ at the meeting 
here.. Dec. 15. The circuit committee 
will divide their efforts, the Copper 
c^juntry m«?imbers to si?cure a cir- 
cuit in that district, tiie w-slern 
members to line up a string of 
towns in the territory of the old 
Northern league. 

The oircuit tiuostlon was discussed 
at some length, informally, at the 
meeting ye.sterday. The most feasible 
plan for the. western district appears 
to be the reorganization of the old 
Northern league with Duluth, Winni- 
peg, Fargo, Grand Forks, Sui»er;or 
and Crookston. It is al.so very likely 
that teams can be placeil on St. Paul 
and Minneapolis. It is .said that the 
r.ianagers of the Twin Cities teams 
of the American association have 
given the Northern league magnates 
a.ssuranoe that they will not hinder 
theim in entering . the Twin City 
Held and It is not expected the man- 
agement of any other team will en- 
ter objections. If such 4>e the case, 
the Northern league will step in. 
Otherwise, the old circuit, aa it was 
l)efore the Copper country was taken 
in will probably form the league next 
year. 

Incidentally, A. W. Kuehnow an- 
nounced this morning that this yenr 
marks the end of his work as a base- 
ball promoter In Duluth. Mr. Kuehnow 
has managed Duluth teams for .several 
years past, giving the club a good de:il 
I of his time and attention, but he finds 
I that he cannot do both his busin'i.^s 
'and b-iseball full justice and will drop 
I the baseball. Negotiations are now on 
I for the sale of the franchise and club, 
land "Spike" Ander.son, the Minneapolis 
I baseball man, who played with Duluth 
I for a short time this summer ani 
[handled the Winnipeg Maroons last 
I year, is a bidder. The present owners 
of the -club. Interested in Its future 
succe.ss, are Inclined to accept Ander- 
son's terms, as they know he will I') 
Justice ])y the team. He Is a good 
player and a good manager and if ne 
secures the franchise. Duluth fans can 
count upon being served a fine quality 
of baseball. 



Y. W. C A. 

Classes open Oct. 1st. Cooking, dress- 
making, millinery, embroidery, French, 
German, current events, English for locate 
foreigners, physical culture. Register 
at once. 



Advices from Hibbing received by 
the local police have it that a slippery 
check artist has been at work in the 
range towns for the past two weeks, 
and as a result small ciiecks, ranging 
from 15 to $10 and $12 have been float- 
ed In quantities there, and several 
parties victimized. 

The checks are drawn upon banks of 
Virginia, Hibbing and other' range 
towns, and several of them bear the 
signature of "John Larson," but when 
presented are repudiated, the checks 
being pronounced worthless "and a 
fraud. 

The checks are written in purple 
ink and in a fairly good hand. Some 
of them appear to made payable to 
the maker by himself, and in these 
cases can not be called forgeries, al- 
though the checks are worthless and 
"John Larson," payer. Is not known to 
tile banks oft- which the checks are 
drawn. 

A man now sUipected of being the 
guilty party, wasj arrested last week 
at Hibbing witii^ several checks on 
his person. He tild the authoi'ltis a 
good .story, stating that the checks were 
given him by auotJier man to casn ror 
him and he knewhio thing of" their be- 
ing worthle.s.s UntU they were present- 
ed at the bank, •^'s 

It would appes^ that there are a 
pair of the r;i,8c"afls at work in this 
.section, and that -one is used a.s a dum- 
jny for the other, the real artist In 
the game who uses the pen so handi- 
ly. 

Nothing has l>een obtained in the 
way of a clew to the whereabouts or 
identity of the inysjterious stranger who 
used P. McD>nij#i|'9 name so success- 
fully on checks -^vhich were cashed 
by local ^x^ople. mentioned In The 
Herald on .Saturday. 

Mr. McDonnell .states to The Herald 
that he does not sign his name at all 
like the signature on the bogus checks 
and that the report that he was in the 
habit of putting memorandum on his 
checks to show what the .<?ame was 
Lssued tgr, is wirong. He wonders that 
local people would cash .such checks 
as have been shown him as worked off 
here last week. 



Winter and Cold Weather 

is on the program. 

YOU CAN'T GET AWAY FROM IT 

The coal m^n wants spot cash, the g^rocer and butcher you must pay in 

thirty days, but, 

Clothing and Shoes 
Furniture and Stoves 

* you can buy on easy terms of 

ONE DOLUR A WEEK 

al 



H. A. NELSON 
Mgr. 




mrs 



H. A. NELSON 
Mgr. 



8 Eomt AuyoWor Street* 




yPE^BOIB IMEWi 



^ 



WHO WAS MRS. 
MARY MITCHELL? 

Little Known Regarding 

Woman WI10 Died 

at Hospital. 



Cheadie is of 
the opinion that the matter is not ful.y 
■uud<.r.-5tood by the officials. 

Tlij bill submitlfd to the county by 
the city calls for $12,7S9.19 for the treat- 
ment and prevention of contagious dis- 
eases, and extends over the period from 
Jan. 1. I'JOtJ, to Stpt. 1, 1307, one year and 
eight months. 

The iifius in the bill, according to the 

city clerk, are all for the treatment of 

contagiou.s diseases, milk inspection, and 

tuberculin test.s, and the city has within 

the same period paid out for the health 
department the sum of $17,681.59. 

"If Proctor paid th-- city of Duluth 
Bomelhing li'.to $4')tl f>r the treatment of 
contagious di-'^^-ases, that amount should 
Com«' out of the wliole bill presented ihe 
county, half of which the county puy.s," 
remarked the city clerk. This will be 
lookid up. and if the amount has be'u 
paid, it will he d'ducted from the full 
am. Hint, $12. 7^9.19, hiilf of which the city 
and h:df the County pays for cJutagious 
disease patients, their care and the pre- 
vention of the spread of contagion. 

Fully xo per cent of the expenses of the 
health department, according to the offi- 
cials, is the care of contjglou.s diseases 
and the prevention 



mining region, 
I Pasquale Calo of Hibbing has started 
'. a $40,500 damage ca.se in the district 
i court against the Greer Contracting 
j company and the Oliver Iron Mining 
, company. 

, 'According to the complaint, which 
, was filed by J. LaMotte. this morn- 
ing, Calo claims that while he was 
i working In the Morris ppen pit mine 
I at Hibbing, May 7 last. The Greer 
j Contracting company, which was strip- 
ping the Albany mine, adjoining the 
j Morris property, set off an unusually 
large blast, and a big rock was blown 
' by the force of the explosion over into 
i the Morris mine, striking Calo on the 
j head. It is claimed that his skull was 
crushed, and that as a result of the 
I injury his entire right side is paralyzed. 
; Calo claims that the stripping com- 
i pany was to blame for the explosion 
land that the Oliver company was to 
j blame because as his employer it did 
! not provide him a safe place to work. 
I John Pakiji, administrator of the es- 
. tate 01 Domjan Campa. decea.sed, has 



of^tho'^^d orthei«-^,;^-,^'ver In.n Mining company 
■ame. The in.speotion of milk and tuber- 1 ^'^'" *^.^'f^ damages for the accidental 
culin tests i-< considered by the depart- death of Campa, Dec. 22 last. It is 
mt-nt as belonging to tiiis branch of the 1 alleged he was buried and crushed 
"work, and any car fare paid out in travel- under a caving in of earth and timbers 
Ing to a locality for making tests comes. 
In the opinion of th<> department, proper- 
ly within th>' work of the department per- 
taining to contagious diseases, their Pre- 
vention and cure. 



WILL TALK 
OF MERGER 

Local Strikers to Discuss 

Plan to Join Railroad 

Operators. 

Scheme to Combine Com- 
mercial Union With Rail- 
way Order, Brewing. 



Mrs. Mary Mitchell, whose home is 
supposed to be at Green City, Mo., 
died at St. Mary's hospital last even- 
ing after a brief illness. 

Little is known of the deceased, and 
there is considerable mystery connected 
with her death. She came to the hos- 
pital from the Metropole hotel where 
she was a guest about a week ago and 
no one at thf hotel knows anything^ 
alx>ut her otl^r than that she came 
there as a gin^ some weeks ago. 

.She was a middle aged woman, and 
letters found among her effects would 
lead to the supp^jsition that she has 
relatives in Gv?«i^..,^ity. Mo. Telegra;ms 
have been sent out In an effort to 
her relatives or friends. 

At the hospital she was uncommuni- 
cative and the attendants know nothing 
of her history. 



THOSE WHO HAVE 
PASSED BEYOND 

Kalamazoo, Mich.. Sept. 16.— M. D. 
Woodford, former president of the 
Cincinnati. Hamilton & Dayton rail- 
way, died here yeaterday. Mr. Wood- 
ford had stopped here while on the 
way home with his family from 
Charlevoix to Cincinnati. He was 
taken with heart trouble at the 
American hotel, two weeks ago, and 
It was seen from the outset that hw 
Illness was dangei»'as. Mr. Woi)d- 
ford waa 70 years old. and seen serv- 
ice as a riih'oad man on the Michi- 
gan Central road and the Cincinnati. 
Hamilton & Dayton. 

I St. Paul, Minn., Sept. 16.— Dr. G^Jtt- 
I fried Sianim. .Swiss consuJ at St. Paul, 
' died la.*t aigtit after a lingering ill- 
I ness. Dr. Stam-m. who was 64 years 
I old, came to St. Paijd from Switzer- 
I land "thirty-four years ago, and for 
' many years had been Swiss oonsul 

■ ' £<ir Mimiesota, Montana, Wyoming 

I and the Dakotas. He was one of 
The striking telegraphers of Duluth. the prominent physicaans of the 
will hold a meeting thi.s evening at their ' Northwest. 

NO. 10 Me-saba block, when! gE^ATOR rKTTUS'Tl"iiARY. 




BANG! 
BANG! 

The hunting sea- 
son Is on and we're 
prepared for it this 
year even better 
than ever b e f o r §. 
Shot (iiiun, Riflen, 
Sni:ill .\riiiH tinil Aiii- 
■miiiiKIdu. .See our line 
before >uu purehnne. 

JOS. E. 

FOX 

15 E. SiriORIOIl ST. 
Oi»p. Bijou Tbeater. 



they will endorse the 

• ti,a rkf Alaharr._ 

_ _ to California In th*> early 
'd?\'s"and engaging in placer mining. Ho 
took with him ©n that long and tedious 
Order of Railroad Teleg-i journey three books, the Bible, Shakes- 



in a mine. 

« • • 

A damage suit growing out of the 
death of Johann Seigel, a Jewish ped- 
ler, at the Northern Pacific company's 
Fifth avenue crossing May 13 last, has 
been started in the district court. John 
H. Norton, representing Israel Dorsky, 
admmistor of the estate of the de- 
cedent, has filed the compraint in a 
damage case against the railway com- 
pany for $5,000, the statutory limit-. In 

T*'ir^5in'l^''«Ilr«!^'^H "^^M '" ^^.^ ^.^t ] j-'Y^- — -f f^e' uew moVe.' i\ i7 und7r: paV'rT'oI U by" heart, and I haver.-t' for^ 
of dr.ving acro.ss the railway tracks i gtood. also, that the railroad telegraph- gottln them jwt. -J learned many of 
when an engine belonging to defend- j ers would welcome the amalgamation Burns' poems by heart and much of 
ant company, backing from behind the i Members of both orders feel that the ghake.speare io> tlve sarn^^ ^^^'i, ^^"' 
freight shed, struck his rig and car- , nvrger would greatly increase their Such reading of tht-.sr' threp books was 
ried it against the iron Dlllar at thesirengrh and tend to secure for them an education W Ifself. it is not likely 
corner of^.he union depot'sied. lei'^'Jl i his^/ -ges and better working condi- .that m-y m^^^^^^^ 

thrown under the engine and ^'^fjf' commercial telegraphers are still able a way.' .. .; 

optimistic concerning the outcome of the , .wiM^^ — ^— 1— ^•'^■— ^~ ' 

strike. At the local headiiuarierjj are 



headquarters, 

in all probability laey wm enaorse mej in(Jj;"napolis Star: The late Senator Pet 
plan that the unions all over the ooun- j^^g Qf Alabama was a "Forty-niner." go- 
try are deliberating on to merge the j ing overland 
Commercial Telegraphers' Union of Am- 
erica and the 
ranhers. - peare and Burns* poems 

*' ■ ^ ., , , ,. -He said of them at one time not long 

There has been considerable discussion ^.j^J;,.-! read the Bible from cover to 
on this subject among the commercial 1 cover- I read the side notes; I read the 
telegraphers and a majority of them are captions of the chapters; I learned great 
in fa\-x>r of the new move. It is under- parts oi it by heart, 
stood, also, that the railroad telegraph- gotten them jwt. -J 
ers would welcome the amalgamation. Burns' poems hy 
Members of both orders feel that the ghake.speare io, tive 

' tn^'Sr 



was thrown under the engine and 
run over. He died at the hospital a 
few hours after the accident. 



•V.-HITK LILY" -soap for th' bath— for 
daintiest fabrics. At good grocers. 



Detroit and Return $12.00 



posted bulletins from the different local 
unions and all of them are ch'^ery mes- 
sages, stating that they are guining 'a 
strf-ngth all the time. 

The telegraphers may add another 

, clau.se to their demands to the telegraph 

$12, via t^Je .South Shore; tickets on ' <^""^P*'*'*^^' ^^ ^ acceded to before they 






*( 



sale Sept. 8, 11, 15 and 20, connecting at 
St. IgTiace-wlth steamer of the D. & 
C. N. company. To Buffalo $2 higher. 
Limit, three weeks. For sleeping car 
and steamer reservation.s. apply to A. 
J. Perrin, General Agent. 430 West Su- 
perior street, Duluth. 



return to work, and that i.«! that the tele 
graph companies furnish the typewriter.5 
u-sed by their operators. 

The action of the companies in making 
operators furnish th'jir own typewriters, 
to be us*>d in company business, has al- 
ways been a thorn in the sides o£ the 
telegraphers. 



PURE KETTLE RENDERED 
L.ARD 

PARAGON MAM & BACON 



>u 



STARTS PROCEEDINGS. 

Interstate Transfer Company Will Con- 
demn Ri^ht-of-Way. 

The Interstate Transfer company 
Saturday began condemnation proceed- 
ings In Superior for the right-of-way 
of Us roail from a point near the Su- 
perior entry on Wisconsin i)oint to the 
St. Louis river. A map and lis pendies 
covering the route to be taken, was 
filed with the register of deeds at the 
same time proceedings were started in 
district court. 

The entire line lies outside the city 
limits with the exception of tjhe eastern 
end. which cuts across sections 4 and j34 
to got to Wisconsin point. The start 
is made near the adjoining western cor, 
ners of section 1 and 12 in 48-15. and 
proceeding eastward follows in a gen- 
eral way the line of the old Superior 
Pelt Line & Termittal railway, runniag 
through Saunders. ; 

Between the two ends of the new line 
every road now entering or about to 
enter Superior and Duluth from . the 
East, South and West will be crossed, 
and in this way the steel plant will 
secure direct connection with each road, 
for the Steel corporation is behind th^s 
Interstate Transfer company, and of- 
ficers of the company are the .same as 
officers of the Duluth, Missabe & North- 
ern road. 

DOC" BRADFORD ARRESTED 

Held on Charge of Stealing Skirt Valued 
at $10. 

Dr. Ira B. Bradford, the alleged hus- 
band of the half-breed woman. Lizzie 
Brook.s, who was arrested and ordered 
out of Duluth Saturday, was arrested 
the same day by Superior authorities 
charged with the theft of a silk skurt 
valued at $10. The skirt was taken 
from the apartments of Mrs. Dan Bu- 
chanan in the Keystone block. 

Bradford was arraigned and pleaded 
not guilty. He will have a hearing 
Thursday, and in default of bail wa.s 
remanded to the county jail. He 
pleaded for clemency, stating that he 
would die In jail without "dope." Brad- 
ford Is a slave to the morphine habit. 

W. C. T. U. Convention. 

The convention of the Inter-County 
W. C. T. U. will open tomorrow night 
at the Hammond avenue Presbyterian 
church and continue until Thursday 
night. White ribbon advocates are ex- 
pected to be present from Ashland, 
Bayfield. Douglas, Iron and Washburn 
counties. Mayor Linley will welcome 
them in a speech tomorrow night and 
the two days' session will be occupied 
with papers and routine business. 

One Year in Jail. 

In superior court tins morning, John 
Deegan pleaded guilty to a cliarge of as- 
saul- with intent to do great bodily harm 
and was sentenced to one year's Impnson- 
ment in the county jail. The ^.ssault was 
oommitted on the person of Ed Olsen. a 
saloonkeeper last May. Deegan was or- 
dered out of Olsen's saloon and when he 
refused to go, the pDprietor attempted to 
oject him. Olsen was quite badly ciit up. 
Deegan was tirsl arraigned on a charge 
of assault with intent to kill, but w'hile 
the jury was being selected he agreed to 
plead guilty to the lesser charge and take 
a sentence. 

New Sheds in Use. 

The new transfer sheds of the Great 
Northern Railroad company were put into 
c jmmi.^sion today, the first freight being 
handled through them. The new sheds 
improve the situation in Superior im- 
nipnsfly and through them it is expected 
all freight entering the city will be baud- 
led more expeditiously. 

Building TresUe. 

A Superior lumber Arm Is furnishing 
Wa.shington fir to the United States Steel 
corporation and it is being taken to the 
site of the steel plant, to be used in the 
t-rection of a trestle to span a gully near 
the .titft of the plant. The erection of the 
trestle, on which work has already been 
begun, will open an av^Mlue, by wlii'^h the 
materials for the erection of the buildings 
of the plant may be taken to the site. 

Enrollment Larger. 

The enrollment figures of the Superior 
•schools for this year, thus far, show an 
increase of 135 in the number of children 
attending school over the number at the 
corresponding time last year. The enroll- 
ment figures to day are 5,403, while last 
year, there were but 5.268 children attend- 
ing school at this time. 

Thieves Take $23. 

Thieves entered the home of James 
Casey, at 1118 John avenue, Saturday 



night, and look $20 belonging to the 
owner and $3 belonging to the servant. 
The $20 was taken from the pockets of 
Mr. Casey's trousers while he slept. He 
found the garment Jn the hallway with 
'he pockets turned Inside out. It Is said 
that the servaht girl, when she entered 
the house Saturday night, nelected to 
lock the front door. 



Will Count the Mail. 

Preparations are being made lo count 
all (he letters passing through the Su- 
perior postoffice for the week beginning 
1 Oct. 12 The work will be dont- on the 
j order of the department at Washington. 
It is understood that the department de- 
1 sires to obtain information regarding the 
at;iount of work done by the postal em- 
ployes. 

Attaches Contractor's Outfit. 

Six hurs.;s and two wagons belonging 
to J. Arseneau,'a Duluth contractor, were 
.seized on a writ of attachment at Su- 
perior yesterday, while enroute from 
Hawthorne, Wis., to this ci'y. The at- 
tachment was made by Balch Bros., con- 
tractors in Dakota. wh<j claim that Ar- 
seneau owes them $l,(iOO. The outfit had 
been working on a sul)-c<intract for grad- 
ing the \^'isoonsln Central road. 

SUSPECTED 
OF FjORGERY 

Former West End Dancing 
* Master Is Under 
Arrest. 



BitterRootLand 

Five acres pay $S per day. Ten acres 
pay $10 per day Particulars 
KXIDSKN-KERGI'SON KKIIT CO„ 
220 \\c«t MlehlKau Street. 



AT YOUR DEALER'S 

Men's Fine Shoes S3. 50 and $4 

MADE IS DULtrrH BY 

NORTHERN SHOE CO. 

MAKERS OF GOOD SHOES 



STEANI HEATED 
STORE ROOM 

Seventeen foot ceiling, and basement 40 
xltW. will put in good repair, near Lake 
avenue and Superior street. Rent rea- 
sonable. T. \V. Wahl & Co.. Second 
rtoor, Lonsdale building. 



Police Believe. He Is 

the Much Wanted 

Forger. 



Carl A. Llnd. suspected of being 
implicated In the forgery of certain 
checks bearing the name of P. Mc- 
Donnell as maker, was arrested at 
Eveleth last evening and brought to 
this city today. He was placed in the 
city jail pending an arraignment. 

The warrant on which Lind was ar- 
rested alleges that he passed a check 
on Isaac Albert for $10, bearing the 
signature of P. McDonnell, which sig- 
nature was a forgery. 

Lind Is a good looking- young man 
of about 30 years and will be remem- 
bered by West end people as having 
conducted a dancing .school there for 
a time last winter. He was also a pro- 
moter of wrestllne bouts and hung 
about the club rooms in the West end 
most of his time. He Is married, and 
with his wife formerly lived in this 
city. She is now at Kveleth, where 
Llnd claims he has been working at 
collecting and other things. 

Lind makes partial denial of the 
crime, but said to a Herald reporter 
that another man was connected with 
the pa.ssing of the checks, giving his 
name as John Olson- He stated that 
he feared the checks were no good 
and did not care to get mixed up in 
any trouble. The police are confident 
they have '.'le right man and that he 
Is one of a pair who have been pass- 
ing worthle.ss checks on the ranges. 
He was arrested at Hibbing on sus. 
picion, but told a story of another 
man giving him the checks and w-as 
allowed his freedom. The .stories he 
tells the authorities today are conflict- 
ing and he appears to know more of 
the affair than he has told thus far 



tract the contract for a storm sewer in 
the avenue was let. 

The contract for paving Twenty-ninth 
avenue was awarded to J. A. Jolui.so>i 
w hose bid was for $!«,S53.50. There were 
four other bids considered as follows: 
P. McDonnell, $10,940; J. W. Preston, 
$10,885; George A. King, $10,784.50, anJ 
J. p. O'Connell. $10,1!*7. 

Bids for four .sanitary sewers in 
Fourth alley between Twenty-third aiid 
Tw'enty-seventh avenues west wero 
opened, Frank Carlson's bid for $2,730.25 
being accepted. There were nve other 
bids for this work. 

The paving contract calls for the con- 
struction of pavement of crushed rock 
and macadam. 

The Lake avenue paving contract was 
completed Saturday and Is considered 
a good job. The paving extends from 
the Viaduct below Superior street co 
Second street and the material is of 
sandstone on a concrete ba.se. J. W. 
Preston was the contractor having this 
job in hand. 

The iKiard of public works is having 
neces.sary repairs to the a.sphalt and 
tar macadam in the city made l>eforo 
the Barber Asphalt company shuts 
down its plant, which It will do soon, 
the Grey.solon road contract being 
about completed. 

Petitions for paving have been late 
coming In this .season, but there has 
been conslderaV)le work accomplished 
and the remaining worl* is now being 
ruslied as rapidly as possible. 



Dainty SKINS and dainty FABRICS 
thrive on WHITE LILY soip. 



RATHBUN'S 

Preserving 
Fruif 



Do Witt's Little Early Riser Pills. Sold 
by all druggists. 



CONTRACT FOR 
P AVING IS LET 

J. A. Johnson Is Lowest 
Bidder on Twenty- 
Ninth Avenue. 

The board of public works met to- 
day and bids for paving Twenty-ninth 

'avenue west from Superior to Helm 

I street will be opened. 

! In connecUoB with the paving coa-j 



Is cheaper in Duluth than 
in any of the large Eastern 
cities. If you think prices 
are high in Duluth, make a 
tour of the country and you 
will come back home con- 
vinced that your comml.sslon 
man and grocer in. Duluth 
is giving you exceptionally 
g(K>d value. 

A FEW OF OUR 
PRICES 



Preserving Plum 
4 ba.sket ca.ses 

Pre»iervlng Peaches 
—4 box ca.ses 

Pre.serving Pears — ^O HS 



$1.60 



Preserving C^rab 
a|)ples, bu.sh . . . . 

Ilipe Tomatoes 



$1.75 

90c bushel. 



Rathbun's 

117 E. SUl»KRIOR ST. 




DEFECTIVE PAGE 






"wH » 











(^ 



u 





THE DULUTH EVENING HERAtlb. MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 1907. 




Duluth 



''Get the Habit" 



Superior 



JUST R HINT OF SOME OF THE AT- 



TRACTIVE VALUES WE ARE OFFERING 



IN OUR COAT AND SUIT ROOM 

We are now ready to show you the latest, most correct and fashionable 
garments for tlie fall season of 1907. 

See the Swell Tailored Suits in 
Tight-Fitting. English Walking 

Prince Chap Military and 

Cutaways and Long Coat Styles. 

See the grand values w^ show at $25, $35 and $50. 
See the New Coats — Ihes.- early fall days make -me ahnost a neces- 
sity. There are some handsome models in 52 ami 54-iiich len>j;ths, half or 
full lined, either tiyht-tittinj; or in loose styles that are very handsome. 

See the Long Capes, with their stylish full sweep — made up in plain 
hlark or colored broadcloths or in a handsome plaid broadcloth. You'll 
take to them at once. 

SCHOOL DRESSES 

For children, made of all wool serge, saihir style, in reds, blues and 
browns. A sw.'U stvlish little dress for girls from 6 t^ 
14 years — and the price is only 

NEW WAISTS FOR FALL 

Our lines are most comprehensive — Silk, Wool, Linen, Chiffon or 
Nets. Stj'lish, silk waists at $5.00, and running from that up to $18.50. 
We have them in fancy silks in plain colors or blacks. 

SILK WAISTS 

Black taffeta, tucked front and back, long sleeves, with the Gib'^on 
shoulder, made from a soft, reliable silk, is a value we CiT C/) 
want you to see '. ^0« J v 



$5.00 



WOOL WAISTS 



Made of batiste cloth, tucked front and back, perfectly tailored, all 
colors and blacks, usually good value and a leader in CO QQ 
the line j>^« yO 

SEE THE NEW MILLINERY 

If that New Hat Question is bothering you at all, as to what it shall 
be and as to how miich you'll have to pay for it, don't let it worry you 
any more, but come and spend a half houY with one of the millinery 
saleslatfies and she will covince you that you can ea.-^ily suit yourself 
without going any further and that you won't have to pay more than $5, 
$6 or $7.50 for one either, that has both style and distinction about it. 

BLACK DRESS GOODS 

To attract you to our splendid line of these sombre-hued fabrics, we 
offer this: A 5J-inch black all-wool serge (and serges are considered 
very good this fall); this one is our 98c quality, but tomorrow TC- 
we'll make the price, a yard / JC 

COLORED DRESS GOODS 



TO DIVIDE IFIND MORE 
THE LEAGUE BAD CHECKS 



Old Northern League 
Will Probably be Re- 
organized. 



Range Tow^s Victimized 

by a Clever Pen 

Artist. 




"Spike" Anderson is Bid- Suspect at Hibbing Tells 



ding for Duluth 
Franchise. 



A dollar is a popular price to pay for the material. We have made spe- 
cial eff(jrts to meet this demand, and we invite you specially tf "f i\f\ 
to come and see what we can offer you at that price, a yard. . . . ^ i •1/1/ 



KNIT UNDERWEAR 

Our fine stock is now complete and we are showing values in Union 
Suits and separate garments which can't be beat anywhere. The prices 

run from 25c t.. $1 50 a KHrment and from 50c to $7.50 for Union Suits. 



SAY BILL IS PECULIAR 



ALL RIGHT 



ACCIDENT 



City Officials Deny At- Miner Claims Injuries by 
tempt to Pad Expense Flying Rock From 



Account. 



Another Mine. 



Claim City is Not Try- Damage Case Results 

From Accident at Fifth 
Avenue Crossing. 



A. W. Kuthnow., who repre.'^ented 
Duluth at th«e meeling of the Norih- 
ern Copper Country league at Winni- 
peg, yt'st^rday, i-eturned this morning 
fixjm the Canadian city. President 
Glass and John D. Cuddihy of Calu- 
met, who represented the two Cop- 
per country towns in Uie league, 
continued on their way to the Michi- 
gan country. 

At the meeting yesterday, the busi- 
ness ot the league was closed up, a 
circuit committee appointed, the 
magnates agreed that a dissolution 
of partnership was better for both 
the Copper country and the western 
end of ihe circuit, and an adjourn- 
ment was taken to Dec. 15, when 
the magnates will get together agaiu 
in Duluth to deeide upjn the course 
for next year. The meeting was in 
every way a harmonious one, the 
l)est of feeling existing all around 
despite the un.settleil course o-f the 
league during the year. 

The cireuil eommilLoo, consisting of 
A. H. Pulford of Winnipeg, A. W. 
Kuehnow of Duluth, John D. Cuddihy 
ef Calumet and John C. Mann of 
Houghton, will begin immediately to 
line up the situation for next year, 
and they will i-epjrt, at the meeting 
here; Dec. 15. The circuit committee 
will divide their efforts, the Copper 
couiiliy ineimliers to secure a cir- 
cuit in that distriet, the w-stern 
mentbers to line up a string of 
towns in the territory of the old 
Northern league. 

The circuit tiuestlon was discussed 
at some length, infortnally. A' the 
ni-eting ye.sterday. The most feasible 

appears 
the old 
Winni- 
SuiK^rlor 
likely 
Paul 
and Minneapolis. It is said that the 
managers of the Twin Ciiii^s t'^'ams 
of the American a.ssociation have 
given the Northern league magnates 
assurance that they will not hinder 
them in entering . the Twin City 
Meld and it is not expected the man- 
agement of any other team will en- 
ter objections. If .such ^>e the case, 
the Northern K^ague will step in. 
Otherwl.se, the old circuit, as it was 
before the C<>p?)er country was taken 
in will probaibly form the It-ague next 
year. 

Incidentally. A. W. Kuehnow An- 
nounced this morning that this year 
marks the end of his work as a ba-se- 
ball promoter In Duluth. Mr. Kuehnow 
has managed Duluth teams for .several 
years past, giving the club a good de.il 
1 of his time and attention, but he finds 
I that he cannot do both his busini.^s 
'and b.isf'ball full Justice and will drop 
\ the ba.seball. Negotiations are now on 
[for the sale of the franehi.se and club, 
land "Spike" Anderson, the Mianeapoli.*^ 
I baseball man, who played with Duluth 
'for a short time this summer ani 
' handled the Winnipeg Maroons last 
I year, is a bidder. The present owners 
of the club, interested in Its future 
success, are inclined to accept Ander- 
son's terms, as they know he will 1> 
justice by the team. He is a good 
player and a good manager and if ne 
secures the franchise. Duluth fans can 
count upon being served a fine quality 
of ba.seball. 



plan for the. western district 
to i>e the reorganization of 
Northern league with Duluth. 
peg. Fargo. Grand Forks, 
and Crook.*on. It is al.so very 
that teams can be placed on St. 



Good Story and 
^ Escapes. 



Advices from Hibbing received by 
the local police have it that a slippery 
check artist has been at work in the 
range towns for the past two weeks, 
and as a result small checks, ranging 
from $5 to $10 and $12 have been float- 
ed In quantities there, and several 
parlies victimized. 

The checks are drawn upon banks of 
Virginia. Hibbing and other range 
towns, and .several of them bear the 
signature of "John Larson." but when 
presented are repudiated, the checks 
being pronounced worthless and a 
fraud. 

The checks arc written in purple 
ink and in a fairly good hand, rfome 
of them appear to made payable to 
the maker by himself, and in these 
cases can not be called forgeries, al- 
though the checks are worthless and 
"John Larson," payer. Is not known to 
tile banks oft- which the checks are 
drawn. 

A man now suspected of being the 
guilty party, was» arrested last week 
at Hibbing witti' several checks on 
his person. He tild tiie authorltis a 
good .story, stating that the checks were 
given him by another man to casn tor 
liim and he knew Tnolhing of" their be- 
ing worthles.s UntU they were present- 
ed at the bank. '^-^ 

It would .ippeat that there are a 
pair of the ri^scarts at work in this 
-section, and that 'one Is u.sed as a dum- 
;ny for the other, the real arti.st In 
the game who uses the pen so handi- 
ly. 

Nothing has been obtained in the 
way of a clew to the whereabouts or 
identity of the mysterious stranger who 
used P. Mcl>iniieli's name so success- 
fully on checks ■which were cashed 
by local peoi)Ie. mentioned in Tlie 
Herald on .Saturday. 

Mr. McDonn-^ll states to The Herald 
that he does not sign his name at all 
like the signature on the bogus checks 
and that the report tliat he was in the 
habit of putting memorandum on his 
checks to .•^how what the .same was 
issued fQr. is wrong. He wonders that 
local people would cash such checks 
as have been shown him as worked off 
here last week. 



is on ihe program. 

YOU GAN'T GET AWAY FROM IT 

' The coal m^n wants spot cash, the g^rocer and butcher you must pay in 

thirty days, but, 

Clothing and Shoes 
Furniture and Stoves 

^ you can buy on easy terms of 




H. A. NELSON 
Mgr. 



H. A. NELSON 
Mgr. 



B East SutwHor Streei* 



\WEmm M\ 



V' 



ing to Hold County 
Up. 

Relative to the complaint of the coun y 
to th>' eff.^ct that the eity health depart- 
ment bill recently presented to the county 
to exorbitant. City Clerk Cheadle Is of 
the opinion that the matter is not ful.y i Pasquale Calo of Hibbing has started 
uiider.stood by the officials. '^ $4i.>,')00 damage ca.se in the district 



A victim of one of the most peculiar 
j accidents that ever happened in the 
! Northern Minnesota mining region. 



Y. W. C. A. 

Classes open Oct. 1st. Cooking, dress- 
making, millinery, embroidery, French, ! 
German, current events. English for ! 
foreigners, physical culture. Register 
at once. 



WHO WAS MRS. 
MARY MITCHELL? 

Little Known Regarding 

Woman Who Died 

at Hospital. 

Mrs. Mary Mitchell, whose home is 
suppo.sed to be at Green City, Mo., 
died at St. M.iry's hospital last even- 
ing after a brief illne.ss. 

Little is known of tne deceased, and 
there is considerable mystery connected 
with her death. She came to the hos- 
pital from the Metropole hotel where 
she was a guest about a week ago and 
no one at th^ hotel knows anything 
al)out her oth^r than that she came 
there as a giteaat some weeks ago. 

.She was a middle aged woman, and 
lettc-rs found among her effects would 
lead to the supposition that she h.is 
relatives in G^eou^City. Mo. Telegrams 
have been sent out in an effort to 
locate her relatives or friends. 

At the hospital she was uncommuni- 
cative and the attendants know nothing 
of her history. 



t( 



Tlij bill submitted to the county by 
the city calls for $12,7S9.U> for the treat- 
ment and prevention of contagious dis- 
eases, and extend.s over the period from 
Jan. 1. lilOtj, to S^ pt. 1. VMl, one year and 
eitjht nsonths. 

The lit nis in the bill, according to ihe 
city clerk, are all for the treatinout of 
cont.igiou.s diseases, milk insp.^-ction. and 
tubticubn te.st.s, and the city has within 

the sHtn«^ period paid out for the healtli 
department the sum of $17,tj81.59. 

"It F'roctor paid th" city of Duluth 
Boniciliing liltc $4')"i f>r the treatm"nt of 
Contaa;ious di.-^eases, that amount should 
com-- out of tiie wliole bill prcsent'd >lie 
countj-, half nf which the county pay.-s," 
the city clerk. This will be 



the Greer Contracting 
the Oliver Iron Mining 



court against 
company and 
conu)any. 
•According to the complaint, which 
w.is filed by J. LaMotte. this morn- 
ing, Calo claims that while he was 
working in the Morris ppen pit mine 
at Hibbing, May 7 last. The Greer 
Contraclmg company, which was strip- 
ping the Albany mine, adjoining the 
Morris property, set off an unusually 
large blast, and a big rock was blown 
by the force of the explosion over into 
the Morris mine, striking Calo on the 
head. It is claimed that his skull was 
crushed, and that as a result of the 



remarked the city eieiK. Tins win ue i mjury his entire right side is paralyzed 
looki'd ui). and 't the amount ha.-? be a r>..i^ r.i.,i.«^ ►K,r*i. . . . »''*"^'J '^ "■ 
paid, it will be deducted from the full ^^^'^ claims that the stripping com- 
anio'int. $12,7>i'.).19. h.ilf of which the city P^^^^ ^"'^'■^ to blame for the explosion 
and half til.- county pays for omiagrioiis \ and that the Oliver company was to 



di.sease pati>nts, their care and the pte 
vent:on of th.» spread of contagion. 

KuIIy xt) iier c«nt of the exnensis of the 
heaPh d' partment. according to the offi- 
cials, is thi- care of C'ln'jgious d:.-*eases 
and the pr-v.-nlion of tlio spread of the 
■anu-. Th • inspection of milk and tuber- 
culin tests is considiTi'd by the depart- 
ment as b«^longing to liiLs branch of tlie 
Work, and my car fare p.aid out in travd- 
Ing to a locality for niiking tests comes. 
In tin' opinion of thr department, proper- 
ly witiiin tho ivork of th.' department ptT- 
tainins tj contagious diseases, their pre- 
vention and cure. 



blame because as his employer it did 
not provide him a safe place to work. 

John Pakiji. administrator of the es- 
tate of Domjan Campa. decea.sed, has 
sued the Oliver Iron Mining company 
for $.5,000 damages for the accidental 
death of Campa, Dec. 22 last. It is 
alleged he was buried and crushed 
under a caving in of earth and timbers 
in a mine. 

« * « 

A damage suit growing out of the 
death of Johann Scigel, a Jewish ped 



WILL TALK 
OF MERGER 

Local Strikers to Discuss 

Plan to Join Railroad 

Operators. 

Scheme to Combine Com- 
mercial Union With Rail- 
way Order, Brewing. 



The striking telegrrvphers of Duluth 
will hold a in-^eting thi.s ev«-ning at their 
headquarters. No. 10 Mesaba bltxik. when j 
in all probability they will endorse ihej 
ler. at the Northern "Pacific company's i P'an ^'»*t ^^"-^ unions all over the coun- 




BANG ! 
BANG ! 

The hunting sea- 
son Is on and w-'re 
prepared for It tills 
year even better 
than ever b e f o r §. 
Shi>t (iiiiis, RiffeN, 
Niii:ill Anns :iu<l .\iii- 
iiiiiiiitlcu. See iiui' line 
bel'in'e > UI! piireh.iMe. 

JOS. E. 

FOX 

1^ R. srpi:moH st. 

Upp. Bijou Tbeater. 



\ Fifth avenue crossing .May 13 last, has 
I been st.irted in the district court. J.ihn 
H. Norton, representing Israel Dorsky, 
I administor of the estate of the de- 
j cedent, has filed the complaint in a 
I damage case against the railway com- 
i pany for $5.0iJO, the statutory liniit-, in 
I ca.se of death. 3eigel was in the act 
I of driving across the railway tracks 
I when an engine belonging to defend- 
jant company, backing from behind the 
I freight shed, struck his rig and car- 
; ried it against the iron pillar at the 
i corner of the union depot .^hed. Selgel 
! was thrown under the engine and 
run over. He died at the hospital a 
few hours after the accident. 



) 'WHITK LILY' 

I daintiest f.il)r*cs. 



so.ip for th> bath— for 
At good gr'>c»^rs. 



Detroit and Return $12.00 

$12. via the .South Shore; tickets on 
sale Sept. 8, 11. 15 and 20, connecting at 
St. Ignace-with steamer of the D. & 
C N. company. To Buffalo $2 higher. 
Limit, three weeks. For sleeping car 
and steamer reservation.s. apply to A. 
J. Perrin, General Agent, 430 West Su- 
perior street, Duluth. 



try are d^'liberaiing on to merge the 
Commercial Telegraphers' Union of Am- 
erica and the Order of Railroad Teleg-i 
{ raphers. 

There h.is been considerable discussion 

ion this subject among the commercial , 
I telegraphers and a m.ajorlty of th«'ni are' 
I in favor of the new tnove. It i.s ur.der- 
! 3toi>d. also, that the railroad telet^raph- 
! ers would welcome the amalgamation. 
I Members of both orders feel that the 
, merger would greatly increase their 
; strength and tend to secure for them 
; higher wages and bettor working condi- ' 
I tions. 

I The commercial telegraphers are still 
optimistic concerning the outcome of the; 
I strike. At the local headquarters are i 
• posti-d bulletins from the different local 
j unions and all of them are ch-'ery mes- 
1 sag'^s. stating that they are gaining 'a 
'.strength all the time. 

The telegraphers may add anothfr 
I clause to their demands to the telegrapli 
conniaiii*^'^. to l^e acceded to before the.) 
leturii to work, and that is that the tele- 
graph companies furnish the typewriter., 
used by their operators. 

The action of the companies in making 
operators furnish tluir own typewriters, 
to be u.sed in ClJ^npany business, has al- 
ways been a thorn in the sides of tlid 
j telegraphers. 



THOSE WHO HAVE 
PASSEDBEYOND 

Kalamazoo. Mich.. .Sept. 16.— M. D. 
Woodford, former president of the 
Cincinnati. Hamilton & Dayton rail- 
way, died here yesterday. Mr. Wood- 
ford had stopped here while on the 
way home with his family from 
Charlevoix to Cincinnati. He was 
tak-m with heart trouble at the 
American hotel, two weeks ago, and 
It was seen fri>m the outiset that hw 
illness wa.s dangep)ii.s. Mr. W'»d- 
ford was To years old. and seen serv- 
ice as a raih-oad man on the Michi- 
gan t'entral roid and tiie Cincinnati, 
Hamilton <k Dayton. 

.St. Paul. Minn.. Si»i>t. 16.— Dr. G-^tt- 
fried Stanim, .smM.ss eonsuj at St. Paul, 
died la.*t ;.ight after a lingering ill- 
ness. Dr. .Siamm, who was 64 years 
old, came to St. Paul from Switzer- 
laml thirty-four years ago. and for 
many years had been .Swiss oonsul 
for Mimiesota. Montana, Wyoming 
and the Dakotas. He was one of 
the prominent physicians of the 
Northwe.st. 

SENATOR PKTTUS- LIimARY. 

Indianapolis Star: The late Senator Pet- 
tus of Alabama was a 'Forty-niner." go- 
ing o^'erland to California in thp early 
drvs and engaging in placer mining. He- 
took with him *<n that Ions and tedious 
l.tirney three books, the Bible, Shakes- 
peare and Burns' poems. 

He said of them at one time not long 
-Ince- "I read the Bible from cover to 
cover- I read the side notes; I read the 
captions of the chapters; I learned great 
Darts oi" It by heart, and I haven't for- 
eotten them y**t. -I l^'arned many of 
Burns' poems by heart and much of 
fihakHspeare iu, the sanie way. too." 
Such reading of th^-.s.- three books was 
an education W> it*elf. It la not likely 
that many miners engaged in that search 
for wealth speiM: tht*lr leisure in as prottt- 
able a way. ,, .: 



McMillan:s 



PURE KETTLE RENDERED 
paragon': ham & BACON 



STARTS PROCEEDINGS. 

Interstate Transfer Company Will Con- 
demn Ri^ht-of-Way. 

The Interstate Transfer company 
.Saturday began condemnation proceed- 
ings In Superior for the right-of-way 
of its road from a point near the Su- 
perior entry on Wisconsin point to tlie 
.St. Douis river. A map and lis pendes 
covering the i-oute to be taken, was 
filed with the register of deeds at the 
same time proceedings were started in 
district court. 

The entire line lies outside the city 
limits with the exception of the eastern 
end, which cuts across sections 4 and 34 
to get to Wisconsin point. The start 
is made near the adjoining western cor- 
ners of section 1 and 12 in 48-15, and 
proceeding eastward follows in a gen- 
eral way the' line of the old .Superior 
Pelt Line & Terminal railway, runniag 
through Saunders. • 

Between the two ends of the new line 
every road now entering or about to 
enter Superior and Duluth from , the 
East. South and West will be cros.^ed, 
and in this way the steel plant will 
secure direct connection with each road, 
for the Steel corporation is behind th3 
Interstate Transfer company, and of- 
ficers of the company are the same as 
officers of the Duluth. Missabe & North- 
ern road. 

DOC BRADFORD ARRESTED 

Held on Charge of Stealing Skirt Valued 
at $10. 

Dr. Ira B. Bradford, the alleged hus- 
band of the half-breed woman, Lizzie 
Brooks, who was arrested and ordered 
out of Duluth Saturday, was arrested 
the same day by Superior authorities 
charged with the theft of a silk .sku't 
valued at $10. The skirt was taken 
from the apartments of Mrs. Dan Bu- 
chanan in the Keystone block. 

Bradford was arraigned and pleaded 
not guilty. He will have a hearing 
Thursday, and in default of bail was 
remanded to the county jail. He 
pleaded for clemency, stating that he 
would die In jail without "dope." Brad- 
ford is a slave to the morphine habit. 

W. C. T, U. Convention. 

The convention of the Inter-County 
W. C. T. U. will open tomorrow night 
at the Hammond avenue Presbyterian 
church and continue until Thursday 
night. White ribbon advocates are ex- 
pected to be present from A.shland. 
Bayfield. Douglas, Iron and Washburn 
counties. Mayor Linley will wlcome 
them in a speech tomorrow night and 
the two days* .session will be occupied 
with papers and routine business. 

One Year in Jail. 

In superior court tins morning, John 
Deegan pleaded guilty t) a char;.;e of as- 
sauP with intent to do great bodily harm 
and was sentence<l to one year's imprison- 
ment in the county jail. The a.ssault was 
•ommi'ted on the person ot Ed Olsen, a 
.saloonke.-per last May. Deegan was or- 
dered out of Ol.s'-ns saloon and when he 
refused to go, the priprietor attempted to 
•Meet him. Olsen was quite badly cut up. 
Deegan was lirsl arraigned on a charge 
of assault with intent to kill, but while 
the Jury was b^nng .selecl'-d he agre< d to 
plead guilty to the lesser charge and take 
a sentence. 

New Sheds in Use. 

The new transfer sheds of the Great 
Northern Railroad comr>any were put into 
e immi.ssion today, tlio first freight b.Mng 
handled through them. The. new sheds 
improve the situation in Superior im- 
mensely and through them it is exp*-cted 
all freighi ent-^ing the city will be hand- 
led more expeditiously. 

Building Trestle. 

A Superior lumber firm is furnLshtng 
Washington fir to the United States Steel 
corporation and it is being taken to the 
site of the steel plant, to be used tn the 
erection of a trestle to .span a gully near 
the site of the plaht. The erection of the 
trestle, on whicn work has already bepn 
begun, will open an a\''nue, by whi^h the 
materials for the erection of the buildings 
of the plant may be taken to the site. 

Enrollment Larger. 

The enrollment figures of the Superior 
.schools for this year, thus far, show an 
increase of 135 in the number of children 
attending school over the number at the 
corresponding time last year. The enroll- 
ment fieiires to day are 5.403. while la^t 

iyear. there were but 5,2<;8 children attend- 

ling school at this time. 



night, and took $20 belonKing to the 
owner and %'i belonging to the servant. 
The %li) was taken from the pockets of 
Mr. Casey's trousers while he slept. He 
found the garment Jn the hallway with 
'he pockets turned inside out. It Is said 
that the servant girl, when she entered 
the house Saturday night, nelected to 
lock the front door. 

Will Count the Mail. 

Prepara.tiun.s are being made to count 
all the letters passing through the Su- 
perior postoffioe for the week besinuiiig 
Oct. 12 The work will be done on tUo 
order of the de{xiilment at Washington. 
It Is understood that the deparlinenl de- 
sires to obtain information regarding the 
aipount of work done by the postal em- 
ployes. 



Bitter Root Land 

Five acres pay $5 per day. Ten acrea 
pay $10 per day Particulars 
KMDSi:x-Ki:RcrsoN fkiit co., 

220 West .naehiicau Street. 



Attaches Contractor's Outfit. 



tachment was made by Balch 13ros., con- 
tractors in Dakota, who claim that Ar- 
seneau owes them fl.tiW. The outfit had 
been worlting on a suli-eontra'^! for grad- 
ing the Wisconsin Central road. 

SUSPECTED 
OF FORGERY 



Former West End Dancing 

Master is Under 

Arrest. 



AT YOUR DEALER'S 

Men's Fine Shoes S3. 50 and $4 

MADE I'*; DIXITH BY 

NORTHERN SHOE CO. 

MAKERb Of tiOOD SHOES 



STEAM HEATED 
STORE ROOM 

."Seventeen foot (eiling, and basem. nt 40 
xliH). will put in goo.i repair, near Lake 
avenue and .Superior street. Rem rea- 
sonable. T. V\'. Wal.l & Co.. Sv-cond 
fioor, Lonsdale building. 



Police Believe^ He is 

tlie Much Wanted 

Forger. 



Carl A. Lind. suspected of being 
implicated in the forgery of certain 
checks ])earing the n.unie of P. Mc- 
Donnell as maker, was arrested at 
Eveleth last evening and brought to 
this city today. He was placed in the 
city jail pending an arraignment. 

The warrant on which I-iiid was ar- 
rested alleges that he passed a check 
on Lsaac .\lbert for $l(t, bearing the 
signature of P. McDonnell, which sig- 
nature was a forgery. 

Ijiiid is a good lookin? young man 
of about 30 years and v.ill be remem- 
bered by West end people as bavin a: 
conducted a dancing .school there foi 
a time last winter. He was also a pro- 
moter of wrestline bouts and huii;^ 
about the club rooms in the West end 
most of his time. He is married, and 
with his wife formerly lived in this 
city. Hhe is now at Eveleth, where 
Lind claims he has been working at 
collecting and other things. 

Lind makes partial denial of the 
crime, but .said to a Herald reporter 
that another man wa« <onnected with 
the pa.ssing of the cliecks. giving his 
name as John Olson He stated that 
he feared the checks were no good 
and did not care to get mixed up in 
any trouble. The police are confident 
they have I'le right man and that he 
is one of a pair who have been pass- 
ing worthle.ss checks on the ranges. 
He was arrested at Hibbing on sus« 
picion, but told a story of another 
man giving him the checks and was 
allowed his freedom. The .stories he 
tells the authorities today are conilict- 
ing and he appears to know more of 
the aitair than he has told thus far 



tiict the contract fur a storm sewer In 
the avenue was let. 

The contract for paving Twenty-ninth 
avenue was awaide<l to J. A. Johnso'i 
whose bid was for $y,S5a,50. There were 
four other bids considered as follows: 
P. McDonnell. $l0.i»40; J. W. Preston, 
$10,.S.S5; Ueorge A. King, $ia.7S4..50. and 
J. p. O'Connell. $10,1^7. 

liids for four sanitary .sewers In 
Pout th alley between Twenty-third and 
Twenty-seventh avenues west wero 
opened. Frank Carisott's bid for $2,730.25 
being accepted. There were five other 
bids for this work. 

The paving contract calls for the con- 
struction of iiavement of crushed rock 
and macadam. 

The Lake avenue paving contract was 
completed .Saturday and Is considerei 
a good job. The paving extends from 
the Viaduct below .Superior street <.o 
.Second street and the material is of 
sandstone on a coni-rele base. J. VV. 
Preston was the contractor having this 
job ill hand. 

The iKiard of public works is having 
nece.s.sary repairs to the a.sphalt and 
tar macadam in the city made before 
the Barber Asphalt company shuts 
down its plant, which it will do soon. 
the Grey.solon road contract being 
about completed. 

Petitions for paving have been late 
coming in this .season, but there has 
been considerable work accdmpli.shed 
and the remaining work is now being 
rushed as rapidly as possible. 



Daintv .SKLV.S and dainty 
thrive ,.n WHITE LILY soip. 



FABRICS 



RATHBUN'S 

Preserving 




De Witt's Little Early Riser Pills. Sold 
by all druggists. 



Tiiieves TaKc $23. 



Thieves entered the home of James 
Casey, at 1118 John avenue, Saturday 



CONTRACT FOR 
PAVING IS LET 

J. A. Johnson is Lowest 

Bidder on Twenty- | 

Ninth Avenue. I 

The board of public works met to- 
day and bids for paving Twenty-ninth 

i avenue west from .Superior to Helm ' 

; street will be opened. 

j In connection with the paving con-. 



Is cheaper in Duluth than 
in any of the large Eastern 
cities. If you think prices 
are high in Duluth, make a 
tour of the country and you 
will come back home con- 
vinced that your comml.sslon 
man and gr<»cer In Duluth 
is giving you exceptionally 
gcMHl value. 

A FEW OF OUR 
PRICES 



Pre.servliig PIuin.<«- 
4 basket ca-ses. . . . 

Preserving I*eafh« 
— 1 Ijox fa.scs .... 

I'ro.servins: Pear«»- 

bU;-llfI CilhCS 

Pre«.ervlng C'rab 
aiiples, busli 

liipe Tomatoes 90c bu.sliel. 

Rathbun's 

117 E. SUPKRIOR ST. 



-$1.60 
$1.60 
$2.75 
$1.75 






THE POLICE 
COUmJRIST 

Devils Lake Carpenter 
Couid Not Resist Bow- 
ery's Allurements. 

Greek Threatens to Hurl 

Cuspidor at Another's 

Head. 



Abraham Hansen of Devils Lake, N. 
D., was a pitiful sight as he stood in 
court today for the second time within 
the past three days charged with being 
drunk. 

His money, watch and other jewelry 
gone, he broke down and wept when he 
told the court of his troubles and 
pleaded for a chance to return to the 
North Dakota city where Chautoquas 
and harmless amusements are held, 
and where there is no Bowery to lure 
weak mortals from the pathway of so- 
briety. 

Hansen was arrested Friday night on 
a similar charge and paid a light fine 
Saturday, promising lailhfully to get 
out of town and seemingly happy at 
the prospects of doing so. He is a 
carpenter and had considerable money 
when he came to Duluth. 

Once out of the first scrape, Hansen 
could not refrain from taking "one 
more to brace up on" and from that 
time until he was gathered in Sunday 
he trod the pathway of exhiliratlon and 
enjoyment with a number of new found 
friends to help him sptiid his money. 
According to Anraham, when he broke 
a bill to pay for the drinks, the change 
frttiuently found its way into some 
othtr fellow's pocket. He protested 
ft-ebly, for he was about all in from 
his librations, but can not recall who 
his "friends" were or where he lost 
his money. The court gave him a 
chance to get cuit of the city, and he 
will probably do it this time, as he 
appeared the picture of woe and re- 
peiitance in court today. 
* « « 
M. Danculovic made complaint 
against Slave Jericlch, alleging that the 
latter had threatened to do him vio- 
lence, mentkuiing a cuspidor as the 
mean.s he proposed to use in ending 
hl.s earthly career. Jericlch pleaded not 
guilty, and his hearing was set for 
Wednesday. The complaining witnes.s 
asked that the defendant be bound 
over to keep the peace, alleging that 
he feared his life at his hands. 



YOM KIPPUR 
IS ATHAND 

Important Jewish New 

Year Holiday to be 

Observed. 

Local Hebrews and Many 

From Outside Will Hold 

Ceremonies. 



Prom sunset Tuesday evening unt;i 
sunset Wednesday, the Jews will re- 
main in their houses of worship, pray- 
ing and touching neither food nor drink, 
In observance of the final festival days 
of the Jewish New Year, Yom Kippur. 

The orthodox Jews observe the fast 
for twenty-four hours, clad in the white 
tunics, which usually clothe the dead. 
Only the finger tips are washed during 

the hours of fasting and a majority re- 
main in the church throughout the 
night. The woryhippers wear no shoe.3. 
At sunset Wednesday, the book of fate 
is closed, and some of the worshipers 
are fated for death while others are to 
live another year. 

The Yom Kippur celebration is the 
most important of the Jewish year 
and is generally observed. Hebrews 
living In small towns where there are 
no synagogues come to Duluth or ^o 
to the Twin Cities to take part in the 
exercises. The rules of the creed pro- 
vide that no congregation can hold 
services unless there are ten males of 
more tlian 13 years, present. 

On every one of the ten days of the 
New Year's observances, a sheep's horn 
is blown 100 times and also once dar- 
ling Yom Kippur, at the conclusion of 
the ceremonies. 

The central idea of the New Year's 
holidays is to make amends with God 
for the bad deeds done during the past 
twelve months, pray and make prom- 
ises of better conduct in the future. 

The exercises will be held tomorrow 
night and Wednesday in all of the 
Jewish synagogues in the city. Many 
Hebrews from the ranges and othi.r 
neighboring towns will take part. 



I MniTOMs"] 



You can eat hot biscuit at midnight if 
they are made by a good cook who uses 
Hunt's Perfect Baking Powder. 



THEY GO ON 
EXCIJRSION 

Despite Weather, Militia 

Men Enjoy Trip on 

Gopher. 

Minnesota National Guard 
Association Holds Meet- 
ing in Duluth. 



Duluth took on the appearance of 
a militaiy post tliis morning. Sixty- 
flve members of the Minnesota Na- 
tional Guard association, consisting 
of officers of the state militia, arrived 
In the city last evening, and this 
morning, most of them coniing in 
over the Omaha, in special cars pro- 
vided for the purpose. This morning 
they appeared about the hotels and 
on the streets in regulation uniform, 
(making quite an imposing array. 

The prv)gram called for an excur- 
sion down the lake on the steam- 
ship Gopher, but the weather outlook 
was so discouraging that it was sup- 
posed the trip would be given up. 
That is to say, other people than 
members of the association did the 
eupi-osing. The oflflcers. while not on 
campaign duty, did not for a moinent 
think of letting a little thing like 
bad weather Interfere with their 
plans, and accordingly the Gopher 
was boarded, and orders given to 
proceod out into the lake. The boat 
will return about tJiSO this evening. 

A business meeting will be held on 

board. This morning the program of 

addn sses had not been arranged. 

The sx>eeches« will be largely of an 

extemporaneous character. Different 

mnrnbers of the association will be 

csalled up^in for remarks. Tomorrow 

morning there will be a boulevard 

drive, and this will be followed by a 

business meeting. In the evening 

there will be a theater party at the 

Lyceum for the entertainment of the 

visitors. Many of the militia men 

brought their wives along with thtim. 

uid the women are taking part in 

the excursion today, and will also 

enjoy other social features planned 

for the convention. 



ARE HIRING 
MORE MEN 

Railroads Say Strike Will 

Not Affect Their 

Business. 



Superior 
in Strength 

Dr. Price's Flavoring Extracts are su- 
perior in strens:th, freshness and fine- 
ncjis of flavor to any flavoring extracts 
made in the world, and ladies of the 
best taste, who are now using them, 
find them just as represented. Persons 
who desire a delicate and natural flavor 
In their calies, puddings, or any table 
delicacy, will obtain it by using 



Railroad Managers Held 

Conference in St Paul 

Sunday. 



No new developments have come up in 
the railroad boilermalurs' strike situ- 
ation at the Head of the Lakes sinco 
the calling of the strike Saturday. It ia 
claimed, however, that many of the mt-n 
in Duluth and Superior, who walked out 
were not entirely satisfied with the ord- 
er of the union. 

D. M. Philbin, superintendent of the 
Great Northern, at whose shops in Supe- 
rior sixty men walked out, says that the 
business of the road will not be in the 
least interfered with. He us-^erts that 
competent men will be secured to take 
the strikei-s' places, and that some have 
already beon hired. 

Superintendent Blanchard of the North- 
ern Pacirtc says there is nothing new to 
reiiort. 

Tho railroads stand ready to pay boil- 
erniakers 41»/i cents an hour east of the 
Missouri river, and 43Vi cents west of the 
Missouri, with a Hat scale of $-.-5 a day 
for heliters. 

Railway managers assert that during 
eight years past the boHermaker.s have 
lead all other classes of railway labor in 
the yearly percentage of increase In , 
wages thev have received, which on the 
basis of the compromise offer just made j 
by the railways amounts to a total ad- 1 
vance of 7 cents an hour wittiin tw<j | 
years. The railways signitkd their will- j 
ingness to preserve a diff*'rential of 1'4 
cents per hour In favor of the boiler- 1 
makers as compared with the pay oi j 
machinist.'^, but were mt-t with a demand' 
for differentials of 5 and ."iH cents or 
three times the differential which has , 
existed for the past year. 

An important conference of railway! 
nianixgers was held in St. Paul at noon i 
Sunday, at which the strike was thor- j 
oughly canvassed. An organization to 
meet strike conditions was at once form- 
ed and the work of filling vacancies in 
the ranks caused by the strike, will be- 
gin at once. In an official statement 
following the conference the managers 
stated that the strike has so far caused 
no inconvenieiue to the operation of the 
five big systems and that the situation 
at shop points is peaceful. Reports from 
Council Bluffs, and fi-om other shop 
points indicate that In some ca.-^es the 
men do not understand the action of tho 
union jfficers in ordering the strike and 
that there is some dissatisfaction in the 
strike ranks. At a few shop points men 
have already returned to work. 

FILES SmEMENT. 

The Daluth & Northeastern Shows Good 
Earnings For Year. 

St. Paul, Sept. IC— The Duluth & 

Northeastern railroad company, the 

prt>perty of a Minneapolis lumber com- 
pany, filed its financial statement, with 
the railway and warehouse commission 
Saturday. The earnings from passengers 
amounted to $12,35«.78 and from freight, 
$144,028.63. The gross earnings of the com- 
pany were $lt;6,409.64. 



D'EHftlS 



81 




Extracts 



Var^llla 
Lemon 
Orangro 
Rose.ete 



1 



mtm 




MiMk> 



THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: ^ONDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 1907. 



B 



MAIL ORDERS 

promptly filled with utmost 
accuracy. 



I 



^ 



"THE POPULAR TRADING CENTER IN DULUTH" 



H 



PANTON (Si, WHITE COMPANY 



FREE SAMPLES 

of Dress Goods and Silks for 
the asking. 



Duluth's First Form al Op ening Display for Fall, 1907 

W - - ■ - ■— . ^. ■ I. ■ I ■ I ■ I »■ I I I . ■ ■ ' - . ■ II. " 

Hish Class Tailored Suits, 



Panton & 

White 
Compafiy. 



Exclusive Millinery, FootwV 



and Autumn Dress Goods 

At the Glass Block Store Today, Tuesday, Wednesday 



Panton & 

White 
Company. 



SII.KS 

and 
I>Ri?:!<S 
GOOD«4. 

MEN'S. 

\\omi:n'9 

nntl 

CHILDREN'S 

SHOKS. 

BOYS' 
CLOTHINQ. 

MKN'S 

flud 

WOMEN'S 

G1.0Vf::S. 



J 




An Occasion 



of the utmost importance to Duluth's fashionab- 
ly dressed women, and illustrative of the re- 
markable scope of the Panton & White Co.'s 
organization in procuring^ and displaying^ the 
absolutely correct fall and winter styles, as de- 
termined by the creators of fashion. 

A formal presentation of the larg^est, the most 
complete and varied assortment of beautiful and 
worthy merchandise gathered from every corner 
of the continent and fitting^ly supplemented by 
the Americanized adaptations from Parisian 
fashion centers. We extend to all Duluth, 
Superior and vicinity a cordial invitation to 
come — whether you care to buy" or not— we 
want you to 8ee,--to compare"to know. 

The Whole Store Says "Welcome" 





WOMEN'S 

and 

MISSES' 

SUITS. 

COATS. 

SKIRTS, 

WAISTS. 

CHILDREN'S 
WEAR. 

EXCLUSIVE 
MILLINERY. 

DRESS 
ACCESSORIES 



7-Great Opening Bargains-7 



$5 and $6 

Tan Shoes 

FOR MEN AND WOMEN. i 

We fully understand that "tana" are not muctt worn 
in the winter— but if you visit "Jean" he'll make them 
black — and at any rate, when you can buy regular $5 
and $6 shoes for $1.98 is the time to buy for the day 
you'll need them. On two tables in our shoe depart- 
ment the entire stock of men's and women's high and 
ibw tan shoes worth up to $6 a pair — finest leathers — 
nearly all sizes — while they last, 

$1.9S a Pair 



Cut Glass Shakers 

WITH STERLING TOPS. 

Genuine cut glass Salt and Pepper Shakers, 
with STERLING SILVER tops— six shapes 
and cuttings to select from — the kind you 
pay 39c to 50c for in the high price stores. 
An opening week bargain — about 4 gross 
of them — you can have all you want at 

15c Each 



Pictures 

COPIES OF CELEBRATED WATER COLORS. 

Not one of you who are posted on art in water color 
but is familiar with these famous subjects: 

"Another Fellow Dead in Love With Me," "Christmas 
in Ye Olden Time," "A Toast," "Sweet Charity," "Sun- 
set of a Dying Race," "His First Wing Shot," "The 
Fortune Teller," "Unconquered," "The Barn Dance," 
"When Grandmamma Was Young," "For Love and the 
Colonies," "Thanksgiving in Y'e Olden Time." 

These engravures are I3j4x20 iriches and unmounted, 
but we will frame them for you at very little cost. The 
price of the water colors alone for the opening sale is 

lOc Each 



1 



Leather Goods 

A "SNAP" IN WOMEN'S BAGS. 
LISTEN! In living up to our original method of do- 
ing business — the exchange of goods when not :|;is- 
factory, even when sometimes it is no fault in the goods, 
but giving our customers the benefit of the doubt — we 
find we have an accumulation of six or seven dozen 
handbags, purses and chateaines that have been re- 
turned to us as slightly damaged — though in some cases 
you'd never know they were damaged at all. Now — 
mstead of returning them to the manufacturers 
we will give them to our customers for almost 
nothing. They range in price from $3.50 apiece down to 
4QC — take your pick of the lot while they last (none re- 
paired, and none exchanged), for only 

25c Each 



Ribbon Bargains 

200 pieces No. 40 (3'/2 inches wide), all pure 
silk satin-taffeta Ribbons, in all colors and 
black and white. This is a ribbon we have 
sold thousands of yards of during the past 
few weeks at 19c — (you pay 22c anywhere 
else) — good for a hundred uses — during 
opening days — the price per yard is 



12^c 



Umbrellas 

In a week or ten days" we will need the 
space these umbrellas now occupy for 
winter gloves and mittens. We see only 
one way to get room — sell the goods 
that's in the way instead of storing it — 
so here they go; 500 men's and women's 
fine umbrellas — worth $i.75 each— im- 
mense variety of styles in handles — for 
three days — Monday, Tuesday and 
Wednesday, choice, 

98c Each 



Cretonne Samples 

If you were in the scramble for curtain 
and madras samples a week ago you 
know what a bargain thi."? will be; 500 
fine cretonne samples (all colors and 
patterns), about a yard square, goods 
actually worth to 50c a yard. Each one 
has 6 and 7 smaller swatches attached to 
them — but we'll throw them in FREE 
and the price of the samples while they 
last will be 

lOc Each 



Store Hours: 8 a. m. to 6 p. m. 




J 



PANTON & WHITE COMPANY. 



1 



Store Hours: 8 a. m. to 6 p. m. 



ei 



Lost and Found. 

I.,ost, betwet-n 9:30 p. ni. yesterday and 
noon today, a bilious attack, with nausea 
and sick headachf. This loss was occa- 
sioned by finding at a Duluth drug store 
a box of Dr. King's New Life Pills, the 
guaranteed cure, for biliousness, malaria 
and jaundice. 25e. All druggists. 



Wanted— Home for a baby 2 months 
old, or would let a good family adopt 
it if no children in family. Best of 
reasons for doing this. Address 
'•Mother," care of Herald. 



MAKE QUICK TRIP 
OVER BAD ROADS 

Two SL Paul Men Cover 

Route at Night in 

Auto. 

A night ride from St. Paul to Duluth 
in a Ford runabout in twelve hours and 



thirty minutes was completed at an 
early morning hour today by Ray T. 
Goldman and Garfield A. Wood of the 
Saintly City. The trip is considered 
quite an accomplishment for the reason 
that it rained alnrwst continually, and 
the roads were in very bad shape. In 
some places the aatoists went through 
mud. up to the sC|elsJ The machine 
came through the ofdeal in good shape. 
The trip between-' tlHB two cities has 
been made in nin«K hours, but it was 
made In daylight *nd .when the roads 
were in good condition.' 

f - >»» 

As "a small bolt Ai |J>e door Is better 
ttar. none at all," §ff «ib^n a very sm=i! 
ad. of a store In The Herald Is better 
than none at all. For "none at all" 
raeana business oblivion. 



SAYS BRAKEMAN 
' SWATTED HIM 

Adolph Jolinson Wants 
$4,000 From the Rail- 
road Company. 

Claiming that the train crew on the 
Iron Range passenger train between 



Duluth and Ely assaulted, beat and 

bruised him without any cause or prov- 

I ocatlon until he was injured in body 

I and humiliated in mind, Adolph John- 

I son is seeking to recover, through a 

j Jury, $4,000 damages from the railway 

company. The trial of the case began 

I in Judge Ensign's room this morning. 

; Johnson l)eing represented by John 

Jenswoid, Jr. 

The railway company, on the other 
hand, answers that Johnson was mak- 
ing himself a nuisance on the train, 
that he applied vile epithets to the 
brakeman and finally assaulted the lat- 
ter. It is alleged that the brakeman 
used no more force than was necessary 
! to " protect himself from the alleged 



assault by Johnson. 

The civil action of Gust Qronberg 
against W. J. Atwell and others to re- 
cover for a bill of can supplies, waa 
argued to a jury in Judge Dlbell's 
room this morning. It was expected 
that the trial of the crinUnal cases on 
the present term calendar would be 
started this afternoon. 

■The damage case of Victor J. Jacob- 
son, by his guardian, against the Mer- 
rill & Ring Mill company is being tried 
today in Judge Cant's room. 

The first criminal case for trial is 
that of the state against Ed Smith 
and Joe Adams, who were indicted for 
holding up a man in First alley, back 
of the Denver hotel, recently, and rob- 
bing him of 35 cents. 





THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 1907. 



i 



V 



r 



THE EVENING HERALD 

AN INDEPENDENT NEU'SP^VPER. 



Published at Herald Bldg.. First St.. Op. P. O. Square. 
THE HERALD COMPANY. 

Phones: Countingf Room, 324; Editorial Rooms, 1126. 



TEN CENTS A WEEK 

EVERY EVENING — DELIV'ERED BY CARRIER. 



.9 .0: 



Blnglo 

One month - - 

Three mouths (in advance) *•«" 

8lx months (in advance) ••^" 

One year (In advance) "•"'' 

Entered at Duluth Postofflce as Second-Class Matter. 



the worst of it, and it is high time he was having an 
inning, it would be jumping from the fryingpan into the 
fire if all the statesmen took up his case and neglected 
the producer and the manufacturer. It would be just as 
fair, perhaps, to have all political cflforts designed for his 
benefit as it would to have all of them aimed at the profit 
of producer and manufacturer; but it would be still more 
fair if political endeavor could be broad enough to con- 
sult the interests of all classes, and while giving the pro- 
ducer and the manufacturer all that is their due, to stop 



DULUTH WEEKLY HERALD. 



Per year 

Six months. . . 
Thren months. 



.91.00 
.50 
•25 



LARGEST CIRCULATION IN DULUTH 



TO SUBSCRIBERS: 

It Is Important when desiring the address of your 
paper changed to give both old and new addres ses. 



HOTEL^^^OOSSIP. 

"They are bcKlni|n? to ship lumber- 
Jack* into the wolda for the winter's 
worlt, but the nutlber is still pretty 
small," said D. O-ftamb of B.^midji, 
Minn., at the McKay. "The men who are 
sent out now are Jnj^^ucted to build 
camps, cou-strucL road.s, and otherwise at- 
tend to the prelimtfiarnrs of the season's 
work. The main gangrt, cannot be set to 
%voik until the ground is froz«n ovfr. 

"The prottls of the logger are almost as 
dependent on we.ithcr cuuilUiona us ar.^ 
the prortta of the- fariier. The wrong 
kind of a winter ca<i "easily mean that tlic 
loifginK contractor will conii-- out a loser 
instead of a winner. Up In tlua country, 
however, the wrong kind are not sut'n- 
cenily wronj^ to more than seriously ham- 
per the work, and by going at it right 
tiie contractor can it least come out even. 
I haven't heard of any serious losses tor 
several years past. 

"The lack of snow doesn't bother log- 
gers up here, for there isn't any lack of 
it out in the woods, except on rare oc- 
casions. More often there is too much, 
competition at home, while the benevolent tariff stood |ranjer^^thanjo,>^mtle. ^,[^ast_ wu.te,. Jor 



copy, <ia"y----- •••;•;;;;;;:;• ;;;;;::;:::' Uoi there and not rob the consumer by giving them more 

than their share. 

The poor consumer has been, indeed a pitiable figure 
in society. For the manufacturer, government has pro- 
vided tariff schedules that permitted him to charge inordi- 
nate profits, even though he might be at the same time 
selling the same goods abroad at a very much more mod- 
el ate figure. It has given him the opportunity to join 
with his fellows in the creation of trusts that eliminated 



" and I have been taking a cigar out 

of his case every day for the last three 
n^onths. Well." she went on, "I've got a 
hundred now, and I'll give them to him 
for a birthday present.' 



THE WEATHER. 




A FOREIGN VIEW. 

In the heat and passion of the fight for fair play in 
which the people of this country are engaged there is 
little room for calm judgment of the manner and ulti- 
mate results of the fight. So on one side you hear that 
it is a brutal and insane attack upon wealth and business 
which can only result in the destruction of prosperity; 
while on the other side you hear that it is a noble fight 
for industrial freedom, a continuation of the fight for real 
democracy and equal opportunity that has been in prog- 
ress all through history, in which the regal and lordly 
tyrants of other days have been replaced by the selfish 
and sordid tyrants of high finance. 

But over in Great Britain, where the conflict can be 
viewed dispassionately and with a judgment unclouded 
by prejudice and passion, the issue is clearly visible, and 
it is altogether encouraging to those who will not per- 
mit Wall street panics to deceive them into abandoning 
the cause of the people. 

England has not shared in the distrust of American 
securities which certain interests have tried to ingcnder 
in the hope that the result would be to scare the Amer- 
ican people out of their fii^ht for fair play. The British 
investor looks upon it as a fight not only for the public, 
but for the stockholder. This is the correct view of it. 

Under the domination of Wall street interests, it is 
questionable whether the worst sufferer from economic 
abuses has been the wage-earner, the consumer, or the 
stockholder. The wage-earner and the consumer have 
suffered from unfairly high prices demanded to pay divi- 
dends on watered stock, but the stockholder, too, has 
had his troubles. He has found that in the great indus- 
trial organizations, very often, money that belonged to 
him and that should have gone to him in dividends has 
been held back that the ring of high finance might play 
with it and use it to manipulate the stuck markets lor 
the benefit of officers and directors. Life insurance 
funds have been used for this purpose, and from various 
sources money has been gathered, to the detriment of 
stockholders and policyholders, to form gigantic money 
pools to be used in exploiting the public. 

The destruction of these abuses would give greater 
stabilitj' to stock values of all sorts, would encourage 
public investment in securities now regarded with sus- 
picion becau?;c of the taint of high finance that hatigs 
about thejn. and would give to the stockholders and to 
the consuming public benefits that now go to the oli- 
garchy that lias been little better than a gang of organ- 
ized highwaymen which has squeezed the American pub- 
lic as if it were a vast financial sponge, dripping dollars 
into the vaults of banded greed. 

The London Spectator, discussing the campaign, 
uses clear vision and good judgment when it sees in it a 
fight in the interests of property, and, considering Presi- 
dent Ri'osevelt as its chief, says: "He stands for the 
rights of property and the rights of the individual against 
a lawlessness which, if persisted in, can have only one 
end — the destruction of a state based on individual free- 
dom and private property." 



guard against competition from abroad. Meanwhile, the 
poor consumer has been paying the bills, and it has 
pinched him painfully to do it. 

The producers of raw materials have also been pretty 
well cared for by the government and the politicians, 
though that care has not resulted in so many economic 
outrages as has the care of the manufacturers. 

But it cannot be denied that the consumer, long- 
suffering and generous, has suffered enough, and that 
he is due for immediate and tangible relief. The fight 
for tariff revision, for the elimination of trust abuses, 
for shutting off the water supply from purveyors of 
watered stock on which the consumer is expected to pay 
dividends, and for honesty in politics and public service, 
is in his interest. 



THE IRON MINES ASSESSMENT. 

The St. Paul Pioneer-Press affects mystification over 
the attitude of The Herald upon the proposed increase in 
the assessed valuation of the iron mines. It quotes a 



were seriously hamlioapped because of the 
heavy snowfall. One thing that makes it 
hard for woods workers is a heavy snow 
before tiie ground h.xa had a chance to 
freeze over. The snow makes a covering 
that keeps out the cold, and prevents thu 
ground from freezing. This keeps it soft 
underfoot, and it is hard to make good 
roads, or to make any use of horses after 
they are off of the road. When this con- 
dition prevails, about the only way to 
make a good road Is to get a gang of 
men to go along the route and disturb the 
snow in such a manner that the cold can 
penetrate it, and get at the water under- 
neath. 

•1 don't know Just how extensive log- 
ging operations will be in tlie Bemidjl 
district this winter. I am not In the 
business myself, and haven't happened 
to talk to any one who Is. 1 sui>i)ose 't , _ 
will run about the same as it did last | '^'^atn^r. 
year. Last winter there was a great deal 
of cedar cut in ttie Bemidjl district, par- 
ticularly uii» along the Minnesota & In- 
ternational." 

* « * 

"This is the season of the year when 
the baggagemen on the trains up in tins 
Northern country make a lot of money 
on the side," said L.. C. Pearson of 
Crookston, Minn., at the Lenox. "They 
always like to see hunting season come, 



portion of a recent editorial in these columns expressing for tiien there is a heavy travel in dogs, 

,,,.,, . ^ ■ I and evei-i' dog means a pi'^ce of moni*y 

a belief that the proposed assessment is excessive, and fyr the baggageman. Yo\i see the rail- 



The weather has 
lieen unsetthd and 
mostly disagreeable 
yesterday and to- 
day. Y e s t er d a y 
morning it was 
tiiip, though a 
northeast wind kept 
it cool. In the aft- 
ernoon clouds over- 
spread the sky and 
t li r e a t e ncd rain 
wlilch came in the 
evening and per- 
sisted morQ or less all night. This 
morning a mist that was almost rain 
fllle<l the air for a time, ceasing dur- 
ing the forenoon. The weatlier man ex- 
pects clearing weatiier toniglit, and 
sllgiitly cooler, v/ith showers before 
tlie clearing happens. Yesterday's high, 
est temperature was W degs. and last 
night's lowest was 50 degs. 

A year ago today it was warm and 
congenial, the temperature getting up 
to 70 deg. 

The sun rose this morning at 5:47 and 
sets tonight at C:21, inn king 12 hours 
and 36 minutes of sunlight. 

Says Mr. Richardson of conditions: 
"Slight barometric disturbances cen- 
tral over Superior and off the Oregon 
coast caused light to copious rains dur- 
ing Sunday or last night in the upper 
lake region, XA'iseonsin. Minnesota, the 
Dakotas, Northwestern Montana, Ore- 
gon and Washington. Rains fell also 
over gulf states due to low pressures 
In the extreme Southwest. Tempera- 
tures continue chilly in the Northwest, 
the result of high pressures in that 
section. Freezing weather prevails In 
Saskatchewan. The barometer con- 
tinues high in eastern states, attended 
by moderate temper.ature and fair 
The easterly movement of the 
Lake Superior low and the Saskatche- 
w.an high pressures will doubtless be 
attended by clearing weather In this 



TWENTY YEARS AGO. 

Taken Prom the Columns of The Herald of This Date, 18S7. 




*■*♦!). B. Gransey, well known in 
Uiis city, is now connected with the 
Kedpath Lyoeu/m bureau of Boston, 
in the capaoily o-f advajice a^ent. 



***Col. John Giericst, formerly pro- 
prietor of the Hotel La Perl, here, 
and now running a hotel of the same 
name at B/&i Lake Falls, Minn, is in 
the city. 



would be surveyed this winter. Mr. 
Fowler is now in a position to knovr 
whereof he speaks. 



***(Teopge Hathaway, chief of the 
Are dejjartment, is recovering from 
an attack of iyi>lioid fev^r, but is 
still very weak. 



••■•Prank Lucas, the new proprietor 
of the Clarendon, was formerly man- 
ager of the well known summer re- 
sort hotel, the Wesserwissett House, 
at Brighton, Me. 



•••Bob Williams of Towar Is in 
town with some splendid specimens 
of iron ore from land owned by Mr. 
Williams said Duluth parties, near 
Tower. 



••Duluth won one prize at the St. •••Maj. T. B. Ho<>ver left this 

Paul dog show, the second prize for nioining for Tower, where he will en 

Leijivberg St. Bernard dogs being gage another 
brought here by H. F. Thon>p3on's 



splendid dog, "Rab." The fine anima.1 
was only l>e«aten for the first prize by 
"Monai-oh," for whom Buffalo Bill is 
said to have offered $3,00ti in cash. 



•**The fair for the t>en€flt of the 
St. Jean Baptiste church, at the West 
erwi, opened last night. The following 
ladies have charge of the undertak- 
ing: Mrs. Capt. Jax^ques, Mrs. La 
VaQue, Mra. J. A. Robert. Mass Aggie 
Hart, Mrs. L. Lang^don. Miss Prefon- 
taine and Miss Grignon. 



•••F. E. Benjaanin of Mandan. Dak., 
is visitirtg his cousin, Paul Qaylord. 
the photographer. 



locality tonight." 



remarks that "the proposition that would most appeal to 
them (the Duluth papers), evidently, would be to appor- 
tion the state taxes etiually among the counties, regard- 
less of the comparative wealth of the property owners 
therein." 

This is confusing the issue, through malice or ignor- 
ance. The part of The Herald's remarks whicii the 
Pioneer-Press did not quote charged that there is not a 
class of property in the state that will be assessed at as 
high a rate as the mines will be if the proposed increase 
is put into effcict. In other words, The Herald charged, 



roads do not charge anything for trans 
porting dogs. They are put in the bag- 
gage car. something after thu fashion oi a 
grip. While there is no regular charge, 
so long as the master accompanies the 
doK. it is understood on all sides that 
the baggageman shall be given a piece 
of money, ranging from a quarter up- 
wards. Most of the money comes in the 
shape of half dollars, but often the tips 
range higher than that, for, next to his 
immediate family, the thorough sports- 
man loves his dog better than anything ' <JaIveston 
else in the world, and is willing to pay | Green Bay 
well to see that he is taken care of i Ha\Te .... 
properly. It is not uncommon for a man I Helena ... 
in the baggage car to get r2 or 13 for | Houghton 
carrying a single dog over lils division. I Huron 



Following were yesterday's highest 
temperatures as recorded by the weath- 
er bureau: 

Abilene 90 Little Rock . 

Asheville 7'> Mai«tuette .. 

Atlanta 80 Memphis 

Boston S(] Milwaukee ... 

Buffalo 74 Montgomery . 

Cairo S'3 Moorhead — 

Charleston 82 New Orleans 

Chicago S'i New York ... 

Cincinnati W Norfolk .... 

Concordia 92 Nonhfleld ... 

Davemport 86 Oklahoma ..., 

Denver 34 Omaha 

Detroit 84 Pittsburi? 

Devils Lake (i8 Portland, Or. 

Dodge S8 Prince Alb>>rt 

Duluth S"? Rapid City 

El Paso 

Escanaba 



.85 

M 

.m 

M 

.SO 
.SO 



•••Engineer James Fowler is credit- 
ed with having said that the Minne- 
sota & Northwestem's Duluth line 



MINNESOTA OPINIONS. 

Brainerd Tribune: It is stated that 
Senator Lodge will prepare a tariff re- 
vision plank for the next national Re- 
puljiicaii platform. But if the party is 
to be committed to tariff revision, 
wouldn't It l>e just as well for the plat- 
form to be drawn l)y a real revisionist? 



crew of men for work 
on the explorations by the Consoli- 
dated Vermilion Iron & Land ooia- 
I>any. 



•••The death of Caipt. Peter July, 
late of the barge D. C. Whitney. Is 
reported. The decease-i was well 
known along the lalces. He will bd 
succeeded on the Whitney by Capt. 
Dan Ingham. 



•••It Is stated that a deal has been 
entered into between the Burlington 
and the Duluth. South Shore & At- 
lantic railways whereby a Joint bridge 
will be built acroiis the hay from 
Connor's to Rice's Point. The Bur- 
lington will begin Its extension from 
a point in Wisconsin to Duluth next 
month. and reach Duluth early 
next spring. The line Is surveyed 
and staked out into Duluth. 



SUNNY GEMS. 



Chicago Record-Herald: "I thought 
you said you never gambled." 

"I never do." 

"Then why have you bought that 
basket of cantaloupes?" 



and believes, that a single class of property has been ■ or a part of it. This counts up pretty 

'' ^ •' I fast, for every 



picked out for special assessment because it happens to 
lie in one corner of the state, because it is different from 
other property, and above all, because part of it belongs 
to a very large and very wealthy corporation, li farm 
property, for instance, were assessed at the rate proposed 
for mining property, the valuation of the state would be 
immensly increased and tax rates materially lowered. 
But it will not be so assessed, this year or any other 
year. 

The Herald protested, not because the increase costs 
anybody a cent in taxes except the iron mining interests, 
but because the chief industry of this county, one that is 
expected to develop large manufacturing industries here 
if the state does not show an attitude of hostility toward 
it, has been singled out for special attack by the taxing 
powers, and because in fixing the valuation the ordinary 
rules of assessment in vogue in this state were cast aside. 



' fast, for every run of the train to and 
from the chicken fields carries its (luota 
of dogs. 

"This is also a profitable sea.son for the 
brakemen on the freight trains, or such 



Jack.sonville 
Kansas City 



g4 i Anoka Free Press: The tariff on lum- 
■g2'l)er Ks a premium on the destruction of 
■gg home forests. A removal of the tariff 
"a,, would tend to preserve domestic llniL»er 

M by enabling part at least of the timber 
'A ' products used to be slilpped In from 
• , . I abroad. 

J . •!*! Le Sueur News: It Is possible that the 

"-n ^t D* 1^ 2j: I American people will insist on a re- 

"Li ^ V , "■ i!;'vision of the tariff as a positive Issuj 

..8^ »an Antonio — ^"^iin the next campaign, but if they do not 

84 Santa Fe I^ they will regret it. The reii.-f from 

•■^[trusts will not oonie as quickly from 
..901 law enforcement as it will from cut'.ing 
■ •ft* 'off the pap that feds them. It is folly 
• •82 fj talk of ruin from revision, with ruin 



...64 S. Ste. Marie 

CS .Shreveport .. 

....»» Spokane.. .. 

....78 Washington , 

,...S0 Wichita .... 

,.S8 Winnipeg 



Baltimore American: "It is a wonder 
that successful halr-dresders do not 
Imitate the Indian processes." 
•Why?" 

"Because the Indian tribes are noted 
for their success in raising hair." 



Philadelphia Press: "I don't see how 
Inveterate temperance advocates can 
t ver make up their minds to go to 
Europe." 

"What an idea! Why not?" 

"Because there comes a point In their 
ocean trip when they are bound to be 
half seas over." 



KnoxviUe SI Yellowstone 

La Crosse ** ' 



.90 
.64 
.66 



"NO PULLMANS DAMAGED." 

There are several paintuliy laiailiar features in the re- 
ports of the railroad wreck that took place in Vermont 
yesterday. 

An operator, to whom was given the fearful responsi- 
bility of the safety of the trains, made an error in trans- 
mitting train orders, and the result was that two trains, a 
passenger and a freight, met in head-on collision. 

The carelessness that caused the fearful havoc in 
which twenty-four persons were killed and many others 
were seriously injured is one familiar feature. 

Another is the fact that all of those who were killed 
and injured were in one coach, a day coach used for 
ordinary pas.senger travel, and probably patronized by 
those who cannot afford to ride in tlie strongly built chair 
cars and Pullmans. The significance of these words in 
the reports cannot be overlooked: "None of the Pull- 
mans were damaged." 

In other words, if the twenty-four persons who gave 
up their lives in this wreck had spent the additional 
money needed to gain them entrance to the Pullman 
cars, none of them would have been killed. 

On the other hand, if those in the Pullmans had been 
so situated financially that they were forced to ride in 
the common day coach, most of them would have been 
killed or seriously hurt. 

The carelessness of an operator in putting a cipher 
in the train number where there should have been a 
figure 4 caused the collision, and the negligence of the 
railroad in carrying passengers in a fragile day coach 
when it is possible to buy substantial coaches like the 
Pullmans caused the deaths. 



A GOVERNMENT ORGAN. 

The first number of our esteemed contemporary, the 
Canal Record, published at Ancon, Canal Zone, Isthmus 
of Panama, is at hand, and No. i of Vol. i is an eight- 
page paper, well printed and full of interesting news 
about tile progress of the work upon the canal. 

It ought to be a good paper, because its editor is paid 
$io,ooo a year by the government to collect and dissem- 
inate information for the enlightenment of the American 
people. It will be published weekly, and so far as known 
it is the first case where a government has taken this 
method of informing its people about the progress of a 
public enterprise. 

From it we learn a large variety of interesting facts. 
We are informed that the families of canal employes re- 



Department of Agriculture. Weather 

ofThe'm'asTlaVid wiUlTig^o dVsrIigard the I Bureau, Duluth, Sept. ItJ.-Local forecast 

rules of the company and allow hoboes for twenty-four hours ending at 7 p m. 

to ride. Beginningin August and extend- Tuesday: Duluth. Superior and vicinity 

in- along after the close of the harvest I including t!ie Mesaba and Vermillion 



staring men in the face right now from 
the conditions made by a tariff once 
good and necessary 'out now out of date. 



North Branch Review: The Rush City 
Post is for Moses E. Ciapp for president. 
The Post forgets that it is the Demo- 
cratic party that needs a Moses. 



Houston Post: "Did you take his 
bill to ills room as he requested?" 

'Fifteen minutes ago." 

"Well, peek over the transom and see 
if he ha.s fainted; he hasn't kicked 
about the size of It yet." 



fields there are hundreds of men who go 
to aild from the Western harvest fields 
who make It their practice to ride the 
freight trains exi-lusively. If caught in 
the act they generally stand ready to tip 
tiie brakeman a dollar or two. which is 
much cheaper than paying fare on the 
passeng'ir train. Usually the brakeman 
is pretty safe in accepting the money, 
unless he gets it from a spotter, for ho 
can always say. you know, that he didn't 
know the hoboes were on his train." 

• • « 

At the Lenox: L. M. Motz. Chicago; O. 
A. l.Kirson. Minneapolis; W. Gill, St. 
Louis; B. A. MoUrary, St. Paul; W. G. 
Thovitter, Minm^poUs; E. Conner. Buf- 
falo; R. H. Flsh-y. 3t Paul. C. B. Joh.i- 
stm, Mankato. Minn.; L. C. Nelson, St. 
Paul; J. E. Fleck. Minneapolis; C. J. 
Jorgensen. Taconiie, Wis.; M. Brunner. 
Ashland, Wis.; Mrs. H. J. Schunian. F. 
E. Wood. Minneapolis; A. W. Wright. 
Austin. Minn.; J. C. MelvUle. Minneap- 
olis; G. C. LanU>ert. E. A Myerden. St. 
Paul; C. D. Lang. Faribault. Minn.; C. 
Lamb, Sauk Center, Minn.; C. W. Spence. 
H. W. Lyman. Minneapolis; W. David- 
son. Cincinnati; J. A. Nichols. Frazee. 
Minn.; W. McLeod. Hl/bbing; J. F. L^i- 
Li>:ide. Ashland. Wis.; J. L'.a. Sparta, 
Minn.; R. J. McIXtnnell, Blwabik. Minn.; 
E. N. Bl'>ck. Buffalo; D. P. Mclntyre, 
Ml.ss Florence Molniyre, Eveleth; J. P. 
Chalmers, Virginia; N. B. Arnold. Eve- 
leth; J. J. Ftizgerald, Mellen. Wis.; M. 
H. Landers, San Francl.soo; H. P. Buu- 
son. Bemidjl. Minn.; Mr, ind Mrs. S. R. 
Norton, La Crosse; F. H. Nelson. Attcl- 
boro. Mass. 

* • • 

At the Spalding: E. S. Rusad, Minot. 
N. D.; C. K. Pepkin.-^, Brooklyn. N. Y.; 
J. M. Williams. Minneapolis; B. G. Kel- 
la-son. Grand R^ipidd; T. E. Westerbuger. 



iron ranges— Probably showers this after- 
noon or tonight. Slightly cooler tonight. 
Tuesday partly clouly. Fresh northerly 
winds. 

H. W. RICHARD.SON, 
Local Forecaster. 



Chicago. Sept. IG.— Forecasts until 7 p. 
m. Tuesday: Wi:sconsin— Showers and 
thunderstorms tonight and Tuesday. 
Cooler. 

Minnesota— Generally fair tonight and 
Tuesday, except showers in south portion. 
Cooler tonight. 

North and South Dakota— Partly cloudy 
tonight and Tuesday. Cooler in extrpme 
South Dakoia tonight. Warmer in North 
Dakota Tue.-?day. 
I Upper Lake.^— Fresh northerly winds on 
I Superior and southerly shifting to north- 
erly on Michigan tonight and on Huron 
Tue.sday. Showers and probably thun- 
derstorms. 



Baltimore American: "Can you read 
the future?" she asked. 

"Yes." he replied. "There is a light 
young man who Is going to destroy 
your doniostic peace." 
Austin Transcript: Last year the Min- i "i know It!" she wailed. "It Is the 
nesota legislature passed a law prohib- gas collector." 
ititiR the r'rat'Tnities and other like or- 
ganizations in the public schools w^lth- 
jut the corust-nt of tlie principal, super- 
intendent of schools or the board. We 
aro glad to see that Minneapolis school 
authorities are enforcing this law. All 
otlier cities should do likewise. 



Crookston Times: In the engine room 
of a Chicago hotel a fly-wheel got out 
of position and broke into pieos, one of 
which crashed through the window of a 
.saloon across the street and completely 
demolished an automatic piano. At times. 
Inanimate objects .show something that 
looks like superhuman intelllgenco. 



Baltimore American: "You say this 
young friend of yours you want to get 
a position for" is of a dogged disposi- 
tion?" 
•Yes." 

"Then why not get him a job as a 
barker?" 



Once more and for 



Cleveland Leader: "I saw Mrs. Par- 
ker kissing a pug dog this morning." 

•What of it?" 

"Shocking taste. I call it." 

••Oil, I don't know. Have you seen 
Mr. Parker?^' 



... ^, a. ^f 11 ..^ J .1 r 11 • I R- E. Staaisbuger, Crov>k»ton, Minn.; M. 

ceiving less than $400 a month are allotted the following j r Brown, St. Paul; 3. A. Burke. Bos- 
furniture: I range, l double bed, 2 pillows, 2 kitchen I ^'"i ^ ^ Stemb.-rg. Chicago; S. A, 



range, . v.^ y. .,^^, - i....,.,. „, -. ^.vv,..x... , i,„,^^^,^„ y^^ paul; J. B. M.axwell. G. 

j ... . Jr., Minneapolis; J. A. Per- 

mosquito bar, i refrigerator, I double mattress, i kitchen I ^^'"^^/p^zgeJ^ui^" J^p^R^^f'^^nnS^ LUnoriqucs De Luxe 

" ' ' ■ Frenchwoman, out in St. Cloud, 



Anderson, 
chairs, 6 dining chairs, i chiffonier, 2 center tables, i , W. DuLxm 



table, I dining table, I sideboard, I dresser, i bedroom 
mat and 3 wicker rockers. 

Those getting more than $400 a month receive these 
same articles, and the following in addition: 3 dining 
chairs, l chiffonier, I towel rack, i parlor desk, 2 parlor 
chairs, I porch swing, i serving table, I dresser, i bed- 
room mat, I parlor wicker rocker, i Morris chair, i 
porch double seat. 

We learn that porterhouse steak is 23 cents, veal cut- 
lets 21 cents, pork cuts 20 cents, dressed chickens $1.40 
each, eggs 29 cents, butter 34 cents, milk 20 cents a quart 
— evidently the level that Duluth milkmen are aiming 
for, — lemons 14 cents a dozen, huckleberries 25 cents a 
quart, cucumbers 6 cents a pound, bananas 5 cents a 
dozen, etc. 

We learn, furthermore, that the national game follows 
the flag, because on .■Ktig. 27 a baseball game was played 



w. w. 



A Name In the .Sand. 

Alone I walked the ocean strand; 
A pearly shell wa.s In my hanii; 
I stooped and wrote upon the sand 
My nam-'- the year— the day. 
A.s onward from the spot I pa.s.sed. 
One lingering look behind I cast; 
A wave came rolling high and fast. 
And washed my lines away. 
And so, methought. 'twill shortly be 
With every mark on earth for nie; 
A wav^ of dark oblivion sea 
Will swsep across the plioe 
Where I have trod the san.ly .shore 
Of time, and been, to be no more. 
Of me— my day— the name I bore, 
To leave nor track nor trace. 

And yet. with Him who counts the .sands 
And holds the water.s in his hands. 
I know a lasting record stands 
Inscribed against my na:ne. 
Of all this mortal part has wroug'.it. 
Of all this thinking soul has thought. 
And from tlie.-se riveting moment.s caught 
For glory or for .shame. 

—HANNAH FLAGG GOULD. 



lis; E. J. Andrews. Minr.eapolis; -- 

Kline. Northfif-ld, Mi-.u;.; M. Baldwin, H. ' Declared she liad nothing to doud; 

A. Jones. Minneapolis; M. C. McMillan. I So to fair Fontainbeau, 

Stillwater. Minn.; H. B. Rowli^y. Minne- 1 Dit elle. I will geau. 

apolis; G. K. Shippard, Mr. and Mrs. C. To witness the French fashions noud 

T. .Spear. St. Paul; F. Wunderllch. V/i- 

nona. Minn.; A. E. Butsch. Owatonna. '80 she .said to her maid, savez vous, 

Mmn.; T. T. Coimlston. W. E. Steele, My dowdiness makes me feel blous; 

Minneapolis; A. Ee-sbait, R. J. Se<*alt, Eh, more de Ina wie. 



I must go, don't you sle. 
To look up the French fashions noua. 



R^'d Wing, Minn.; C. MaReeve. Mlnne- 
ap<jlia; E. C. Harrison, C. H. Roberts. 
Minneapolis; M. T. Molllson, Faribault, 
Minn.; G. Whitney. St. Paul; F. Maiiler. 
Milwauketj; F. L. Burnett, G. F. Or.g. 
New Y'jrk; Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Finch, 
Minneapolis; Mr, and Mrs. P. Doty. St. 
Paul; C. A. Thomas. Niles. Ohio; N. 
Niehol.sen. Austin. Minn.; C. A. Bach- 

in'^anoMs"- !"\^'GrJ!it ^C^'^f^^v'^-i^ r" '^be smiled and she bowed to les vteux. 

L. Evans. Green Bay. Wis.; P H. Feely. I A , ea.^h womaii fhe mette 
iFarrlngton, MJnn.; Mr, and Mrs J. Mar-|i„ ?Jirct5f French ^fwhionsciuite nleux. 

Ward, 3. , 



So. arrayed in a rot>e of ecru. 
Away, then, this fair lady fiu. 

Through the B-jIs de Boulogne, 
Bent on one thouglit aJogne, 
To see the French faahions so nu. 



Stillwater Gazett": uiite nujif; emu iwi ynu 
the 'steenth time, the army officers favor pj-i^ reallsti 
the restoration of the canteen. So do a 
great majority of the liberal minded peo- 
ple of the United States. 



Chicago Record-Herald; "I thought 
said you were going to make this 



Princeton Union: It has been discov- 
ered by the bureau of corporations that 
th" luinb»^r combine Is not "exactly" a 
trust. We defy the bureau to prove, 
however, that the corporation Is not an 
exacting" robber. 



are 



It is realistic. The characters 
drawn with Infinite skill and—" 

"But the millionaire who breaks th« 
laws gets dragged off to jail." 



Town Topics: Friend— Business seems 
to continue good with you. 

Street Car Magnate— Yes. most of 
our passengers continue to hang on. 



- . Llppinootfs: "Do you know who that 

R>. ('loud Journal-Press: Some or the q,^ gentlpman Is talking to our hos- 
newspapers are lamenting the fact that ^,,,37.. asked Mrs. Blunderer of the 
tlune are no Ropublicau aspiiant.s ft.-r Njj^,jy sitting beside her. 
governor of Minnesota out in the lime- 1 -That" answered the lady coldly, 'Is 
light Gl-/e 'em time. Next year there 1 ^^^ g,,^;.. 

will "probably be so many that the eor- . -Qh!" gasped Mrs. Blunderer in confu- 
porati<ms will find it easy to unite the I gj^j, "he's a good deal older than you 
dHlt>gatos on .some compromise candidate. , g^^,^, j, . , not?" 
and defeat the man whom the people ; • 



want. We trust, however, that this will 
not be the outcome '^f the next conven- 
tion Surely two threshings shouid be 
of some practical benefit to a party that 
has between fifty and a hundred thou- 
sand majority. But perhaps not. 

.\lhert Lea Time.s-Ent'^rprise: Senator 
Allison of Iowa d>^nie3 that he has come 
Jut for tariff revision. He wants the 
public to understand that he is yet a 
standpatter. He has al.so announced that 
he is a candidate for re-election to the 
senate If the people of that state pre- 
f.r him to tin' proRiessive Governor cum- 
mins, they deserve just what they get. 

Alb'^rt Lea Standard: Honest, now. 
doesn't the predicament Into which the 
country is forced by the telegraphic 
strike and blockade, suggest the evident 
advantages of government ownership? 



l»«inu»d Paragraphji. 

Chicago NiTws: It takes a deaf mute 

to express silent contempt. . ■ „.^^,^ ..^ ^^.. ^ ..^ -- — 

Money must b.- light when a man is ! .juirea with her the knowledge that he 



The Blt!:f'>rk riiil«>.'*o|»h«»r. 

A. M. Gretd' y In Big Falls Compass: A 
sh>rt tem'por shortens frieud.ship. 

The troublf with a guilty conscience 
Is often insomnia. 

Paying compliments mak'^s a per.son 
popular until he attem<*ts to pay hia 
d«'.>ts that way. 

The old serial, 'A Man to Beat John- 
son." Is running again in tiie state Ite- 
pubiican papers. 

Our idea of an "undesirable citizen" 
is one that makes a co-w pasture out of 
our front yard. 

Nothins brings remorse for a night of 
dissipation .so quickly as a properly reg- 
ulated alarm clock. 

When misfortune overtakes a man, 
Svmpathy pau.ses to .sm.>!l hia breath 
b -fore turning jn the tear faucet. 

A man with a few dollars can evade 
the law, but he must havo thousands to 
defy It and millions to ignore It. 

.The husljand who boasts that he 
keeps no secrets from his wife at least 



have a 



shall. Glens Rllyn. III.; C. B. 
Smith. Worlhmgton. Minn. 
• • • 



At the St. Louis: O. Windseth. C. Mar- 
u . it, "T /- r" •' J '«i^ •••It- w tin, O. Windseth, Ulen. Minn.; J. F Mc- 

betwcen the I. C. C. and Lmpire clubs, resulting in a | Donald, Hawley. Minn., j. McAllister B 

B. Suygart, St. Paul; E, H. Nordland, 
Brooklyn, N. Y.; W. Maunder, St. I»uis 



victory for the former by a score of 6 to o. The cosmo- 



At last, cried the dame, ventrebleu! 
There's a costume, ma foi, that will deu; 

Cecl coutume en grls 

I will copy— oh. Gis". 
For this is a French fashion neu. 



politan character of the population is indicated by the I J. H. Hogan^ Kerrick, ^Imn; srDrPat-^ 
names of the play 
Murphy, Bryan, Gambl 

We iearn that the canal workers have other sources i Nelson, 
of amusement, because we are informed that there arc 



Dressed, she 
choux. 



said to her lover, "Mon 



^ers^ McCustv Fluhartv Gazzoni 1 iV**' ^'V^ >,^'^'^r' "^iv^i^^u^' '^'^'^f **! i My cabbage.' I'm costumed for youx," 

'cia. i»it_v.,iisi>, riuiidii>, oazzoni, Alene. Idaho; L. W. Johnson, Grand !* He renlied "Pas si bete. 

Linble, Yingling, Spreckcn. SmP'^^^'t .^?"b»?M,^?'^MT' ^ounsvilie. | you ckn well imiitet 

, , 1 ., Wis.; Lieut. Pettlger, Minneapolis; C. I Tn,/h.>«t of French fashions so noux." 



Mmneapilia; W. H. Johnson, 
Fond du Lac, Wis.. E. Shadlaman. G. B. 
Garber, Minneapolis; J. Dwan. J. M 



■ The best of French fashions 



several chess, checkers, and billiard tournaments in proir- ' Krownell. Two Harbors; H-Jl^n M. Rush, 
' . , ^ , . , . . , I I>etrolt ; Eileen Forcing, \V inton. Minn. 



rcss at the Empire and Culebra clubs, and the score ;j. c. Donahue. Highland, Mr. and Mrs. 

nf a hnwW-MT rnntf-st U crivpn !J C'. Towne, Mlss Edna Gilmore. F. W. 

Ot a Dowliag contest is given. Walk.:^r. Two Harbors. W. Pnvjt, Eveleth; 

We learn that tropical diseases have been pretty well '-J- ^'- L"-''^"'«v^'i\'^^.' M'"" : ^I^. and Mrs. 

,, , , ' , , 1 • T t , U- Fourpaugh. Hibbing; H. E. Harrold- 

controUed, because out of 357 deaths in July only 54 son, Carlton. Minn.; J. F. Snodgraas. 

U.ITO Hue to Ufri herl Hvcentprv- anH malaria I Cleveland; P. Flannigan, Sagola, Mich.; 

were due to Den-Den, dysenter> and malaria. kj p, walker. Fargo; M. T. 0-«;onnell. 

We learn further that the total value of supplies re- Portland. Or.; c. H. McDonough. Eve- 
j » *u J . t ^ur ,. K *t. J- • f . 'leth; W. W. Potter, Chippewa Falls; J. 

ceived to the date of the report by the division of mate- Wirkus. Minto, N. D. 

rial and supplies aggregated $9,500,000, and that 90 p^r ^^ ^^^ ^^^^^;. ^»J p^,^,^^ ^^^ 

cent of the lot was bought in the United States. Claire. Wis.; C. D. Kolly, W. S. Cox, 

The Canal Record will be read with interest in this j JJSjl'^vv e"!^ R^'vtn^'Mr.'T.f ^^ r 

country, and since it seems to "fill a long-felt want" it;E 

is likely that it has "come to stay. 



will not be bothered, being free, with the annoying "de '^ ^ '^^^'^' ^^^^^^''^- M''^" ■• ''• ^ ^^>^- 



THE POOR CONSUMER. 

Long Prairie Lead-^r: Whit our country needs 
now id ;i statesman in power with the interests of the 
consuni.T at heart. Th-- producers of the raw mate- 
rials and the manufacturers of the finished products 
have liad thi- solii itude of tiie leaders long enoush 
Give the fellow who haa been paying the bills a 
chance now. 

This expresses what a great many people have been 
feeling very strongly in recent years. The btisiness of 
encouraging the producers and the manufacturers has 
been rather overdone, and the process has been very 
costly to the poor consumer, who does not appear to 
have had very many friends at court. 

Yet the consumer has a vote, and there arc a great 
many of him. Why is it that he has not been successful 
in induciirg the statesmen and politicians to take up his 
cause? Perhaps it is because he has not yet arrived at 
the state of "class consciousness" that sociologists talk 
about, but recent currents of economical events have I ^cth ways: the more we care for ourselves the less we 
tended very strongly to give him that "class conscioiis- care for others, 
ness," and it would not be very surprising to presently 
find quite a crowd of statesmen or would-be statesmen 
throngtr.g the forums and declaring their earnest advo- 
cacy of the consumer's cause. 

Yet while the consumer has been getting a good deal 



Th-n they waltz^Hi to the lovely froufrou 
oi" the gray gown that fluttered and flou; 

I And he sv.oie. "Careblieux, 

1 Tres ravlssante lous, 

I Arrayed in the French fashion npu. 

I —New \ork Mall. 



shy of loose change. 

Why should a tax collector 
high opinion of human nature. 

Necessity is the mother of several 
other children besides Invention. 

The lf>ss vou know about people the 
longer vou "will i-'Hain their friendship. 

Wise is the man who expects the un- 
expected to happen and Is prepared 
for it. 

Its high finance if you 
highway robbery if the 

^When a woman declares that she Is 
homely she doesn't expect 
belipve sne believes It. 

While the average man 
his sins will find him 
later, he is willing to 

^That air castle which a girl builds 
during her courtship is almost sure to 
collapse shortly after she faces the 
parso^n w ith the man of her c hoice. 

Prosperity and tJie New York Bond 
I.ssiie. 

Chicago Record- Herald: When a $40.- 
m m bond issue Is more than four times 
oversubscribed it is not easy to draw 
a Ions face and whine of hard times and 
ruin New York's experience with Us 
is.sue has several lessons for the 



a liar. 

LaFollette .says graft exists every- 
where. It must have sn.*jik'd Viack to 
'VLsconsln after Bob Jumped the gover- 
nor iob. 

When we hear a man claim that he is 
self-made man we are glad that he haa 
hatched enough honesty to shoulder the 
blame. 



win, but it's 
other fellow 



a man to 



realizes that 
out sooner or 
bet that they 



fChieago Conservatory. 

Es««bn«h*d !■••. Wailon Psrhlaa, Pr»a. 

OMest ttU'l best school for th-irou^h lunching ol 

MUSIC AND DRAMATIC ART 

This sihix)! always mainiiiitis th.- highest stand, 
ards of artistio eicellerice— employ only I>e3t and 
moHt cnpable instnictora Gra<)uat<>d are well 
egaippea in every 98<«ential minir'^ni>»nt of Maolo 
ani Dnimiitic Art. 8»'nd for interesting catalog. 
S»e«nd Floor, Auditorium Building, Chlcogo, lU. 



AMUSEMEXTS, 



big 



Reflections of a Bachelor. 

New York Pr.-ss: If a girl's father 
doesn't trust you it's a s'g" «»!« does wh.ners 

Women on the st^age seem to-be awful T^^.^f^^", ^'^fat the Interest was not I 
"ff^'ili^eTv^a.^.^ min'f'^shfp 'were to ^''e^^.uTh' to be temp^ting in oompari- 1 
£\e%r!^ -"" ^^^'^ ^"°^ °" '""'l^ -Sst^H^ll ^^-rT?ief ^aT p^r^seS^-p^d 

she were an heiress. . 1 est is high enough. 

A man thinks he is economizing I If the country w< ...,„„„„,. 
himself down from tive hard time.s. as distinguished from a p-Br- . 



were actually enduring : 



d';;;;. Mir.r,.,jnoii«i- f w RirH Vir- i when he cuts himself down rrom nve ^ara time.-. — _ _ 
.wood W H.'TatS'r.' MinneapS'ls;' F^' j! 1 10- ' nt cigars a day to four at two for i.,d of stringency in the money market 
particularly as it I Hubbard. B. Groebnir.^ N.'w Ulm. Minn. ; a quarter 



linquent subscribers" which every other weekly editor 
has to contend with. 



The Big Falls Compass says: "The less we care for 
others, the more we must care for ourselves." It works 



iell Barnum. Minn.; H. L. Wilson, Minne- 
apolis; J. A. Hawkins. Hibbing; R. B. 
Smith. Scanlon. Minn.; J. S. Shannon, 
Ely H. R. Drew, Minneapolis; A. C. Dun- 
nin.s, .A.shland. Wis.; L. E, Roseth. Aus- 
tin Minn.; Mr.-s. L. R Dresden. Miss 

, Craig Miss Ostman, O A. Wood. B. T. 

I Goldman. St. Paul; Miss Juin. Two Har- 
bors- R. J. Willculs, Holyok!\ Minn.; J. 
W King Seattle. Wash.; L. Barton, fc. 
C Neale. Minneapolis; F. D. Zimmerman, 
Fargo. N. D. ; F.^ J- Bllven, Crookston, 
Minn." 



would not have 



"How can we get good official service?" asks the New 
York World. One way is to turn out the professional 
politicians and put in good, plain citizens, and then let 
the people keep*a close watch upon their doings. 



The Mean Thing. 

Human Life: The clubwoman, putting 
down her glass, giggled. 

"You know my ihuBband 3 birthday is 
next week." she said, "and I—" 

Laughter overcame Her for a moment. 



the present bond ^ Issue 

— been bo eagerly snapped at. j 

iriM>trieUv vs Drucs. If. on the other hand, there was m the 

Electricity vs. wrugs. countr>- at large a r-^ally deep-seated and 

New York Press: Reports from France ^jblding fear of the results that w-';re I 
are to the effect that electricity may sup- to flow from the policy of the federal; 
, I A,;,cr f„ th* cinaritv of an anaes- government against law-breaking corpor- 1 
flStlc WhVt^s clllTel^ctro-na"^^^^^ then that «^'*7 ,^22n J^fho ' 

v.. mc' developed by Prof. Leduc of Nan- would have be^n as eager y ^^en as the , 
tes whtch is said to produce complete present issue, for U was Just as safe as • 
i^sbnl^b my without any*^ injurious results the present issue. a"J '^,/fjy ^^Tn'^^''^^ 
whatever He h;is conducted expert- ! safety would have made It tempting as j 
ments sufficient to demonstrate its val- ! an Investment at any price In contrast 
u,- A current of fp^m six to eight volts ( with the .suspected stocks, 
wmpletely deadens the brain oi a rab- We have proof of ^^ree things m this 
bft^and thi« suspension of Its function New York ««P«':'«'V^«- ^"^he%econd Is ' 
f^in be extond<jd indefinitely wKhout dan- country is not hard up. The seconn is 
Zir in the case of the human, where .that tt is not frightened at the future 
ft' has .^eJ'tr^r the parts resume tiheir of the railroads f"<»j,^"«»^^^^'|i^J,'^Xee; 
normal sensationa Immediately upon cut- 1 tions. The third Is that the wan street 



LYCEUM J TOWIGHT 

Also Tnesdny Rvenloir and Wrdoe*- 
day .Matinee and Kvenlnj?. 

KACK-L£0?<eE PLAYERS 

In W Il.LAHD M.\fK*S 

"SA6E BRUSH" 

A Storr ot Wyoinin». 
Nlfflits — UH\ Z^o and SO**; Matinee 
WedneM«lny— lOc and 25c. 
SeatH now ready for "In Old Ken- 
tucky," Sept. 10 to 21, witii *$aturday 
Matinee. Price* — 25e to »H»0. 



ting off the current, and no after effects alarmlsta 
are noticeable. | things." 



have merely been "seeing 



METROPOLITAM 

**THE HOUSE OF IHIRTH." 

Tonlffbt and .\U Tfala Week, in the 
Beat BnrleMine Siiow Von Ever Saw, 

THE ROLLICKERS 

NOTBi This ia a 92 attraction, play- 
Ins at the Met'a popnlar prices. 
BAKGAIN MATINEE TOMORROW. 

Wext Week — "THE JOLLY OIULS." 



I'! 



J 



i 




' r '« 



h 



.y 





THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: -MONDAY, SEPTEMBER le, 1007. 




came to the restaurant to persuade her to 
return hom«. She told Dahl she only 
wanted her clothes and he at once at- 
tacked her. 

Dahl was held In the sum of $500 for 
trial in the district court. He furnished 
i the bond. 



LIVED NEARLY 
HUNDRED YEARS 



Mrs. Lasley. 
Buried at 



Aged 96, 
Lasley 



Point, Wis. 



consin, if not in the Weat, being in 
her 96th year. She was one of the 
pioneer ^settlers of this section. A fall 
resulting in the fracture of the hip 
was the primary cause of her death. 
Two sons survive — Henry, of Muskegon. 
Mich., and Peter, of Laaley's Point. 



CHURCH IS 
DEDICATED 

First English Speaking 
Methodist Church in 
Braham, Isanti County. 

Presiding Elder Clemans 
of Duluth District Con- 
ducts Services Sunday. 

Braham. Minn., Sept. 16.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— With ceremony in keep- 
ing with the event the First Methodist 
j-plscopai church of this place waa de- 
dicated yesterday. There were three 
cervices. Ac the morning service, the 
Bev Justus Parish preached; in the 
afternoon, the presiding elder of the 
Duluth district. Rev. E. C. Clemans, D. 
D preached, as he did at the evening 
Bervice. At the evening service the 
Church was dedicated by the presldmg 
€lder. assi-sted by the pastor, the Rev. 
C P Keast. The Indebtedness of the 
church was practically rai.sed during 
the Jay. Splendid music was furnish- 
ed by Mrs. Anna Lindmark, organist, 
the Misse.s Mabel and Lenore Olson 
and Messrs. J. H. Johnson. Walter 
Pears.jn. F. R, Barnes and Alfred We- 
bert. Th..' services were well attended 
and the citizens of Braham are pleased 
■With theis church in their midst. The 
proi5poct3 for the future of the church 
are good in Braham. one of the most 
proiiii.s'.ng towns in Isanto county, on 
the Grreat Northern railroad, between 
Minneapolis and Dulutit. 

The church is a frame building, the 
main part 24 by 36. with a lecture room 
12 by ItJ. osting when new, about 
Jl 2'30. The c.iurch was originally built 
by the Swedish Methodist Episcopal 
people of Braham and vicinity, but 
owing to the moving away of many of 
the Swedish ^n.embers. their jv^rk was ^^^^^^^ ^^ ^^^^ ^^^^^^^ ^^ ^^^^^^^ ^.^ 

saloon open on Sunday. The charge 



CRUSHING PLANT 
AT LAKE LINDEN 

Big C. & H. Mill Is Near- 
ly Ready for Its 
Machinery. 

Wlnneconne, Wis., Sept. 16.— (Special Calumet. Mich.. .Sept. 16.— (Special to 
to The Herald.)— The funeral of the j^^ie Herald.)— Rapid strides have been 
late Mrs. Louise Lasley of Lasley's ' made in the structural work at the C. 
Point, near this village, who died Fri- 1 ^ jj mills at Lake Linden, and a 
day was held this morning from the | portion of the contracts have already 
Poygun Catholic church. Mrs. Lasley . been completed. The large recrush- 
was one of the oldest women In Wis- i Ing plant is rapidly nearing comple- 



WHEAT PROFITS 
BIGTHIS YEAR 

North Dakota Farmer 

Assured Large Return 

on His Crop. 

Fargo, N. D., Sept. 16.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— With the total wheat es- 
timate for the country about 120.000,000 
bushels less than last year and a good 
general yield In North Dakota, though 
not as large as last year, the farmers 
of the state have good reason to feel 
elated over the outlook. 

The thresher is demonstrating the 



HORSES FOR DULUTH. 

Montana Man Coming This Way With 
Carload of Animals. 

Grand Forks, N. D.. Sept. 16.— (Special 
to The Herald).— O. P. Collins, formerly 
In business In Grand Forks, with Leslie 
Stinson. was here yesterday enroute from 
hLs Ridelawn. Mont., ranch with a car 
of fine horses which he is shipping to 
Duluth. Mr. Collins has several hun- 
dred horses on his ranch, which are 
worth som*" money at present prices, and 
he is handling some for other parties 
also. He unloaded the horses at Crooka- 
ton for a twenty-four hour rest. 



ON MURDER CHARGE. 



tion, and little over two weeks remain 

before the mill will be rf ^.^y *^<^ Jf ' me mresntr is ac.»..,.straLiii8 tii« 
ceive the machinery^ The Du»^'^>n« ^_fs q^^my ^^.^.j ^j,e quantity of the wheat 

Especially Is this 

The yield In the 

aggregate will not be as large as last 



erected in 
not one 
course of 



and 



1 a systematic in^nner ana , ^^ ^^^ ^^^^^ 

accident occured during the j ^^^^ .^ ^^^ ^,^j,^y 



construction 



The 



same 



thing may be said concerning the erec- j y^^^j. ^^^ ^^e quality is said to be the 

and considering j 

I 



tion of the two mammoth_ stacks, which ij^^g^ In years. This together with the 



explosion. 

, .^ _.„...,.. ... „ „ two hours before making their escape 

are 200 feet in height, and considering i j^^^. ^^^ ^^^ wheat in several sea- with the booty. Absolutely no clew has 
everything, the concern was quite tor- ^^^_^ nieans milions of dollars into beon obtained and the authorities are 
tunate in the construction. ^j^^ hands of the farmers and business I '^o'"*''"* In the_ dark. 



BOLD BANK ROBBERY. 

Several Highwaymen Hold Up Town in 
Approved Bandit Style. 

Ferney, S. D., Sept. 16.— One of the 
boldest bank robberies In ttiis section 
of South Dakota was pulled off early 
Saturday when the Free State bank was 

cracked for $2,000. 

At least six men were in the gang, 
who finding three men in a blacksmith 
shop, warned them not to move, and 
then visited three or four houses where 
lights were burning and commanded 
the occupants to extinguish the lights 
and remain Indoors. 

By this time the greatest excitement 
prevailed and a few minutes later the 
people were terrorized by hearing the 
The bandits worked nearly 



The recrushlng plant Is also a large 
structure, the dimensions of which are 



Charles Ryan Arrested, Accused of KiH . .^ ,, ^,^^ ,,„,._ ^, .„„ ........... .... 

in^ Walter Ecclcston Near Tomahawk i^*^ ^^ y^t ^*?^,^"'^ ^'^n®^'J^ h^^^ln' p^ont on a smaii yteid is larger 'than 

mg Ifdlicr CtUOlUil liwr IVUIdlUtWA. , porty-elght Chilean mills will be in- ■. ^^^ ^^^ ^^^j^g ^j, p^^^ y^^rs. However. 



, ^ -nr.iu , .. .^ ■ This is the fourth bank robbery in 

men of the state. W 1th wheat at near- , ^j^j^ vicinity In the past few weeks, 
ly $1 per bushel at the elevators, the | Every town In this and neighboring 

counties is on tuo lookout. 



twice that number 



Tomahawk. Wis.. S*ipt. 16.— (.Special i stalled and about 
. mv. TLi n . .-.u I TT. o u ! of Wilfley tables, necessl 

to The Herald.)-<:harle3 E. Ryan has . pj^y^^nt of an addl 
been arrested on a warrant charging him ' pioyes. A twenty-five ton crane will 
with the murder of Walter Eccleston, I be placed in position in the plant, and 

who was killed by _ „ „ . , 

Tuesday at the Ryan homestead, seven i nioved. 
miles west of this city. This action ! 



the yield is not .so small as to equalize 



cessitatlng the em- ^^^^^^ ^,,;j^ ^^j,^^ -^^^^ ^pj^^ ; , riAfc^riTAQIN RDIFP 

tlonal force of ent- i ^^j.^g»;^ are receiving more for their DAK01A5 IN OKlt-T 




Stewart 

Heaters 



''Always 
the 
'Best 



was taken by District Attorney R. B. 
Smith, after the coroner's jury had re- 
turned its verdict. Ri'an will be given 
a preliminary hearing on Sept. 20. In 
the meantime he will be prisoner at the 
county jail In Merrill. 



a ifunshof wound I *" this manner, all machinery will be 
a gun:,not wouna | ^^^^ ,^^.^ ^^^^^ ^..j, ^^ operated 

by electricity, and a permanent fixture, 
.50 should additional machinery be In- 
stalled, It will be done with this crane. 



TEST LIQUOR LAW. 




I 



PENINSULA BRIEFS 



grain this year in the aggregate than ^ 
last year. More farmers are holding : 
their grain than in past seasons and 
they will c<jntinue to hold It. thus 
tending to keep prices at a reasonable 
figure for them. 

TO FORM LEAGUE. 



Case of Widespread interest to be Tried 
at Chippewa Fails. 

Chippe\\a Fall.s, Wi3., Sept. 16.— A i 
of state wide interest will be i 



Calunwt— Michael P. Shtiehan of the 
Hecla location died Friday. Mr. Sheehan 
was one of the j!d rf'sidynts of the Copper 
country, having come here forty-two 

vars ago when he enter-^ the employ .. ^ ....,, . 

of 'h^ Calumet & Hecla Mining company. I made by several of the high schools in 



Athletic and Literary May be Organized 
in North Dakota. 

Jamestown. X. D., Sept. 16.— (Special 
to The Herald.)— Efforts are being 



this state to form an athletic and 
literary league. It is stated that as yet 



case 



H-* was born sixty-eight years ago m 
Ireland and came to this country as a 
youtli. - - 

Calum-'t— After a vory .successful season, nothing definite had been done except 
, ,_ ■ , . w . » Tobm's harbor, th.» popular I-i!'? Royaje ^ jjj^^ ^m ^hat scho«)ls would be 

tried in the municipal court here sept. | summer re.sort. has clo.sed. The place Is ^.mi^g ^^ join this sort of 'a league. 
2ii. when John Gallus of Cadott is ar- ; owned, by Calumet _ peopld._ aii^d ^thoy^are , ^^^ ^^ ^^^ eight have expressed a de- 
sire to enter. They are Fargo, Coopers- 
Hancock-John DriscoU. a former r'-si- ] town. Valley City. Tower City, Ender- 
againdt Galius i.s not that ho sold any ' (j .at of Hancock, but who l^ft for the lin and Oakes 
liquor on this day. but merely that the : \Ve.-Jt a number jjf y^ars aso. 'li''<i *t ^a't : -phe purpose 
door of his saloon was open. A-' '' 



passed upon this question. Sai 
have been tried for keeping op 



given up. The first services of the "^""f" r"_ ^".1 "i'.^.*,'..."' ^.r.*""? .:".^ ln« 'he .summer. 
Engli.sh .speaking M-jthodists were con- 
ducted by the Rev. J. J. Parish, now 
pastor of the Methodist Episcopal 
church in Pine City. Rev. Justus 
Pari.sh. now of Deerwood. Minn., com- 
menced holding regular services four I 
years Ago, using the Swedish church. 
In October. li*<W. the Rev. Charles P. 1 
Keast was appointed to the cliarge and ' 
began immediately to plan for pur 
chasii;g the church. Subscriptions 
wer^i made by tha citizens of Braham 
and the board of home mi-ssions and 
church exten.^ion of the Methodist 
Episcopal church gave a donation of 
$2.j«). The money being raised, n.*go- 
tiatlons were opened with Rev. Jonn A 
"W^agner, presiding alder of the Swedish 
Methodist Episcopal church, who had 
charge of the church at Braham, and 
the building was purchased. Great 
credit is due to the Rev. C. P. Keast 
and to the trustees of the church, John 
Monson. L. L. Hills. W. F. Way. F. R. 
Barnes and C. A. P<-terson. The trus 



of this league is to 



ar IS I-ake Tu •'^day. The rf^nmlns. accompani-^d pj,omot*^ athletics and at the same time 
.<«i v>^' hy Jitnes and J-^rry Prl.>*coll, broth.»rs of : . .- standard of scholarshlD 

oor rne'n \ t/- deceased, will be brought to Hancock l^^^^^l^'.t f.^^^J ,^ ,, 

ieii their j ''nought. m-H -rman Gundlach of Hough- i work. In this manner it is 



Grand Forks, N. U.— The Grand Forks 
park board has made the levy for the 
ensuing year, amounting to a total of 
JS.aw. Part of this is for the purpose 
of paying interest on outstanding indebt- 
edness, and the balance Is for the cur- 
rent expenses of the year. 

Minot. N. D.— E. D. Henry, assistant 
engineer for the Minot division of the 
Great Northern, will in future have his 
heAdquartera at WiUiston. Ed Nolan, 
who has worked east of Minot oi\ thJ 
cast end. will be located at Minot. The 
work at WUliston is very important and 
has reached a stage where it needs aji 
engineer on the ground all the time. 

Arvilla. N. D.— State's Attorney Wine- 
man has ordered the Great Northern rail- 
way to open a highway at the gravel 
pit near here, and ke»>p it open. Re- 
cently farmers compialne>d to the state's 
attorney that they were obliged to travel 
out of their road in order to reacli town. 
Th«» company will undoubtedly have the 
road fixed up at once. 

E>evil.s Lake. N. D.— Messrs. Pope and 
HUl ,who have been making an Inves- 
tigation of the waters of Devils lake to 
ascertain if flsh live there, have left for 
their home in Washington, D. C. They 
stated that they would not be able to 
make a report on what they have found 



th-> athletic for some time a.s they will have to make 

no^i-aaarv ^.n official report to the department be- 

, ighton-H-rman Gundlach of Hougn- i worn., i" <■■''» i»^"— ' - '" "„ IttL^. fere it is made public. 

places and selling litiuor. however, but i ^^n, who s-ifEored painful Injuri-^.s by for a fotball player, or any otner pargo, N. D.— There is every indication 

^ , whether they are liable for only keep- having hi.s leg cru.^h^'d in the machinery athlete to keep up in his studies In ♦jjat^ ^^^^ headquarters of the Dakota dl- 

I ing their doors open when they did not 'of his <?a.sollne launch several we.^k3 ago. ; order that he may continue to play in vision of the North.^rn Paoiflo will re- 

" sell any liquor is the interesting ques- has sufficiently recovered to be able to be • ^^ league team. The promoters are main permanently in Fargo without be- 

tion which Judge Jenkins will have to I out a^ain. T»rk«nn dK-d ' confident that this measure will be ing tran.sferred to D^lworth and that 

J :i. _. ► -jR Houghton— Mrs. Maria Jackson ai--'a , . ., ^ ovneot.< that several other ^'' ^he rt-st of the forces tor the Dll- 

^ Saturday at the age of 104 year.-^, th<^ old- adopted and ^^^^^^^.^J'^^.^^^^l^l, *".,"„ worth headquarters. exceT>t engine<«rs, 

est inhabitant of the upper penin.sula of i high sc.;ools o\ er the state win jom. n^^^^^^^ conductors and brakemen, will 

Michi-an. The plan has been tried In Minne- 

««7irr>^/-^xiOTKi IM DDICC < E.scanaba-A party of 100 men arc gjta and It worked splen iidly. 

WISCOlNolIN IIN OKllLr ^^archmi? the dl.^trict .south of this city| 

in an »fforr to and Pfit»>r Semer, who has ( ■■T-r'rinr« r" * I I Cn 

been l.>st since Tuesday. The district U Irlttllnlij LALLtil. 



decide Sept. 




UsUkusti— inquiry in ims ciiy among i ^^o^^red by a den.s>> forest and little hope 
former residents oi the village of Omro , ig entertained of finding the man alive. 



Houghton— William H. Thomas, for the 
past quarter of a century a rejiident of 



fails to reveal the identity of the wife of 

John J. GLstav^j Burghoffer of Chicago, a 

curio dealer who was found dead m his j Jlough'ton died suddenly Friday. Mr. 

shop last Tuesday. The fact is estab- | Thomas was born in Cornwall. Eng., In 

llslied, however, iliat Burbhofter fornit-rly ; ih:19. VVhon 33 years of age. or In H72. 
^ _ _ __ lived i Umro, cor.duclm^ some kind of a j Mr. Thoma.^ came to this country, locat- 

teosiidve faithfully pushed the enter- I store thnrp!. and tliat he luarruid an Omro hng In L'.\ns>^. wher-^ he remained for 
T>ria.:> t.^ A .successful conclusloH. The i woman many years ago. I about tfn years and then came to Hough- 

^ „^ f n";. KMii.iin? fflvaq fh-i citv I Manitow«c— The Wisconsin Pea Canning ] ton. residing here continuously Since that 

securing of V;^%, ''^^'^J,2h .,,\i;vin^ ' company, which now owns the Landrath ' — "- 
of Braham its first English .•,peaklng , i f- ^ j Vandruell plant at 



Executive Committee of North Dakota 
Baptists to Hold Meetings. 

Fargo, N. D., Sept. 16.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— The executive commit- 



also remain In this city. 



DEAD IN WOODS. 



Otis Lymo of Itasca. Michigan. Found 
Near East Grand Forks. 

East Grand Forks, Minn., Sept. 16.— 
(Special to The Herald.)— While roving 
about in the woods along the bank of 
the Red river near here Saturday, 



church. 



MINNESOTA IN BRIEF 



BIG MARKET DAY. 



1 Two Rivers, has declared a dividend of 
10 per cent on all stock, payable Oct. 1. 

JanesviUe— The attendance at the state 
school for the blind near here is but 

s n -.nty-iive this year, a smaller number 

than usual. | ...... 

, Ai.hiand-Aii departments at Northiind jjotajjig Event Planned by Tradesmen 

\noka— A corn and potato carnival will j college and acud-my will open Wvdnes- 
b* held h-r*' "Thunsday Friday and Satur- | day at 9 a. m. Students from .»ut of town 



tee of the North Dakota Baptist state 

convention board has been appointed j Edgar Wilson and the two Stearns boys 

time. , ,, T» . . T-. 1 it. I V. T=. , \i,r..^T, r'r.^i.iir ->f ^are^n »pn- came across the dead body of a man 

Hancock — J. H. Harrison of Duluth I by Rev. Myron Cooley or r argo, gen . 

Is transacting husine.ss in this city. 



pral missionary, to meet In the study (that subsequent Investigation shown In 
at the First Baptist church here, Tues- letters found on his person by the cor 




of Red Lake Fails. 

Red Lake Fall.s. Minn.. S'-pt. 



16.— 



day Sept. 24. The committee is com 
posed of the following ministers and 
laymen: Rev. Herbert Tilden and R 
L. Carlton of Fargo; Rev. C 
lams, Ellendale; Rev. L. M 
Bottineau; Rev. F. E. R. 
R. B. Griffith. Grand Forks 



C. Will- 



oner proved the dead was Otis Lymo of 
Itasca. Ml'h. The coroner decided an 
inquest was not necessary. 

The last of the letters in the posses- 
sion of the dead man from home was 
Waterman, j written In 1^!W. and was addressed to 
Miller and him at Omemee, where he had evidently 
Tn a.^.^i- beeri working at that time. Ho had 
in aaui i ^^^^ ^^^^ f,^^. gg^.^jral days 




and was 



tlon to these, Rev. O. A. \MUiams. '-'seen with s.^veral other men drinking 



(Special to The Herald.) — Prelim- i j)_ ^j Minneapolis, and Rev. Myron j together on Friday evening. Three sll 



was insiaiuiy kilUd in the railro.id yards | ton. Wish., where he holds an Import 
here in counl-ng .somf cars. His foot ( ant posr.ion with the Northwestern Lum^ 



inary arrangements have been made ' Cooley of this city will be present. The 
for a big celebration and market day , committee will consider applloatlons 
' ^ r , T^ ,, -nr .a j for aid from Baptist mission fields in 

at Red Lake Falls on Wednesday, . '..,„. ^ DaJtota and ratify the calling 
Sept. 25. and from the outlook It will ; ^-^'J^-^^^^J^^f ?^^;,.JJ^ fields. 



caukht" throwiiVg him to the ground, and i ber "company of that place. j be on a larger scale than any like ^ 

the switcli engine pas:*<:>d ov.^r him, Pond dii LkIc— .Managt-r C. R. Baker of | event ever before attempted in North- 



cru.'hlug the body almost beyond recog 
nUion. He was married but had no 
children 



the Hotel En.'ing. 
smooth individual 



Is in search of j+jern Minnesota. 

who contract-'d at The merchants of th<? city plan on 
board bill of iHH 3«ime weeks ago and 



_^ „ . , ,i,»„, r . — .1 . • . - .making this a unique event, sort of a 

Mountain L-ike-The9-y^ir-old laugh er, left without maKing any announcement ; ^ ^,, ^j^^t promises to be a 

of Axel Siork. a farmer living ^lghtmWe.l.oncern.ng .^'^.^^^''^[^'^^^•q "^/^^'j^^'-^j} ) prosner^ fall to the people of this 



HE WOULDN'T TELL. 



from thL-^ village, was cremated in a fire t at the hotel Aug. _., ^^ ^. .... ».j„^. „.. , ^, ... . . , .. .i,, j' 

that burned th- Stork home. F-)ur chil- i Cincinnati and was accompanied by his , section of the state, and to this end 

dren who w*re ale.'ping in the second . wife. will see that there is nothing left un- ^ 

Biory were re.soued with the aid of lad- | Kaukauna— Andrew C. Black, aged S3 ! done that will make the day one iQ^ng _, Herald) About three months 

' "■ "~ ■ ' .,««.- .g jjp^j fj.,j,„ j^ig infirnuties. Mr. j to be remembered. ^"® nci» ./ oo^ir/- 



Suspect in a Tar and Feather Party 
Keeps Mam. 

Fargo, N. D.. Sept. 16. — (Special to 



ders. Th • origin of the fire has not been 
astc-rtaiu-d. 

St Piiui— The James A. Noweli com- 
pany lut.s ftled articles of incorporatio»i, 
with all authorized capital stock of $30,000. 
The company i.s organized for conducting 
a gener.^l insuranct- buslne-ss. and the In- 
corp.>r itrjrs are as follows; James A. 
Nowell, R. M. Smith, Clart^nte A. Storms, 
H. O. Hunt and FUzhugh B'jrn.^. 

Bagl -y- Th^ D -imer & Pepper Elevator 
conipanv ha.s !►■ is.d the Ba-^l^y flour mill 
from H. H. Kk;land for one year, with 
an option to buy. They w;ll continue to 
run the tr.ill under the m.anagement of A. 
Mollne, the miller who has b^en employed 
as such fjr several years. 

Brainerd— Division No. 1 of Crow Wing 
counr^-. AncU'nt Order of Hibernians, 
•will hold a banquet at the Ransford ho- 
tel on the severing of Monday. Sept. 23. 
In commemoration of the execution of 
the Iri.<h piriot, Robert Emmett. whose 
martyrdom to tlie cAuse of Irish liberty 
occurred .Sept. 23, ia03. 

Red I..akt> Falls— The October term of 
the Re.i L,ake county district court will 
be held In this*. cUy dunllK the last week 
In Oc.ober. the session to start on the 
28th inst. 

Sauk R.ipids— The Sauk R.apids public 
schools so fir have an tiirollment of 310 
pupils. Thi.-? 13 unusually large for this 
time of the year. A large number of 
tho.se who attend iho sch.»l during the 
winter have not yet returned and wh'-n 



years 

Bhick was a pioneer in Kaukauna, first 

com 

a pa 

pos 



The work of arranging the regular ago Roy Mattson. Northern 



Pacific 

D.. 

auditor of 

nrizps Offeree rrorr. i the company, was tarred and feath- 

prizes Offered n on. unknown parties on account. 

every business house in the city, a ^rea OV u , arrogant and 

ments'^T^I-and coTe f bf thTRe'd unaccommodating methoda Since that 
LakTFall.s*'ba"nd and o her"^ thmg.f'to time Northern Pacitic detectives have 



There will be 



ling here in 1H46. when he purchased I progj-am has not been completed, but 1 station agent at Leonard, N 

!n? hfs Stair^ow.'lfllout i^ ^'frf^. ' ^'^['y ^^.^^ ^f "^^ '.^"'« ,^"'^ programs | ^ j,., j, ^ son of a traveling audit 

VJ^ ^^ 'ff.^'^f ^V".^ ^"^' 2?arti^culars. | ^^^ company, was tarred and 1 

LODMAN DID NOT 
ENJOY FREEDOM 



make the day pleasant and profitable. 
A new feature will be a big auction 
sale, so that the farmers may bring 



labored on the case In an effort to 



ver dollars were found under him 
where they had apparently fallen from 
his pockets and his hat was some littlo 
distance aw.ay. It was surmised at first 
that he might have been doped with 
knockout drops, but there was no evi- 
dence of this and death was perhaps 
due to chronl(" alcoholism. 



A Glorious heater, symmetrical and pleasing to 
the eye, of generous proportions and elaborate 
ornamentation. Has duplex grate, scientific- 
ally constructed fire box that means a big saving 
to you. Highly nickeled and all nickeled parts 
easily removed. They're the best that honest, brainy 
stove men who have been in the business seventy- 
five years can make. None better, none so good — 
they're your kind. We give a written guarantee, 
backed by Fuller-Warren Co., that the Stewart 
Heater will give a fourth more heat with a fourth 
less fuel than any other make. 

Remember we take your old stove as part pay- 
ment and we can arrange terms at $1.00 per week. 

f.$. Kelly furniture €o. 

Kelly's For Qood Furniture— 226-28 W. Superior St. 




DENTISTS HAVE MEETING. 

Red River Dental Society Holds Annual 
Session at Crookston. 

Crookston, Minn., Sept. 1*3.— (Special to 
The Herald).— The annual meeting of the 
Red River Valley Dental society came 
to a close here Saturday evening with 
the election of officers for the ensuing 
year, as follows: Dr. Thomas Spence, 
Crookston, president; Dr. W. H. Whlt- 
comb. Grand Forks, N. D., vice president; 
Dr. F. M W(r11s, Grand Forks, N. D.. 
secretary and Dr. C. L. Tompkins, Grand 
Forks, N. D., treasurer. The meeting 



Sent From St. Louis 

County, Rearrested at 

Prison Doors. 

Stillwater. Minn., Sept 16. — (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — As he left the 



saie, so mat me rarmers may nring > t ^^ ....^ ,..0 • arroatAd taken shown in 

whatever they want to town and havi mer near Leonard ^'^;'.^"«jfj^^- ^^'[^'^ , a large r 
it sold fre^ of cost. toCasselton and P"' through the ; j q_ ^.^ 



BAR PLANS BANQUET. 

United States Senator, Congressman and 
Two Judges to be Guests. 

Bemidjl. Minn.. St-pt. IJ.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— The Beltrami County Bar 



state prison upon his discharge after a.ssociation has decided to give a banquet 
doing time for one crime, William 1 '" honor of Senator Mos^s E. Clapp, 
L'»dman was promptly arrested on- an- 1 Congre.ssman Halvor Sfeenerson and 
(ifh«»r f-hiriri fin.i ar>r>tf.ir« to h.» a vf>rv ' Judgos Mc«-ltnahan and Sp-joner, during 
K„ .^r. ^. .?If^ "-* f ^P " ^° ^ ^ i the ,oming .-ounty fair. Sept. 26 to 28. 



locate the guilty parties, and on j was one of the most successful that has 
Thiirsdav Clvde Peters a young far- I b^-en held In the valley. The enthusiasm 
P"'^!**?^T JL.f..f ,'oV«rro«t^,i taken I shown throughout was contributed to in 

measure by the presence of Dr. 
, J u. v^. ..ells of Minneapolis, who gave a 
sweating process. He was promisea j clinic of an unusually Interesting char- 
immunity if he would tell the names , acler. The next annual meeting will be 
of the men implicated in the tarring, I held at Grand Forks, N. D. 
but he stoutly held to his statement I 

that he knew nothing as to who < 

formed the party. He was then 
br>>ught to Fargo before Judge Miller, 
who placed Peters under bone's and 
set the hearing for Sept. 24. The peo- 
ple of Leonard are greatly excited over 
the arrest. 



THE HEALER 



RED RIVER VERY LOW. 



badly wanted man. 

He was received at the prison Sept. 



The following commltte'^ was appointed 



thi-v d> 11 is beli^n-ed that the enroU 

nient will reach 450. t years and six months for grand lar- 

Little FalLs— Lightning struck th-> barn | cenv in .St. Louis county. His appre 



I to have charge of the affair: E. E. Mc- 
26. 1905. under a sentence of two , Donald. D. H. Fisk and Graham M. Tor- 



re nee. 
Congr'^ssmin 



Steenerson will spiak 



Grand Forks, N. D.^ Sept 15.— Not for 

six years has the Red river been as low 

as It is a.s pre.sent, rivor men declare. 

There are old sand bars showing up that 

_____ _ __^. __ bad nearly b-'ien forgotten. Old-timers 

ownVd^ljy RoherF Grams of Y^aiV' Haven | he'iusiori upon Velease^fVom fh"" MTnne- ! ^"^ "ie>.r.st day of the' fair. S^pL 26.'and ■ s-^^^- however, that the river has been 
Bhorilv b.fore 6 o'clock Friday morn- gota orison shows the b^ne^^^^ '^'^^i^P ^'"l •^P*^ak" on S^pt. 27. q^'^e a lit:le lower at some periods. Tho 

Ing. The barn caught Are and with it gLTti-^joT^vs'enyof n^ rain during the week brought the river 

eeveral other smaller buildmgs. all of ^^J'; '^l^'^^^^.^^^^^'^^^ time, so all th-,, gentlemon. to- up six mches, 

which burned measurement a.s a means of detection. | gather with Judge Spooner, will be here 

Big FaiU-fhe name of the man who' Before his discharge Warden Wolfer | on the Friday evonlng. Sept. 27. Th^ 
was killed here bv the train Tue.sday last j received telegrams from the warden of , banquet will undoubtedly be given that 
was William Kolsiad. aged 45 years, and the state prison at Columbus, Oliio, j evening, 
not Charles .ScUback. as was reported I and from W. A. Pinkerton, the Chicago 



to the pro.ss 

Cr)ok.sr.)n— L J. VoUand, v.- ho has re- 
sided In Sampson's addition for the past jumbus, Ohio, came here and tooK 
four ye.tn-, hxis l<?ft witii his wife and 1 »»,„ ,„.,„ tn ,>„^tr^rt-,r o„ u^ i,** ♦u^ 
family and -his father-in-law, Hans Jen- ! '^^f '"'^^ '" custody as he left the 
son. for North Yakima, where he willjP'i??"- _, ,^ 

make his futuro home. Warden Wolfer has received a let- 

Stillwaier.- The .«ilver anniversary of ter enclosing photographs which 
Balem German Lutheran church was eel- 1 proved that he was wanted as a parole 



detective, stating that he was wanted -Had dyspep.-?la an.l indigestion for 
for forgery. James A. Dunden of Co- Jf *"■ ^^^ appetite, and what I did eat 

, K„c. Aui.. .,., ».,„_„>._".. I distressed m- terribly. Burdock Blood 

Bitters cured me."— J. H. Walker, Sun- 
bury, Ohio. 



ebratH,i .S-inday with three services at 
Which former pastors preached. The 
congrestation is out of debt and has 
built three churches. The first organi- 
xation w;is effected Sept. li. 1882. al- 
though th-re were a few meetings prior 
to that time. 

Minn^ap:.li.<— L. M. Gorsner fell under 
the wheels of a delivery wagon Satur- 
day evening, while trying to get into the 
vehicle to ride home. He was so badly 
crushed by the wheels tha' he died while 
being taken to the cily hospital in the 
S>atrol wagon. 



breaker in Ohio. He is wanted for 
forgeries in Rockford, 111., and Bris- 
tol. Tenn It is shown by the records 
that before his confinement In the 
loca.1 prison he served terms in Jack- 
son. Mich., and on Blackwell Island. 
N. Y., for forgeries. 



RED LAKE FALLS HAS 

A DISASTROUS BLAZE. 



FARMER SEEKS BLOOD. 



Stops earache in two minutes; toothache 
or pam of burn or .scald in Ave minutes; 
hoarseness, one hour; muscleache, two 
iiours, sore throat, twelve hours- Dr. 
Thomas Eclectric Oil. monarch over pain. 



Threatens to Kill His Wife for Giving 
Him ttie Ge-by. 

McVille. N. D., Sept. IG.— ^Special to 
The Herald.)— Shouting, "You will not get 
your clothes— blood might as well flow 
now as any time," John L. Dahl, a farm- 
er residing north of here, made a dea- 
i perale attempt to kill his wife. He at- 
tacked her with a big knife, after knock- 
Red Lake Falls, Minn.. .«?ept. 16.— 1 i„g her down. The attack was made In 
(Special to The Herald.) — Fire Satur- 
day night started in the office of the 
Sauer meat market from a heating 



stove. The loss is as follows: Duffy 
building. $1,800, insurance, J800: Sauer 
building contents, $500, insurance, $3')0. 
SplUane building and contents. $2,000. 
fully covered; Majerus fetsd store, $300, 
fully covered. 



the Palace restaurant and the proprietor's 
wife grappled with the enraged man and 
screamed for help. Several pt'^rsons 
rushed to her assistance, .and Dahl was 
dragged away. Mrs. Dahl escaped with 
a little gash on her neck and a cut on her 
finger. ; 

Dahl gave himself up to Deputy Sheriff 

j Kniefel. who took him to LaJtota. Mrs. 

I Dahl had left her husb^nd.^ and DaU 




oKECTOiY or 1 


mm 


EHEilS 


n 


-i 



WHERE TOGO TONIGHT. 

LYCEUM — Mack-Leone company in 

"Sige Brush." 
METROPOLITAN— Burlesque. 



EDWARD OLMEY 

Duluth people are awakening to the 
fact that they have a wonderful man In 
their midst. One gentleman was entire- 
ly healed of rheumatism, another of 
asthma, while one lady was instantly 
healed of stomach trouble. The healer 
is busy from morning until night heal- 
ing the many who come to him, at his 
office in Old Maaonic Temple, comer 
I Superior •treet and Second avenue ea«t. 



HIS OWN PLAY. 

Wiiiard track's "Sage Brusli" Given by 
IHack-Leone Players. 

Many a play of tar less merit than 
•'Sage Brush" has been featured on the 
American stage, and has reaped a meas- 
ure of fame and money for its author. 

"Sage Brush" Is a product of the pen 
of Willard Mack, the versatile manager 
of the Mack-Leone players. Not many 
of his Duluth friends realized Mr. Mack's 
ability as a dramatist, and some may 
have " anticipated a failure when "Sage 
Brush" was announced. It was not an 
experiment, however, as Mr. Mack has 
produced It in Brooklyn and Chicago, 
with a fair measure of success. The play 
is not startlingly original in plot and per- 
haps not brilliant enough to bring imme- 
diate r^TOgnition to an unknown author, 
but It Is a good, consistent, little Western 
drama, free from gun play, and with 
plenty of everything else that goes to 
make for the success of a Western play. 

The hero of the story Is a young col- 
lege bred ranch foreman, and the western 
school teacher is the object of his ador- 
ation. Then there is a Plnkerton detec- 
tive, a horse thief, a cowpuncher villain, 
who kidnaps the school teacher, and an 
exciting rescue aided by a repentant 
companion of the villain. 

Considering the hurried work neces- 
sary, the Mack-Leone players gave the 
piece a most admirable production last 
evening, and the members of the com- 
pany will doubtless show an Improve- 
ment In their work tonight, tomorrow 
and Wednesday. 

Mr. Mack himself assumes the role of 



CASTOR I A 

For InfEuits and Children. 

The Kind You Have Always Bought 



his hero, and plays it with the same 
quiet ability which characterizes all of 
his work. Will F. Chapman makes the 
villain a man with some saving virtues, 
as the author intended. Some of the 
supporting members have an excellent 
opportunity for good character work, and 
they take full advantage of It, notably 
Frank G. Patton as Hank Jones, and 
Mis.s Marie Bonsall's Mrs. Dalby. Frank 
Joynerk's work as Mr. Dalby Is also ex- 
cellent. Beatrice Meade m.vkes a very 
attractive sc'nool teacher, and the minor 
parts are filled In a satisfactory manner. 



THE ROLLICKERS 

Give One of Best Burlesque Stiows Yet 
Seen Here. 

The Rolllckers are at the MetropoUtao 
this we.-k with a better show than most 
of those touring the Empire circuit. It 
is very much like the higher class of 
musical entertainment that used to 
flourish in Weber &. Fields little Broad- 
way music hall. 

There are two very funny stage He- 
brews and all tiie other members of the 
cast are out to "do " them. In fact, the 

title of the two-act musical farce whlcli 
IS given is 'B. Dunne Goode &. Co." 

There is quite a plot to the piece. 
The broker who is anxious to sell his 
business to the Hebrews gets Into do- 
mestic difficulties and some valuable 
papers are lost and every one turns 
out on a search for them. The quarrel 
which the two Hebrews hav«3 in the 
first act and their encounter with the 
shark in tiie second act are two situa- 
tions that test the laughing puwers of 
every one. 

Joseph K. Watson and William H. 
Cohan shine as ttie Hebrews. Tbey 
are finished actors, and have been fur- 
nished good lines as a basl.s for their 
work. Ed Morton, who sings coon 
songs very well, plays the broker and 
Kathryn Pearl is the prlmma donna. 
What she lacks in voice she makes up 
in a pretty faee figure. Her duet wltn 
Mr. Morton. "Miss Mexico," I3 the must. 
cal hit of the piece. 

Violet Pearl is an active little sou- 
brette— a sort of Eva Tanguay, Mabel 
Hite and Anna Held rolled Into one. 
Her Imitations of Anna Held are rather 
clever. Al Hall is mildly funny as a 
stock trader, and he dances well. Bo 
does Eddie Barto, who plays the office 
boy. The other principal^ are quite sat- 
isfactory. 

The company Is a large one and In- 
cludes a genuine pony ballet. 



Bears the 
Signature of 



\ 



ROBBERY AT STAPLES. 
Staples. Minn.. Sept. 16.— H. C. Mil- 
ler's department store was entered by 
' thieves at an early hour Saturday and 
I between $300 and $400 worth of goods 
■were stolen, consisting of fur coata, 
clothing and two leather suit caaea. Noi 
I clue has been found. 

i 






+ 



THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 1907. 






f\ 



The Universal 
Staple. 

strengthening food for the 
weakest digestion. 

Nourishing food for the 
strongest digestion. 

Good for the babies — good 
for all ages — the most nutri- 
tious of ah the wheat foods. 

Uneeda Biscuit 



In moisture and 
dust proof packages. 

NATIONAL BISCUIT COMPANY 



OVER SCORE 
AREWLLED 

And Twcnty-Scvcn In- 
jured in Wreck on 
Boston & Maine. 



QUEER KIND 
OF RUNAWAY 

M. A. Ryan's Automobile 

Takes Spurt Along 

Superior Street. 

No One in Machine and 

the Crowd is 

Mystified. 



"Blast me bloody sidelights if that 
Ain't the crazkst ship ever I see 
oruising the rock-ribbed shores of 
LAke Superior without even a pilot 
to fitter Jier." 

So saying, an old salt water sailor, 
who recently acce-pied an easier btirth 
on a lake l>oat tjlopped in the middle 
of the sidewalk, late Saturday after- 
noon, blocking trafBc temporarily 
With his outspread legSi, and gazed 
In open-eyed wonder and astonishment 

••t an automobile that cairne e^isily 
rolling down Superior street, without 
anyone in the seat or elsewhere about 
the machine to guide its erratic 
coursCt 

Attracted by the actions of the 
sailor, the hurryiiig throng also came 
to a halt, and the wonder on the 
•alt's face was reflected on many 
other faces. Tlie automobile suc- 
cessfully di'dged two or three teams, 
ajid calmly prececal d on its vvay, 
rapidly gaining speed as it prt>gTtrssed. 
If It had bftii a ruriiiway horse peo- 

Sle would have known what to do, 
ut a machine was a difierent prop- 
osition, and evidently thexe were no 
chauffeurs in tlie crowd. No one else 
knew enough about the mysterious 
working of an auto to risk jumijng 
Into it and stopping it. Each man 
figured he would only make miittera 
worse, probably Increasing the speed 
Instead of bringing the machine to 
a stop. 

But it was plain to be seen that 
•omething had to be done immedi- 
ately to avert a serious accident, for 
the street was crowded with teams, 
and it was only by a miracle that 
the runaway had thus far dodged 
them. The devil wagon might, after 
attaing a 30-mile an hour clip, take 
« sudden notion to try the sidewalk, 
and then there would be broken bones 
to answer for. 

The machiiiO was on the left side 
of the street, and meeting all the 
teams coming Its way. While the 
crowd heid its brt-ath and watched 
to s^e what would happen when a 
collision occurred between It and a 
— — -— ^_ 



ipair of heavy draft horses that 
loomed up directly In front of it, a 
man came tearing madly down the 
middle of the street, long legs beat- 
ing a hasty tattoo on the brick pave- 
ment. He was hot on the scent of 
the run.away. His nose sniffed the 
air, and an occasional familiar whJlf 
of gasoline guided him in his wild 
flight. Nearer and nearer drew the 
auto to the team, and nearer and 
nearer drew the man to the auto. 
He reached it just in time, and with 
an exciting leap that would have 
done credit to a professional hurdle 
jumper, he sprang into the seat and 
grasped the steering lever, jerking the 
machine lo one sdde just in time to 
save a team of snorting horses and 
a badly frightened driver from a 
disastrous mixup in the middle of the 
street. The wandering auto con- 
sented to be driven up to the curb- 
stone and to come to a stop, and 
the crowd breathed a great sigh of 
relief. 

The man was M. A. Ryan, president 
of the Northwestern Steam Boiler 
works. He had brought his auto- 
mobile to a stop in front of the 
Lyceum building, and as his business 
inside the structure woul-d occupy him 
only a minute, he did not turn off the 
power, but merely changed a lever or 
two and left the machine standing 
with power turnt-d on. Something 
slipped after he got up the steps, and 
the auto started eastward, turning 
away from the curb and then start- 
ing along t>y the side of the street 
car track, just as if guided by human 
agency. Only by the greatest good 
luck did It escape a collision. 



EXCURSION TO 
THE COUNTY FAIR 

Commercial Club May 

Run a Special Train 

to tlibbing. 

The Duluth Commercial club will 
probably undertake an excursion from 
Duluth to Hibbing next Friday on ac- 
count of the St. Louis county fair to 
be held In the latter town. Puluth is 
: greatly Interested in the fair, particu- 
larly her luslness interests, and it is 
expected that 200 or 300 people will 
take advantage of excursion rates 
that will be in effect to vi.slt the at- 
traction. Details of the excursion 
have not yet been completed, but that 
it will be conducted is practically as- 
.•sured. It is expected that a special 
train will be run. 

Hibbing people are doing all that 
is nosslble to make the fair a success, 
and it is said that it will be well 
worth any one's while to vsit It. The 
Visit will also show the friendly feel- 
ing Duluth. as a whole, entertains for 
her near neighbors. A liberal array 
of prizes is offered for exhibits, and It 
is said there will be a strong racing 



card. 



Make It Right 



First, be sure it comes to a boil, then boil 
it 15 minutes longer. 

That's the only way to get the rich color, 
specific flavour, and wholesome food qualities 
out of 

POSTVM FOOD COFFEE 

You can't get any "badness" out of it, if 
you boil it an hour — there's none there. It's 
made of clean, hard wheat berries, parched 
just like coffee but without the drug — caffeine 
— that makes coffee harmful to so many 
persons. 

i Make it right, and understand why 



"There's a Reason" for 




STVM 






Quebec Express and 

Freiglit Train Collide 

Near Canaan, VL 



White River Junction, Vt., Sept. 16. 
— A fearful head-on collision between 
the south-bound Quebec express and a 
north-bound freight train on the Con- 
cord division of the Boston & Maine 
railroad occurred four miles north jf 
Canaan station yesterday, due to a 
mistake in a train dispatcher's orders, 
and from a demcriished passenger coac.'i 
there were taken out twenty-four dead 
and twenty-seven other passengers, 

most of them seriously injured. Nearly 
all those who were in the death car 
were returning from a fair at Sher- 
brooke. Que., sixty miles north. 

The conductor of the freight train 
was given to understand by the night 
operator that he had plenty of time to 
reach a siding at Canaan station, re- 
ceiving, according to the superintend- 
ent of the division, a copy of a tele- 
graph order from the train dispatcher 
at Concord which confused the train 
numbers, thirty and thirty-four. 

The wreck occurred just after the 
express had rounded into a straiglit 
stretch of track, but owing to the early 
morning mist neither engineer saw tlie 
other's headlight, until too late. 

The dead, klentified, are as follows: 

Timothy Shaughnessy, Castle Bar, 
Que.; Mrs. Shaughnessy, Miss Annie, 
St. Pierre, Isle V'erte, Que.; Fred M. 
Phelps. Ochiltree, Tex.; Mrs. A. E. War- 
ren, Haverhill, Mass.; Mrs. F. C. Blake, 
South Corinth, Vt.; Mrs. Margaret 
Larg>', Manchester, N. Y.; Miss Barrell, 
Manchester; Mrs. Phillip Gagon, Sher- 
brooke; Miss Alvina Giron, Nashua; 
Mrs. Webster, a dressmaker from Mas- 
sachusetts; J. L. Concrot, Somerville, 
Mass.; infant child of C. Gifford, Con- 
cord, N. H.; Mrs. E. L. Briggs, West 
Cannan, N. H.; John G. Duncan, 
Bethel, Vt. 

The unidentified include a boy of 4 
years old, a man 46 years old, a woman 
30 years old, a man 55 years old, a 
man 35 years old and a number more. 
Twenty-two of the bodies were removed 
to Concord during the day. 

The most seriously Injured, who wera 
taken to the Margaret Hitchcock hos- 
pital at Hanover, N. H., include an un- 
known boy, tx)th legs broken, arm torn 
out and head Injured, dying. 

The following were also Injured: 
Saunders, Nashau, legs and arms in- 
jured; Mrs. Saunders, Nashua, head and 
back injured; Mrs. G. N. Saunders, Na- 
shua, N. H., wounds on head; Miss C. 
Saunders, Nashua, contusions on face; 
Miss D. Saunders, Nashua, internal in- 
juries; Fred Saunders, Nashua, shoul- 
ders Injured; Mrs. Hester Saunders, 
Broughton, Mass., head and back In- 
jured; Charles St. Pierre, Isle Verte, 
Que., internal injuries; Arthur Jacfjues, 
Millbury, internal injuries; Batholder 
Somers, back broken; Phillip Magnan, 
Sherbrooke, internal injuries; Jonn 
Burrett, Manchester, N. H., head and 
breast injured; Miss Abbie Jansen, Na- 
shua, broken frontal bone. 

The southbound train was made 
up at Sherbrooke Saturday evening, 
where it picked up two sleepers from 
Quebec and two more day coaches. 
It consisted of the baggage car, 
passenger coaches -and smoking car 
in that order, with sleepirs in the 
rear. The train left White River 
Junction at 3:50 a. m., forty minutes 
late, and was followed ten minutes 
later by "the Montreal express over 
the Central Vermont railway. The 
Quebec train is known as No. 30 and I 
the Montreal train as No. 34. * In I 
the meantime, a northbound train ! 
known as No. 267 bad arrived at | 
Canaan, eighteen miles down the 
road, at 4:10, on time. According 
to the division superintendent, W. 
R. Itay, J. R. Crowley, the night I 
train dispatcher at Concord, sent a 
dispatch to John Greely, the night 
operator at Canaan, that No. 34 
was one hour and ten minutes late. 

The order, which Conductor Law- 
rence of the freight train showed 
after the accident, distinctly states 
that No. 30 instead of No. 34 was 
an hour and ten minutes late. Con- 
ductor Lawrence believing that he 
had sufficient time In the hour and 
ten minutes to reach the side track 
at West Canaan, four miles beyond, 
before No. 30 reached it, ordered his 
train ahead. The superintendent de- 
clared that the cause of the acci- 
dent was due to the mistake in 
placing the cipher after the three In 
the number of the train in.stead of 
a four. 

The morning was misty in the 
Western New Hampshire mountains 
and the long freight train with a 
score of heavily loaded cars lumber- 
id up the long grade towards West 
Canaan at the usual speed. On the 
other side of the curve was the 
Quebec express, sliding down the 
single track with her load of passen- [ 
gers and the four heavy sleepers in | 
the rear. The freight train was on 
a sinjrle piece of track about a mile 
in length and the Quebec express 
had rounded the curve Into this 
stretch when the two engineers saw 
the headlights of the opposite trains! 
burst out of the fog. Both engineers ' 
set their brakes and then jumped j 
while the two great locomotives i 
crashed into each other and rolled 
Into the ditch. 

The baggage car was hurled back 
into tile passenger coach like a 
great raan and tore It asunder from 
end to end. As It did .so the rear end 
of the car rose up so that it stopped 
at the forward ejid of the smoker 
which was behind the passenger 
coach. Only a few windows were 
broken in the smoking car, and none 
of the Pullmans were dauna.ged. 

The ill-fated i>assonger coach was 
crowded with more than fifty people. 
Shortly before the accident a few of 
the men had gone back into the 
smoking car in the rear, leaving the 
women to- get a little sleep In the 
straight seats. 

One of those who esca/ped said tha,t 
as the train was rounding a curve 
same one in front of the caj- began 
to sing, so that nearly every one was 
awake when the crash came. Those 
who were in the other ears recovered 
from th«ir dazed senses. Jumped out 
to the -side of the track and hurried 
to the demolTshed coax^h, where 
groans, cries and shrieks were rend- 
ing the air. 

Fortunately, with the engines off to 
one side, the wreckage did not take 
fire. The train hands, ably seoonded 
by the passengers from the sleeping 
cars, groiped their way alony the ruins 



GARTERS = 



Genuine Must Bear 
Fac-Simile Signature 




% 



USE SUBSTITUTES. 



SlCiyEADAGHE 

CARTELS 



Positively cored by 
these Little Pills. 

They also relieve Dis- 
tress from Dyspepsia, In- 
digrestlou and Too Hearty 
Eating. A perfect rem- 
edy for Dizziness, Nausea, 
Drowsiness, Bad Taste 
in the Mouth. Coated 
Tongue, Pain In the Side, 
TORPID LIVER. They 
regulate tbo Bowels. Purely Vegetable. 

SMALL Pill, SMALL DOSE. SMALL PAIGE. 




ITTIE 

IVER 

LLS. 




Genuine Must Bear 
Fac-Simile Signature 

REFUSE SUBSTITUTES. 



and began the work of rescue. The 
bodies of the dead were laid beside 
the track quickly, while the rescuers 
turned their attention to those who 
needed aid. Great beams were lifted, 
broken Joists were thrown aside and 
the bleeding and mangletl forms were 
dragged out and laid on the backs of 
broken seats and upon blankets from 
the sleeping cars. 

Wounds were hastily t)Ound up with 
strips of t)€dding from the sleei>ers. 
The IHtle bajul worked until daylight 
before the doctors came. 

The neighborhood is a sparsely set- 
tled one. but the fanners were 
arouse<l and lent every aid to the 
work of relief. In the meantiane word 
had been sent to this place, to Con- 
cord and Hanover, and within an 
hour a. large force of physicians was 
hurrying to the scene. 

Frank Ryan, a brakeman on the 
express, ' w-as caught In the wreck 
and had an artery severed. He was 
unconscious for nearly fifteen min- 
utes, and when he regained his senses 
his first thought was of the Montreal 
express which he knew was thunder- 
ing down on the wreck with no 
brakeman in the rear to wave a 
warning signal. In a few words 
Ryan told of the approaching danger, 
and the Montreal express was stop- 
per! only a quarter of a mile from 
the rear of the wrecked train. 



PRICE SET 
ONMAINS 

City Likely to Buy the 

Prindle Gas Pipes 

for $8,000: 



Council Will be Asked 

to Authorize the 

Purchase. 



A Humane Appeal. 

A humane citizen of Richmond, Ind., 
Mr. U. D. VVilUams, 107 West Main street, 
says: "I appeal to all persons with weak 
lungs to take Dr. King's New Discovery, 
the only remedy that has helped me and 
fully comes up to the proprietor's recom- 
mendation." It saves more lives than all 
other throat and lung remedies put to- 
gether. Used as a cough and cold cure 
the world over. Cures asthma, bronchitis, 
croup, whooping ccugh, quinsy, hoarse- 
ness and phthisic, stops hemorrhages of 
the lungs and builds them up. Guaranteed 
at all drug stores. 60c and 11.00. Trial 
bottle free. 



The city council may be asked this 
evening to authorize the purchase of the 
Prindle Gas company's mains In First 
alley, FMrst avenue east and Michigan 
street, for $8,017.50. 

It is understood that that some agree- 
ment has been had between the city 
authorities and the owners of the old 
gas plant, whereby the latter are ready 
to turn over all the mains for the price 
mentioned. 

At the last meeting of the board of 
water and light commhssloners the 
proppositlon to be made the owners of 
the Prindle Gas company for all or a 
portion of the company's mains wris 
discussed. The action taken by iho 
board is shown in the following res- 
olution: 

"Resolved, that the following prop- 
ositions for the purchase of the Prindle 
Gas company's pipe, be submitted to 
the owners thereof; which, if either 
is accepted, this board win recommeni 
to the common council for their imme- 
diate acquirement. 

"First, to purchase the pipe in Fiist 
alley, being 2,250 feet of ten-inch gas 
pipe, running from First avenue eass 
to Fifth avenue west, for the sum of 
$5,175. 

"Second, to purchase all of the pipe, 
of the said company; being 2,250, feet i 
of ten-inch pipe in First alley as di- 
scribed above; 600 feet of ten-inch 
pipe in First avenue east, from the 
aforesaid alley to Michigan street, and 
west in Michigan street to the work;? 
of the said company; 2,990 feet of 
eight-inch pipe in Michigan street, west 
from said works, and 200 feet of four- 
inch pipe in Michigan street east from 
First avenue east, all for the sum of 
$8,017.50. 

"The board will further recommend. 
If either of the above propositions is 
accepted, and if the company desir'ss 
that a stipulation be entered into by 
the city whereby the status of the 
Prindle Gas company will not be 
changed because of the sale of the 
pipe In question." 

The price that the board voted lo 
offer the gas company for the pipe in 
First alley, is the manager's estimate 
of the cost of laying pipes there under] 
the present conditions of the material 



A Home 
Drink 



After the fatigue of the day's work — 
after the dinner is over and you sit down 
for a comfortable evening at home, a 
bottle of Pabst Blue Ribbon will add to 
your enjoyment, and aid your digestioa 



mm 



.y 



?< 



Pabst 

BlueRibbon. 

Tke Beer of Quality 

is brewed from Pabst Famous Eight-Dajr 
Malt, which contains all of the nourishing,, 
wholesome, food properties of barley-graio 
in predigcsted form. These properties^ 
together with the tonic quality of the choic* 
est hops, give nourishment and tone to the 
system. The very small percentage of 
alcohol (less than 3\ic)'\s a mild stimulant 
that prompts the stomach to doitsbest worlu 
When ordering beer, ask 
for Pabst Blue Ribbon. 
Made by Pabst at Milwaukee 

And Bottled only at the Brewery. 

Pabst Brewing Co., 

LalTe Ave. Viaduct & R-. R. St.. Duluth. 

Phones. Bell 346-K; Zenith 346. 



-'>^' 






GUN WOUNDS 
P ROVE FATAL 

Thomas Nichols Dies at 

SL Mary's Hospital 

From Injuries. 

Thomas Nichols, the young man who 
was accidentally shot in the thigh 
whilie hunting near Rice lake last 
Friday, passed away at .St. Mary's hos- 
pital last evening. Death was due to 
blood poisoning, which developed but 
yesterday, prior to that time his re- 
covery seeming assured. 

The deceased lived with his parents 
at 6 East Superior street, and was 
but 19 years of age. His death is on& 
of the few fatalities reported this 
year from hunting accidents. 

WILBUR VOLIVA 
IS OVERSEER 

Chosen Head of Dowie's 
Church by Ecclesiasti- 
cal Conference. 

Chicago, Sept. 16.— Wilbur Glenn Vohva 
was formally elected general overseer of 
the Christian Catholic Apostolic church 
In Zion for life by the general ecclesias- 
tical conference in a tent at Zion City 
yesterday. The vote of 1,262 was pro- 
nounced unanimous. 

In his Biieech of acceptance, Vollva an- 
nounced that a mass meeting would be ' 
held Monday, at which time he would 
make known his plans regarding the pil- \ 
grimage to tl>e ranch in New Mexico, 
where the New Zion City is to be found- ' 
ed. He further stated that he would 
have to have JIO.OOO within the next ten 
days, and called upon his followers to 
contribute this amount. 

He was followed by John A. Lewis, 
named by John Alexander Dowie In his 
will as his lawful successor, whose fol- 
lowing will hold a general conference 
next week. Numerically it Is not so I 
strong in Zion City as the one headtd by i 
V'oliva, but it is said to have l)ei:n prant- I 
e«l support from the affiliated churches j 
throughout the world. 



ii 



11 



BATH POWDER 

A Perfumed Luxury for the Bath 

Softens Hard Water. Belter 

than Perfume. 25 baths, 

25 -J"**"-*^ 2 5 cents 
A CAN 



AT ALL STORES 
OR MAILED BY US 



RICE POWDER 

Best Toilet powder. Antiseptlcally 

pure. Relieves sunburn and 

chafing. Best for 

baby. ^^^^^-''^^ZS't 
A CAN 



BATCHELLER IMPORTING GO. KEW YORK. 




would cost 



duplicate 



system. 



As a matter of fact the city does not 
require the First avenue east main or 
the Michigan street main at the present 
time, but It Is probable that, with the 
increasing consumption of gas the ad- 
ditional pipes through the business sec- 
tion may become very useful in tlie 
future. 

It is the second proposition that is 
understood to have been practically 
accepted by the gas company. 



CHORUS LEADER 
GIVEN SURPRISE 



Pleasant Affair Saturday 

Evening for Olaf T. 

Holten. 



Normanna male chorus, was given a 
pleasant surprise by the members of 



I among them being one for better ser- [ member of a prominent family of 

s almost instantly 
reek Park Sunday by 
m his horse, which 
shied at an object in the road. 

The strike of the dock workers of 
the Southern Pacific at Galveston 
seems to be a waiting game. Sunday 
was the quietest day since the strike 
was inaugurated. The prevailing be- 
lief now is that nothing will be don»i 
pending word from New York. The 
strikers claim ten men are at work. 
The Southern Pacific peofile say there 
are fifty or sixty. Newspaper men are 
barred from the docks. 



minute service resumed. Presi- 
den Tessman is away and Vice Presi- 
dent Getchell Avill act as chairman of 
the council tonight. 



Lester Park! 

Dancing Tuesday and 
Thursday Evenings. 



HELD FOR ASSAULT. 



Occa.sional headache, l>ekhing, bad tsuste 
In the mouth, lack of appitite and slight 
nervousness are symptoms of iiidig«stion 
wliich, wlicn allowed to go untand for 
will d< velop into a case of dyspep.sla lh:it 
will take a lf)ng time to get rid of. Kodol 
will make your food do you good and will 
enable you lo enjoy what you eat. All 
drugg^ists. 



RELATIVES WANT CHILD. 



Williams Accused of Siiooting in Street 
Quarrel. ^ 

Edward Williams, who has been j -, . „ ' 

bound over to the grand jury on the j Wane Crampp HaS 00 LacR Of COOd 

charge of assaulting W. A. Phillips,! Ho.nieS. 

of Eveleth. was brought to the county George W. Berger was recently ap- 
jail Saturday afternoon. Ball was fixed pointed by the probate as truardian »f 
Olaf T. Hallen, the leader of the , a^^jgoo, which Williams was unable to , his little 9-year-old niece, Mario 

Tt"'ls' claimed that Williams shot i^''"f^"'PP- Mr. Grampp, the father of the 
Phillips in a street quarrel. The bullei , thild has petitioned tht- court to vacate 



the chorus and their friends Saturday : j^^,^ ^ 38-calibre revolver "grazed Phil- i the order of guardianship in favor of 
evening at Kalamazoo hall. There were lips' face, but did no serious injury. In,_ ^^^„^^ o. ^ . » .», .u. .^ 

about a hundred present at the ban- Anton Shuster was brought down ^^' ^^^^^^ ^lid to have the authority 



quel, which was served, and many 
interesting toasts were delivered. 

The affair was given by the mem- 
bers only to show their great appre- Ian argtiment over religion. Remarks 
elation for the efforts of Mr. Halten ; became personal and the dispute finally 
and the high esteem in which they hold [ended with the assault, 
hira 



from Chisholm to serve a ten-day term 'v*^'^^*^*^ ''' the parent. Judge Middlecoft 
for assaulting Tekla Curry with a j has ordered Mr. Berger to appear Sept. 
brick. The men are said to have had j 23, and show cause why the order for 




"1 tri*il all kinils of blood ramcdles which failed 
ko <lu me any koo-I but 1 have foaiid the riKbt thing 
at Inm. My fare tvai full of pimple* and black- 
bf^adb. After taking Cascarota tiiey all left. ] am 
loiitliinlMK the uvo of tliem and recommending 
khera to my friends. I feci Hne when 1 ri»e ii tb« 
miirniiii;. Hop« to bare a cbaooe to recommeDd 
Uai carets-" 

Fred C. Witten. 7S £lm St.. Newark. M. J. 

Best Tor 
r ^^^r The bowels ^ 

CANDY CATHARTIC 



Pt«Man%. Palatable. Potent. Taste Good. Do Good, 
Herer Sicken. Weaken or Qrlpe. lOc. 25c. $0c. NcTje 
lold in bulk. Ttie eennine tablot (tumped C C 0. 
3aaranteed to (tore or joar money back. 

Sterling Remedy (A., Chicago or N.Y. 595 

INNUALSALE, TEN MILUON BOXES 



Those who delivered toasts after the 
banquet were H. B. Knudsen, C. J. 
Hailing, George M. Jensen and Gustaf 
Gulickson. On behalf of the members 
and friends present Mr. Hailing pre- 
sent Mr. Hailing presented Mr. Halten 
with a gold watch and handsome fob. 
In a few well chosen words Mr. Halt- 
en expressed his thanks and appre- 
ciation for the reception and present. 

During the evening several selections 
were renderd by the members of the 
chorus, and the male quartette also 
gave several songs. A number of 
readings were given by C). Stenson, and 
following the program dancing was in- 
dulged in to a late hour. 

FOR HUMANE OFFICER. 

Several Candidates for Position to be 
Filled Wednesday. 

There are a number of candidates 
for the position on the humane society 
m^de vacant / by the death of H. C. 
Withrow and the vacancy will be fill- 
ed at the meeting of the society to be 
held at the council rooms Wednesday 
evening. Albert Webber of the police 
department is the only local candi- 
date for the position, and has many 
friends who are favoring his candi- 
dacy. The secretary's annual report 
will be made at the meeting Wednes- 
day, and promises to be Interesting. 

COUNCIL MEETS TONIGHT. 

Considerable Routine Work to be Done 
—President Tessman Absent 

The council will meet tonight in 
regular session and there is consider* 
able routine work to be done, but 
nothing of a special nature. The work 
of the special committee and of the 
conference committee now being ac- 
complished, the matter of the raise in 
the tax levy only require.^ the final 
action of the council. This action will 
not be made until the Octoter meeting 
of the council. 

Numerous petitions have been circu- 
lated during the past week and will be 
presented to the council tonight. 



BRIEF TELEGRAMS. 



his appointment should not be vacated. 
It is understood that the child's pa- 
rents were divorced about a year ago 
and the little girl was given in the 
custody of her mother. Mrs. Grampp 
Three young hunters were killed ! died a few months ago and Marie went 
Saturday by a dynamite explosion, j to live vviih htr uncle, although she 
near Cheboygan, Mich., when they has several other aunts, all of whom 
mistook a dynamite storehouse in the ^ are anxious to have her. 
woods for a deserted hut and used it ' Mr. Grampp desires his sister, Mrs. 
for a target. Neison R. Howlett of Grand Haven, 

C. Berry Winship, 22 years old, a Mich., to have the care of the child. 




MISS JULIE FLORENCE WALSH 



WOMEN SUFFER 

Many women suffer in bilence and 
drift along from bad lo worse, know- 
ing well that they ought to have 
immediate assistance. 

How many women do yo\i know 
who are perfectly well and strong? 

The cause may be eafiil3' traced to 
some feminine derangement which 
manifests itself in dcpresbion of 
spirits, reluctance to go anywhere 
* or dc anything, backache, dragging 
sensations, flatulency, nervousness, 
and sleeplessness. 

These symptomsare but warnings 
thai there is danger ahead, and un- 
less heeded, a life of suffering or a 
serious operation is the inevitable 
result. The best remedy for all 
these symptoms is 

Lydia E. Pinkham's Vegetable Compound 

made from native roots and herbs. No other medicine in the country has 
received such widespread and unqualified endorsement. Ko other medi- 
cine has such a record of cures of female ills. 

Miss J. F. Walsh, of 328 W. 36th St , New York City, writes:— "Lydia 
E. Pinkham's Vegetable Ck)rapound has been of inestimable value in 
restoring my health. I suffered from female illness which caused 
dreadful headaches, dizziness, and dull pains in my back, but your 
medicine soon brought about a change in my general condition, built 
me up and made me perfectly well." 

Lydia E. Pinkham's Vegetable Compound cures Female Complaints, 
such as Backache, Falling and Displacements. Inflammation and Ulcera- 
tion, and organic diseases. It is invaluable in preparing for child-birth 
and during the Change of Life. It cures Nervous Prostration, Headache, 
General Debility, and invigorates the whole system. 

Mrs. Pinkham's Standing Invitation to Women 

Women suffering from any form of female weakness are invited to 
write Mrs. Pinkham, at Lynn, Mass. Her advice is free. 



4^ 



if 



I.- 



t ' 



-J 



^ 




■MM 



THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD :_ MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 1907. 



GORDON 



'T^IIE letters in the 
■^ word G-o-r-d-o-n 

are just a little more 

than enough to spell. 

G-O-O-D. 
Gordon Hats are just 

a little better than' 

need be. 




Gordon dc Luxe 



'T^IIE hat label 
-*• that means 



a whole 
more of 
the extra 
bettcr- 
ness. 



dollar 



4 



$ 



3 



FALL SUITS 

It will be to your Interest if you 
intend getting a fall or winter 
suit to call and see our stoclc. On 
both s';i's 

And Overcoats 

\Vc ciin save you mi.nej" and 
guarantee yuu will be thoi-oughly 
pli-.is.'d in m-t-rv wriv 

MORRISON 

8 LAKK AVENUE SOUTH. 



VIRGINIA 
WINS TWO 

Duluth Wins Saturday, 

But Drops a Double 

Header. 

Two Good Games Be- 
fore Large Sunday 
Crowd. 



engaged in a desperate pitching duel yee- 
terduy, Cleveland winning, 3 to 2. The 
greatest crowd in the history of the local 
American league club saw the contest, the 
grounds being filled and the gates closed 
long before the game started. Chicago 
eanud a run in the fifth and bundled 
three hits for another in tiie seventh, 
tiling Cleveland, who had scored twice in 
tile .sixth on solid piiciiing. Tlie visitois 
took the lead again in the ninth on a 
double and Liebhurdt's single. 

Score: R- H. E. 

Chicago OOOOIOIOO— 2 8 I 

Cleveland J J 2 1-3 12 1 

Batteries— Walsh and Sullivan; Lieb- 
hardt and Bemis. Umpire— Connolly. 



Chicago 

Pittsburg ... 
New York . 
Philadeluhia 
Bn»klyn ... 
Cincinnati ., 
B'j.ston 



National Lea^^ue. 

STANDING. 
Played. Won. 



...135 
...131 
...U'l 

..128 
...i:« 
...rsi 
...lis 



St. lyjuis 134 



78 
77 
71 
62 
&4 
4S 
40 



Lost. 
38 
53 
56 
57 
71 
7S 
80 



Pet. 
.719 
.590 
.579 
.555 
.466 
.4U9 

.2nn 

.2»i 



CUP GOiS TO 
MINIKAHDA 

• 

Minneapolis Golfers Win 

From the Northland 

Players. 



NAVIES OF 
THE^WERS 

Japan Replacing 6-Inch 

Guns With to on the 

Mikasa. 

Great Britain Needs 
Heavier Ordnance- 
Kaiser's Program. 



fbot.Schulze 
shoes are 
all made 
with 
full vam ps 



Ever y bit 
^of Foot.SchuIze 
material and 
stitching 
is honest 



Virginia. Minn., S-^pt. 18.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— Beautiful work by Al 
Cumniings in SiiturUay's game gave the 

1 Duluth barnstormers on*' game from Vir- 
ginia s ex-Kaguir.s, but y.i-sierday. ilie 
Sox were taken Into camp twice, by 
.scores of 3 to 2. and 5 to 4. rtispectively. 

\ The tir.st game went ton inning.-i and 

' wa.s a pitchers' duel between Trtdway 
and Han.'y, with neither having any ad- batting 

I van lag*'. .\ c-jiiple of Wfll-bunched swat^ victory. The 
in thn tenth round decided llie result of ^ of their hits 
til, game in Tredwuy's favor. , first inning. 
Til.; .sffond game was also closely play- i Chicago 

ted. de.spite the fact ihat Livintf.ston and , Cincmuati .. 
Summ- rs did the throwing f..r Duluth,; atteries 



RESULTS S.\TURDAY. 
Chicago. 12; Cincinnati. 5. 
Pttt.sburg. 6; St. Louis. 1. 
Philadelphia, 3; Bo.-*t(jn. 1. 
Pliiladelphia. 9; Boston. 1. 
Br>oklyn. 8; New York, 7. 
Brooklyn. 2; New York. 0. 



CHICAOfJ. 8; CINCINNATI. 1. 

Chicagxj, S'pl. 16.— Chicago made it four 

straigiit from Cincinnati ye.sterday by 

pounding Hilt for eleven singles, which 

resulted in an S to 1 victory. Lund- 



Clever Golf Players 
Wet and Soggy 
Grounds. 



on 



The Minikahda Golf club team of 
Minneapolia, Saturday, won 
trophy for team competition from 
the Northland Country club on the 



London. Sept. 16.— Time and again naval 
j writers have contended in favor of the j 
re.irniing of British warships to bring 1 
them into line with modern progress in 
artillery, but the authorities of White- 
hall have opposed the scheme with rare 
exceptions, and that for obvious reasons. 
But Germany is embarking upon such a 
scheme, and the results will be watched 
with interest, 
the i -^^P^" *^*s essayed the task in the Rus- 
I sian ves.sols captured, while the change 
j of armament In the Mikasa is a matter of 



great Interest. This case is typical, 
course of the Duluth club. The : Qriglnally the vessel had four 12-inch and 

play was 18-hole team play. Nassau ] fourteen 6-lnch guns, being superior to 



gren's pitching and KUng's and 1'i''''''^r» . .. ^ j score being Minikahda tiie Formidable class simaltaneou.'^ly built i 

wer.^ the principal tiiclors in ^i^.^i.^ ;^ ,_^ " o o e »■ j ^^^^ ^^^^ British navy in having two more | 



J. J .WALL'S 

FAMILY LIQUOR STORE. 

310 AVF.sT }?riT.KlOK ST. 



.$1.25 

.$i..-»o 

.$1.50 
.$1.75 



Old Crow, bottlfd In bond, 

5s, lor ..$1.25 

Heiinituer*', liottlfd In b<md, 
.■>.s, for 

Bond & I.illard, Itultlod in 
lK>n(i, quarts 

lUark and \Miite Scotch. 

3-St«r llc!uics-.y Bfan«ly. . . 

Geneva Ciln, (I>e Ku.vihts) 

luruc. for SI. 75 

<Jord«(n l>ry (iin $1.15 

Iin]>t. .laniaica I{iun. quarts $1.75 
S^'uirnun's Canadian \M>i-ky $1.1.5 

Deliveries made to all part-s of 
tile city. 
>f:i:; orders |>r«)nii>»!y 



while Rogers was working for Virginia. ' and McLean 

The Sox got t-> RogL-r.s in the early in- 

nings for four .seor<.s. wliile the b.si the! PITTSBURG. 

Virginians could d > was one in tiie s.c- 

ond. They knotted it up with three 

score.s in ihe sixth and the winning run 

was scored in the eighth. The scores 

follow: 



visitors made close work 
and their oniy run in the 
Score: R. H. E. 

3 0200003 x-S 11 1 

1 <> I>-1 4 1 

Lundgren and Kling; Hitt 



Umpire— Emslie. 



19, Duluth 8. 

Despite the rain, which fell al- 
most constantly during the after- 
noon, some clever golf was seen on 
the wet and soggy course. The 
Minneapolis team was compos.-^d 
some 
state 



team was 
of the best players 
and their work was 



of 
in the 
cunsist- 



6-:nch quick-iirers. Ei<ht of these 6-inch 
guns will now be removed to enable four I 
10-:nch gun.s to be fitted. This may be | 
quite a suitable arrangement so far as [ 
weight is concern.d. but the .stress of al 
l)-inch gun firing with a muzzle energy 
of 31,iiOO-foot tons Is very much greater | 
than th' effect from a 6-inch (lulck-tlrer j 
di-scharging a shot of one-ftfth the 
weight with an energy of only 6,iW0-foot 



li must be accepted that the structural 



attended to. 



VIRGINIA. 










First game— AB. 


R. 


H. 


PO. 


A. 


E. 


OLson. If 5 

















Taylor, 2b 5 











2 





.McCormick, of 3 








4 








.M»Vvrs, rf 2 


2 














i';iirk.', c 5 


1 


5 











' Kyan, lb 4 





3 


10 








'1 liomp.son. 3b 4 


1 


1 


2 


2 





Olm.suad. .ss 3 








2 


3 


1 


Tredway. p 4 


u 


2 





3 





TotaLs r. 


3 


7 


30 


10 


1 


1>ULUTH. 










AB. 


R. 


H. 


PO. 


A. 


K 


.Siimin-^r.?, cf 3 





1 


5 


1 





1 Bennett, rf 5 


1 


1 


(» 








Munroe, lb 4 








12 





1 


' Livingston, If 3 


1 


1 


11 





1 


, L'.ighty. ss 4 





2 


1 


5 





1 H in«y. p 3 








*l 


7 


1 


iFlah.-rty. 2b 4 





1 


1 


1 


u 


1 R.>l)in.s.in. c 4 








3 


3 





McLauglilin. 3b. ... 4 





1 


4 


1 


1 



S; ST. LOUIS. 1. 

.St. Louis, Sept. 16.— The Pittsburg Na- -— -- -— , 

tionald bunoh-d the.r hits in the tilth ently good. The surprise ot the ; tons. 

and sixth innings and won yester.iaya play was the excellent form shown, -- -__ - ---.--. - . .. . ,.^ ^ ,u„ 

game by S to 1. Score: R. H. E. by F. L. Finkenstead, who held L. I strength of tliis \ickers ship justmes the 

It. Louis 000 1 00-1 8 2,H. Johnson, the winner of the state r'^ange, which will matenalSy add to. the 

Pitts^burg 0O003 5 0O0-8 9 0| championship in the recent tourna 

Batt' rits— McGlynn, Beelje and Hosiet- 1 „^,„, „,. ut p-ini tn » tit. «,'.>r.> i.. ,.■ ^ .i y wi »,.,iu r-^ 

ler- I ..ever and Gibson I'mnires— Kiem "^^"'^ ^' ^^- ^'^"'; '•^^ ^ ^^^ seort. t j^. Katori and the Kashima, built re 

ter, L'lAtr and uioson. umpiits ii^uni ^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^ ^^^ competition was j spectiv<ly by the Vickers and Armstrong. 

offered by Duluth people and will i Indeed, the Mika.sa now approximates to 
Ci>ntinue to be plaved lor until won ' the gun pow.r uf the Agamemnon aiU 
three times in successi-.n by either ' Lord Nel^^on. and, like them, has th.> C- 



FOOT-SCHULZE means Hone^ Leather. 
FOOT-SCHULZE means permanence of shape. 
FOOT-SCHULZE means be^ materials throughout. 
FOOT-SCHULZE means up-to-date la^s. 
FOOT-SCHULZE means perfedfit from fir^ try-on. 
FOOT-SCHULZE means corred ^yle. 

They are the shoes that make folks say 

"THE WEST HAS SHOES 
THAT BEAT THE EAST" 

Insl^ on seeing FOOT-SCHULZE at your dealer's. If he 
cannot show vou, let us direct you to the nearer dealer who can. 

fFrite FOOT,SCHULZE&CO., St. Paul 

FOR A 



fighting strength of the vessel, making 
! her equal almost to the latter vessel.s. 



and Rigler. 



American Association. 



«iCohimbu3 ... 

Toledo 

Minneapolis . 
Louisville .... 
Kansas City 
Indianapol.s 
Milwaukee 



S'lW.NDlNG. 
Played. Won. 



.15:* 
...153 

..151 
...151 
...152 

..15.i 

...15:: 



St. Paul 153 



9U 
88 
7S 
77 
76 
73 
71 
58 



Lost. 
64 
65 
73 
77 
76 
80 
SI 
95 



Pet. 
.aH 
.B75 
.517 
.50t> 
.500 
.477 
.466 
.37i* 



RESULTS .S^VTURDAY. 
Louisville, 6; Coliimbu.s, 3. 
Kansas dty, 4; Milwaukee, 3. 
Toledo, 8; Indianapolis, 5. 



7 30 



18 



COLUMBUS WIN'S PENNANT. 

Columbus, Sept. 16.— Columbus fastened 

. to its lliird straight American associa- 

0001010 00 1—3' *''J" pennant by breaking even in yesl<!r- 

day's doubli;-header. which ended the 

st-ason. Three smsleo, a double and a 



Totals 

Soor>- by Innings: 

Virginia 

iMiluth 2 0—2 

NSr''^^UreJ";;as'l;Us^i^Z!r^Su^:!'r''^^^^ - "-« ^y Cianahnger. gave 

Livingston. Homn run— Tiiomp.s.)n. Stol- 1 '^"'' •.^aampions 



club, when it will become the per- 
manent property of that club. 

The Minneapolis golfvra were en- 
tertained at dinner at the Northland 
club Saturday evening, and an or- 
chestra furnished music for dancing 
throughout the evening. 

Til" se )res follows: 
Minikahda Pts. 

1.1. H. Johnson tied 

Gurtield 3-up 

'Irooks 3-up 

:V. C. Johnson... 3-up 

Hertig 3-np 

Jutts tied 

L'ariiahan 2-up 

ierahty 1-up 

Toehl'r 3-up 

T. R. Brooks 

Cotton 

E. J. Fisher 

McGlH 1-up 



Duluth Pts. 

Finkensteadt .. .. 

Towne 

Walker 

Thompson 

H. Blown 
Crosby . . . 

Alexander 

Meyers 

Miller, Jr 

H. H. Meyers 2-up 

Bagl.^y 3-up 

H. W. Fisher 3-up 
Waite 



D 



.tied 



BRIDGE GIVES WAY. 



Four People Are Hurt and 100 Submerged 
at Findiay, 0. 

Findlay. Ohio. Sept. 16.— Four people 
^ere seriou.sly injured and 100 people ; 
were aubm^ rged in the Blanchard viver , 
late yesterday afternoon while on their 
■way home from a ba.seball game, as a 
result of the breaking down of the 
Spindle street su.^pensiou bridge in this' 
city. j 

The injured are Miss Hilda C)utfelt. i yummpra. 
17 years, back sprained, will recover; H-'iinett, 
George Davis, internally Injured; Glenn 
Harris, ag.'d 12. badly 
Internally injund; Mrs. 



en b.ises— Benni'tt (Jk Meyers Ci). Bas 
on balls— Off Tredw.iy, 4; off 
Hit Ijy piteh>-d ball— Flaherty. Aici>aiig 
Iin, Summers and Meyers. Struck out — 
By Tn-dway. 4; by Haney, 3. Wild pitch 
— Haney. Time of game, 2 hours. 
VIRGINIA. 



Second game— 

01.-«o:i, If 

Taylor, 2b 

McCormick, cf. 

M.>y<is. rf 

Knrkt'. c 

Ryan, lb 

Thxmp.son. 3b. . 
Olnistead. ss. .. 
R<>gers, p 



Ai-:. 
. 5 
. 4 
. 4 
. 4 
. 5 
. 4 
. 4 



R. 






1 



1 

2 


1 



enougli to win In the i 
. ! oiK-ning inning. T<jwnaen.i was pounded I 
H mov 5' ' bard in the l.tst game. Manager Clyiner ' 
Mrl>aiigh- i Pi'^'^hed the last Inning and was ot scored 

First game— R. H. E. 

Columbus 5 3 1 1 X— 10 IS 4 

Louisville 10 1110—4 9 4 

B;itteries— 'Robertaille and Blue; Frantz 
and Peitst. Umpire— Kane. 

.Secoinl gallic— R. H. E. 

Columbus 011000 2—4 8 5 

U'Ui.sville 4 12 3 0-10 14 1 

Baitt.ries— Townseiid. Clynier. Fohl and 
Blue; L. Durham and Huglics. Umpire- 
Kane. 



Total ly I T>tal 



S 



H. PO. 

1 2 



2 
3 
1 
5 

10 
3 
1 




A. 


2 

u 

1 





1 

2 
6 



E. 



Totals 



cf.-p. 

rf 

.Munio", lb , 

bruised and Haney, If 

N. Drehense. : Lfighty. .>-3 

seriou.sly hurl about the face and in- ! L.'vlng.j;ton. p.-cf. 
ternally injured. There were a numl>er »* i'in<^Tt>. JO 
of narmw e.sf.ipes frinn drowniiig. 

The giving away of the bridge vva.^ 
caus^^d by the breaking of a cable that 
supported one of the sides, suppo.sedly 
by the excessive weight that was on 
It at the time. 



DULUTH. 

AB. R. 
, ... 5 

4 

4 

4 

4 



14 27 12 



I R<»binson, o. 
Mcl>auglilin, 



3b. 



1 






1 

2 





H. 

2 




1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 



PO. 

3 
3 
8 
3 
1 
1 

5 

2 



A. 

1 


3 
2 


1 



KAN.SAS CITY TAKES TWO. 

Kansas City, .Sept. I'J.— Kans^ts City 
took l>')th games of a dojl>le-he ader here 
ironi MiiwaLikec yesterday. Scores: 

First game- R. H. E. 

Kan.sas City 1 2 2 0— 5 6 6 

Mii waukei- 2 i>— 2 7 3 

B ulerif'.s— Egan and Criss; Schneiberg 
and B^•vIll.^ Umpire— Hayes. 

.Seomd game— R. H. E. 

Kansas City 10 2 2 0-5 6 2 

Milwaukee 1 1 0— 2 8 2 

Batteries— Brand.jn and .Sullivan; Good- 
win and Roth. Umpire— Hayes. 



Totals 

.Scort) by Innings: 
Virginia , 



.32 



4 8 27 



AN AMERICAN KILLED 

BY MEXICAN BANDITS. 

Ktporte, Ind.. Sept. 16. — A telegram 
received from Dwight Furness of, 
Furuesville, Ind., who is United Stalest 
consul at Guaiiajuta, Mexico, tells of | 
the murder there by Mexican bandits 1 
of Georg" Rose, an American, and the 
Injury of his wife. The murdered 
man was Ji son of W. A. D. Rose of 
BfUlon Harbor, Mich., and was 34 
years of age. He w as graduated from j 
the Michigan Agricultural cdlege In 
lS'.t6 and in 19''ii was married to Mi.«s 
Wiiiiiifred McGr:Uh of Salt Lake City- 
Mr. Rise was a mining engineer. 

Aceording to the telegram from 
Consul Fun;es.s, Rose was shot by rob- 
bers. Whether he dleti Instantly or 
lived .some time after the attack is 
not stated. Mrs. Rose was also shot, 
but it is be!!-'V»^d sh'^ will recover. 



10 3 1 O-T) 

Luliith 12 10 0—4 

.Sunitiiary: Two basf hits— Summers, 
Flile riy. Ryan, Rogt-rs, Meyrs, (2>. 
Tliive i)as.- hit— Olson. Stolen base— 
.Suminirs. Ooubl.- plays— Rogers to Tay- 
lor to Ryan; .Meyers to Ryan. Bases on 
halls— Off Rogers, 1; off Siimm.'fs, 2, 
.•struck out — By Rogers. 5; by Livingston. 



INDIANAPOLIS, 8; TOLEPO. 4 
Toledo, S'^pt. 16.— Tol.-do lost th. 
gam«' of tile season to 
ragged fleldmg. Score: R. H 

ToUnlo 10 1110 0—4 13 5 

Indianapolis 2 10 3 2 x— 8 13 2 

Batterie.s^Chech and Land; Eubanks 
and Hawley. 



ESSICK BEATEN 
BY ttlBBlNG 

American Association Bat- 
tery Couldn't Stop 
Brady's Men. 

Hibbing, Minn., Sept. lC.-(Special to 
JThe Herald.)— Coleraine used Esslck and 

Sugden. a battery from the St. Paul Am- 
I erican association team yesterday, but 

they couldn't do anything with the Hib- 
, bing champs and Brady's colts took 
jdown a victory by a aoore of 3 to 3. 

Gilligan was in great form, holding the 

(Cob'raine crowd to three hits. He waa a 

Its were 



inch Quick-firers to punish the obtrusive 
torpf'do li'ia'.s. 

Many may ask the question why the 
ten Formidables or the six Duncans in 
,the Britit^h fl.-^-t could not be shnilarly re- 
armed, but the Japane.se government had 
t.) greatly overhaul the Mika.sa aft^r she 
I had been under the wal* r for months, 
I otherwise th^y might not have considered 
I it wortli while to inak<> tlie change. So 
also with the captured and saved Rus- 
sian vesstls. 

With Germ.any the case is different, 
land is more comparable with British 
i conditions. The Kaiser cla.ss, including | 
five ships, and the Wlttelbach class, al- 1 
so of five vess-'ls. are comparatively | 
modern. Not one waa alloat elevi:n yeaxs 1 
ago, and some were launched a.« late ) 
as 1901. The form-^r class have Harvey 1 
armor, the latter Krupp plat, s, but their , 
armament is distinctly weak, according j 
to present day ideas. In twin-gun tur- 
rets, fore and aft. thejr hav-" 9.4-:nch ', 
guns, and dotted over the upper works, 
eighteen 5.9-inch quick firers. I 

The.se are the ships which some naval , 
critics likt'n to tht- British Fonnida-blj | 
and King Edward classes. To s'lbstitute 
11-inch guns for the four 9.4-inoh guns 
would involve a great increase In gun 
;)ower, but with the additional stress due 
to a muzzle energy of 30,0»Kv-foot toas 
against 10.700-f6ot tons, the comparative 
P"3wer of the two weapons is not a neg- 
ligible quantity. It means stiffoning, [ 
w'nich again Involves greater weight, and 1 
this, added to the im^reased w>^lght of ! 
the larger guns and their mountings andi 
ammunition, will immerse the ship to aj 
gr'^aler d^^ith. reducing spe'^d, which 
even now is only eighteen knots. Whit 
Is more serious is that the part of the 
armor bt-lt now above the w'ater lino 
would almost entirely disappear. 

The armor reserv of buoyinijy in the 
Kaiser class is alr«>ady less than in 
many other ships which might be nam- 
ed. Thus G»rmany has not her naval 
troubles to seek. 

The facts show that Germany's posi- 
tion relative to that of Great Britain is 
not so strong as some would have us 
! believe. This holds good also as to the 
time taken in constructing ships. Of 
flv« battleships of the l)euts.'hland class, 
whose inoe.ption dates back nearly fivfi 
' years, two have just been put in com- 
passes for runs. I mission, one will be commissioned in the 
Tile series with Virginia, opens tomor- putumn and two more next ye.ir. All 
row and it promises to be a warm onu. these vessel are of leas p.-cwer than 
It has been changed, so that Hibbing 1 even the Formidable claims, and do not 



of their beautifully illuminated 25-cent 
PAINT "BOOK for Children, 
together with a card of watercolors, or the 
''FOOT-SCHULZE Style Book,'' 
for everybody who wears shoes. 

Either or both books sent absolutely free for the asking. 
Address us simply : 

FOOT, SCHULZE & CO., 

SHOE MANUFACTURERS 
SAINT PAUL 



and be sure you 
tell us in what 



Look Pop 
this "mark 
of sho^ 
insurance" 



paper you saw 
this offer 



on the 
soles of 
your shoe 
purchase 



lo.:t th.. elo-.intf'^'^"^'^^'"*^ crowu 10 laree luia. n 
Im^LmA,?!- s« li'-^^" wild though and the hi 
Indianai),)Iis bV : Punched with passes for runs. 



TRADE 
MARK 



ST. PAUL I.OSKS TWO GAMES. 
St. Paul. .Sept. IC— St. Paul lost both 



plays at Virginia tomorrow, 



Come under the same 



ategt»ry as the 
ordered, I 



ONLY TWO PARTIES. 



l; by .Summers, 3. Wild pitch— Rogers. 1 Sames of yesterday's double-header to 
Innings pltclied— By I.,iving3ion, G; by i Ml"aeapolis 5 to 1, and 2 to 1. The 
.Summers, i. Attendance, l,aOO. I teams cK>se the season today aut Minne- 

— apolis. Scores; 

Saturday, the barnsionnera played he(. I First game— R. H. E. 

ter ball, both in the fi.ij and at bat, and St. Paul 000001000—1 3 1 

won out l>y a score of 4 to 1. Al t'um- Minneapolis 2 10 11—5 8 

mings h<ld the Virgiiii.ins to five .siife ! Batteries— Minnehan and L.aughlln; 



lirst installment for a new large cruiser 
of the improved type which will be the 

seventeenth of the twenty large crui.sers I ^__ 

contemplated by the navy law. The re- _ . . ri *• • 11 n.._:....i. 

wa^ orrterert nainmg tJiree larg.- cruisers will be iaid ] TueSdaV S tIeCtlOn III UppeF FeninSUia 

and comnleted 'down in 1*J9, I'jll and 1^12. while In Wlo the '' 

twv> AgamTmnonsi^^''^'k of superseding in rotation the ob.so- 



I 



, lesceni cruis.Ts will be begun. In addi- 



Will be Tame Affair. 



Wednesday , 
and Thursday and Virginia plays here K'ng Edward VII. 
Saturday, Sunday and" Monday during' Since the r>eiitschland 
the tair. The games wUl be played in \ England has laid down 
the morning.. It Is said Virginia will 0^''' Kina, Edwards, 
spring some big league .batteries, but th^ «n<^ ,a^D,-ea In ought, ^^„f ^^e Belleroplion , -^^ ^^ ^ ^^^^ installment for the new or , 

^s^b^tl^lS^Sa^^d'^Vi.^K,^-^^ --»^ -f ^*^« 

linent for the fifteenth and also 
cruiser "E," and a fourth and la.si in- 
stallment for the cruiser Scharnhorst. 
Provision will also be made for the usual 







ones ami they never had a chance. Josie 
Krick started to pitch for Virginia, l>ut 
in th«' fourth, he attenipted to stop .a line 
drive off Monroe's bat and his pitching 
hand was Injured. He continued until 
'the sixth, when he retired. Tredway suc- 
ceeding lilm. 

In the .^i.xth. with a man on base, Cum- 
mings made probably thi> longest hit ever 
made on the range. The ball went over 
the fence and struck a house some dis- 
tance from the grounds. It only went 
for two l)ase3. as it pii.ssed the tV-nce out- 
side the hon<e run mark. Score: 

T> T| C* 

nnluth 000013000—4 8 2 

Virginia 1 ')— 1 f. G 

Bitieiies — Cumniings and Robinson; 
Kriik. Tredway anil Kurke. 



Graham and Buelow. Umpire— Weni.n 
Second game— R. H. E. 

St. Paul 00 10 00 0—1 S 2 

Minneapolis 2 U 0— 2 9 

Batteries— CrI.ss and I<;iugh!in: Kilroy 

and Graham. Umpire— Werden. 



Hibbing team will reRiAin as it is at 
pr.sent. The score of yesterday's game 
follows: R. H. E. 

Coleraine 10 2 0—3 3 5 

Hib»>ing 1 D J 2 1 x-« 6 

Rvtterie.s— Esslck and -Sugden; Gilligan 
ajid Callahan. 



Calumet, Mich., Sept. 16. — (Special 



De Witt's Carbolized Witch Hazel Salvo 
is good for boils, liuriis, cuts and scalds. 
Sold by all druggists. 





] 



FITWELLS WIN. 



American League. 



_ When you 

are tired 6, nervous 

NOTHtNO IS S06OCD AS 
A GLASS OF 

FITGER'SBEES 

K Its small amount of alco- 
hol (3^ per cent) aids diges- 
tion; the malted barley and 
Bohemian hops (the best ob- 
tainable) make a tonic invig- 
orating and strengthening. 
Keep a case in your cellar 
and let your family share in 
its goodness. 





STANDING. 








Played. 


Won. 


Lost. 


Pet. 


Philadelphia 


IM 


so 


50 


.(>i5 


Detroit 


1:52 


7S 


54 


.5.4 


Cliicago 


U4 


79 


ao 


.C».! 


Cleveland .. 


va, 


la 


57 


.5.1 


New York . 


i:!2 


til 


71 


.4i2 


Bo'^ion 


m 


.".S 


76 


AW 


Si. Isolds . 


\z-i 


lA) 


T7 


.417 


V.ashuigion 


127 


*J 


87 


.j:5 




RESULTS SATURDAY. 
St. Louis, 4, l»'troit, 1. 
St. Louis, 4; I'etroii, 3. 
Phihidelphia T; Boston, 6. 
Phdadelphia, 5; Boston 2. 
t'liieago. 7; Cleveland, 2. 
N-w York, S; Washington, 2. 




Duluth Amateurs Defeat Two Harbors 
Nine. 6 to 2. 

Two Harbor.s, Minn.. Sept. IC— (Special 

to The Herald.)— In the last game of the 
seiuson here the F'ltwells of Duluth de- 
feated tile Two Harbors nine by a score 
of 6 to 2. All the scores were made In the 
first three Innings, after which both 
Thorscn and Beets pitched .shutout ball. 
Score: | «„ 

Fitwells 3 1 2 0-« 

Two Harbors 2 0—2 



quite met the condition laid down by an 
influential Russian paper— that Britain i 
need only build two guns for everj' one 
ordered by Germany In order to Insure 
the maintenance of peace. The ten i 
British Hhips laid down since 19i).3, and 
all In the iwt to be completed next year, ; 
are equal to fift«'en of the German ships, 
and yet they have only built Ave. The 
three Invincible cruisers are not Includ- 
ed. 

.Vs to the future the conditions are 
equally reassuring. The German navy 
program in.ludes four battleships of n,- 
9W tons, with rHoiprocatlng machinery 
to develop 20,1)00 Indicatetl horse power. ' 
Two of these ships, named the F^rsatz 
Sachen and Ersatz Bayern, were laid 
down two months ago, and the two oth- 
ers. th*» Ersatz Wurtemberg and Ersatz 
Baden, are provided for in the 19i):-8 pro- 
gram, but have not been commenced. It 

yet too .soon to speak of 19<)S-^ 
the present intention is to begin 



:\umber of small cruisers, 
and auxiliary craft. 



Tokio, Sept. 13. — The Japanese naval 
budget shows the distribution of the ex- 
penditure involved liy the war and reflects 
the fact that while Japan's prestige has 
oeen enormously enhanced and her navy 
greatly improved, there is a considerable 
debit account. This, it -ippears, will be 
spread over six years, terminating In ; 
r.^12-14. The naval expen.'ses of the war, j 
so far as they are charg-'able against the 
navy, amount to 173,v»0'J,00'J yen. and of the 
$i:;,?H).i>jo Is Uj be met during the next 
rt«cal year. In this item of 175,iji).).«W0 yen 
th< re Is Included, of course, the ship!?' 
but cost and expen.si of putting the captured 
>*h- battleships Into fighting condition. Thus, 



uiinaiiied" i election board r>roml.ses to be unusu- 
ally easy Tuesday when a choice is to 
be made of the delegates to the con- 
torpedo-boats stltuUonal convention at Lansing. 
There will be but two parties on the 
ticket and it i.s believed that on thl.s 
account all the return.s will be In by 6 
o'clock Tuesday evening. The polls 
open at 7 o'clock in the morning and 
clo.se at 5 in the afternoon. The offi- 
cials of the election board are i\er- 
mitted to close the polls one hour at 
noon if they care to do so. 



FRANKLIN'S SLUGGERS 



Snow Cutlers Under and Win Fifteenth 
Straight Game. 



data. 

o? 



will 



TIGKRS GET KVKN BREAK. 

St. Louis, S-pt. lii.— 1 •uniis the St. Louis- 
Detroit American lea^-iie ba.*«eball game 
yesterday fmpire Evans was struck on 
the h«.ad by a .si»da bottle in the hands 
of a spectator and was seriously injured, 
his recovery being doul>tfuI. The attack 
was made during an altercation ovr a 
foul. The crowd made a rush for th-- 
spectator and chased him around the lot, 
the arrival oi th-' pidice saving him. 
Detroit and St. I/»)Uis split even yesterd.iy 
aftern<->on, Detroit taking tlie lifst g.im ■. 
t> to 3 and St. Loui^; the second, whi..h 
was snorieiifed to seven innings, 3 to '1. 
Scores: 

First game— R. H. E. 

St Louis 10 110 0-3 11 2 

Detroit 10 5 0—6 10 3 

Batterle.s— Powell and Spencer; Killian 
and Payne. ITmpirejs— Dineeii, Schmidt 
and Evans. 

Second game— R, H. K, 

St. Louis 1 1 1 X— 3 7 

Detroit 2 0—2 5 4 



YOU 



The Franklin ;i 
- ason yesterday, 
straight victory. 



asfball team closed its 



I .ships, according to official 
1 have fourteen or sixt' en guns •>? eleven- 
inch caliber, with several stnalW-r guns 
for de^tvn.s^: against torpe.lfl boat -at- 
by winninif its fifteenth ' taok. and six sulmi-^rged torpedo tubes 

defeating the D. G. ^% ^'\'^r J^'^ crul-sers. England had 
,-..,. , , ... .« ^^ ■"'^ f***" held her own. One shin of Is - 

Cutler team by a scare of 21 to 10. The fxjo tons with Parson's turbine ma- 
game was played at Thirty-second ave- chinery of 45,ij'>'» horse-power has been 
nue west and was a terrible slugg'ng laid down, another will be included 
match. The Outler team's pitchers were '^he program of 1>K*. another in i;ni. and 
pounded all through the contest and, al- oi^t; in lt»12. In ajidition to this ve.s*el 
tliough Danielson took a pretty stiff wal 



,vo .. ,_ _.^ 

ers. The first four of these Ersatz bat- during the next naval year there would 
tleships— the Dreadnaughts of the Kals- be spent on the replacement of ships lost, 
er's navy— will be compleK^d by 1»M if apart altogether froni normal new con- 
the hoptis of the government are realized struction, $6,t.5<3,000; on the r*^pair and r^- 
England will then have t^n Dread- armament of the Russian ships, $4.n2o,0»JO: 
naughts. If the present Intentions of th-^ for repairs at th ^ war ports. $l.G:o,i)<Hi. The 
admiralty are realized. The Germ:in work on the Mikasa, which is not in- 



j Most disfiguring skin erupiions, scrofula, 
I pimrtles, rashes, etc., are due to impuie 
] blood. Burdock Blood Bitters is a cKans- 
\ ing blood tonic. Makes you clear-eyed, 
clear-brained, clear-.skinned. 



luded in this category, will involve about 
SI 200 00"). 

The next main item is for the replace- 
ment of old works, forts, etc., and the 
total to be spent in six ye.Trs is 7ij,577,0<W 
yen and of this $.5.7*},000 will b.; spent dur- 
ing the financial year. The six years' 
program of new con.st ruction will amount, 
according to present intentions, to 73,liO,- 
In 0<") yen and one-third the price is to be 
met during the next financial year. 



TO EXHIBIT APPLE.S. 
Bemidji. Minn., Sept. 16.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — L. Amadon, who has 
been a progressive and up-to-date 
farmer near Alida postoffice, near 
Creek township, Clearwater county, an- 
nounces that he will exhibit at the 
forthcoming Beltrami County fair. 
Transcendent crab apples an 1 black- 
berries which he has raised during tho 
p.'-esent season. 

Mr. Amadou's farm is almost directly 
on the line between Beltrami and Clear- 
I water cotJir.tirs. 



It'ping. the Franklins wert- never in dan- 
ger. Scor*: 

Franklins ^803 124 4 2-21 

Cutlers .....12 3 02 02 0-10 

Batteries— Danielson and Hestrom; 

Pattum. M^rGinnis and Hutlel. 



SCOTT-GRAFFS VICTORS. 



Can buy this hlRh-grado 17- 
jrwcltnl Huiiiihun. udju.«!ted 

watch. In the world-l'ainous 
••IJ4»s.s" liiird cui^c, oiicu face 
or hunting, for 



in 



$ 1 8.00 



CLEVELAND, 3; OHICAGO, 2. 
Chicago, Sept. 16.— Walsh and Leibhardt 



Othcr> a.sk 


$:",0 


to 


$S.'> 


for 


It. 


VV(^ 


arc so 


lliMK 


it 


for 


$18 


at 


our 


S|>ecial 


Sale. 











Lumbermen Too Much for Millers 
Final Game.« 

Vill hard yes 



The Scott-Graffs hit Ue' 
tcrday and the ITnlversal 
fierce ball In the fiel 
winning by a score of 
was played at Athlefic 



of p5,'.«e«) tons now l^egrun. and to be fitted i 
with ten or tw«'lve guns of ll-inch caliber! 
as compared with eight of 12-inch calib-r 
in the 17.250 ton Invincibles, Germany ha.s i 
nearing completion two cruisers, tho 
Griesenan and Scharnhorst of 11, 42") tons • 
t2t;,'J'Jii horse-power), with eight S.3-inch 
guns, six 6-inc hguns, and twenty-eight ' 
smaller weapons; a cruL^er of 14,7*50 tons ; 
and 3.'),C'00 horse-power, with eight 11 -inch i 
and .several lighter guns. Thus by 1912 



S.S.S. 



A CERTAIN SAFE 
TREATMENT 



S. S. S. Is the only safe and reliable cure for Contagious Blood Poison, 
she will have three^visseis^ which^ niay I It is purely vegetable, made entirely from healing, cleansing roots, herbs 
be comparable to Invin cibles. | and barks, and in addition to curing this vile disorder, S. S. S. builds up 

Berlin. Sept. 13.— The preliminary draft j every part of the System. Mercury and potash cannot cure the trouble^ 




ESTERLY, 

Spalding Hotel Jeweler. 



lllers playt d 

lumberm.en 

The game ; 

_ ark. Smith, ' 
first baseman for the fitft)tt-GrafE8, took 
down the hitting honors w 
and a t ripple. Score 

Scott-Graffs 2 4 

Millers 13 

Batteries— Culllns and Flyiin; Graham, 
Sutherland, Olson and Muri^y. 



•s wi^ two doubles 
-1^ l7 R- H. E. 

Q»0 as 1-12 10 4 

W 0— 4 5 10 



Hummers Win Oot. 

Olund. the Hummer8'*!.pfu;her, let the 
Hazelwood Parks dowrL^fth three hits 
yesterday, and the Hummers won an easy 
victory by a score of 4 to 2. 



two new battleships and one new crui.ser, 
all three of which are to be of the l;irg- 
'•.-=•. type. Tho tlve battleshipi^ of the 13,- 
2<.^)-ton Deutschland class will have been 
o.)mpleted for sea by next year. At pres- 
ent only the Deut.schland and the Pom- 
nifrn are in commission; the Hannover, 
it is hoptid, will be ready in the autumn. 
The- two remaining battleships of this 
class are the Schleslen and the Sohle.«wig- 
Holstein 
pie ted nex 

It is hoped 
construction the first full division of the 
n >w battleships of 18,000 tons or more will 
b" alloat by the year 1910. wh-^n also the 
last of the thirty-eight battleships con^ 
tomplated by the navy law of I'JOO will be 
laid down. 

The estimates for 1908 wdl also include A 



year^'is-If TneiudVr'Virst '?nstSLlX"'foi they Can Only mask'it in the systeii for awhile, and when they are left oflf 

the disease returns, usually, in worse form than before, and the patient finds 
he has damaged his health with these strong minerals, which disease the 
delicate lining of the stomach, affect the bowels, produce chronic dyspepsia 
and often set up Mercurial Rheumatism. It will not do to trifle with a dis- 
ease so powerful as Contagious Blood Poison, for every day it remains in the 
blood it is progressing toward a dangerous stage, and will in the end get be- 
yond the control of any treatment. S. S. S. cures blood poison in the right 
. which It is hoped, will be com- j ^ay, it goes down into the circulation and removes every particle of the virus. 
looped ^by increasing the rate of j No bad results are ever experienced from the use of S. S. S. It is gentle and 

pleasant in its action, and forty "years of cures warrant the statement that 
S. S. S. is not only a safe but a certain treatment. Home treatnient book 
on this disease and any medical advice desired sent free to all who write, 

THE SWIFT SPECIFIC CO., ATLANTA, ^GA^ 



f 



--^-^ 



■H-t^ 



_. |„ - , — -— ' - r- ■■ ■ ■* -^ : : 



THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 1907. 



GORDON 



'T^HE letters in the 
•■■ word G-o-r-d-o-n 

are just a little more 

than enough to spell 

G-O-O-D. 
Gordon Hats are Just 

a little better than 

need be. 




Gordon dr T.uxc 



'npIlE hat label 
"*■ that means 



i$ 



a whole 
more of 
the extra 
better- 
ncss. 



dollar 



4 



3 



FALL SUITS 

It will he to your interest if you 
Intend gottinj? a fall or winter 
suit to ('.ill and see our stock. On 

both s'li's 

And Overcoats 



Wo ran 
Kuar.intre 

fil'-.isfil in 



save y')u iniitu-y iitul 
yiiu will be thorouiflily 
('■■try '.VTV 



MORRISON 

s LAKK AVRNUE SOUTH 



VIRGINIA 
WINS TWO 

Duluth Wins Saturday, 

But Drops a Double 

Header. 

Two Good Games Be- 
fore Large Sunday 
Crowd. 



engaged in a de.spurate pllclimg duel yes- | 
terday, Clevoland winning, 3 to 2. The , 
grtatbst crowd in tho history of the local 
Aiuoiican ieagu« club saw the contest, the 
Knjuud.s being tilled and the gates clode'l 
long b'.foro the game started. Chicago 
(jar:nd a run in Ih-' tiftli and bundled 
thrt-e hits lor another in the seventh, 
tiling Clevelrind. wlio hud scored twice in 
tlu' -sixtli on solid piiciiing. Tne visitoi6 
to-jk tile lead again in the ninth on a 
double and Lieb.hardfs single. 

Score: R H. E. 

Chicago OftOOlOlOO-2 8 I 

Cleveland i) 2 1-3 12 1 

Ha tterie-s— Walsh and Sullivan; Lieb- 
hardl and Bemia. Umpire— Connolly. 



Chicago .... 
Pittsburg ... 
N-w York . 
PiilLtdelphia 
Br(x>klyn ... 
Cincinnati ., 

B.t.stoii 

St. l^juis .. 



National League. 

STANOING. 
Played. Won. 



.135 
..131 
..UJ 
..UH 

..i;» 
..va 

..128 
..134 



a7 

77 
71 
62 
&4 
48 
40 



Lost. 
38 
53 

56 

57 
71 
78 
80 
»4 



Pel. 
.713 
.5!Xi 
.57'J 
.555 
.4CG 
AM 

.2»a 



CUP GOB TO 
MINIKAHDA 

m 

Minneapolis Golfers Win 

From the Northland 

Players. 



NAVIES OF 
THE^WERS 

Japan Replacing 6-Inch 

Guns With 10 on the 

Mikasa. 



on 



Virginia, Minn., .S-pt. 16.— ^Special 
The l{enild.>-B-autifal work by 
Cumniing.-i in Saturday's ganic gave 
Duluth barnstormers on.- g.iuie from 
ginra's e.K-l«agUt'rs. but y.-.sierday. 




All 
the I 
Vir- 
ile { 
S.>x wt'ro lak.'U into camp twice, by 
scores of 3 to 2. anl 5 to 4. r'-'spectively. ' 
1 The tirst game wt-ut ten innings and 
'was a pitcliers' duel betwi-eii Tridway 
and Haiiey, with neither having any ad- 
I vintage. A oiiple of wU-bunchtd .^wat'i 
; in the lenih round deeidcd the result uf 
; the game in Trt-dways lavor. 
■ The SIC jnd game was also closely play- 
' td. despite the fact that l.iiviutj.'iton and 
.Summ- rs did the throwing f..r DuluLh. 
while Rogers was working for Virginia, i 
Tile S.x sot to Rogers lu the early lu- 
ning-^ for four .-^cor'-:*. while tlie best the,! 
; Virginians could do was one in the s.-o-i 
oiid. Th-y knotted It up with three 
; scores in tht; sixth and the winning run 
I was scored in the eighth. The scores 
follow: 

VIRGINIA. ! 



RESULT.S .SATURDAY. 
Ciiicaso. 12; Cincinnati. 5. 
Pittsburg, B; St. Louis, 1. 
Philad-lphla. 3; Boston. 1. 
Phil.ldelphia, 9; Boston. 1. 
Br-oklyn. S; New York, 7. 
Bro^»klyn, 2; New York. 0. 



CHICAGO. 8; CINCINNATI, 1. 

Chicago. .S-pi. lo.— Chicago made it four 
stri'.giit from Cincinnati yesterday by 
pounding Hitt for eleven singles, which 
r.'S'ilt.'d in an S to 1 victory. I..und- 
givn's pitching and Klings and Tinker's 
batting wtiv tho principal factors in tlie 
victory. The visitors made close w<jrk 
of tlieir hits and ilieir only run in the 
Hrst inning. Score: R. H. E. 

Chicago 3 U 20000 3 X— 8 11 1 

Cincinnati 1 'J 0— 1 4 1 

attt :i'-s— Eundgren and Kling; Hilt 
and McLean. Umpir*;- Emslie. 



^0 Clever Golf Players 
Wet and Soggy 
Grounds. 



The Mlnikahda Golf club team of 
Minneapolis, Saturday. won 
trophy for team competition from 
the Northland Country club on the 
course of the Duluth club. The 
play was 18-hole team play, Na3.sau 
style, the final .score being Mlnikahda 
19, Duluth 8. 

Despite the rain, which fell al- 
most constantly during the after- 



Great Britain Needs 

Heavier Ordnance — 

Kaiser's Program. 



Foot.Schulze 
shoes are 
ail made 
with 
full vam ps 



Ever y bit 
foi Foot.Schulze 
material and 
stitching 
is honest 



Lcmdon. Sept. 16.— Time and again navaJ 
writers have contended in favor of the 
rearining of British warships to bring 
them into line with modern progress In 
artillery, but the authorities of While- 
hall have opposfd the scheme with rare 
exceptiona, and that for obvious reas^ons. 
But Germany is embarking upon such a \ 
scheme, and the results will be watched 
with interest. i 

xj^ I Japan has essayed the task in the Rus- I 
isian ves-scls captured, whiie the change^ 
i of armament In the Mikasa Is a matter of ; 
i great Interest. This case Is typical, 
originally the ves.sel had four 12-lnch and 
, fourteen 6-inch guns. b<'lng superior to [ 
I the Formidalih- class sim-.illaneciusly built i 
I for the British navy in having two m:>re i 
|6-:nch quick-iirers. Ei^ht of th.-se 6-inch ; 
I guns will now be removed to enable four, 
I ill-inch guns to be fitted. This may be j 

far 



Firs; game— AB. 


R. 


H. 


PO. 


A. 


E. 


Ol.-jon, If 5 








o 








Taylor. 2b 5 


IJ 





E 


2 


a 


M 'Cormick. cf 2 








4 








.M- yers. If ;; 


2 














Kurkr, c 5 


1 


i1 








u 


Kvaii. lb A 


1} 


3 


10 








1 homp.Hon. 31> 4 


1 


1 


2 


') 


u 


< »lmsli-ad. ss 3 








2 


•J 


1 


Tr -.hvay. p 4 





■I 





3 





Totals r. 


3 


7 


3;j 


10 


1 


DfLCT 


H. 










AB 


R. 


H. 


I><3. 


A. 


K 


1 .^iimm-^rs, cf 3 





1 


5 


1 





1 B'linett, rf 5 


1 


1 








u 


1 Miinroe, lb 4 








12 





1 


J.ivnigston, If 3 


1 


1 


■« 





1 


L.iglity. ss 4 





2 


1 


5 


\) 


1 il in«y. p 








• > 

M 


i 


1 


riahfi-tv. I'b 4 





1 


1 


1 


u 


. Kobinson, c 4 








3 


3 





Mi-Laugiilin, 3b. ... 4 





1 


4 


1 


1 


1 Totals 3'J 


2 


7 


30 


U 


3 


! S<-.)r>- b.v innings: 













PITTSBCRG. 8; ST. LOUIS. 1. j 

St. Louis, S>"pt. 16.— ThH Pittsburg Na- ■ 
tionals bunch'd the.r hits iu the titlh 
and six*-h innings and won yesterday's 
game by 8 to 1. Scor«: R. 11. E. 

Si. Louis 0)0000100—1 8 2, 

Pitl.--burg 3 5 0— 8 9 0; 

Batt< rii'S— Metilyiin. I>oel<e and Hostel- ! 
ler; Ij"<'ver and Gibson. Umpires— Kiem 
and Rigler. 

American Association. 



! (luite a suitable arrangement so far as 
noon, some clever golf was seen on 1 weight Is .3on'">rn. d, but the stre.ss of a 
.V- . „„ 1 o,,o.t^„ ^r.,,...=^ rri,.:^ ' l>-ineh gun firing with a muzzle energy 

the wet and .soggy course. The , ^j, 31 .n-io-fuot tons Is very much greater 

Minneapolis team was compos.-d of j ^jj..^j^ ^jj , effect from a 6-inch fi"ifit-f^i"^''' 
some of the l»est players in tlie ! jj^eharging 
state and their work was cun.sist- j weight with 
ently good. The surprise of the ; tons 
play was the e.\<el!eni form shown 
by F. L. Finkeiistead, who held L. 
H. Johnson, the winner of the state ! 



a shot of on.-tlflh tho 
an energy of only 6,v>'»-foot 



Columbus ... 

Toledo 

Minneapolis . 
Louisville .... 
Kansas City 
Inoi.inapol.s 
Milwaukee .. 
St. Paul .... 



STANI>1N« v. 
Pi.iyed. Won. 



...153 

. . 151 
...V)i 
...152 

...152 
,..153 



iW 
*i 
78 
77 
76 
73 
71 
58 



Lost. 
64 
65 
73 
77 
76 
80 
81 
05 



Pet. 
.584 
.575 
.517 

.5.A> 
.500 
.477 
.466 



It must be accented that the structural 
strength of this Vickers' ship justirtes the 
ehangf, which will materially add to the 
, . , «v. ^ ''' i ftgliting strength of the vessd, making 

chanipbuishii' in the reci-nt tourna- , ,,,,,. j.,f,j.^j .^;„^o.st to the latter vessel.-,; 
nient at .St. Paul, to a tie score. m^,. i.i:uori and the Kashima, built r^^- 1 

The cup for the coinpiHition was ; spectlvdy by the Vickers and Armstrong. I 
offered by Duluth people and will i indeed, the Mika.sa now approximates to | 
continue to be played lor until won | thf gun pow.t of the Again 
three time.s in .succession by either I-'"''! Nelson, and. like th-m. 



FOOT-SCHULZE means Honeil Leather. 
FOOT-SCHULZE means permanence of shape. 
FOOT-SCHULZE means beil materials throughout. 
FOOT-SCHULZE means up-to-date la^s. 
FOOT-SCHULZE means perfect fit from fir^ try-on. 
FOOT-SCHULZE means correcft ^yle. 

They are the shoes that make folks say 

"THE WEST HAS SHOES 
THAT BEAT THE EAST" 

InsiA on seeing FOOT-SCHULZE at your dealer's. If he 
cannot show vou, let us dired you to the nearer dealer who can. 

IFrite FOOT,SCHULZE&CO., *S/. Paul 

FOR A 



BRIDGE GIVES WAY. 

Four People Are Hurt and 100 Submerg2d 
at Finiilay, 0. 

Find'ay. Ohio. .Sept. 16.— Four people 
•were .seriously injured and VM) people 
■were submerged in the Blanchard river 
late yesterday aflei-noon while on their 
May 1: >me from a ba.seball game, as a 
result of the breaking down of the 
.Spindle street suspension bridge in thia 

city. 

The injured are Miss Hilda (»utfell. 
17 years, back sprained, will recover; 
Oeorgf Davis, internally injured; Gh-nn 
Harris, ag.'d 12. badly bruisetl and 
internal'y injur -d; Mr.s. N. Drehense. 
serioii.sly hurt about the face and in- 
ternilly injurel. Th-re were a number 
of narrow esc ines from drownirig. 

The giving away of t!ie bridge wa.-^ 
cau.sed by the breaking >f a cabl-> that 
supported one of the sides, supposedly 
]>y the exce.ssive weight that was on 
It at the tnrni. 



Virginia 1 1 tH) 1— 3 

l.iiiuih 2 '> 0— 2 

."^•immary: Two b^isf hits— l..elglity. 
Mark''. Three l>ase lilts— Mci^iiughiui, 
Livingston. Hom-! run— Thompson. .Sti>l- 
en b.isfs— iJeniii tt (2;. M yirs t3). liases 



RE.SULTS .SwVTURDAY, 

Li)ui.sville, 6; Columbu.-^, 3. 
, Kansas City. 4; MilU:tukee, 3. 
I Toledo. 8; Indianapolis. 5. 

COLUMBr.S WINS PENNANT. 

I Coluia))us, Sept. 16.— Columbus fastened 
! to lis third straight American assocla- 
' tion pennant by bre.ikin*; evi-n In yesl'^r- 
day's doubh-header. Which ende^i the 
st-ason. Three sinr;Ies, a d.>uble and a 
t triple, with a muff by Gdiialinger. gave 
j tlu- champions eiiougli to win lu the 
lojHning inning. Townaeriil was pounded 
liard in the l.idl game. Manager Clynii-r 



club, when it will b"come the per- 
manent pr op.-rty of tJiai club. 

The Minneap'dls golfvrs were en- 
tertained at dinner at the Northland 
club Saturday evening, and an or- 
chestra furnished music for dancing 
throughout the evening. 

Tie- S'^ u«'S follows: 
Mlnikahda Pts. 

1.1. H. Johnson tied 

.3-up 

.o-up 

.8-up 

.3-up 

.tied 

.2-up 

.1-up 

.3-up 



minoii an.l 

has the 0- 

the obtrusive 



Garfield 

'trooks 

\. C. Johnson. 

Hertig 

'utts 

L'arnahan 

jt-rahtv 

To^-hbr 

T. R Brooks.. 

('oiton 

E. J. Fisher ... 
McGill 



Pts. 



..tied 



..1-up 
Total 1'.' 



Duluth 
Finkenstoadt 

Towne 

Walker .. .. 
Thompson ... 
H. Brown .. 

I'rosby 

Alexander 

Meyers 

Miller. Jr 

H. H. Meyers 2-up 

Bagl -y 3-up 

H. W. Fisher 3-up 
Waiie 

Total 8 



HU ^?'^[^h.J';;;Jr^laher^ MlSglfliP^^cUed Uu. last inning anU was ot scored 
lin. .Summers and Meyers. Struck out— i ^^1',' 
By Tndway. 4; by Haney. 3. Wild pitch 
— Haney. Time of game. 2 hours. 
VIRGINIA. 



S.'cond game — AH. 


R. 


H. 


PO. 


A. 


K. 


Oi.son. If 5 





1 


<> 


a 


1 


Taylor, 2b 4 





2 


2 








MeCermick. cf. ... 4 








3 








M.-vcrs. rf 4 


1 


.1 


1 


1 


u 


Kurke. c 5 





1 


5 








Kvan. lb 4 


1 


• > 


10 








Tiiompson. 3b 4 


■> 


i 


3 


1 


1 


Olmstead. ss 3 





^ 


1 


2 





Rogers, p 4 


1 


- 





6 





Totals :r7 


5 


14 


•yy 


12 


■} 


OULUTII. 










AB 


R. 


H. 


PO. 


A. 


E. 


.Summers, cf.-p. ... 5 


1 


2 


3 








It-nneii. rf 4 








3 


1 





Munro ■. lb 4 








8 








Haney. If 4 





1 


3 





[) 


Leighty. S3 4 





1 


1 


3 


1 


Livln.gstoii. p.-cf.... 2 


1 


1 


1 


2 


u 


Kiaherty. 2b 3 


2 


1 


5 





1 


1 Kobinson. c 4 


II 


1 


5 





1 


1 Mcl*iughlin. Sb. ..2 





1 


2 


1 


u 



Stii .ris 
First game- R. H. E. 

ji'olumbus 5 i> 3 1 1 X— 10 IS 4 

iL.)Uisvllle 1000 1110-4 9 4 

( livtteries— 'Ri^bertalile and Blue; Franlz 



.Secoml ganiv.:— R. It. E 

• ■.jiuml.us 110002—4 8 3 

Louisville 4 12 3 0-10 It 1 

Batteries— Townsend. Clynier. F>hl and 
Blue; L. Durham and HuglKS. Umpire- 
Kane. 

KAN.S.\i? CITY TAKK.S TWO. 

Kansas City, .Sept. M.— Kansiis City 
took b>;h games of a do.ible-he ider here 
from Miiwaukee yesterday. Scores: 

First game- R. H. E. 

Kansas '"ity 10 2 2 0—5 6 6 

Milvvaukei- 2 ij— 2 7 3 

Baiterii's- Egan and Criss; Schneiberg 
and Beville. Umpire— Hayed. 

Second game— R. H. E. 

Kansas City 1 2 2 0— 5 6 2 

•Milwaukee 110 0—2 8 2 

Batteries— Brandon and .'luHivan; Good- 
wii; and Roth. Umpire— Hayes. 



ESSICK BEATEN 
BY HIBBING 

American Association Bat- 
tery Couldn't Stop 
Brady's Men. 



inch iiuick-tirers to punish 
torpedo bia'.s. j 

Manr may ask the question why tlie 
ten Formidabks or the six Duncans in i 
the Briti.-'li tie-t could n.>t be shuilarly re- 
armed, b'j* the Japane.se government had 
to greatly overhaul the Mika.'^n after she 
had been under the waif r for months. 
I otherwise they might nc>t have considered 
lit worth while to make the ch inge. So 
I also with the captured and saved Rus- 
I sian vessels. 

I With Germany the case is different, 
! and is more oontparable with British 
conditions. The Kaiser class. Including 
five ships, and the Wltielbach cLiss. al- 
' so of five vessels, are comparativly , 
modern. Not one was afloat eleven years j 
ago. and some were launched as late i 
as 1901. The former class have Harvey I 
arm.>r. the latter Krupp plates, but their j 
armament is distinctly weak, a'.-f'ording i 
to present day ideas. In twin-gun tur- 
rets, fore and aft. they have 3.4-:n- h 
guns, and dotted ovr the upper work-s 
eighteen 5.9-ineh ((iiick flrers. ; 

Tiiese .\re the ships which ..s-ime naval ', 
cri'ies liken to the Britisii Formidibl-s i 
and King Edward --lasses. To substitute 
11-ineh guns for the four 9.4-inch guns 
would involve a great increase In gun | 
power, but with the additi.)nal stress due | 
to a tuuzzl.-' f nergy of 3'\0'XV-foot teas 
against lo.Tt»-f6oi tons, the comparative 
p.5wer of the two weapons is not a nesj- 
liglMe (iuant:*y. It means s'jff<'ning. 
which again tnvolv:\s greater weight, and ! 
this, addt.'d to the {n<*reased weight of! 
the larger guns .uiil their mountings and 
ammunition, will immerse the ship '>^ a 
greater de^jth. reducing speed. which 
even now is only eighteen knots. Whit 
Is more serious is that the part of the 
armor b-lt now .xbove the wvtor line 
would almost entirely disappear. 

The armor reserve of buoyiney in the 
Kai.ser class is alread.v less than in 

might be nam- 
not her naval 



iFi 



D 



of their beautifully illuminated 25-cent 
PAINT "BOOK for Children, 
together viith a card of watercolors, or the 
''FOOT-SCHULZE Style Book,'' 
for everybody who wears shoes. 

Either or both books sent absolutely free for the asking. 
Address us simply : 

FOOT, SCHULZE & CO., 

SHOE MANUFACTURERS 
SAINT PAUL 

paper 



AN AMERICAN KILLED 

BY MEXICAN BANDITS. 



I..aporte. Ind., Sept. 16. — A telegram 
rei-eived from Dwight Furness 
Furnesville. Ind.. who is United States 
consul at Guaiiajuta. Mexic.). tells <»f 
the murder there by Mexican bandits 
of G»^org" Rose, an American, and the 
Injury of his wife. The mtirdereii 
man was a son of \V. A. D. Rose of 



Totals 32 4 8 27 8 2 

.Scjre by Innings: 

Virginia 1 ft ."> 1 0— 5 

Duluth 1 2 1 iM) u — 4 

Summary: Two base hits-^Summers. ,„,,,„,,, ,,. 
Flaherty. Ryan. Rogers. Meyers. ,2): I ^"'^' "''"'P""'* 
Tliree bas<- hit- Olson. Stolen base— I 
.Summers. l>juble plays— Rogers to Tay- | 
lor to Ryan; Meyers to Ryan. B.ises on: 
lialls— Oft" Rogers, 1; off Summer.s, 2, i 
Struck out— By Ftogers. 5; by Livingston. 
1; by Summers, 3. Wild pitch— Roger.-t. ' 
, Innings pitched- By Livingston. 6; by' 
ol I Summers. 3. Attendance, 1.200. 1 



INrHAN.VPuLLS. S; TOLEDO. 4. 
Toledo. .Sept. 16.— Toledo lost the closing 
game )f l\\^, seasoti to Indianapolis by 
r.isged fielding. Score: R. H. E. 

Toieiio 100011100—4 13 5 

...0 2 100 3 2x— 8 13 2 
Batteries-<:'hech and Land; Eubanku 
and Hawleif. 



Hibbing. Minn.. Sept. 16.-(Special to 
The Herald.)— L'oleraine used Kssiek and i many other ships which 
Sugden. a battery from the St. Paul Am- ! '^'i. Thus G-nr.any has 

. , . , ... troubles to seek, 

erican association team yesterday, but q^jj,. f^^,^ .,;^,^^, ^^ai Germany's posi- 

they couldn't do anything with the Hib-|tion relative to that of Great Britain is 
bing champs and Bra<ly'3 colts took : "ot *:> -Strong as some would have u.=! 
down a victory by a score of 3 to 3 



' t>elieve. This holds grwid al.so as to 



BeuLon Harbor, Mich., ami was 34 | in th. 
years of age. He was gra.luated fn>mi drive 
the Mb higan Agricultural college iti 'i"'" 
1S96 and iti l!»oii was marri*»d to Mi.'«s 
VViunifred McGrath of Salt I«ike City. 
Mr. Rose was a mining engineer. 

Aci- ording to the telegnim from 
Consul Furiie.ss, Ro.se wa.s shot by rob- 
bers. Whet Iter he died Instantly or 
lived some time after the attack is 
not stated. Mr^. R'>se was also shot. 



Saturda.v, the barnstoi-mers playe«l I.et-i 
ter ball, both In the fj. Ij and at bat, and 
won out by a score <if 4 to 1. .M Ciun- 
mlngs lieM the Virginians lo five .siife ! 
ones and they n.'\-er li;i.d a chance. Josie 
Krick starteil to pheh for Virginia, but i 



He continueii until 
retired. Tredway sue- 



but if is !ie 



-h-- 



reC'iver. 










fourth, he attempicd to stop a line 'St. Paul 
off Monroe's b.it and his pitching i Minneapolis 
was injure. 1. 
the sixth, when he 
ceeding Idm. 

In the sixth, with a man on t>ase. Cum- 
mings niM.de j)rol.ably the longest hit ever 
made on the range. T!ie liall went over 
the fence and struck a house somt? dis- 
taiu'e from the grounds. It only went 
for two bases, as it pas.setl the fence out- 
side the home run mark. Score: 

R T-T V* 

nuhith 1 3 Of»— 4 S 2 

Virginia n 1 0— 1 5 6 

B 1 tierie.s — Ciimmings and Robinson; 
Kri.It. Tredway and Kurke. 



ST. PAUL LOSES TWO GAMES. 

St. Paul. .Sept. 16.— St. Paul lost both 
games of yesterday's double-header to 
Minneapolia 5 to 1, and 2 tu 1. The 
teams cIo.He the season today ad Minne- 
.iI)olis. Scores; 

First game- R. H. E. 

St. Paul 00000 100 0-1 li 1 

Minneapolis 2 10 1 1—5 8 

Bitteries— Minnehan and Laughlin; 
(jraham .md Buelow. Umpir-. — Werden. 

Second game— R. H. E. 



Gilligan was in great form, holding the 

iColeralnc crowd to three hits. He waa a 

: little wild though and tiie hits were 

; bunched with pa.sses for runs. 

1 Tile series with Virginia, opens tomor- 
row and it promises ly bo a warm one. 

, It hajj been cliangicl. so that Hibbing 
plays at Virginia tomorrow, Wednesii ay 
and Thursday and Virginia plays here 
Saturday, Sunday and Monday during 
trie fair. The games wHI t>e played iti 
th^ morning. . It Is .said Virginia will i fi^'*^ 
spring some big league .imtteries. l>ut thiji*"" 
Hiibliing team will remain as it is af'^^d 
pr.s.nt. The score of yesterday's game 
follows: R. H. E. 

Coleraine 10 2 0—3 3 5 

Hil*bliig 1 I) 1 2 1 x-5 S 

Batteries— Elsslck and Sugdeii; Gilligan 
anil Callahan. 



... .0 1 0-1 S 2 
... .2 0—2 9 
Batterie.s— CrIss and Liughiin; Kilroy 
and Gr.ih.im. Umpire— Werden. 



FITWELLS WIN. 



De Will's Carboiizid Witch Hazel Salvo 
Is good for T>oi:s, burns, cuts and scalds. 
Sold by all dnigijists. 



1^ 



} 



American Uague. 



_ When you 

ARE TIRED e, NERVOV5 
KOTHIKG ?S SOCOCD Al* 
A GLASS OF 

FilGEKSBEO 

< Its small amount of alco- 
hol {2\ per cent) aids diges- 
tion; the mahcd barley and 
Bohemian hops (the best ob- 
tainable) make a tonic invig- 
orating and strengthening. 
Keep a case in your cellar 
and let your family share in 
its goodness. 





STAM'l 


.Ni;. 








Played 


Won. 


Losi. 


I'd. 


Philadelphia 


lo ( 


80 


W 


.li:5 


n.'troit 


i:!2 


7S 


54 


.5.-i 


Chiiago 


134 


70 


55 


.5*1 


Ciev.'land .. 


lie 


ii> 


57 


.5.1 


New York . 


1:12 


ill 


71 


.412 


B.-sfon 


114 


5S 


7»; 


.4Vi 


Si. Louls . 


i.:2 


...J 


77 


.417 


\". ;i.-iiington 


127 


40 


S7 


.'a.li 



RESULTS SATURDAY. 

St. Louis. 4. 1» -iroit, 1. 
St. Loui.s, 4; I'etroii. 3. 
Pliil.d-Ipiiia 7; E;..st,.n. 6. 
Philadelphia. '<: B'.ston. 2. 
<"ii.ieaj;o, 7; Cb-v.-land. 2. 
New York, S; Washington, 2. 




Duluth Amateurs Defeat Two Harbors 
Nine, 6 to 2. 

Two Harbors. Minn.. Sept. IC— (Special 

to The Herald.)— In the last game of the 
sea.son here the Fitwells of Duluth de- 
feated tile Two Harbors nine by a score 
of t) to 2. All the scores were made in the 
first three Innings, after whicli both 
Thorscn and Beets pitclied shutout ball. 
Score: 

Fitwells 3 12 0-6 

Two Harbors 0200000 0—2 



t he 
time taken In eons' rueting sliips. Of 
ftv<^ battleships of 'he ' >e<its<'hland class, 
whose inception dates back nearly fivo 
years, two have just be-ei put in com- 
mi.ssion, one will be c>mniissioned in the, 
.lutumii and two more next ye.ir. All 
these ve.ssels are of less p.>wer th.m 
even the Formidable class, and do not 
Come und»'r the same category as the 
King Edward VII. 

.Since -he Deutsehland was orclered, 
F^ngland ha« laid dt/wn and complete.i 
King Edwanis. two Agamemr.ons 
a Drea.lnought. and tho Belleropiion 
Temi'raire will not be much b-'hind 
Thus in battleships England has r^>ently 
rjuite met the condition laid down bv an 
influential Russian pai>'r— that Britain 
need only build two guns for every one 
ordered by Germany in order to insure 
the m lintenanee ,jf peace. The ten 
British ships laid d.iwn siU'Ce l**.!, and 
all in the list 'o he completed next year, 
are e*|u*' to fift<H^n of the German ships, 
and yet they have only built five. The 
three Invincible cruisers are not Includ- 
ed. 

.Vs to the ftilure thf' conditirms are 
c'lually reassuring. The German navy 
program ine-Iudes four battleships of r.- 
•J'io tons, with rMcipro.-atin^ machinery 
•o develop ^i^\,Of*^ Indiiateil horse power. 
Two of these --hips, nan-.ed the F]rs.itz 
j S.ichen and Ersatz Bay.-rn. were laid 
! d<>-wn two :no<ith,s .igo. and the two oth- 
ers, the Ersatz Wurtemberg and FJr.satz 
, Baden, are proviiled for in *he I^JT-S pro- 
Igrani. but have not be-n commenced. II 
! is yet too .soon to -jpoak of IMS-S, but 
the present intention is to begin two o«h- 



and be sure you 
teii us in v.hat 



Look for 
thii'marh 
of sho«? 
insurance" 



you saw 
this offer 



on the 
soles of 
your shoe 
purchase 



TRADE 
MARK 



first installment for a new large cruis'T 
of the improved t.vpe which will l>e the 
seventeenth of the twenty large crul.sers 
ooniemplated by the n.ivy law. The re- 
^•aul:n^ tlir^e larg-- cruisers will b.- iaid 
down in l-M. I'dl ami iyi2. while In loiu the 
work i)i superseding in rotation tlie obso- 
lescent cruisers w;li be begun. In a-idi- 
tion to a first installment for the new or 
sixte"nth large, cruiser "F," which has 
been laid down this year, a third itistali- 
ireiit for the fifteenth and also unnaiiii!d 
cruiser "E," and a f>urth and lasl in- 
stallment for the cruis..T Scharnhorsi. 
Provision will also be made for the usual 
iiumber 'f small cruisers. t<jrp<'do-boat3 
and auxiliary craft. 



— The Japanese naval 
distribution of the ex- 



ONLY TWO PARTIES. 

Tuesday's Election in Upper Peninsula 
Wili be Tame Affair. 

Calumet, Mich., .Sept. 16. — (Special 
to Tho Herald.) — The work of tho 
election l>()ard promises to be unusu- 
ally eji.sy Tuesday when a choice is to 
be made of the delegates to the con- 
stitutional C(tiiveiition at Lansing. 
Tht^re will be but two i>arties on the 
ticket and it is believed that on this 
account all the return.s will bi- In by 6 
Tuesday evening. The polls 
open at 7 o'clock in the morning and 
clo.se at 5 in the afternoon. The offi- 
cials of the election board are per- 



mitted to close the polls one 
no>m if they care to do .so. 



Iiour at 



I 



FRANKLINJSLl'GGERS 

Snow Cutlers Under and Win Fifteenth 
Straight Game. 



Tokio. Sept. 13. 
!>udget shows the 

penditure invohed l^y the war and refierts } o'clock 
the fact that while Japan's prestige h.as 
been enormously enhanced and her navy 
greatly improved, there is a considerable 
debit "account. This, it appears, will be 
.spread over six years, terminating In 
VA'i-U. The naval expen.^es of the war, 
.so fai as tl'.ey are eharg'-able against the 
navy, amount to 17o,-)'>},00«j yen. ai>.d of the 
$l:;,7'>'),i.'<)0 1.? U> be met during the next 

^:t rinciSl.^rc'r^!>t:;ie:'^;:::''^h?;" 'hl-I. Burdock Blood Bitters isa Chans 
cost and expen.s,- of putting the captured •'•« 
battleships Into fighting cmuition. Thus, | 
during the next naval year there would i 
b*' spent on the replac.eren' of ships lost, } 
apart altogefh-r from normal new con- ; 
■^truction, $6,'60.<>W; on the repair and re 
armament of the Rus.sian siiips, $4.:>25.<i<W 



Most disfiguring .skin eruptions, scrofula, 
pimpies, rashes, etc.. are due to impuie 




TlUKPvS GET EVEN BREAK. 

St. Louis, Sept. 10.— During the St. Louis- 
Detroit American league baseball game 
yesterday Umpire Evans was struck on 
tile head by a .-oda l>oitl«' in ilie liaiuls 
t)f a spei'talor and was seriously injured, 
his reeovery brln.g doul>tfu!. The attack 
was made during an altercation oyer a 
foul. The crowd made a rush for the 
spectator and ihast.a hitn around the lot. 
th. arrival of the police .saving him. 
Detroit and St. Ijouis split even yesterd.iy 
afteiTio.ir.. L>etroii taking liie first gam •. 
•; to 3 and St. Loui.< the second, which 
was shortened to seven innings. 3 to 2. 
Sc'U-us: 

First game- R. H. E. 

St Louis OOlOllOO 0-3 11 2 

Detroit 1 ■) 5 0— »; M .T 

Batteries— Powell and Spencer; Kilh.ui 
and Payne. Umpircjs— Dineen, Schmidi 
and Evans. 

Second game— R, H. E. 

St. Louis 1 1 1 X— 3 7 

Detroit 2 0—2 5 4 



YOU 



Can buy this hleh-fjrado 17- 
j»-\vi'lcd Hamilton. adjusted 

walch. in the wurld-t'anioti.s 
••Ilu'»s" fiil< d ia*<L', oiien face 
or liunting. for 



lory 

by 



>as -ball team closed its 
I by winning its fifteenth ' 
defeating the D. G. , 



Ijlood tonic. Makes you clear-eyed, 
cb'.it-braiiied. clear-skinned. 

ers. The first four of these Ersatz bat- 
tleships— the Dreadnaughts of the Kal.'S- 
er's njvy— will 'ue coiupb-iPd by DIO If 
the hopes of the government are realized. 
England will then h.iye t^n Dread- 
naughts. If the present intentions :•' the 
admiralty are realized. The Germ.m 
ships, according to official data, will 
have fourteen or sixteen guns of eleven- 
inch caliber, with several smaller guns 
for dcfen.se ;tgainst torp'dl^ boat -at- 
taek. and six subm-^rged torpedo tubes 
As to the big cruisers. England had 

c ..1 . 1A T-u ''■'"' ^'^^ ^*''^ *"''■ ""^'■"- ♦^^^•'•f' '^'I'r, of Is.- 
a scjre of 21 to 10. The >X! tuns with Parson's turbine mi- 

playcd at Thirty-second ave- ; ehinery of \W.»^'> horse-p.iwer has b.eii 

and was a terrible .si ugg'ng la-id down, anoih. r will he included in 

Cutler team's pitchers were 'he program of i:»»«*. another in VAX. and 

one in lyl2. In .a.ld;tion to this ve.sjiel 
• .f Is.:*.) tons now begun. an<! ti bo fitted 
with sen or twelve guns of 11-inch caliber 
as compared wiih eight of 12-inch calib'-r 
in the I7.25u ton Invincibles, Germany lin> 
ne.ar;ng completion two cruisers. th^; 
Griesenan and Scharnhorst of ll,42it tons 
t.2';,t.te horse-power), with eight >>.3-inch 
guns, six G-inc hguns, and tweniy-*ilght 
smaller weapons; a cruisi-r of 14,730 ions 
an<l So.fHiO horse-power, with eight ll-ini^h 

and several lighter guns. Thus by iyi2> . , ,,- , .,.,, t.i- i • ^*v,u- 

he will have three ve.sseis which may It IS purely Vegetable, made entirely from healing, cleansing roots, nerbs 

e comparable to Invin cibles. | and barks, and in addition to curing this vile disorder, S. S. S. builds up 

Berlin. Sept. 1.3.— The preliminary draft 1 every part of the System. Mercury and potash cannot cure the trouble ; 

of the navy estimates for the financial \ ^^^y ^^^ ^jjiy j^asfe it in the System for awhile, and when they are left ofE 



The Franklm 
season yesterday 
straight vie 
Cutler team 
game was 
ntie west 
match. The 

pounded all through the contest and, al- 
though Danielson t..ok a j^retty stiff wal- 
leping. ih.- Franklins wen- n-.-ver in dan- 
g«'r. Scon*: 

Franklins 8 3 3 12 4 4 2—21 

Cutlers 12 302 02 00-10 

Batteries— Danielson and Hestrom; 

Paltum. M.-(.iinms and Huttel. 



for repairs at th • war p'Tts. ?l,0:.5.>.«»i). The 
work on the Mikasa. whicii is not in- 
. I U.Jed in this category, wiU involve al)out 
$1.200.<;iO«). 

Tl «' next mam item is for the replace- 
ment of old works, fort.«, etc., and the 
total to be spent in six years is 7';,o7r,iNX.' 
vtn and ..f this $5,74'>.O(i0 will be spent dur- 
ing the financial year. The six years' 
program of uew construction will amount, 
according to present intentions, to 73.1.0,- 
(KM yen and one-third the price is to tjo 
met during the next financial year. 



TO EXHIBIT APPLE.S. 
Bemidji. Minn., .Sept. IG.— (Special to 
' The Herald.) — L. Amadon, who has 
been a progressive and up-to-date 
farmer near Alida postoffice, near 
Creek township, Clearwater county, an- 
nounces that he will exhibit at the 
forthcoming Beltrami County fair. 
Transcendent crab apples anl black- 
berrii-s wliich he has raised during tho 
p.'-esent season. 

Ml. -Vmadon's farm is almost directly 
on the line betw-een Beltrami and Clear- 
1 water counties. 



SCOTT-GRAFFS VICTORS. 




A CERTAIN SAFE 
.^^.^>w. TREATMENT 

S. S. S. is the only safe and reliable cure for Contagious Blood Poi.^ion. 





$ 1 8.00 



Other?, ask 9,?,(\ to 


s.*i.-. 


for 


It. 


AVc arc woiiing it 


for 


$18 


ut 


our JSpofial >ali*. 









Lumbermen Too Much for Millers in 
Final Game.4^ 

The Scott-Graft.-- hit Uie Sail hard yes- 
terday and the Universal ailllers playtd 
fii.rce ball In the fiel<^ t1^ lumbermen 
winning by a scoria of Il/to ^- The game 
was played at Athletic '^park. Smith, 
first baseman for the K«ott-Graffs, took 
down the hitting honors wJJIi two doubles 
and a t ripple. Score: ** \l R. H. E. 

Scott-Grafts 2 4 OjO 5$ 1-12 10 4 

Millers 1 3 #% 0— 4 5 10 

Batteries— CuUins and Flytin; Graham, 
I Sutherland. Olson and Murray. 



y.-ar l^>* inchiiies first installments fori,, -,. -^ ,, • " * ^i i_ r j 4.1 ' *• «. r: j« 

two new battleships and on.^ new cruiser, ! the disease retums, usually, lU worse form than before, and the patient iinas 



CLEVELAND, 
Chicago, Sept. 16.- 



3, CHICAGO. 2. 
Walsh and Leibhardt 



ESTERLY, 

Spalding Hotel Jeweler. 



Hummers Win Oat 

Olund, the Hummera'*' pitcher, let the 
Hazelwood Parks dowrL;:,"t^fth three hits 
yesterday, and the Hiimniefs won an easy 
victory by a score of 4 to 2. 



""il \yp*^' ^T!v'''S. ''irat'aeships''^of ^'he"if 1 1 ^^ ^^ damaged his health with these strong minerals, \vhich disease the 
jo-ton Deutschi'and class will have*be"n | delicate lining of the stomach, affect the bowels, produce chronic dyijpepsia 

and often set up Mercurial Rheumatism. It "will not do to trifle with a dis- 
ease so powerful as Contagious Blood Poison, for every day it remains in the 
blood it is progressing toward a dangerous stage, and will in the end get be- 
yond the control of any treatment. S. S. S. cures blood poison in the right 
, way, it goes down into the circulation and removes every particle of the virus. 
pieied^ "hoped ^ by increasing the rate of j No bad results are ever experienced from the use of S. S. S. It is gentle and 

pleasant in its action, and forty "years of cures warrant the statement that 
S. S. S. is not only a safe but a certain treatment. Home treatiuent book 
on this disease and any medical advice desired sent free to all who write. 



completeti for .^e.n by next year. At pres 
• nt only the Deutsohland and the Pom- 
nirrn are in crjninusslim; th<' Hannover, 
'it is hoped, will be ready in the autumn. 
The two remaining battleships of this 
cliiris are the Sehlesien iind the SiL'hl.^.^wig- 
Holsteln. which it is hoped, will be com- 



18 hoped 
construction the first full division of the 
n »w battleships of 18.000 tons or more will 
be afloat bv the year 1910, wh-n also the 
last of the thirty-eight battleships con. 
lemplated by the navy law of li^fW will be 
laid down. 
I The estimates for 1908 will also include * 



THE SWIFT SPECIFIC_CO.,_ATLANTA,jGA* 



!- 



i 



m 



INTENTIONAL DUPLICATE EXPOSURE 




10 



THE DULUTH EVENING HEAALD: MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 1907. 



I 





PyLPOT MB 

puirroi^i 



GREATNESS 
OF WJLUTH 

Rev. Kcrby S. Miller Has 

Idealist's Plans for 

Future. 



He Would Have "Greater 

Duluth Commission" 

Appointed. 



"Ncbody in Puluth, no organization, no 
broad plant Ur r>i;lijth as a whole! 
There should i^f appointed a Gitattr Du- 
luth comnuss.on ol Ironi five to seven 
men— one or two ought to be idealists— 
whicJi sh(iuld plan the way of living here 
and hitudy Duluih as a whole, net only 
from the cornmercial side Lut from the- 
human .«ide as well," said Rev. Kerby S. 
Miller when summing up his sermon on 
•"Greatir Duluth," in the First Unitarian 
church yesterday morning. 

Thf Greater Duluth Hiat Mr. Miller 
would see is the idealist's c.ty beautiful, 
with no shniis; with no more poverty than 
1.S ntees.-<irv a'fttr greed has been elimin- 
ated froia lusiiusi^. with all the city s 
public ut;iities owned by the people; with 
more pitrks, lots of sunlignt In all houses, 
and the right idea abi-ut living. Mr. 
Miller did not lay .'■o much stress on the 
advance <. f the cUy in mere population. 

He h.ud In part: 

"Cities are centers of influence where 
men e.'.ther not tnly to trade goods but lo 
get ideas. In America we set m to have a 
craze for city building, probably due to 
changing conditions, whicn demand a 
giiater distribution of things. There 
must }<■ distribution centers. 

"Peiik are not loath to change the;r 
occui-a lions from tillers of the soil to 
making things. The compaMlonsliip of 
city hie is longed for. And one thing 
about the cities of this country is a 
craze for bigness. There is always a 
great desire to boom a city and get more 
peoi)le into It— and what is bsak of that 
desire? Sui-erticially, it would seem that 
It was real estate. The value of booming 
cities in tliis way is <;iie!-tioned. 
Spcinilatiun a HimlKiuec. 

"Speculation in real estate is one of the 
grave iiinurances to the development of a 
city. And 1 am told that 75 per cent Qi 
the vacant laii'l in Duluth is owned by 
non-residents. Just think of it 
back in comfort wiiile you and I add vaiue 
to the.r land. That bor; oi thing is in- 
toUrable to me, an<I I should be in favor, 
not of a single tiix, but a double tax on 
vacant land owned by non-residents. I 
ehould like to se some of the values of 
land accrue to the mechanics, makers of 
things, wage-earners— all v/ho put heart 
and blood mto the city life. 

"1 believe that I>uluth has a good loca- 
tion, a good climate and natuial ad- 
vantages for a city of half a million peo- 
ple. A city alw.'iys grows willi its market, 
and Duluth's market Is the great North- 
west. 

"The location of the steel plant at Du- 
luth is significant, nut because It boosts 
real estate, but because it gives a hint 
of the futurt. A j<rogrtss in cUy building 
that boosts only real estate and trade is 
not worth while. A city should not oniv 
supply things for the market, but facili- 
ties for clean sanitary living and cultured 
Burroundinss. 1 think that every jnan 
should be taken care of. 

"I have not a great deal of fault to find 
with the way the city is being governed 
now, but I have some suggestions, which 
could be worked out later. We have seen 
the txpeiiences vi other cities in their 
up-bulldlnp, so why cannot we lead, in- 
stead of tag along behind. It is incum- 
bent ui>on us to prtvide for things so that 
tlie mistry and suffering in large cities 
is done away with. 

liiglli I'rities for Lots. 

"High pi ices t.f lots keep people away 
from Duluth. I heard that a VV» st Duluth 
land company increased the price of its 
large holdings Si per cent after the an- 
nc'uncement concerning the ntw steel 
plant was made. People do not have to 
buy l^uluth lots. There must 1 e st.me at- 
traction about them. The great p"wer is 
turned on now and many big factories 
ought to come here, unless human condi- 
tions keep them away. 

"I have nothing but condemnation. 
scorn and contin)i>t for the unscrupulous 
real estate man who sells merely to sell 
and he out'ht not to bv encouraged ovt r- 
mueh. I would suggest that a few mil- 
lions be spent during the nfxt few years 
on pretty littl" homes within the reach of 
the people, in West Duluth. Now. West 
Duluth is a drtary place. It strikes me 
that way every time I go out there. 
Thtre should be some men here who 



That's what we heard a discriminating little lady say 
Friday— and in one form or another, we have teen hear- 
ing the same thing time and again for two weeks past- 
there' s a reason. 





117-119 West Superior Street. D-ul-utK, Minix. 

rOR QVICK. SJ^TISrACTORY SCRVICE. 

Autumn Dis 
Fine Millinery 

Tomorrow, Tuesday, September the 1 7th 

Note the elegance of the models we picture today — isn't that 
snit hat a handsome affair, with its tailored air, topped off with 
beautiful pluma.e:e — and isn't the other one an exquisite concep- 
tion for more dressy wear? 

SufJi hats as the«c nro "distingnlslutr' — you know at a glance that thoy 
are pre-eminently desirable — your friends will a^Iinire them quite a-s niueh 
as you do. These two hats jtre represiMUative of the seores of other hifch- 
ela.ss creations we will show to our visiturs^iml just as our magnificent 
millinery business has been built up in the past by s<>lling fine and fash- 
ionable hats at rca.sonable pric(>:. We have made it a |M>int to price them 
for less than you have been traiiKtl to pay elsewhere for equally high- 
class millinery. 



WE RANK FIRST IN LACES ALSO 
AS YOU MAY SEE 

U^e've been very husv unpacking new laces of the rarer 
and more desirable sorts for four days now — see them to- 
morrow in the sbozv window and at the department. 



The first formal showing of Pattern Hats occurs tomorrow, 
en show a collection of millinery sur])assing in every wav all 
wings made by this house. May it please you and your friends 
present. 



prev 




m^ 



wholesome and fine as Duluth. and If 
there were slums in the Greater Duluth. 
I cannot help thinking tliat it would be 
our fault. We ought to prohibit the bund- 
ling of block houses and flats. We should 
have a city onlinance providing that there 
should be a space of ten feet on each side 
of every building. The homes, where the 
women and chilren spend both the night 
and day, should have pUnty of sunlight. 
"We I'Ught to have more parks and we 
should preserve our lake front. We 
should own our f>wn electric light plant, 
our own street cars and our own tele- 
phones. 

"There should be appointed a Greater 
Duluth commission of 5 or " men. It 
They sit would be an advisory and not a legislative 
body and should inform people of Duluth 
as a place to live and work. City build- 
ing is jire-eminently i>ur business now and 
there will be a city here as long as there 
is an -America." 



tering the conditions of these people. 
Although the peopie do not realize it, 
this is one of the causes of the scK-ial 
unrest because the lack of the money, 
which they squander in saloons, causes 
discontent and bitterness against the 
rich." 

Rev. Coyle gave as another cause 
of the ilnrest the wrong views which 
the laboring classes have. Some think 
that labor is 



A CLEVER REPTILE. 



Snake Waits For Hen's Cackle and Then 
Gets Egg. 

Des Moines, Iowa, Kept. 16.— Here is a 

story of a snake which waited for a pet 

bantam hen to cackle, and as soon as the 

the only producer of ! barnyard melody floated through the 



UNREST AND 
ITSJAISES 

Rev. Campbell Coyle De- 
clares Social Upheaval 
is Imminent. 



Education and Display 

of Wealth Among 

the Causes. 



"Social Unrest and the Causes Be- 
hind It,'* was the subject ot the third 
I sermon in the series on labor topics 
being given Sunday evenings by Rev, 
Campbell Coyle at the Firsit Presby- 
terian church, last night. 

Rev. Ct>yle demonstrated that this 
social unrest is evident everywhere 
in aJl classes, and in his opinion it 



wealth in the country, but he declared i breezes the snake would go lo the nest, 
that this idea is a wrong one. The dl- j swallow the egg and get away. And it is 
rector of big enterprises, who with ' ^^ nature fake .iMier-at least Smith 
his brains and executive abilty is able ; Thompson a Polk county farmer who 
to keep men under him at work, is owns the nen, says it is not. 
one of 'the wealth p)roducers. The Thomp.von noticed that his bantam eggs 
mother at home, who provides a pleas- I were disappearing, although the bantam 
ant and comfortable place for her , ^t." »*'^'"'-'<3 t" ^^^ cacklmg with regular- 



family, is another wealth producer. I 
Another cause is that capital has 

wrong ideas of labor and looks on it 

as a commodity. 
Next Sunday Rev. Coyle will deliver 

a sermon on the subject "The Church 

and the Worklngmen." 



DUTY OF A FATHER. 



D. E. H.. Sept. 16, '07. 



means life or death to the country, 
would prt some of the money into such an according as the people adjust them- 



enterprise. 

"Shiins ought not to le 



in a place as 




8eive.>». Men everywhere are talking 
a<bout reform, aji<l how their condi- 
tion can be bettereil and the climax 

is bound to come within a few years. 
One ol" the first causes for the un- 
rest and 
Coyle, is 



Rev. Roderick J. Mooney Preaches on 
This Topic 

Roderick J. Mooney delivered the third I 
of his series of sermons on the subject, i 
"The Fifteen Year Old Son and The i 
Fifteen Year Old Girl" at St. Luke's treatment, 25 cent.s 

Episcopal church of the West end in the 

morning and at the Holy Apostles Episco- 
pal church, West Duluth In the evening, 

Sunday. 
Large audiences greeted the speaker 

both morning and evening and the lecture 

was heard with apprtciative attention. 
! "The Father of the Fifteen Year Olds" 
Iwas the tht nie, the text being from 
lEpheslans, 0:4. The moral responsibilities 

of the parent were dwelt upK>n and singled 
'out bv the speaker in the course of his 

remarks. The father's neglect of duty. 

he claimed, is often the cause of the 

child's ruin later in life and the duty to 

the 15-vear-okl children, at the age when 

they are liable to turn from the path of 

righteousness, is an important one. 

! WILL EXAMINE BUHER. 

I ! 

• State Inspector Here to Investigate, 
Storage Plants. 

Assistant .^taie Dairy Food Commis- 
sioner John McCabe of St. Paul is in ! 
Duluth for the purpose of investigating j 
the large amount of butter and cheese 1 
said to be in cold storage in this city. | 
The lnvestigatk>n has been started at ] 
the instance of the Minnesota State 
Cheesemakers' association, and the 
movement is to result in a more rigid 
inspection in the future. 

Mr. McCabe says that many of those 



ity. 

And then he discovered the truth. One 
day, as the hen b» gan lo cackle, Thoinp- 
.siin strolled Into tl'e barnyard just in 
time to sec a monster bull.snake wrigsb 
up to "Speck's nest, swallow the egg and 
glide back under the woodpile. 

Thompscin says he has no doulit that 
the snake deliberately waits for Speck to 
cackle. Often, Thompstm says, he has 
tried to beat his snakeship to it, but 
adways without success. He declares the 
snake knows by instinct just when Speck 
is going to cackle, and thus gets the 
start. 



SERIOUS 
PROBLEM 

That is Discussed by 

Paymaster General of 

the Army. 

Modification of Law Gov- 
erning Detail System 
is Urged. 



field grades will be abolished becaiise 
not later than Jan. 1, li«08, a vacancy 
in the grade c>f major will occur which 



There's a reason for that ache In •*rour 
back— right where It "stitches" every 
time you bend over, turn around or walk 
any distance. It's your kidneys. Take De 
Witt's Kidney and Bladder pills. A week's 
Sold by all druggists. 



recticn. They struck out new paths for 
themselves and .always reached their des- 
tination witiU'Ut fail This was regarded 

.must under cxisth^g law be hlled by ^r^^:^\^^,''{^i;;!^''^ ,,, 
detail of a major from the line. What, up near one entrance to the nest. It 

I troubles Gen. Sniffen as to the efS- • seemed to have an immediate attraction 

; ciency of his corps, troubles Gen. Ale-! tor the ants, :«> thty unanimously used 
shire, head of the quarte: masters de-]the entrance on thai side eom.ng to and 

'partment, the latter even going so far I gpi'^K from the nest. Then it was^c^^^^^^ 
as to recommend in his annual rep( rt ' *" ' ' " " " "* 

ia school for the training of quarter- 

I masters with particular reference to 

!the constructions of tuildings and build- 
ing materials, plumbing and a first 
hand knowledge of textiles and their 
nianufacture. 

The detail system was undoubtedly 
an experiment with congress, and a-s 
the practical questions growing out of 
the system are presented to the com- 
mittees of the two houses dealing with 
the subject a modification of the law 
of 1901, would seem imperative and 
further remedial legislation expected 
from time to time and that finaliy 
a system of detail suited to ail the 
conditions of the service and adjusted 
to the functions of each staff depart- 
ment ultimately adopted. 



over to the other side, causing great ex- 
citeuitnt apj'arently among tijc insects, 
which tnded in their changing over to 
the newly illunrlnaied way. 

('haiiges In the brilliancy of the light 
.seenied to have no perceptible efttct on 
the atits, but they never failed t<' detect 
the change of direction. All possible pre- 
cautions were taken to prevtnt tlie heat 
from the l;inip from reaching them, so 
that it is regarded as certain that they 
perceived the light. 



dissatisfaction, says Rev. I engaged in the dairv business have an , 

.the ever-mcrea.s:ng imelu- , .^^^ ^j^.^^ ^^^ railroads are pandering I 

genco of the people throughout the ; ^^ j,^^ ^^^^^ creameries of the state, ! 

country. Education is now the prop- i ^^^^ ^^, ^^^ ^^^^^ ,^^,^^. j^ ^,^^^^^, ^j^g , 

trust creameries undersell and beat the 



Independent concerns. The inde- j 

pendents have asked the interstate I 

commerce commission to step in and \ 

stop the alleged discrimination as be- ^ 

, tween the states of Wisc-onsin, Illinois i 

I and Iowa. | 

I So far as Duluth is concerned. Mr. I 

McCabe says he if here to investigate ' 

some of the goods as to their purity. ! 



**Gee, that Malta- Vita rest was'' clted^by Rev. Coyle 

' ing the too great distinction 

is great— I feels as I could i ^ t'^^veny 
kick *sky-high.'" TheKio. 



erty of the people of every class. 
The children of the masses are be- 
ing sent to schCK-d by the millions, 
while before only those of the rich 
weiX' given a chance to learn. As a 
It suit the working people are begin- 
ning to read and to do their own 
thinking, and the longing for reform 
and the bettering of their conditions 
is bound to come with this. 

The newspapers are one of the gnnt 
fact(>rs in the present reform move- 
ment, as they ai-e one of the greatest 
of educating forces of the time. 
Therefore they are one of the great- 
est agitators of the time. 

"All this means." said Dr. Coyle, 
"That the more the p>oorer classes 
ct^me to know, the more they want 
and this, of ct«urse, means dissatis- 
faction with their lot and social un- 

"^^" for the social un- ■ closed there Saturday, when Rev. Wil! 



SOCIETY. GETS AWFUL SHOCK 

By Free Love Declaration of Minister 
and Prominent Woman. 

New York, Sept. IC— A serious breach 
I among the clergymen of I'tica, which ^ 
I startled the society of the town, was dis- i 



Another cau^e 



and wealth. 



people are bound to be discontented freedom 
i as long as they see the wastefulness 
<.f the rich. 



as be- I lam P. M. Sims, formerly of New York 

between city, and Mrs. Hen Burlingame Dudley- 

The poorer i Dorn publicly declartd their belief in the 



of love, heaven-made "affini- 
ties" and pre-natal marriages. The min- 
ister's wife has been in an a.sylum for 
ten years. 
Mrs. Dorn, who is a widow, is a high 



Malta-Vita is a good substitute 
for medicine, especially when 
taken in the morning. You keep 
your "ginger" up all day. It's a 
brain feeder, and a strength 
maker. The malt's a tonic and — 
it's always delicious. 



The facts that the courts of justice _ 
I of this country often favor the wealthy officer of the King s Daughters, and ha.=« 
I is another of the causes which make ' held almost every office at the disposal of 

; the people in the more humbler walks j the Good remplars. 

I of life bitter against the rich," said Dr. 
I Coyle. "It cannot be denied that often 
I justice appears weak and limp in the 

presence of money, but straightens up 
1 and is strong in the presence of pover- 
I ty. This of course is bound to cause 

discontent among the classes.'' 



E. S. BLYDENBURGH IS 
ACQUITTED BY JUDGE. 



Eldora. Iowa, Sept. 16.— Judge Evans 
Shifllessness and lack of thrift was \ took the case of Ebenezer S. Blyden- 

The best cereal that ever went ^ irS^^'S^,^Z^\^X^ •^^^'^'^'^ ^""^P'r^^-^ 

, ei lor tne unrist wmcn is spreauiiio , Blvdenburgh was accused of poisoning 
over the country. He pointed out that , ,^j« -^jfe ^ith rough on rats four years 
while the rich did net in many cases { ^go. On his first trial he was convicted 




i4*v'*'%'*^ 



•ji' t^ «rf« > 



onto a table. 



T tlalta-T ita 





'CJ 



do all that they should to aid the poor, 
the working people and poorer classes 
' did not do all they might for their own 
' good. 

I "Eight hundred millions of dollars 
I are spent annually by the people of 
I the United States in saloons and for 
I the purchase of liquor," he said. This 
' sum would go along way toward bet- 



but he sectired a new trial. The physi- 
cian who attended Mrs. Blvdenburgh m 
her last illness testified that death was 
due to nair.ral causes. 



The ncglii^ee has gone 
its way and the stiff 
bosom has come to stay. 

Don't spoil the effect of 
your new Fall Suit by 
wearing a negligee shirt. 

Last Saturday a goodly 
bunch of new Manhattan 
.Shirts arrived, cut in com- 
fortable lines, coat style, 
and such handsome pat- 
terns! These are the 
princes in shirtdom, and 
here are also dukes, 
counts, etc., but no pau- 
pers. 

Did you see our new 
flannels? 



PRl.^ONER.S- .'-TRANCE PETS. 

Pearson's Weekly: A curious and jia- 
thetic, albeit not so uncttmmon, fet-Ature 
of piison life wa« touched upon the 
other day when a man named Kelley 
complained to a magistrate that he had 
been prevented by the warden from 
bringing out of iirison with him a rat 
that he had tamed. 

Prisoners at ail times have been in 
the habit of making pets of the four- 
footed creatures that haunt their prisons 
Big Blil Johnson, in his day a notoriouq 
South L(t:ndon character, trained mice 
in Penttmville, and trained them so 

Washington, Sept. 16.— (Special to „ . . , ,„, , , .^ . 

The Herald )-Unless congress recon- water fountains are to be Informed by to earn over £C0 by exhibiting them, 
int rieraiu..) unitss coiigiess lecou , . . sufficient to set him up in busmes.s. 



s> r - - FROM TIIE HERALD 

WASlllNGTON Bt'KEAU. 



BAD SODA WATERS TO 

BEAR TRUE LABELS. 

■Washington, S<-pt. 16.— Patrons of soda \ cleverly that on his release he was al>lQ 



Sparrows, blackbirds, spiders and 
even flies have all been made pets of 



aiders its former work relative to thei»he department ^^ ,«f;;i,^"i[.'l^;, ^'^'^'f^ Jl^r' 

, erage-s they may drink wuhout impair- 
four-year detail of line officers of rank jng their health. The investigation being 
corresponding to that of vacancies 'o ' conducted under the extensively adver- by convicts; and m-t long ago a sad 
V xj,i 1 • • -^ ^ * f9 A Itistd refreshing araj invigorating prep- 1 little story found Its way into the press 

be filled in certain specihed Starr de- .^r^tions made under secret formulas, as ! of how a Portland "lifer" named Per- 
ipartments the extinction of staff of-! well as the standard syrups and mineral g^j^^, „..^g driven insane through the 

Ificers with permanent commissions '-^ ^^Ti'^lt xhoxxeht by the experts that some ^."^^11?,? t''L.^fl ^''"^'^ "'"''"'^ ^^ ^^^ 
jthe army will result. This is a »^^»^^^;<'*.jhe more popular <^nnk^ will uPJ>^n{ ^'\^S .^.'l^h! S Whitr<.hapel murder- 
!of serioub discussion with the present j^^n-J.^^'^- "^'^l^-^*-" ^'»^ presence of nur y ^^^^^^ friends with the pri.son cat 

; paymaster general of the army, Brig.' Various spring and mineral waters are j and interrupted the chaplain's ex- 
Gen. C. C. Snifl'en, in hia report lo the also to be subjected to the scrutiny oi | hortations at the foot ot the gallows to 
secretai-y of war. Until the act of Dr. Wihy's corps of chemists and Hie inquire concerning its welfare. Prl- 
February 2, 1901 was passed efficient ! department will advertise such frauds as f.^ard. the double dyed prisoner, kept a 
men could be appointed to the pay ; m'^y be disclosed. No surprise would be p.jjj^^,,^ pj^ ^^.jjj, j^j^., ^^ Glasgow jail 
corps who« training had been along ; -used^^amo.ig^^th^ ^,^., hitler tears at parting with it. 

nnancial lines, bookkeeping, and i"t-M),e medicinal properties claimed, but Few criminals, however, have pos- 
essentlals which go to make a gi>'J'J i .should turn out to be impure and injur- j s^s^t <» such power over animals as did 
paymaster. But under the act of 1^01 it,us, jthe Spainard Guevarra. who was exe- 

the appointment from civil life waa L>r. Wiley has completed an analysis | cuted .some years back in Newgate for 
doll'- away with, and now the vacancies of numerous food prer'ar.iticns put on the: the brutal murder of a woman on 
to be filled in the pay corps must be market a« des;raible food for live sb'ck. Hampshead Heath. He caught and 
made from the line of the army at the The report is iii the hiuids of the secie- . j.^^^^,, j^^.,, ^.^^^ j.,, ^^^^^ ^y^^.y would 



wiiim or the caprice of the man in au- 



tar>' and will shortly be made public. Ini 

several instances, the preparations, it is! 

been found frauds. 



come at his ceil and follov,* him about 



anywhere. The prison mice, too, would 
come runnig out of their hrles at the 



thority without rtgard to the training ^.^^^ ^.^^.^ 

of the man selected for paymaster. T' ' ' - 

I Gen. Snifien, probably more than any | j^p rqse tatU soar -athcrs freely In all sound of his voice. And even the spar 

other man who has occupied the po-. kinds ot water. For use in HARD WATER its i rows, attracted apparently )iy the 

sition of paymaster general since the; Btrongest point. KIRK'S— drugifisis. if rooers. | strange personality of the man, flew 
! close of the Civil war, has been esscn- ' 



SENSE or SIGHT IN ANTS. 



in flocks to his cell window. 



general. Before he waa «"" weie guiueu emueiy oy sense Ol 
le pay corps he was one :^f"ell has been demoiished by a series of 
,<: 1 J, ^t ricirc or>H expenments reported in the Revue Scien- 
raiit 8 closest cierKS ana ^,j..^^ A hitle platform of cardboard! 



: tially an exfrcutive man. He ha.s serv- | 

' ed all through the grades of paymaster i The old theory that ants could not see 
ito paymaster general. Before he waa ' and were guided entirely by sense of 
i appointed to the 
jof President Gra 
I before he was called to the 

'House under the Grant administration | jncfined piano leading conveniently down j lowing story of a 
'he occupied a clerical i»osiiion In iho|to the entrance. Then a number of the 
i war department. His training has been insects and a quantity of their eggs were 
'in a broad school not conlmed lo tiie! placed upon the platform. a splendid servant, but she didn't knoAV 

1^ nr «t-ifi- nf the armv but com- 1 ^"'^"' ^ ''^'*^ minutes the ants seemed anything about gas to cook with, so 
line or stafl of the arm>. but com >__„„ „,,»,„.,..„ K„t iv,.v ve.-v soon lj,^\,.ent to the kitchen with her to ex 



RATI.'-FACTORY FIRE. 

Pittsburg Press: During the discu;?- 

» ,., , , ., , ,. ,,sion of the Madden bill for cheaper 

„.... ; i.fique. A hitle platform of cardboard I ^ ^ .,,.,,, 

White !.^^.as set up near one of their nests withiSas, Congressman Legare told the fol- 

cook he had onco 

brf'Ught from home with him. She was 




but in tim-i of hostilities the adequacy 
of the detail system when applied to 
the higher grades of major, lieutenant- 
colonel and colonel is seriously quea 



Without hesitation the ants ceased using 



the cook again for lour or five day?. 



then upon < nteriiig the kitchen, he said, 
"Well, Martha, how's that range do- 



tht old plane and took to the new one, 

showing conclusively. It is argued, that 
^..^^..j ^v.^.. they were not following a trail by scent 
tioned. At such a time very few of- but were getting their bearings by someilng?" 
ficers of the line of such grade.s will be , other s*;nse^^ ^^^ ^^ ^^^^^ ^^^^^ ^^ theLn.d- 
found w tiling to lose their chances for ^^^_^ .^^.j^,^ ^ ^.j^^ j^ seeing whether each i 
commands, distinction and advance- j j^^i^i^jual always used the same P'Uh and |^.^,^„ ^.^^ ^^^ r^.^^^ ^^e what you 



utter consternation she rc- 
d: 
'Deed, sir, that's the best stove I 






3 



If you haven't the time to exercise reg- 
ularlV. Doans Regulets will prevent con- 
stipation. They induce a mild. easy. 
hi-al'hful action ot the bowels without 
griping. Ask your druggist for them. 25c. 




Good Cravenettcs for this damp 
weather. Also rain-proof "Best- 
Ever" Suits for boys. 



ment and assume the pecuniary re- iV,e game entrance to his nest ' It ^aSj^Y^J', , - , , , ^.5,, ^ 

sponsibilities and risks, which attend lound that no such thing was the case. kindled foi ^^J^^^.']^y^-^f^^%^^^^lj2 
thtexigent and unfamiliar disbursing i They all seemed to know all the en- burning, and it ami even lowered 
duties ot payma>=ters in the field. | trances and to have a sense of their di- once. 

I Gen. Sniffen, who has very pronounc- 

■ ed views upon the question of the de- 

^tail system, takes the position which 
has been held by his two immediaie 
predecessor.?, G< nerals Bales and Dodge, 
that the applications of the system 
should not extend beyond the lowest 

' grade in the army, which is that of 

j captain, and that the three field grades 

[should be permanent; that vacancie.^ 
occurring in the grade of major in the 

} pay corps .should be filled by the ap- 
pointment of captains who have served 
or may be serving a detail, and whose 
fitness for permanent commissions shall 
be established by the records they shall 
have made for efficiency in the di.-:- 
bursement and accountability of public 
funds, and that these permanent ap- 
pointees should be eligible to promotion 
to the grade of colonel. 

It is an undeniable fact that the of- 
ficer who devotes his official life lo spe- 
cial duties under a permanent commis- 
sion must become more expert, use- 
ful and competent than the officer who 
intermittently serves for a limited 
period in one or the other or ail of 

' several departments or corps in the 

I army subject to detail. Unless at the 

'coming session of congress legislation 

lis passed changing existi-ng conditions 

I in the pay corps, the permancy of the 



Bon . 

Ami 

The Best Scotiring Soap Made 



A Scouring Soap 

A Metal Polish 
A Glass Cleaner 



1I 



I • 



i 




1 



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THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: »|p¥DAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 1907. 



- It 



HIRAIilSWESMmUlHSDEP]^ 



UUNCHES 
MA\^RACE 

Some Anxiety to Have 

North Butte and 

Doman Go. 



Those present were: L. G. Pisher. D. T, 
Jenkins, Fred C. Harris, Richard Schell, 
F. H. Wade, Kenneth- McDonald. J. B. 
Decker, Harry Pierce, E. Pierce. D. F. 
Tucker, Frank Wade, Jr., Arthur Jac- 
oby. Walter Jacoby. Edgar Lynch, C. N. 
I Ziegler, Hugo Jacoby. 



CONCERNING 

la 1L iTm. 




VVade's Boat Gaining 

Friends and is Backed 

to ,Win. 



West Duluth Briefs. 

John Mattson. deputy state game 



The autumn haze on the landshape morning for , the Eaj^- « Beside 

' Hollister, covers were laid for: 
i Me.sdaines— 

Mary L. Barton. 
Mary A. Putman, 
Mary E. Rock, 
Barbara M. Stang 



along St. Louis river, visible even 
when the day is as dim and gray as 
yesterday, has a special lui'e of its 
own, and a large number of the 



Boat club members and their guests 
ejijoyed the week-end at the Spirit 
Lake branch. Among those who 
passed Saturday and Sunday at the 
branch were: lAr. and Mrs. A. S. 
_ . . _ Ames and Miss Margaret Ailfies, Miss 

warden, ha.s returned from St. Paul Florence Corbett, Mr. and Mrs. C^_H. 

after a few days' vl.^^it. 

Mrs. Lyle Staples and children of 305 

North Fifty-sixth avenue west, have 



Frink of Minneapolis, Mr. and Mrs. 
M. M. Monahau. Mr. and Mrs. W. 
W Davis, Mr. and Mrs. K. R. Wells, 



Mrs. 



G«ip*ie A. Cox. 
Ajiiaiida A. Gele- 
tjeSu. 




returned to their home after .several Miss Jule Davis. Miss Mabel Meekr 



weeks' visit in St. Paul and Minneap- 
olis. 

The Ladies' Missionary and Aid so- 
ciety of Plymouth Congregational 
church, will meet tomorrow afternoon 
at the home of Mrs. C. R. Keyes, 705 
Fifty-seventh avenue west. 

Mr. and Mrs. G. C. Fisher of Minne- 
apolis, visited Mr. and Mrs. Lyle 
Staples over Sunday 



Mi.s3 Katherine Kennedy. Mr. and 
Mrs. W. Conant. Capt. and Mrs. W. 
H. Smallwood. Mrs. Jamar of Chi- 
cago, M. F. Jamar. Jr.. and Walker 
Jamar, Miss Baslable, Miss Ivrlz, and 
Messrs. Rene Hugo, J. A. Bradley. 
L. S. Poirier, R. J. McDonald, C. F. 
, How. Jr., C. B. Stewart. G. E. War- 
1 rei:, B. J. Daugherty. Jaok Piotmcky, 
and Ed WaJker. 



Surprise Party. 



Watch and j^nvel^y repairing. Hurst. 

Rev. K. E. Forsell leaves tomorrow 
for Minneapolis to attend the annual 
conference of the .Swedish Mission 
churches of Minnesota. Sa 

Mr. and Mr.s. J. G. Lanyon of Chis- j MurT>hy at his hmne. „ ^ 

holm visited friends in West Duluth nue west. An enjoyable evening was 
yesterday, en route to Detroit. Mich., 'passed by the following guests: 
j where they will visit for a few weeks. 1 Mr. and Mrs. Frederich Anderson. 



Card Party. 

Mr. a«fd Mrs. J. L. Crawford enter- 
tained in honor of their guest at their 
home on West Fifth street. Five hun- 
dred was played and the favors were 
won by Mrs. Garland and Mr. Bennett. 
Those present were: 
Mes.>sr8. and Mesdanies-^ 

Charles Ricfamuta A. E. Overman, 
of Chirago, M. J. Durken, . 

.Sands Van Wag- Charles, Fugle, 
ner. 
Mesdames — 

Stone, Garland. 

Messrs.— 

Bennett. Nol.son. 



Wedding. 

The marriage of Mis.s Bertha M. Gar- 
rett and Hugh A. Esterly, both of this 
city, has l>een announced. The wedding 
took place Saturday and the announce- 
ment comes somewhat as a surprise *o 
A pleasant surpri.se party was given j|,^.j. p^^ny friends. Mr. and Mr.s. 
Saturday evening in honor of George ; g^fg, 



107 West . J 
Superior St. ( 



TWO STORES 



\ 19th Ave. West 
f and Superior St. 



407 First ave- 



Robert Langdon, who resigned his po- i Mis.se.s— 
jition at Nygren's drug store last week. y^ji^nce^La Lone. 



The motor boat enthusiasts of West 
I>uluth are becoming anxious as fall 
«oaneK on apace. They want Dick 

ficheirs North Butte and Frank Wade's , , v.. * ^. 

^ .^ .u ^^ J A^,^\A^ left yesterday for his former home in 

Doman to come together and decide Rhinolander. Wis., where he will take 

once and for all the motor boat su- another position. 

cremacy of the Head of the Lakes. A son was born Saturday to Rev. and 

TlKre's no disputing the fact that Mrs K. E. Forsell of 325 North Fifty- 

*"^' - . ^ *, ^ ninth avenue west, 
the North Butte and the Doman can . ^^^. Martin Peterson, pastor of the 

run away from anything else In the Swedish Mission church at Fargo, is 

motor boat line cleaving the waters j visiting friends in West Duluth for a 

<A the bay. But can the North Butte ^^^^^^ys^ ^^^^ ^ ^^ ^^„^^ ^^^j ^„,^_ 

defeat the Doman? There's the rut), j Raymond, of 101 North Fifty-eighth av- 

Some say yea, others .say no. and . enue west, have returned from St. Paul 

they all say the only way to settle ' and Minneapolis after a week's visit. 

the question is for the two boats i Mrs. R. F. Bentson and son. William. 

to race a sufficient distance to effectu- j of Milwaukee. Wis., are visiting Mr. 

ally and conclusively decide the su-iand Mrs. H. J. Johnson of Sixty-sixth | honor was 

prema'^y. I avenue west and .Polk street. I. M. j loving cup. 

Since Schell bn»ught the North | Mayhew of Red Lake Falls, Minn., is 
Butte up from O.shkosh. where it had i visiting at the home of Joseph Mayhew, 
been showing 



LciJvtta Little- 
worth, 
Antoinette Johnson, 
Anna K nut son, 
Mathilda M*'ter, 
Anna Sulhvan, 
Agnes Murphy. 



its stern to the b*?st 
Wlsc'.nsin enfhusiasts could put for- 
ward, the larunch owners of West 
I>uluth have talked nothing but a 
race l^.tween the two boats. Wade's 
Ability to beat anything else on the 
bay Wiis unquestioned, and the same | 
oonct-ssion was accorded Schell. But. j 
thoug-h the North Butte was popu- i 
larly supposed to be able to run 
a,way from everything. Wade's friends 
contended from the first that his | 
boat could make things interesting ■ 
for the North Butte. | 

The backers of Wade's boat have | 
grown in nuntber in the past few ; 
days. When Schell first came, the | 
two V>oat.s had a little brush. and 
Schell won. There have been several 
bruHhes s.inoe, and .Schell didn't do 
eo much winning. But the tilts have 
all been unsatisfactory, on account 
of the boats not starting together, 
a.nd there being no distance. People 



5913 Lf^xington street. 

For Sale — A good heater burns either 
coal or wood, also several other good 
stoves. 14 South Fifty-fourth avenue 
west. 



EVENING SCHOOL EOR 
DAY WORKERS 

Opens Sept. 3»th— Y. M. C. A. 



Nellie Dunleavy, 
Laura Pelchor, 
Mary KivapacK 
Alice Muriihy, 
Lauia Lecky, 
Me.ssts.— 
Andn>w Er.-<palmer, George King. 
Einil Hansen, Howard Collins, 

Floyd Smith. William Andrews, 

Ralph Murphy. C. W. Fuller. 

Informal Evening. 

Mr. and Mr.s. Leon .Solomon enter- 
tained last evening In honor of Miss 
Eva Pollinsky, who.se wfedduig will 
take place in October. The guest of 
pre.sented with a silver 
Those pi-eseiit were: 
Messrs. and Mesdames— 
David Frankfort 



terly 
city. 



will make their home in this 



J. OPeikov.sky, 

L. Shenowsky, 

L. Moscovich. 
Mis.ses— 

ManiP Weinberg, 

Dora Polinsky, 

Sadie Fostjf 
Mrs. M. VViinbcrg. 
M»*ssr.'i.— 

Rol»<rt Rosen of 
Miimf>apotis, 

Louis Meyer of Mo- 
lino. 



A. H. Polinsky, 
I Lieberman, 
J. Coh.^n, 
J. HeLstein. 

Is'ranci^s Light. 
Fanny Abraham- 
sou. 
Sarah Polinsky. 

Harry Wfinborg. 
Morris Nides of 
Hibblng. 



Center of Interest for Women. 

The Gidding establishment today 
was a veritable niocca for well dressed 
women, as the store offered a double 
attraction, consisting of the informal 



w+io have seen the b«iats go together ; opening and display of apparel and the 



are rather dubious. A good many 
are on the fence. Tho Doman is be- 
ing bcK>sted as a favorite by some, 
-who had fornu^rly sworn by the North 

Butte. Wade has been .saying noth- i fj^^^t tji,. store was well filled with 
Ing. hut the I>i.man is in shape , enthusiastic women. The expression of 
tor a race any time Sche.ll is ready [ecstasy which found vent from time to 



Gassard corset demonstration. At this 
time of the year when women's inter- 
ests are so strongly centered on the 
dress problem, it is needless to say 



to trot out his spetxler. 

On jiaper the North Butte has the 
advantage. When Schell owned the 
Doman, then the Bisbee IIL, hu was 
able to gel a prn-ity go;xl line on the 
requisites for a racing boat. He had 
the North Butte built. Both boats 
are equ'ppP'd with D-Miian engines 
Of the saniM power. The North Butte 
1b two f»'et longer, and the hull Is 
built with .some new Ideas for speed. 
Despite this. Wade's boat is being 
backed up to win, and Schell's friends 
are urging him to send the North 
Butte Against th^^ West Duluth boat 
to pn>ve that his flyer is unbeatable 
by anything now in the waters of 
the bay. 



Entertained at Camp. 

Art Jacoby and Eiigar Lync^ enter- 
tainol a number of friends yesterday 
at thfMr camp on the St. Louis river. 
A dinner was served at noon, after 
which the afternoon was pleasantly 
«pent. The speeders, Doman and North 
Butte were at the camp and the guests 
■were given some hair-raising rides. 



time might have been well nigh amus- 
ing to an interested bystander possess- 
ing a keen s«tise of humor. *** 

WOULD TAKK UP POLITICS. 
Philadelphia Record: Th.- Renisen B»'ll 
tells of an old (Jernian who had a lnjy 
of whom he was very proud, and decided 
to find out the trend of his mind. He 
adopted a novel method by which to test 
him. He slipped into tho boy'a room 
one mornin.»j and placed on hi.<3 table a 
bottle of whisky, a Bible and a silver 
dollar. "Now," said he. "wht>n dot boy 
comes if h« takes dot dollar he's going 
to be a ijeeznis man; if hp takes dot Bible 
he's goiu^ ti.) be a preacher: If he takes 
dot whisky he's no good, and going to be 
a drunkard." Then he hid behind a door 
to see whii'h his son would choose. In 
came tho boy whistling. He ran up to 
the table, picked up the Bible and put it 
under his arm, thfin snatched up th« 
IxUtle. took two or three drinks, picked 
up the dollar and put It in his pock^^t. 
and went out smacking his lips. The 
Dutchman p.)ked his head out from be- 
hind the door and exclaimed: 'Mein 
Gott: he is going to be a bolitician." 



Hosts at Dinner. 

Mr. and Mrs, J. D. Zien were hosts 
at dinner last evening at the Spalding 
iin compliment to Mlss" Clara Shapiro 
'and Dr. Maurice Lefkowitz. whose en- 
gagement has recently been announced. 
The table decorations were tn pink rodes 
and covers were laid for nint'. 

Guest at Dinner. 

Mrs. Lillian M. Hollister, suprwne 

commander of the ladies of* the 

Maccabees of the World, was the 

guest of honor at dinner at the .SpaJd- 

i ing cafe. Friday evening, at which a 

j number of the Lady Maccabees of 

! the city were hostesses. American 

beauty roses were the table d-HJora- 

tlons. Mrs. Hollister left Saturday 



Personal Mention. 

Dr. and Mrs. M. T. Naughton of i 
Chicago are the gue.sts of Dr. Naugh- I 
ton's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Coleman ' 
Naughton, of 120 East Third street. 
Mr. and Mrs. Naug-hton aLso have as ^ 
their guest Mrs. T. Connelly of Min- 
neapolis. 

• * * I 

Miss Jessie Case arui Miss Georgia ■ 
Everest left today for New York, | 
where they will .study at Pratt in- j 

iiUtute for a year. 

* • ♦ 

Miss Flor'ence Newcoimb of 521 East 
Third street, has returned from a 
five-weeks' visit at Detroit, Mich. 

• * * 

E. B. Daugherty of 1422 East 
street, ha-s as her guest her 
Miss Hazed A3|u;«a of St. Paul. 

* ♦ - • 

Martin Trenhella, who has 
been the guest of her daughter, Mrs. 
Carl Dricvsdiach. of 506 East First 
street, has returned to her home at 

HibbJng. 

♦ • » 

Miss Pullar. the new physical di- 
rector of the Y. W. C. A., has ar- 
rived in the city from Saulr Ste. 
Manie. She will be at the association 
rooms a.rranging for the various clas- 
ses. The re^rular term wild begin 

Uot. 1. 

* * • 

Mr and Mrs. Asa Dailey of Lake- 
.«*ide left Saturday for a week's visit 
at the Twin Cities and Hudson, Wis. 



Mrs. 
First 
ajster, 

Mrs. 



WE BEGAN THIS MORNING OUR 

GREAT ANNUAL ADVANCE 
SALE OF MOORE'S STOVES 

And ranges, and this sale includes every kind of both heating 
and cooking stoves and ranges. The object of this sale at this 
time is to urge you to anticipate your stove needs by buying 
NOW. Of course, j'ou realize when the first "cold snap"' comes 
everyone will want their new stove at once, and as the majority 
of Duluth people are going to buy "MOORE" stoves this fall, 
■we urge j'ou to get your order in AT ONCE. It is to relieve 
tlie rush and congestion that is bound to come later that we give 
you this opportunity. 

BUY "MOORE'S" STOVES— BUY LESS COAL. 

That's the "slogan" that is selling •'MOORE'S" stoves 
every day. "MOORE'S" stoves consume less coal than any 
other stove because the)' get more heat out of the coal — in fact 
get ALL the heat out of the coal. They do this because they are 
pvoperly constructed — because they are constructed differently 
from other stoves. 

PICK OUT YOUR STOVE NOWl PAY $ LOO. 

Only One Dollar mind you, (and this for a short time 
only) and we will have the stove you select polished 
anij fitted up ready to set up in your home at a mo- 
ment's notice. All that it costs yovi to be ready f'>r 
an unexpected cold snap is $i.oo. The dollar is easy — 
the cold is certain. 

WE WILL TAKE YOUR OLD STOVE AS 
PART PAYMENT O.N A NEW ONE. 

No matter what kind of a stove you may have or 
what kind of a stove or range you may want we will 
take your old stove as part payment ant! will make you 
a liberal allowance for it. The balance you can ar- 
range to pay on very liberal terms. Besides this, we 
can save you from $7.50 to $15 in the price of your 
new stove or range. 

KEEP THIS FACT IN MIND-BUY MOORE'S 
STOVES— BUY LESS COALl 



Pick out 

your stovi 

now ! 

Pay only 

$1.00. IVs 

store it 

Jree. 





li' 



Mrs. M. Baldwin and daughter. Nellie. 
and Miss Ada Georges of Virginia. 
Minn., are the guests of Mrs. Robert E. 
Hood of 17 Fifty-eighth awnue east. 



Miss Pansy L. Wirth has gone 



absolutely perfection; was miserf(We 



If 



slie frowned, and ralst-d to the highest 
pinnacle of bliss if she smiled. He had 
never made any secret of his adoration; 
in fact, he was rather proud of it. He 
had sufftred In silenee and despair her 
many snubs, had taken as only just hor 
^o occasional critlci.sms. and had steadily 



dear Jack." she wrote. "You have been 
all that is good, gen«^rous and devoted. 
But 1 am convinced that should we niarri' 



Boston, where she will enter .Simmon's |refu.sod to believe that she could be in- | igj„ ^nd Home Rul« in 
college She was accompanied as far 1 different to him. His ulier hain^mes^ an«l l Fourth Century B. C.'' 
as Ditroit by her parents! Mr. and Mrs. ! triumph when a ength she accepted him j^ck. end^aySred to lis 



as Detroit by 
Max Wlrth. 

Mrs. J. D. 



• * 
Jewett. 



citv, but now of Imsk Angeles. Gal., is 
spending a few days in Duluth. the 
guest of Mrs. A. M. Mauseau. 



wei almost ridiculous. 
"I suppose you've told your aunt?" he 
. !said. when, after she had expressed her 
formerly of this admiration for tho ro.ses. they sat down 



In the luxurious parlor. 1 at the supper, and carried all before him. 

Before Edith had time to reply, there 'Never had he shown to greater advantage 
was a ring at the front door bell, and 



come." she wrote, and added in a post- 
.script that the lecturer, an eminent 
scliolar. had been asked to take supper 

with them after the lecture. I we would both be wretched. Our engage- 

Of course Jack decided to run the risk ment ^'as a mistake and the eooner a 
of being bored, and appeared promptly at 1 mistake is r«paired the better, always, 
the hour Edith had named in h<-r note. ! Jack was proud. He ioved Edith Starr 
The subject of tho lecture was "National- 1 desperately, but he told himself that if 

Greece in the | she did not want him. of cour.se he 
I wouldn't try to hold her. His notes were 
listen and under- ; always brief, and he wrote now the brief- 
stand it. but became hopelessly befogged est of his life. It consisted of three 
within ten minutes. | words: "You are free," and his signa- 

Charles Everley was one of the guests lure. 




mi IBET^QL 



Yellow tomataoes. 50 cent.s a peck. 

Red cabbages. 10 cents each. _ 

Green finger peppers. 10 cents a 
dozen. 

Cantaloupes. 10 to l.*; cents each. 
Hub-bard s<ii»ish, 15 cents each. 

Dried beef, 30 cents a lb. 

Frogs leg.=?, 20 cents a dozen. 

Suckling pigs. J3.D0. 

One may revel in broiled lanib chops 
of the .smallest and moat innocent 
kind with never a thought of the 
innocent ci-eature who gambolled on 




jack's face clouded as he heard a mans 
voice inquiring for Miss Starr. 

"That's Everley," he said. "Confound 
him' Why can't he call somewhere else 
otcasionally? This makes the second 
Lmie he's called here In the last five days." 

Edith's greeting of the newcomer be- 
t raved no annoyance. Indeed, it struck 
Jack that she wa.s altogether too cordial, 
under the circumstances. 



Everything he said had an air of clever 
nos.s. His brilliant wit, his easy, con- 
' fldent manner, hl.s veiled compliments, 
' put everyone— except Jack— in a good 
; humor. He was listened to with attention 
by all; his ideas were lueid and ho ex- 
; pressed himself to the point. 
' Poor Jack sat sil-nt throughout the 
1 meal, and told himself that ho had a 
I thorough contempt for a man who inon- 
j opolized the conversation. Everley, con 



Charles Everley was a lawyer, and ! found him, gave uo one else a chance to 
though only 30 years of age. had already get in a word. 



Early in the following fall Edith's en- 
gagement to Charle.s Everley was an- 
nounced. Jack WHS invited to the wed- 
ding, but he didn't a' tend. "Tliat would 
have been a drop too much in his cup of 
disappointment. 

But a year later he married little Rose 
Thorp, 

(Copy right.) 



It pays to advertise in The- Herald- Ask 
Sllberstein & Bondy Co. 



not for a Roman hoiiday. but for the 
moat ordinary of American lunch- 
eons, but even the most unsynvpa- 
thetl'c must shudder slightly when 
that most innocent Iwnlcing thing on 
earth, a very youn« Jrig, is served 
roasted wiiole. with aii apple l>e- 
tween his poor, forevar still, jaws. 
The calk>used per.son who could in- 
sert a sharp carving. Knife and re- 
move the iKiad ■ 

Oh! Oh! Isn't it 'airful. 



!af!iit;veJ prominence in 
He wa.s a tall, fine 



his profession, 
looking broad 



It pays to advertise In The Herald. Ask 
French & Bassett. 





$1.00 $1.00 $1.00 

That is all you need per week to pay for a ROYAL HEATER or 
RANGE. We have the largest assortment of stoves in the city, and 
our prices are the lowest. 



Royal Base 
Burners 



$35 



$35 



Royal Steel 
Ranges 

Radiant Home Heaters $40, $45, $S0, $5S 

Double Heaters $5.0G Extra. 




Miss Florence Hyland 

teacher of voice. Pupils received at 
residence. 602 East Third street. Ze- 
nith 'phone 75; old 'phone 75-L. 



>VE.NING- ST01»: 



Jack's Engagement 



By Florence Haliowell Hoyt 



match, and will be profu.se with congratu- 
lations. Jack is young, handsome, well- 
Rorn. well off, and de«p«^rately in love 
with you; while you are ditto in all ex- 
cept one." 
"Which one. Aunt Sarah?" 
"You are not at all in love with him." 
Edith started slightly and the hru-^^h 
paused for an instant, but her flowing 
hair hid the sudden rush of color to her 
face. 



; and an occasional surprise in tho way of 



F. H. WADE, 

329-331 Central Avenue. 



"So vou're going to marry him?" 

"I suppose so; we're engaged." 

There was no enthusiasm in Edith 
Starr's voice. She was standing before 
the »)iireau in her own room, brushing out 
her long, thick hair, and she continued 
the slow, regular motion without a pause. 

•H-m •• Mis.-* Sarah Dver lo.>ked keenly ! scenery. ^\ , 

at her niece, interrogation in her hand- i Ed.th smiled faintly. She understood 
some middle-aged face. She had returned I P^^rtectly her aunt's metaphor, but she 
"the day before from Florida, wliere she made no reply. She was rather of a re- 
had spent the winter, and had been met served nature, and cTtremeJy proud, 
with the news of Edith's engagement to j "W*-!!. my dear, all I can say Is that 
Jack Dorman. This was the first oppor- j I sincerely trust you m^v be happy in 
tunity she had found to speak to her your marriage." Miss Dyer had risen 
niece on the subject. . and was moving toward the door. She 

For many reasons the engagement had paused w'ilh her hand on the door knob to 
l)een a surprise and something of a dis- add: "And no one can say that Jack isn't 
Mi.-^s Dyer. Edith hadia 



I fear you have spent anything but a 

f)leasanl evening," Edith .snid. as her 
over, who lingered until all the other 
guest.« had gone, was pulling on his new 
spring overcoat in the wide hall. 

"Oh, -no; it was delightful, perfectly 
delightful:" answered Jack, with h^avy 
.sarcasm. "Everley surpassed my wildest 
-expectations. I wonder he doesn't enter 
the lecture field himself." 

"Good night," said Edith, coldly, and 
ascended the stairs to the .second floor 
without giving even a glance backward. 

"I'm always putting my foot into II 
somehow," thought poor Jack, as he went i 
^^^^___^^^_^,^,^__„^_«„^^.„,.„Bi„iM^ j out into the .sweet spring night. I 

" When he arrived at his office the next 

shouldered fellow, with a dlgnilied pres- 1 morning he received a painful surpri.s.' m 
ence and most attractive manners. j the .'!hai>e of a note from Edith asking 

Jack always experienced a feeling of 1 to be released from her engagement to 1 
chagrin and impatience when in the pres- ! liim. I 

ence of the lawyer, and now. after a few "Do not blame yourself In the least. I 
words of greeting, he picked up a pile of | 
pliotographs which Miss Dyer had ; 
brought from Florida, and resigned him- { 
sell to a dull evening. ] 

What in the mischief were they talk- , 
Ing about? Jack wondered. He heard 
Edith say she had joined the Society for | 
Psychical Researcii the previous day, and | 
he wondered why she had nut mentioned i 
it the evening before, when they had a ; 
long talk. Perhaps she thought him not 
at all interested m such matters. Well, : 
she was right. He thought it all con- 
founded rot. and that women could hnd ; 
enough to interest and amuse them with- 
out joining "crank" clubs. Of course : 
Edith would give up that sort of thing 
wht'n she wag married. He would soon 
talk her out of her ridiculous notions. 

"I fear you were dreadfully Iwred. , 
Jack," Edith said, when Mr. Everley had i 
departed. , ,^ ,, 

•'Bored wa.'Jn't the name for It. an- 
swered Jack frankly. '1 b( lieve Everley 
crams for days before coming here." | 

"He Is wonderfully brilliant and fas- 
cinating," rejoined Edith. "He ke<ps up 
in a marvelous degree with the progr^-ss 
of the age. considering how hard h** 
works at his profe*ision." | 

"Oh, h*" is smart enough— nobody donips 
that" said Jack, "but no jwacock ever i 
was half as vain as he is. He has an , 
idea that all the women adore him." 
j:dith stiffened a little. ' 

"I don't I»ke to hear one man disparage 
another." she said coldly. ^.,.,^ i 

"Oh everyone- says he's vain. Edith. ] 
Why. 'his walk is enough to tell you that. 
But don't let us waste Ume talking 
'about him, darhiig; let's talk about our- 



CHRISTIE LITHOGRAPH & 
PRINTING CO. 

Are Now Locate J in the Milton 
Block, 130-132 W. Michigan St. 



Send in your orders for Print- 
ing, Litliograpliing or Blanlc 
Books. Both Pliones 362. 



"WHERE VALUES REIQM SUPREME" 




21-23 W EST SUPERIOR STREET. 
A Splendid Showing of 

New Fall Suits, Coats, Skirts! 

Waists 



"For my part." observftd Miss Dyer, ! selves." r.-.nre intpr ' 

"I d .n't like a fl.i.t prairi*> where one can "Do you think hat w 11 be more inter- 
see for miles ahead^ and feel reasonably estlng?'' B'l'^l' « I'P '^^'^^'^J,^ vou art ' 
-aggravatlngly-sure of the dull, dead ' "^^«^l'^p'^lv H..w different iou art 
level of the road. Give me rolling count rj' 



' "Decidedly. How different you 
from most women, Edith," he said. . t 
"I am not at all the sort of woman i 
you should have fallen in love with, ' 
Jack," rejointd Edith quickly, yet with : 
an air of reluctance. "Your wife shoulu ; 
be a dear, plump little creature, full of 
kittenish ways, ready to laugh or cry a.^ | 
suited the occa.-^ion, and given over to i 
the vanities and frivolities of this mun- ' 
dane world. Sometimes— very often. In 
fact— I doubt my ability to make you ; 
happy." ... . 

ni rtsk that," said Jack, kissing her. 



"And no one can say that jacK isn t ; ,,^f " '""^ V i',.,„™; t-.h,, -J^n n-eri* de- 
borough gentleman a^ as good as T'O^-urse I^^^^^-^w ^who ^you .^ere^de^ 



sort of a woman would suit me. 



Appointment to Mi.-^s Dyer. Edith hadia t 

!)een brought up under her cure, and she 'gold. , 

understood her thoroughly. She also' As the door closed behind the old lady. ; that •;„•'•'---.,.". ..^ „ uicture but 

knew Jack Dorman-knew him very well Edith let the brush fall with a sudden, ^'^^'^j^ ^^^^r.^^^r^S' do./^AU the men say 

indeed. | impatient movement and threw herself : she la a silly htUe don. All ine men 8a> 

"We've been engage<l only a week," ilnto the low chair by th"? open fire which \^°- 



said Edith, still calmly brushing, "and : her aunt had just vac; 
of course. It hasn't been annt3unc"-Hl yel." , At half past so\-en 

"No; yju waited for my return, I sup- ipeared as u.<5ual. He hi 
po.se. XA'ell, ttte worlil will call it a good i.^ince his engagement b) 
•■ — ^^^— iing. He brought Edith fcj 

jLa France roses, and uii 

ipresetited It. » ' 

I Jack Dorman had hosife i 

I was a big. tender-heartedj 

who had taken any ntiml, 

atlileilc feats during his *^ 

wiio was amiable to a 



H. M. Gerson, 



Dorman ap- 
ide It a point 
M pvery even- 
ly bouquet of 
ad her as he 

friends. He 
strong fellow, 
of prires for 
lege d.iys, and 



LADIES' TAILOR 

1^22 Jefferson St. 

Zenith Phmie i036Y. 



He met the silly lUtle doll on the street 
! the next day. She was attirtd In the 
' late.Kt fashion, and a diminutive spaniel, 
[wearing a velvet blanket edged with fur. 
followed her at the end of a gold chain, i 
What a bright, gay little creature she 
was! Jack thought, as he turned away 
after parting with her. And she was i 
certainly amusing. But how utterly dif- ; 
! ferent from Edith Starr! ' 

: The next morning Jack received by ; 
special mes.senger a note from Edith 



fault. But hr^ I -. . .' ,j .,, . ^ X. i 

wasn't clever. He was incapable of a asking him if he would like -to escort her 
mean action, innately pure-minded and aunt and herself to a lecture to be de- 
Dulnth Minn I chivalrous. But he had no tajite for livored that ^venlng in one of the large, 
^..».; I science -and had never read Browning. I churches. ^„„.. I 

OW PKoM mtr-L. 1 Jack simply adored her, thought her "If you think it wlU bore you, don t 



r 



New Skirts 

In all the new models and fabrics, 

broadcloths, serges, Panamas, 

voiles, taffetas and novelties. 
A special assortment of skirts on 
sale tomorrow in all wool serges, 
Panamas and novelties, all new 
models and exceptional values. 

Your dtoice S5 
Mew Fall Coats 

In Broadcloths, Kcraeys. Meltons, 
Tweeds, novelties, furettes, etc. 
The very best models from the very 
best makers at the very lowest 
prices. 

Children's Coats, sizes 4 to 14, 
prices range $15 
down to 



$3.50 



New Fall Waists in fancy Wash 
Fabrics, checks, plaidj^^ ^^K 
and stripes at ^t m^%9 



A b^ assortment of Waists 
lawns, Swisses, batistes, 
mulls and novelties, at.. 



in 



98o 



Children's 
School Dresses 

In dark and medium col(jrs, checks 
and plaids, smart an"a neatly 
trimmed. Pretty little dresses, in 
all sizes from 4 o 14 years. Prices 

$1.25 to $^.75 

Children's Dresses in ginghams, 
chambrays and prints, $1.25 and 
$1.00 values for 75c 
and 



50o 



Good Cotton Blankets — 
at 



Blankets and Comforts 

59o 



10-4 size 

Blankets, 
borders. . 



m nice grey 
with fancy 



Cotton 



Extra size 12-4 Blankets, witlr 
fancy borders, spe- 
cial price 



Heavy Cotton Blankets, in tan, 
gold and white, full 11-4 O^g^ 



Size 

Good heavy 

Comforts 



full size 



85o 



$1.25 

iforts, filled in 

$1.00 



Heavy full size Comforts, filled in 
nic^ cotton and 
quilted, for. ........ 

See the nttmbers in fancy Com- 
forts from $1.50 to $2.50. 

We can save you money on all 
those numbers. 




mwrrrTi^ 



DEFECTIVE PAGE 



-- 



M 



TH2 DULUTH EVENING HERALD'. MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 1907. 



f 



^ 



r 



THE MARKET 

IS simm 

V/heat Closes Higher on 
Bullish News From 
Canadian Northwest 



clover, nothing doing. Cash wheat, 
red, W«447%c, No. 3 red. JM^iraltS'/ic; 
hard, tt5c; others--, nothing doing. 



No. 
No. 



Flax Has 
luth 



Bulge 
During 
Day. 



in Du- 
the 



Minnoapulis \Vh(*at. 

Minnearolis. Sept. If..— Close: "Whont — 
Sept., |1.W»*.; I>eeeml>er. $1.1*-%; May. 
Jl.(»9>^; No. 1 hard. old. |l.(».sf>v. new, H.0>^«; 
No. 1 northern, old, $Ht7^>, new, ^.l.tiVVs; 
No. 2 northern, old. IHt'-'s; No. ;; new, 
tHi^hn; No. 3 northern. Jl.Ol-VW. 



Miii!ica|M)Us Flour. 

Minneapolis, Sept. Iti.-'l'hc flour mar- 
ket is untiiangcd. No ehanK<n were re- 
ported in th«' iiiillinK ssituatiun. Mill- 
ers' reports are soinewiiat nilxvd. The 
volunio of business i.s k*'*'<1. I'l'' tliis 
doeo nt>t prevt lit a <ieKree vi eon.'ierva- 
tion as repartis future roininitmi'nts '•'""I'lt 
because of the ■uneertainty wlilv ii stVnis 
to infect the trade as to tlie perma- 
nani y of present prices. Sliipini'iUs, 5C..- 
0-lti l.arrels. First pat.nts. $5.:X)(ii'6.3(i; sec- 
ond patents. $5.U><t«'5.i;« ; iin^t clears, $3.'J0 
4j4; second t lears. $,!.Ui^r3.J0. Wheat- 
Close: Septeir.ber, $1.(>414; December. 
$l.t>C\; May, $l.iiHii,(i/ 1.091^. 



Grain 

Sept. 



in 



store. 

mi7: 



Duluth Board of Trade, Sept. 16.— Wheal 
had an advance in the American markets 
today, on reports of further damage to 
the Canadian crop by frost. The news 
from the Canadian Northwest was very 
bullish. The worlds shipments showed 
« considerable decrease over last week 
and last year. Trading on the local ex- 
cLange was somewhat restricted by inade- 
quate communication with the outside 
markets caused by wire trouble. The 
fact made it impossible to secure some 
of the usual data today. L<iverpool closed 
%d to IVtd higher. 

World' ssliipments of wheat were 8,0»0,- 
000 bus., agaaist 11,056,000 bus., last week 
and 10.36;;.(.»UO bus. a year ago. 

Worlds shipments of corn were 3,S34.00i) 
bus., against 3,145,(iO bus., last week and 
8,086,CiOo bus., a year ago. 

The visible supply ot wheat decreased 
1,W7,(I00 bus., and is now 45,500,000 bus. 
The visible supply of corn decreased 83,0*J0 
bus. 

The September option closed '/fee higher 
In Duluili and '/fee in Chicago and Minne- 
apolis. Tlie December option closed •^4C 
higher in Duluili and Minneapolis and 
H-%c in Chicago. The May option closed 
lie higher in Duluth and Minneapolis 
ajid %c in Chicago. 

December corn closed %c lower in Chi- 
cago and was %d to ^d higher in Liver- 
pool. L>ec ember oats closed %-%c lower 
»n Chicago. 

Wheal was rather quiet in the Du- 
luth market. The opening prices were 
up and tlie tone was on a higher level 
throiigljout the day. September wheat 
opened ^c higher at $1.0i<, advanced to 
$1.09, declined lo $1.08'/^, rallied to $1.09^4, 
declined to llA-i>% and closed at that 
price, a gain of %i.: over Saturday. De- 
cember wheat opened %c higher at 
tlM%, advanced to $1,071^, fluctuated to 
$1.07^, went off to $1.07. rallied to $1.07% 
and dosed at that price, a gain of ^c 
over Saturday. May wheat opened '^c 
higher at $1.10%», advanced to $1,11% and 
declined by the close lo $1.11, a gain of 
%c over Saturday. 

Cash spring wheat was selling on a 
basis of l^c over September for No. 1 
northern. 

Durum wheat closed %c higher. 

Flax was rather quiet, but prices were 
higher. September flax opened un- 
changed at $l.-'4i^, advanced to $1-1S:^, d.* 
cllned to $1.^ and closed at that price, a 
gain of ^c over Saturday. October tlax 
opened unchanged at $l.:;o%, advanced to 
Sl-'^iZV^, declined to $1.21%. rallied to $1.1:2, 
wtnt off to $1.2114 and closed at that price, 
a gain trf %c over Saturday. 

November ttax opened unchanged at 
H.20, advanced to $1.21. d«:lined to $l.:o^4 
and dostd at that price, a gain of %c 
over Saturday. December fiax opened '/nc 
Uigher at $M(!%, advaiiced to ll.lb and de- 
clined by the close to $1.17%, a gain of 
%c over Saturday. 

Rye was marked off to 78-83c and the 
Other coarse grains were unchanged. 

Following were the cosing prices: 

Wheat— No. 1 hard on track, $1.U«4. To 
arrive: No. 1 northern, $1.10>^; No. 2 
northern, $l.(*4j. On track: No. 1 i»orth- 
•rn, $1.10; No. 2 northern. $1.0i>:/s; Sep- 
tember, JI.I'Ks^b; Lucinr.'* :■, Jil.Oi'fe: May, 
JQ.IJ. Durum, on track: No. 1, hi-\^; No. 
2, 86; Septernotr durum. No. 1, 8(i/4: No. 
2, 841^; October durum, 87i^; November 
durum, S7^. Flux: To arrive, $1.26; flax 
on track, $1.25; SeptemlKr, $1.25N; Octo- 
ber, $1.2iVi; November, $1.2(»%; Decem- 
ber, $1.17^; May, $1.2414. Oats, to arrive, 
48c; oats c>n track, 49c. Kye, 78-Mc. Bar- 
ley, 77-S7C. 

Cars inspected: Wheat, 176; last year, 
876; oats. 6; barley, 66; flax, 11; last year, 
». 

Receipts: Wheat, 121,887; oats, 8,377; 
barley, 40,197; rye, l.lOo; flax, 5,343. 

Wheat, 89,000; oats. 12,653; 
rye. 1.S67. 



At Duluth, 

Wheat. Bushels 

No. 1 hard 33 837 

No. 1 northern 390,825 

No. 2 northern 11,534 

Rejected 4G6 

No grade 582 

Special bin 390,057 

Durum 274,816 

Total of wheat 1,102,147 

Decrease during week 69,611 

Stocks a^year ago 1,149,229 

Coarse grains. 

Oats 64927 

Increase 4.286 

Rye 1.264 

Decrease 22.519 

Barley 328.028 

Increase 110,818 

Flax 146,«84 

Decrease 82.608 



IB 
16 
18 
14 
16 
10 

IS 
35 



13 
15 
50 
15 

2 00 
12% 

12 
12 
11 



15 

00 
50 
75 
4% 
10 

10 

26 
60 

28 



the 



30 

29 
25 



16 
16V4 
19 
15 



9% 
14 



Chicago Oats, Corn and Pork. 

Oats. 
/ Dec. 

High 62% 

iLow 61%-J4 

iClose 51%-% 



Corn. 
Dec. 
56% 
56% 
56% 



Pork. 
Sept. 



$15.37 



noon today, the list being supplied by 

secretary of the exchange: 
BUTTER. 

Creamery prints 29 ® 

Tuts .. 28 ® 

Renovated 24 @ 

Ladles 21 

iPacking .; 18 

EGGS. 

Fresh 19 20 

CHEESE. 

Full cream. -twins IB ® 

Wiscoii.-^ln Jlats 16 ® 

llli>ck and wheel Swiss 18 (H 

Brick cheese 14 <ai 

Llmberger, full cream 

Pnmosi 

HONEY. 

New fancy white clover IS (Jf 20 

syrup, 10-lb cans .... 1 
, NUTS. 

Filberts, per lb 

Soft-slit'll walnuts, per lb .. 

Cocoanuts. dozen 

brazils, per lb 

Hkkory nuts, per bus 

Mixed nuls. per lb 

Peanuts, per lb 12 ii 

Pecans, per lb 12 ii 

Chestnuts, per lb 

MAPLE SUGAR 

Vermont, per lb 

FRUITS. 

Dutchess apples, per box ... _ .- 

Apples, per bbl 4 50 @ 4 75 

Iranscendenl crabs, per bus 

Bananas, per lb 

Dates, hard, 12-lb box 

Dates, sugar walnut 10-lb 
box 

Fifes, Smyrna, 10-lb box .... 

Firs. Cal., 10-lb box 

Tokay grapes, per four bas- 
ket crate 2 

1 Malagas, per four basket ' 

1 crate 2 25 

Rose perncr per four basket 

1* crate 

I Grapes, Concord, per basket 

! Grape fruit, per case 6 50 @10 00 

'Lemons, Cal 6 50 <B) 6 00 

Limes, per box 1 

Mediterranean sweet or- 
anges 4 60 

Valencia oranges 6 00 @6 

1 Pineapples, per crate 4 25 <j 4 

! Blueberries, 16 quarts 2 00 «<) 2 

Currants, 16 quarts 2 25 

Red raspberries, "^4 pints 2 25 ® 2 



75 
40 
50 
50 
50 



American 



Wlieat 

Du- 

1 luth. 
I December- 
Open $1.06% 

High 1.07% 

'Low 1.06% 

Close 1071% 

Close 14 1.06% 

May- 
Open $1.10% 

IHigh 1.11% 

iLow 1.10% 

Close I.IIB 

Close 14 1.10=4 



Market. 

Minne- 
apolis. 



$1.05 

1.06% 
1.-04% 
1.05% 
1.04% 

$1.09 
1.10 
1.09 
1.09% 
1.08% 



Chi- 
cago. 

98%-9 

9y-8 

98% 

98''fe9.tA 

98% 

$1.W% 

1.05%% 
1.04% 
1.04% 
1.04% 



GREEN VEGETABLES. 

Asparagus, per dozen 65 

Wax beans, per bus 80 

New beets, per dozen 75 

Cucumbers, bush 66 

New cabbage, per crate .... 1 50 

Cauliflower, per basket 126 



dozen 



Liverpool Grain. 

Liverpool, Sept. 16.— Close: Wheat- 
Spot nominal. Futures firnv September, 
7s &d; December, 7s 11 %d; March, 8s %d; 
spot corn firm; American prime mixed; 
5s 4%d. Futures steady; September, 5s 
6%d; October, 6s %d; hops in London 
firm. ... 



Duluth Car Dispection. 

Wheal— No. 1 hard, 6; No. 1 northern. 
51; No. 2 northern, 21; No. 3 spring, I; no 
grade, S; No. 1 durum, 60; No. 2 durum, 
22: No. 3 durum, 7; rejected and no grade 
durum. 1; total of durum, tiO; total ot 
wheat. 176. last year, 376. 

Flax— No. 1, 10; no grade, 1; toUl of flax, 
11, last year. 35. 

Oats, 6; barley, 66. 

Total of all cars, 269. Cars, on track, 
today, 450. 



Celery 

New carrots, per 

Endives, per bus 

Lettuce, per bus 

Parsley, per dozen 

Peas, per bus 

Pieplant, per 50-lb box 

Oyster plant, per dozen .... 
Radishes, round, per dozen. 
Long radishes, per dozen . 

Spinach, per box 

ToniaToes per bus 



crate .'. 1 

1 



35 
75 
00 
60 
40 
00 
00 
75 
20 
16 
40 
25 
00 
60 






26 
50 
25 

60 

76 

,75 

00 

40 



New York Grain. 

New York, Sept. 16.-Close: Wheat 
-September, $1.04%; DeceiT.ber, $1.07%; 
.May, $1.11. Corn— December, 67c; May, 

64%c. 



Shipments: 
Ijarley. 5,808; 



Cash Kal^s Monday. 

No. 1 hard wheat, 1 car 

No. 1 northern wheat, 4,000 bus 
arrive 



11% 



...$1 
to 

... 1.10 



No 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 



1 northern, 12,00u bus to arrive.. 1.09% 

1 northern, 14 cars 110% 

1 northern, 3 cars 1.10% 

1 northtrn, 2 cars 1.10% 

1 northern. 1 car mixed l.(<9 



Grain Gos.sip. 

Chicago wheat letter: 

For the first hour offerings were 
rather light and the filling of a good 
volume of orders gave the market its 
strong turn. This is the third week in 
succession that the visible supply has 
decreased about 200,000 bushels. The 
market held early advance fairly well 
until the last hour, when export busi- 
ness proved very disappointing and 
prices dropped back 1 cent under the 
high point. The market shows some 
gain for the day, as it did on Saturday, 
but lacks good buying force because 
the foreigners are not taking wiieat 
from the largo stocks In Chicago 
iiouscs. Would at least pick out a good 
break before buying wheat unless ex- 
port business is greatly enlarged. 

Corn— \\'eather over the entire corn belt 
continues so fine that everything else is 

secondary. If this continues, a bull mar- 

ket will be out of the question for Ihe'poi-ii 
present. The change to wet or cold weath- iVeal 
er over the big corn states will be the 1 
signal for some very quick buying of | 
corn. Cash corn prices are at a good 
premium over May. 

Oat."- Market likely to follow any de- 
cided turn ( ither way in wheat and corn. 
Receipts today covered two days' inspec- 
tion and an estimate of 44G carp covers 
forty-eight hours up to Wednesday morn- 
ing. 



Fancy Italian plums 

Fancy Washington Bartlett 

I>ears 3 50 

Fancy Washington peaches 1 60 
Fancy Washington peach<;s, 

five box lots 1 40 

VEGETABLES. 

Horseradish, per bbl 9 

Onions, Spanish, per crate .. 2 
Red Globe onions, new, per 

j 100 lbs i 

I Sweet potatoes, per bbl .... 6 

I New potatoes 

Navy beans 2 

Brov/n beans 2 

Beets, per bue 

Carrots, per bus 

Bagas, per bus 

POP CORN. 

Choice, per lb 

Rice corn, shelled 

NEW CIDER 

Clarified. 16-gallon keg 2 

Orange, cherry or pear .... 3 

Black raspberry juice 6 

DRESSED POULTRY. 

Springs, per lb 14 

Hens, per lb 10 

per lb 14 

lb 17 



00 

00 

76 
50 
70 
00 
00 
60 
76 
00 

4 
t 

79 
50 
50 



00 

76 
25 
25 



(QP 300 



Spring ducks. 
Turktys, per 
Geese, per lb 



9 



16 
U 



@ U 



FISH. 

Pike, per lb 10 

Perch, per lb 10 

Freeh salmon, per lb 16 

Halibut, per lb 10 

Trout, per lb 10 

Pickerel, per lb 7 

White, per lb ., 12Vfc 

HAY. 

Timothy, per ton 12 50 

Upland, No. 1, per ton 11 uO 

FEED. 
Shorts, per ton 27 50 



[Bran, 
Oats, 



per 
per 



ton 

bus 



25 00 
66 



Beef .. .-.. 
Mutton .. 

Lard 

loins 



MEATS. 



8 # 
10 (ij; 

9% 

9 ly) 



10 

12 

18. 

10 



New York. 

Sept. 16.— Butler firm, 
creamery specials, 28c; 



re- 
ex- 



2 northern wheat, 4 cars l.oSV* 

2 northern, 25.(.>00 bus to arrive 1.08% 

2 northern. 6 cars 1 07% 

2 northtrn, 5,(K)0 bus to arrive.. 107% 
2 northern, 1 car 1.0!) 

3 wheat. 2 cars 1.07% 

3, 3 cars 1.07% 

Rejected wheat. 2 cars 1.06% 

Durum wheat. 16 cars No. 1 88% 

Durum, 14 cars No. 1 88% 

6 cars No. 1 89 

2 cars No. 1 
S cars No. 2. 

4 cars No. 2 8t.% 

5 cars No. 2 86% 

2 cars No. 2 87 

wheat, 1 car 84% 

2 cars 87% 

8 cars 

12,00(' bus to arrive 

8 cars 

4 cars to arrive — 



Com and Wheat Bulletin. 

For the twenty-four hours ending 
a. m., S«i>t. 16: 



at 8 



STATIONS. 



Tempera- 
ture. 



S3 •= 



t:E 



e 






SI 



Durum, 

Durum, 

Durum, 

Durum, 

Dui um. 

Durum, 

No. 3 

Barley, 

Barley. 

Barley, 

Barley, 

Barley, 

Barley, 

Barley, 

Barley, 

Barley. 

Barley, 

Barley, 

Barley, 

Barley, 

Oats 

Oats 



Alexandria . 

Crookslon .. 

Ilalstad .... 
.89% ! Minneapolis 
.86% :New I'lm . 

Amenia 



New York, 
ceipts, 13,;.(iO; 

tras, 27%c; thirds to firsts, 22(&27c; state 
dairy, common to finest, 20^27; process, 
common to special, 18i&25c; western fac- 
tory, common to firsts, 18i.i<S22%c. Cheese, 
firm; receipts, 696; state full cream, col- 
ored and white, fine, 14c; good to prime, 
13%(&%c; common to fair, lli&'13c; lariie 
colored, fine. 13%; white, 13%(g)%: com- 
mon to prime, ll@12%c; skims, ll%c. 
Egs, firm; receipts, 6,071; state, Pennsyl- 
vania and nearby fancy selected white, 
28^ 30c; good to choice, 25@27c; brown 
and mixed fancy. 25#27c; first to extra 
firsts. 22©;24c; western firsts, 22<g)22%ci 
seconds, 19©21c. 



..Cloudyi 
. . Foggy ' 
..Cloudyi 
,. Cloudyi 
..Cloudy; 
...Cloudy! 



, 80 

,...•• .8b 

87 

2000 bus to arrive 84 

1 car 79% 

1 car 78 

1 car 84 



Devils Lake Cloudy j 

; La;igdon Clear; 

'I'embina Pt. cloudy; 

; Duluth Foggy, 

(Huron Cloudy ^ 

I La Crosse Cloudyi 

iMoorhead Cloud v; 

I St. Paul Cloudy, 

Winnipeg Clear| 



1 car 

part car .... 

1 car 

1 car 

part car No. 2 
1,200 bus No. 3 



white, 
wiiite. 



Oats. 2 cars No. 3 white 

Oats, 8 cars No. 3 white 

Oats. 6,000 bus to arrive No. 3 white 

Fla.\', 4.000 bus to arrive ». 

Flax. 1 car 

Flax, 1 car 

Flax, 8.000 bus to arrive 126 

Flax 4.000 bus to arrive 1.25% 

Flax 2 cars l-f> 



79 

75 

.82 

.88 

.5(1% 

.49 

.4i'% 

.49% 

.49% 
1.25 
1.25% 
1.26% 



64 

70 
70 
68 
70 
70 
C8 
66 
70 
56 
70 
84 
74 
70 
64 



• 46 


.76 1 


50 


.08 ; 


48 


.32 1 


56 


.70 1 


44 


1.04 


40 


.40 


44 





42 





40 


1 


50 


.64 


46 


T 1 


68 1 


.52 1 


48 


.70 


62 


.88 i 


42 


° 



Chicago. 

Chicago. Sept. 16.— Butler steady; cream- 
eries, 22%(§-27',ic ; dairies, 2]@2r)%c. Eggs 
steady; at mark, cases included, i5%<&'l7%r. 
Cheese steady; daisies, 13%(itil3%c; twins, 
12c; young Americas. 13%c; Poultry, live, 
steady; aurkeys, 13c. chickens, lie. 



Showers 
Dakota. 



fell 

H. W 



REMARKS, 
over Ivllnnesoia 



and South 



RICHARDSON. 

Local Fcrtcaster. 



Screenings, 1 car flax, per ton. 



.18.00 



THE CHICAGO MARKET. 

Wheat Started Higher and the Strength 
Continued Ail Day. 

Chicago. Sept. 16.— The wheat market 
started out firm and hibher this miming, 
strong all day. 



all 
December 



The 

%(&'%c 



The inark»t was 
close was strong with 
higher at ll'e. 

Com started with a decline from yes- 
terday. 

The early loss was recovered and 
prict s for a time ruled firm. The close, 
nowever. was weak with December %c 
lower at 5€%c. 

Close: Wheat. September. $9.48<g«: De- 
cember. 99c. Corn, September. 59%c; De- 
cember. 66%c. Oats. September, 527%c; 
December, 61%{ir%c. Pork. October. 

$15 47%c; January. $15.50. l.iird, Octot^r, 
|8Ct''J02%; January. 1ii.65. Ribs. Oeti-bsr. 
B/i>2%; January. $8. Rye. cash. Rtrrt'dc. 
Barley, cash, 8iK&92c. FhiX, timothy and 



T Indicates inappreciable rainfall. • For 
yesterday. ♦• For twenty-four hours end- 
ing at 8 a. m., 75th meridian time. 

NOTE— The average maximum and mini- 
mum temperatures and the average rain- 
fall are made up at each center from the 
actual number of reports received. The 
state of weather is ll^iat prevailing at 
lime of obcervaiicn. 



THE PRODUCE MARKETS. 

The produce market opened with a firm 
tone in prices today but no material ad- 
vance in quotations ov«r Saturdays 
price is noted. Butler and dairy prod- 



but tlie anticipated 
Eastern markets did 



BICYCLE COFFEE GRINDER. 
Dedham correspondence Boston 

Globe: The old adage that "the head 
should save the heels" has been trans- 
formed by the Mahern brotherB, Frank 
and Fred, employed at a Dedham 
i grocery, so that the legs are made to 

save the arms, and that in a most 
unique manner. 

It is a method of runnig a coffee 
mill by leg pov.er on a bicycle instead 
of by arm power. One of the disagree- 
able features of the grocery busint.sa 
has been the ar.-n method of grinding 
coffee. 

Now this is just where the quick wit 
of Frank Mahern came in. A devotee 
of the wheel and knowing that it is 
much easier to pedal than to strain 
with the arms, he conceived the idea 
that a transfer of the strain from arms 
to legs would be much easier and quick- 
er. 

The question was one of applying 
the power of the coffee mill, which 
was done by removing the forward 
wheel of a tandem and fastening the 
bicycle in such a way tliat the rear 
wheel was directly opposite one of tlie 
wheels of the coffee mill, which was 
fitted with a belt wheel. 

The tire was removed from the bi- 
cycle wheel and a belt put on, run- 
ning from the wheel to the belt wheel 
on the coffee mill. 

The arrangement was then complete 
and when there is coffee to be ground 
it is thrown into the grinder, the bicycle 
is mounted and the rider takes a prac- 



DECUNES 

irfsrocKs 

Vjgoroq^^eiilng of Meta 
Stocks Weakened tlie 
tsi^arkel 

No Effective Rally and 

Close Was Irregular 

and Dull. 



New York, Sept. 16.— Opening pricees of 
stocks showed sharply coaHicting move- 
ments in some of the most prominent 
Issues, although the volnme of business 
was moderate. Northern Pacific rose 1% 
and Reading, Brooklyn Rapid Transit, 
Anaconda and American Smelling pre- 
ferred large fractions. Union Pacific 
opened off a shade and then rallied to a 
large fraction over Saturday's closing. 
-Sloss-Sheffield Steel foil 1%, Atchison 
nearly a point and Amalgamated Copper 
and Great Northern Ore certificates lar,ie 
fractions. 

Vigorous selling of the metal stocks 
imparted a weuK tone to the market. 
Shorts started lo cover at the low leve , 
prices turned upward rapidly, and all the 
leading slocks sold well above last wetiks 
closing. The buying of the Hiil stocks, 
Union Pacific and Reading v.as jiarticular- 
ly effective in stimulating the rally, ^n 
the decline Granby Mining got down 7 
points, Amaltramatfd Copper 1%, Unittd 
States Steel preferred 1. At 11 o'clock the 
market was tjuite strong in tone. 

The rise in Northern I'acific reached 2'%, 
Union Pacific 1%, Republic Steel 1%, S.. 
Paul, New York Ceniral, Interboroug^ 
Metal preferred, International Paper pre- 
ferred, Western Union and Anaconda 1. 
Prices react* d when buying by the shor.s 
became less urgent. Tojedo Railway felil 
1%, Erie second preferred 1% and Denver 
& Rio Grande 1. American District sold 
at 20 compared with 37 lor the preceding 
sale in March. The tone was dull a:.d 
heavy at noon. 

Prices slipped back further on squall 
offerings, Reading, Union Pacifis, Norili- 
ern Pacific, American Smelling and 
Amalgamated Copper selling from 1 to 1 
below their high prices of the mornins. 
Adams Exprtss jump<d up 15 points and 
United States Rubber first, preferred 1%. 
Rock Island preferred lojit 1%. 

Increased selling of the meta] stocks, 
which depressed Amalgamated Copper to 
the lowest of the day. discouraged I'uylng 
in other quarters and there was a gradual 
drop lo prices. The leading railroad 
stocks, however, held about at last week's 
closing although they lost most of their 
rise. Pullman fell 1%; Amalgaiiialed Cop- 
per. 1%, and Granby Mining sold at 30, a 
loss of 17 points. 

The market closed irregular and dull. A 
large selling order on Union Pacific car- 
ried it % unled last night. Amalgamated 
Copper extended its decline to 2% points. 
American Smelting and Atchison pre- I 
ferred lost 1; Chicago & Alton pre- 
ferred. 1%; and Union Pacific preferren, 2. 
There wa.« no effective rally. Baltimore 
& Ohio sold at an advance of 1%. j 



T N 



Zen. 'Phone. fS9. Dnl. 'Phone, 011. 

¥©riiii IBo 
©ir1i©ini 




BROKER 



410 ^VEST SUPERIOR STREET, 
DUL.L'TH, MINN. 



iHJILyTIHI 



PRIVATE WIRES. 

Correspondenta in all leading mar- 
kets. 

Boston correspondents: Hayden, 
Btone & Co. 



PaiSini@.W@U@irS@® 



BANKERS AND BROKERS. 



Members New York and 
Boston Stock Exchanges 



DULUTH OFFICE— 
Room A, Torrey Building, 

816 W^mt Snperlor Street. 




60 Conirresa St., Boaton. 

Members of 
Boston Stock ExchiOige. 

Direct and ExeiiMlve 

Private \%'lrea to 

BOSTO.X, NEW YORK. CHICAGO, 

CALU.MET and HOUOHTON, MICII. 

Diilath Offloei 828 W. Superior St. 

Old 'Phone, 1857. 
R. G. HliBBEI.L., Manager.* 



IDTOIKIELL 

COPPER STOCKS. 

UX TRANSACTIONS CONFIDENTIAL 
«M RIRST NATIONAL BANK 
BUILDING. DULUTH. 
Zenith. 1889 PHONES Duluth, 102S. 



Quotations furnished by Gay & Sturgla, 
brokers, 328 West Superior street: 



Stocks— 



|High|Low|Close 



Atchison 

Amalgamated Copper.. 

Smelting 

Brooklyn H&pia Transit 
Colorado Fuel & Iron 

Canadian Pacific 

Chesapeake & Ohio ... 

Erie 

Louisville & Nashville 

Anaconda 

New York Central 

Peoples Gas 

Pennsylvania Railway 

Reading 

St. Paul 

Southern Pacific 

Sugar 

United States Steel .... 

do preferred 

Union Pacific 

American Liocomotive .. 

Northern P'acific 

Great Northern 

American Car Foundry 



S6 


K% 


86 


61 


58% 


58% 


90 


«7% 


87% 


44% 


43% 


44 


22% 


22% 


22% 


l(i6% 


166% 


166% 


33% 


33 


S3 


20% 


20% 


20% 


lOWi 


107 


108 


38 


36% 


37% 


105% 


104% 


105% 


8ti 


»% 


85% 


i:!O^A 


lli»% 


119% 


to-* 


a3->H 


!M% 


120 


118% 


119 


«6% 


MV4 


85 


111 


no 


110 


2fe;4 


27% 


2.'% 


yo'-<, 


89% 


9!."^ 


i2s>^^: 


127% 


127% 


50% 


&o% 


bO^i 


1301^ 


128 


120% 


127^4 


125% 


TMi 


37% 1 


37V*1 


37% 



Dulnth 365. Zenith »9T. 

J, Q. Pfmghton & Co. 

BROKERS 

Li«ted and Unlisted Copper Stock*. 

630-31-aa Manhattan Bulldlnc, 

Duluth, Minn. 



THE COPPER STOCKS. 



The following are the closing quotations 
of copper stocks at Boston tod.ay, report- 
ed by Paine, Webber & Co., Room A, 
Torrey building: 



Stocks 



I Bid. I Asked. 



6tocl{ G<»ssip. 

I New York — Logan & Bryan to Paine. 
I Webber & Co.: The New York sto«k 
I market was irregular today, and in 
: most cases lower. The pressure on 
.Amalgamated Copper & Smelting con- 
, tinues, and the metal situation is still 
' in a demoralized state. It is rumored 
that several large producers will cur- 
tail their production about ^0 per cent, 
the effect of which wU] be to gradu- 
ally decrease the present large surplus 
of copper metal. Of course, any action 
along these lines will tend to create ap- 
I prehension as to whether or not ihe 
i present dividend rate of coppers can 
be maintained, and should the di- 
I vidends be reduced there will undoubt- 
j edly be a further sympathetic decline, 
j There Is not much change in the mone- 
tary situation, but conditions are 
gradually beconiing normal. There is a 
'• large short interest in the market and 
a substantial rally is not unlikely at 
any time. However, the transactions 
[ are mostly confined to the operations 
I of professionals, who are be*rishiy in- 
I clined, and in the absence of favor- 
able developments the market Is likely 
' to drag lower, although stocks are un- 
doubtedly selling on an attractive 
I investment basis. 

I 

j TreaKury Balan€*e8. 

I Washington, bepl. 16.— Today's state- 
Iment of the treasury balances In the 
'general fund exclusive of the $150,000,000 
gold reserve shows: Available cash 
i balance, r^40,846,27f ; gold coin and bul- 
lion $53 980,804; gold sertiflcates, $81,- 
' 801,720. 



Anierican Saginaw ., 

Atlantic 

Arcadian 

Adventure 

AUouez 

Ash Bed 

Arnold 

Ahmeek 

Arizona Commercial 

Balaklala 

Bingham 

Black Mountain 

Butte & Superior 

Butte & London 

Boston Consolidated 

Butte Coalition 

Copper Range 

Calumet & Arizona.. 

Calumet & Hecla 

Carman 

Cumberland Ely 

Comanche 

Copper Queen 

Centennial 

Davis-Daly 

Dtnn- Arizona 

Daly West 

East Butte 

Franklin 

Greene Cananea 

Globe Consolidated . 

Helvetia 

Isle Royale 

Keweenaw - 

Mass. Gas 

Michigan 



ucts remain firm, 
raise in price in 
not occur. 

« • • 

Large shipments of tomatoes, cucum- 
bers and other small vegetables arrived 
ttniay. Tomatoes are ripening fast with 
the rains and sunshine following them 
and the markets will be well supplied 
from now on. 

« * « 

Melons continue to arrive In quantities 1 tice spin and at the same time grinds 
and are exceptionally good- this vear. the coffee. 
They are 



exceptionally good- this year. 
selling at reasonable prices. 

♦ • * 

Meat prices remain unchanged and 
poultry is about the same with the mar- 
kets well supplied with good specimens 
of spring chickens. 

• • * 

The following prices are quoted up to 



Send Us Samples of Barley and Oats for Grade and Prices. 

0. 0. WYIili 

DULUTH. GRAIN COMMISSION. MINNEAPOLIS. 




KANSAS COYOTE BOUNTIES. 
Gove correspondence Topeka Capi- 
ta!: The bounty on coyote scalps has 
i reached a str.ge where it Is one of the 
big bills met by the county commls- 
i sioners at each session of the board, 
and to such an extent has it grown that 
many persons make the hunting of 
: coyote a business fcvr the very reason 
that it pays and pays big. 
Scalps are turned into the county at 
I the regular $1 rate in bunches as high 
I as fifty to a man. while a count shows 
1 that upward of 500 coyotes were gather- 
! ed In during April. May and June of 
this year in this county, and the treas- 
ury has been touched $1 per head. It 
has truly reached a stage of the great- 
est importance, financially, if not other- 
wise. 



Tlie Cotton Market. 

New York, Sept. 16.— The cotton market 
op( ned weali at a decline oT 16 to 25 points, 
under the influence of weak cables and 
the severe break in the New Orleans mar- 
ket after the loca,! clos« Saturday, which 
was attributed to liquidation of Hedges 
and freer offerings of actual cotton from 
the Southwest. Tradinp was very active 
' at the opening here. After selling at 31.25 
I for October and 11.46 for January, the 
demand from shorts checked the down- 
! ward movement and prices rallies 6 to 7 
points from the lowest. 

fpot closed quiet; 40 points lower; mld- 
ng uplands. 12.20; middling gulf. 12.45. 
Sales 2.40 bales. Futures closed steady. 
Closing bids: Sept.. 10.95; Oct.. 11.02; Nov.. 
IIOP- Dec. 11.16; Jan.. 12.25; Feb., 11.25; 
' March 11.32; April, 11.36; May. 11.39; June, 
i 11.41; July, 11.45. 

New York Money. 

' New York. .Sept. 16.— Close: Money on 
icall firm: 2^t per cent. Ruling rate 3%; 
closing bid, 3; offered at 3. Time loans 
dull and steady; 60 days 5 psr cent; un- 
der 90 days. 5% to 6 per cent: six months 

6 per cent. Prime mercantile paper. 6%'ff 

7 per cent. Sterling exchange, easy with 
actual business in bankers' bills at $4.S5.4E 
(g^.SS.SO for demand and at $4. 81.85^4. SI. r»0 
for GO day bills: commercial bills %^.nQ 
4.81%. Bar silver, 67%; Mexican dollars. 

j62(@''C. Gov^ntaent bonds steady; rail- 
1 road bonds steady. 



Mass 

Mercur 

Mohawk 

Nipissing 

North putte 

NevSda Cons 

Nev:id.^-Utah 

National 

Old Dominion 

Osceola 

Old Colony 

Photnix 

Parrott 

Pneumatic Service .... 

do pfd 

Quincy 

Raven ./ 

Rhode Island 

Santa Fe 

Sliattuck 

Superior Copper 

Shannon 

Superior & Boston ... 
Superior & Pittsiburg 

Tamarack 

Trinity 

United Copper 

Utah Cons<.lldated ... 

U. S. Mining 

U. S. Mining pfd 

Victoria 

Warren 

Winona, 

Wolverine 

Wolverine & Arizona 

Wyandot 

Amalgamated 

Anaconda 



6% 
9% 
3% 
2 
30 



12 
6% 
8% 
4 

1% 

1% 

17% 

15% 

56%. 

110 

610 

"'6%' 

25 
1 

19 
7% 
5% 

7% 
9% 
6% 
2% 

14% 
5 

51 
9 
3»A 

38c 

t»8% 

45% 
&% 
3% 

46c 

24 

90 

25c 

"13" 
4 

10% 
78 

1 
.3 

2% 



8% 
9% 



10% 
63 
14% 
47 
34% 
37% 
88 
4 



e 

115 
2% 
90c 
68% 

37% 



10 
3% 



34 

1 

1 

76 

13 



9 

4% 
2 

1% 
18 
16 

57% 
112 
615 
3% 
6% 
28 



20 

8 

6% 
12% 

6 

8 

9% 

7% 

3 
15 

7 
52 

y% 

4 

40c 
68% 

7% 
46 

9% 

4 

4Sc 
24% 



40c 

1 
13% 

4% 
11 
79 

1% 

3% 

2% 
19% 

9^4 
10 

3% 
10% 
66 
15% 
50 
34% 
39 
38V4 

4% 

5 

6% 
118 



DULUTH COPPER CURB MARKET. 
WALTJBR W. CARR 

202-204 MANHATTAN BUILDING. 

REFKKCNCEi / 

Prlvnte WircM. City Nntioual Hank. Prtvate l.onm Dfwfance 

City 'PboneM. 1S05. Duluth, Minn. 'Pbone«, 1C57-180S. 

. SEPTE.MBEK 16, 19(Vr 



.4mer. 

Black 

nntte 

Butte 

Butte 

Cal. 



Saginaw 

Mountain. . . , 

Coalition 

& London. .. 

& *«uperlor . . 
& .Arizona*. 
Calumet & IMnntana . , 
Cuniherlan(l-E,ly . . . .' 

Cal. & Globe 

Cal. & Sonora '. '. 

Carman Cons 

Cliff 

Comanche. . .-^ 

Copper Gulf 

CopiKT Queen 

Denn-Arizona 

Duluth Exploration. . 



Bid.l Ask. 



7.00 
3.H7 

15.7.1 
1.00! 

1.871 
110.0011 



6.2.5 

.00 

10.501 

3.50 

1.00 

.27 

1.66 

6.00 



7.2.'5 
4.00 

16.00 
1.12 
2.00 

12.00 

.10 

6.50 

1.00 

10.75 
4.00 
1.12 
.28 
7.50 
1.05 
6.25 
2.50 



Bid.l Ask. 



East Butte 


6.25 
7.00 


6.50 


Globe Cons 


7.12 


Greene Cananea 


9.25 


9.37 


Kaneork Cons 


. 6.00 


6.25 


Ke\veenaw 


^ 5.75 


6.00 


Nipi.>ising. 


6.75 


7.00 


National 


.50 


.60 


North Butte 


45.75 


46.00 


North Butte Ex 


1.50 


1.62 


Old Donjlnjon 


24.00 


1 24.12 


Rup. & Pitt.shurg 


10.25 


10.37 


Sup. & Bo.«Jton . 


3.62 


3.87 


Tonapah Common .... 


10.50 


1 11.00 


Wol verine- Arizona. . . 


3.00 


3.25 


Shattuck-Arizona. . . . 




21.00 


Warren 


5.66 


5.25 



ZE:NITU 14«4. 



DVL.UTU 187i. 



COPPEH STOCK BKOKER.. 

414 WEST SUPERIOR STREET. 102 BIANHATTAN BUILDING. 

Reference! City National Banlc. Dulutli, Blinn. 



Plaouea, 200S. 



CAPITAL, 950,000. 



Bnaine«H ConfldentlaL 




COPPER AND MINING STOCK BROKERS. 

PRIVATE WIRES TO ALL LEADING MARKETS. 
OCflcea — Pltoe^iiz Block, Duluth, and 821 Central Ave., \%e»t Duluth. 



Telephone* — Zenith 121S| Duluth OSl. 

D%»lxstK, MInrk. 

ilRlDIICilR 



Unlisted Coppers 
a Specialty. 



S14-St5 Palladio Buildins. 



Private Wires to All 
Principal Mnrfceta. 



Duluth. 



Minneapoiia, 



Sirainidlallll 




BROKERS 




Zenith >phone TOO. 

Duluth 'pboue 1300. 
Mala Floor — Palladio Building. 




LHJIISIDIFF 



STOCKS AND BONDS. 

All orders ProinptIr and Conflden- 

tially Executed. 

806 LONSDALE BUILDING. 

Old 'Phone 1626. 



the siiin thickened it up so thexe wux 78 
pounds." 

With a wild shriek our reporter leaped 
into the eea. He came up just in t*m« 
to meet Herb Cfx>ke. who has a btin^a- 
low on the Rumsen road. 

"A most remarkable IhinK occurred on 
my estate the other day." tretling a 
strangle hold on our ie\)urter and iiold- 
InK liis attention without the least dif- 
ficulty. "I heard what I fancied— please 
call it fancied —I heard what 1 fancied 
to be the sound of an automo-bile horn^ 
aiid thinking that sonit New York frienda 
of mine had come down to drink up ev- 
erything on the ice 1 sallied Icrih tO 
gretrt them. But 1 looked in vain. No 
speeding car affrighted my vis'ioJi. (Be 
careful to put this in my own words.) 



and i!3 already reducing its working 
force. 

It is rather surprising the amount 
of cop^per prcKiuction that copper can- 
not be prttduced at a profit under 13 
cents per pound.With a $4 wage sc-alt- in 

many of the leading co^yper camps, ■ - - r/ - _- „ „ vulirar n^^^ 

the cost of producing cx>p,>er has been B^"^^ J.caped a^'n^ir^miy f^onf an acfjace^^ 

increased 2 cents per pouna. farm and was wanwcring round the r«ar 

* * * . .1**^ '"y t state trying to gel out of th« 

Houghton wire.s: Local shipments wire netting that yuu may have noticed 
of copper of a fair volume are being there. Imagine my surprise when 1 saw 
made from this district and the total protruding from the animal's intelligent 
supplies on hand at this point are lace an autorngbile horn that had be- 
thoiie-ht not to exceed 12 000 tons or 1 ^""^^ '^'s**'"*'<i thereon. The hog wa» 
inougni not 10 exceea i*'"";'''^''%'' sounding the horn by working his jaws 
say 25.000 000 pounds. Officials of the L^^ j,^ ^^.^^ ^^^ pressing the rubber bulb. 
Calumet & Arizona say a cut m pro- j suppose that the horn had fallen frona 
duction is the sensible policy for them a parsing automobile and that the irfg 



had run its nose into it and mastered its 
mechanism by accident. Curious, was It 



F. McNALLY DEAD. 
Chicago, Sept. 16.— Frederick McNally, 
for three years president of the pub- 
lishing house of Rand, McNally & Co., 
died today. ' 



to pursue. 

• • * 

Boston to Paine, Webber & Co.: The ' ^°^\T' 
flnnr tra/lprR mfidp all the fluctuations VV hen our rt-porter reached Asbury 
floor traders made ail tnenucxuauoi^^ ^^^ condition was such thta JameJ 

today and the market ^^as confined ^^„,„j^^ ^^^^^ ^^ j . ^ 

within narrow limits. Amalgamated : ^.n^,. ' " " "*^ 

Copper was the center of attack and ; ■•L.et me say in explanation," began 
closed at lowest. Range he!d well and : Mr. Trammer, that I had set a trap for 
North Butte was fairly steady. Each 1 something that was stealing my game 
day the market looks more sold out ?i'"='**"'^»- When I went out to look at It 
uWk « nfk« ire veiv vrarce the be-^rs i *^*^ following morning 1 found coiled up 
and stocks are veiy scarce, me oe.^s j„ ^j^^ meshes of the rojie trap a water 
are having a hard time to borrow snake five feet long. 1 noticed that the 
enough to adjust themselves, but we snake loeked large about the waist, an<J 
think stocks bought here will not go upon investigation I was interested to 
much lower. The action of the Shan- j find tliat the fulness, so to speak, waa 
non directors in adjourning without paused by a hen that the snake had swal- 
taklng any action on the dividend was i^/ J ij^.^-^ frref^aieX'layX t£ 
disappointing and considerable stock egg." ^ ^ 

came out. it was at Spring I.Ake that our groggy 

reporter stumbled upon Theodore Manse. 
Theodore had been flshng off LK)njr 
Branch and he had a big story on tuB 
string. , 

"I caught a fish that almost scared m* 
into telling ilie truth forever more," said 
Theodore, as he looked furtively about to 
see if any of the neighbors were within 
hearing. "It wasn't such a big fish, as 
fish go down this way. It weighed only 
twelve pounds, hair and all. Yes, tiair, 
« . J r-i L u n *A' J i»-a 11 I ^t '^^^ covered with red hair-but that 

DO^ and risn nave a Batt C and Pl^USeS wasnl the only queer thing about it. Not 
^ » u by a long shot. What really made mo 

Auto tlOrn. j stare was its four eyes. At first I thought 

„ , .., . „, ,, T^ 1 ., ' I wasn't seeing straight, but after shut- 

New York Evening World: Puzzled ^ng my eyes and counting twelve I saw 
landlu<bbers may well ask "What fire the that my first suspicions were correct and 

sad waves saying?" It is almost ^-PO- : -[.^"i^^ '"-"Ji,,'^^, ->''?ireSLXd'?ol"r 
sible to understand what -they re saying jpyes, all rl«ht, red hair and a mouth like 
between their sobs. A low, moaning { a catfish. I took the fish home alive and 
wail heard along the coast In these parts ! §ut »|Jn -J^^^^waler t-ugh.^^When^ my 

sounds like nothing heard before, but the trough a lock of amazement came 
those who know the sea as they know ; over his face. The next thing I knew 
.K,»- rrur. v.nth tiij. sav th'it B.bove th^ • ^^^c flsh Jumpcd out of the water and bit 
thear own bath tub say that above lU-'the dog. A terrible battle then took 
long, weird wash of anguish they can place. The dog came back at the fish, 
bear the heart-brok.^n cry: land they mixed It up for three round*. 

"The sea-going nature faker is in our ■ Then it took me five minutes to pry the 
midst and we are getting ours. Excuse j fish loose. The dog died before I had 
these tears, but— oh, splash! ' . finished the chores." 

That's about the way of it. The sea- 1 Lell Cooper, of H.immell Station, met 
side, nature-faking season has set in and our bewildered reporter as he was beat- 
the modern inventions of the star Per- 1 Ing It back to civil iziitlon. 

'I might give yc>u a 



MORE NATURE FAKES. 



formers are making the faithful old sea-! 'I might give you an item," he vol- 
serpent look like a property snake in a 1 un leered, "about a little experience of 
temperance drama. President Roosevelt mine the other day when I went crab- 
could get a lot of red-hot "copy" by do- , blng. To begin at the beginning, I was 
ing the beach beat, for the heated imag- fixing the handle of my net when I no- 
llnation these warm days is working i,ke t'c^a a movement in the short grass-on a 
' a hot-dog range on Hoboken day at near-by bank. Going to it I saw a soft- 
! Coney Island. The first story to c-ome ' ^"e" crab weighing fully eighteen oun- 
t sizzling off tlie beach is a hot one. Here 1 ?f « Ptrched on the edge of a duck nest. 
i.^jg. lit was eating the duck eggs, of which 

•just t'other d.iy," sJtld Burt Hoffman, j <^*»ere were four. The crab had got away 
I of Highland Beach, N. J., taking a long ^^j^^. one and was breaking the shell of 
1 breath to aid him In getting the yam ' ^I^^th^r when 1 saw me and uttered a 
(Off his chest. "I got a nundred an' t^en- : ^^y^'.^'^rm. It instantly to^^ Ll'.^3.*'!'S! 
Uy poun- sturgeon on the trawl as I ■ >^^'A^"Tn«!fn-, tb« hl^r/i^^^^ 
was beatin' back lo shore. I thought at i ^*^^^''*'- I ^^^i t the heart to stop it. 



thought ^t 

Lfirst I'd hooked a submarine boat and 

that mebbe we'd have a war before sun- 

I down, but little by little it cum over me 



91c 



AN APPETITE CURE. 
Boston Herald: How appetite sub- 
■ that I had a sturgeon sech as had never sides before a well filled menu card was 
[ been seen on lond or sea. It look me four show n in a Washington street restau- 
1 hours to tow the old sockwalloper to th-i rant. The dramatis perjions were two 



St. Paul Livestock. 
St. Paul, Sept. 16.— Cattle receipts. 19,- 
000; 10 cents lower on all kinds. Steer.s, 
$4fiW.2,'>: cow* wad heifers. $2,764^5; calves, 
52(a«.50; Blockers, J2#-£.50; feeders, 2.\(\fjf 
4.25. Hogs, receipts. 1,000. Unchanged. 
Range, $5.Ji(VS«.20; bulk. r'..70®6.80. Sheep, 
10c lower. 'JTearlings, J4.5«g)t). Ewes, J4.50 
^.60; wethers, $5.5.2Si Iambs, $6.25^06. 7S. 



Copper Gossip. 

' Boston to G-ay & Sturgris: Strong 

efforts are being made to secure a 

general curtailment of production on 

the part erf the copt>er producers. Two 

different copper interests are seeking 

to bring abouit an amicable scheme 

whereby the bulk of the American 

copiper prodticlion will be curtailed. 

: Sc^me of the leading consumers, of 

I the country have already agreed to 

] reduce prcnluction 50 per c*nt, pro- 

1 vided the curtailment agreement is 

'pr^tty general. 

The Amalgamated. Cole-Ryan and 
Phelps-Dodge interests have already 
started to curtail. 

! The Copper Q'ueen smelter has blown 
[out two or three of its ten furnaces, 




loUapa- , ' „ 
loozer^usi have been loafin' around the t "Excellent! commented B. "But 
kills where the o41 Lanks is. for when I here's "sirloin steak smothered In 
gets investigatin' him stUl further I finds onions.' Sho;:Idn't we try steak?" 
that his innards is soaked with kerosene. 1 "Just the thing!" agreed A "unless 
■Well. Mister Rockyfeller.' I says to him. ; you care for fricassee of chicken." 
•you re a good deal of a disappointment ..-^^j^y^ ^j^^y have fried kidneys.- 



You see, friend, the roe was „,, v ",;., -d.' ■•^v,^.,''^ k„ .„!. T'.. 

1-, suggested B; tney d be tasty enough. 



to me.' 

BO soused in oil that I wuz goin" to sllni, ,.., ,,,,., . . - 

It away. But rememberin' that caviar is' ^J' "^^'"> sofUy whispered A. "I 
made quick with oil 1 puts the roe on a notice there'k lamb stew on th* bill." 
plank where the sun kin git a crack at "Lamb stew," repeated B, "is it pos- 
it, and two days later, when I takes a sible?" 

lcK.k at it. I finds I have 70 pounds of the -Qr would you prefer mutton broth »" 
richest, bluest, caviar you d want to see. ventured A •'«"».". 

So I takes it up to the city and gits 20, ..ist„ <^pnr'' rpnii^r? n =,«♦*, _i w 
cents a pound f'r it." ; ... Z ' '. V\ replied B, with a sigh. 

"But you said there were only 651 * don t reel like eating today." 
pounds of roe to begin with," remarkcJ 1 Then "let's make it pie!" came ia 
our careful reporter. i chorus from the women, and pie It 

"Sure there wa^." agreed Burt, "^ul was. 



X 



I- 



■fioV. 



*^mmt 




t< 



} 



i . 







THE DULUTH EVENING HERAIiDi MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 1907. 



IS 



MINNESOTA GRADES. 



[correspond In 
g-rades of Nos. 



106 Flour 



all respects with the 
1, 2 and 3 Yellow Corn. 



Exchange, Minneapolis, 
Sept. 4, 1907. 
In compliance with the provisions of i measured, busliel 
Section 20«2, Ciiupter 28, Revised 
Laws of 1905, the joint Minneapolis 
and Dtiluth Grain Lii.spection Boards, 
(Bitard of ApiK>ai) met this day and 
&stal)li.slie<I tlie following GKADKS 
OF Gll.AIX, which shall be known 
as MLNM-^OTA (j;ii,\I>tS, the same 
to take effect and be in force on 
and after the 4ili day of September, 
1907. 

A. F. EVKNSOX, 
Ckncral Chairman. 



0.\TS. I 

No. 1 •WTilte Ontj»— No. 1 White Oats | 
shall be white, dry. sweet, sound, cleaii ' 
and free from other grain and shall | 
weigh not less than '6Z pounds to the | 



W. F. KELSO, 

Genei-al Sec'y. 



MLNXLLVPOLIS GRAIN 
TlOX BO.VRD: 
A. F. Evenson, Cl»., 

S. 1*. Thorhcu, 

W. i'. KELSO, 



IXSPEC- 



Sec'y. 



DILLTH Gli-UN INSPECTION 
BO.UU>: 



T. C. 



N. 



3IcMauus, Ch., 

liana 1*. Bjorge, Sec'y. 
li. M. Gray, 
CHIEF LNSPEC1X>R: 
I. \\. Eva, St. Paid. 
CHIEF DEP UTIES : 
Baincai-d, Minneapolis. 

11. E. Eiuersou, l>uluth. 



una 

lae 

-Shall 



NORTUERN SPRING WHEAT, 
^o. 1 Hard Av'iuc v» heat— d nail Ije 

Hound. LtiiJiUl. awcei. ciean ana consiai- 
ul u\'^i jo itvi ceiii oi iiard acolch uio, 
anu weiKu not ieis lauu i»S pouna** to 
tu« lueaaurud bu;;>uel. 

."^u. 1 .\or»Uera ^yricK V\ Ueut— Siiail 
be bouiia, sweet auO i-ieUJi, may oun- 
aidl oi lue uarU ana soil variei-ieo of 
bpria^ Wiicat. out must contain a iuifcei 
propoiiion ol tne nara vaneiiea 
Wenjn not K-ja mau ■»< pounas to 
meajjuieU uudnel. 

Au. ^ i\«»riuer« «>i>riu|| Wheat 
be spring wneai. aoL ci^an cnouifh or 
*yund ciiOUein tor '.so. 1, Out ot ^ood 
uiUimg ^uallly. and must not weijiU 
iesd man 6<» pounas to tne nieaaured 
ouancl. * 

.\«. d Xurthern >prlDK Wheal— rihaii 
Lie couipoS'.'d oi laieiiur, siii uaiton, 
Spring vvncat o-nd wuigu not lead Luau 
b-t puunas lo tUe nie^isured bubuel. 

So. 4 >iurth«ru »i>riu|| Wheat— titiali 
InciuJe all inicnor oprmg wheal LUat 
Is oaaiy shruuKen or uaniaged, ana 
weiyu not lebd iliau 43 pounaa to the 
intitdurcd busnel. 

Rejet-teU :»pi:liiic W^eat— Shall inciud» 
All arielica ot Spring wlieai aprouled, 
badly bleached, or for any other cause 
uuui for No. 4. 

NuTh.— Hard, flinty wheat, of good 
COior. (.ontaaung no appreciable aOniix- 
luru of soft wneat, may be adnutled 
luio Uie grades or No. 2 Norinern 
Spring and No. 3 Wortliern .Spring 
WiieaL. provided weiglit of '.he same 
18 lioi more tnaii oii« pound less man 
IQe nnniniuai lesl weigat required by 
ttie exioiing ruits of sa;d grades, and 
provided further for such wheat is in 
all otiii-r ledpects i^ualilied 
tiioii inio such graaes. 



Xo. 2 White 0«t»— No. 2 White Cats 

shall be seven-tlghts white, dry. sweet, 

; sound; reasonably clean and practically 

free from other grain, and snail weigh 

I not less than 31 pounds to the mcad- 

' ured bushel. 

I No. 8 White Ont^-No. 3 White Oats 

i shall be seven-eighths white, dry, sweet, 

1 sound, reasonably clean and pracLically 

'free from other grain, and shall weigh 

jnot less than :at pounds to the measured jO 

1 bushel. ,, I S 

No. 4 White Onts— Shall Include all I O 

oats not sufficiently sound and cl^-an <J 

for No. 3 While Oats and shall weigh ; O 

not less than 24 pounds to the nieas- i 

i ured bushel. 

Yellow Oat»— The grades of Nos. 1, 2, 

I and 3. Yellow Oats shall correspond 

' with the grad<s of Nos. 1. 2 and 3 W nite 

Oats, excepting tliat they shall be ox the 

j'ellow varieties. 

No. 1 Oata-No. 1 oats shall be dry. 
sweet, sound, clean and free from other 
grain, and shall weigh not less than 32 
pounds to the measured bushel. 

No. 2 Oats«— No. 2 oats shall be dry. 
s\^'eel. sound, reasonably clean and 
practically free from other grain, and 
shall weigh not less than 31 pounds to 
the measured bushel. 

No. 3 Oats— No.'^'S oats shall be all oats 
that are merchantable and warehous- 
able. and not fit for the higher grades. 
No. I cupped White Oat»— No. 1 Clip- 
ped White Oats shall be white, dry, 
sweet, sound, clean and free from other 
grain and shall not weigh less than 40 
pounds to the measured bushel. 

No. a Clipped White Oat»— No. 2 Clip- 
ped White Oats shall be seven-elghtiis 
white, dry. street, sound, reasonably 
clean and practically free from other 
grain and shall weigh not less than 38 
pounds to the measured bushel. 
I No. 3 Clipped White Oatu— No. 3 Clip- 
I ped White Oats shall he seven-eighths 
white, dry. sweet, sound, reasonably 
' clean and practically free from otaor 
grain, and shall weigh not less than 30 
pounds to the measured bushel. 



ADDITIdMAL WANTS 

■from page 14. 



FARM LANDS. 



FOR SALE-$5(W WILL BUY 40 
acres of well-Improved land on 
MIssabft road, five minutes' walk 
from Burnett. Improvements alone 
cost over ftjDO. This is a snap and 
must be sold at once. 

STEPHEN J. McCarthy, 

No. 223 Manhattan Bldg. 






LANL»S F»R S.A_LE— SOUTH ARKAN- 
saa Is the land of opportunities. If 
you would like to own a home in this 
land of promise write me. Nature has 
given us here a soil ot wonderful fer- 
tility, with sufficient rainfall to Insure 
abundant crops. The climate is mild 
and healthful. It ha.'? Just begun to de- 
velop, and those who buy now will 
never regret it. James C. Norraan, 
Hamburg, Ark. 



WANTS 

BRING 
^ QUICK C^ 



^uw 



HELP WANTED— FEMALE. 
(Continued.) 

O<KK*0<KKK><KK«K><>CK><H>CKK>l>i>^ 
WANTlhD 
Competent and experienced seam- 
stresses and tailors. Apply at once 
J. M. GIDDING & CO. 



18 
IS 
IS 



WANTED TO RENT. 

WANTED - BY RESPECTAQLe' WOM- 
an employed during the day, room in 
strictly private family to apply on 
sewing done. Address S. E., Herald. 



P<H3<HCH>i>0<HXK>i><K><H><H>0<^^ 



WANTED-AT WASHBURN HALL, A 
girl for general cleaning and disn- 
^ashing and to assist m kitchen 
Kood wages. Call Saturday evening 
and Monday. Fifth street and 
Twenty-third avenue east^ 

WANTED - GIRL FOR tiE^l^RAL 
housework; family of two. lUi li-ati 
First street. 



j WANTED- TO RENT— 5 OR 6-ROOM 
I modern flat. East end. before Dec. L 
B. 4, Herald. 

W.\NTED TO RENT^A HOUSE WITH- 
In ten blocks of depot; 5 or G rooms. 
.Address W. H. J., care of St. James 
hotel. 

WANTED TO RENT— A 10 or 12-ROOM 
modern house, preferably in East end 
of the city; will take long time lease. 
Address O. H. Clarke, care of Clarke- 
Hepworth company. 

WANTED TO RENT - TWO UNFUR- 
nished rooms for light housekeeping; 
centrally locat«^; by mother and daugh- 
ter. W. 21. Herald. 




FOR SALE-THIRTY MILES FROM 
the Twin Cities and close to new elec- 
tric road, about 140 acres on fine lake. 
50 under plow . good meadow, balance | 
covered with hard wood. A nice house, 
large barn, corn crib, granary, and 
wagon shed. Pretty yard and nice or- 
chard. One of prettiest places in this 
section, $3,'X<0. $1,')0(} cash, balance easy 
terms. Buildings can't be built for that 
price. S. A. Carlisle, Wyoming. Minn. 



sound, 

shall 

to the 



RYE. 
No. 1 Rye— No. 1 Rye shall be 

plump and well cleaned, and 
Weigh not less than ati pounds 
measured bushel. 

No. Z Rye— No. 2 Rye shall be sound, 
reasonably clean and reasonably free 
from other grain, and shall weigh not 
less than 54 pounds to the measured 
bushel. 

No. 3 Rye— All rye slightly damaged, 
sllgtitiy musty, or from any other cause 
unfit for No. Z shaJl be graded as No. 3. 



for adniis- 



WIUTE WIXTIiIR WHE.\T. 

No. 1 White Winter U heat— Snail 

Include all varieties of pure, soft, wnite 
winter wueal, sound, piuuip, dry, sweet 
4tnd Clean, and wtiga nut K;S3 than ,i)4 
pounds to the mea.sured bushel. 

No. 2 White Winter Wheat-Siiall in- 
clude all varieties oi soft, while, winter 
wiieat, dry, aounO and clean, may con- 
tain not more than o per cent of soft red 
■winter wiu-ai, and weigh not less man 
6b pouad.s to tiie measured bushel. 

No. S White Winter VV beat— Shall tn- 
cludo all varieties of suil white winter 
wheat, may contain 6 per cent of dam- 
aged grain other man mow-bur«t 
wheat, and may contain lo per cent of 
soft, red. winter wheat, and weigh not 
le.^s than 63 pounds to lue measured 
busUel. 



REI> WINTER WUE.VT, 

No. 1 Red Winter Wheat— Shall be 
IJure. red winter wtieat of both llgtit 
und dark colors, sound, sweet, plump 
ttiid Well cK:aned, and weigh not less 
than o'J pounds to tlie measured liushel. 

No. 2 Red \^ inter Wheat— Shall be 
red winter wheat of bolti light and 
dark color.s, snail not contain more 
than it per cent of white winter; sound, 
eweef and ■lean, and weigh not less 
than oti pouad.s to the measured busliel. 

No. 3 Red U inter Wheat— Shall be 
sound, red wintt-r wneat not clean and 
pluaip enough tor No. 2; shall not con- 
tain more ttiaii 5 per cent of wnite 
winter, and wcigli not less than 5i 
pounds to the niuasured bushel. 



BARLEY. 

No. 1 Barley— No. 1 Barley shall be 
plump, bright, clean and free from 
other grain, and shall weigh not less 
than 4S pounds to the measured bushel. 

No. 2 Barley--No 2 Barley sluil' be 
sound and of healthy color, not plump 
enough for No. 1. reasonably clean and 
reasonably free from other grain, and 
shall weigh not less than 46 pounds to 
llie measured bushel. 

No. 3 Barley— No. 3 barley shall In- 
clude all slightly shrunken and other- 
wise slightly damaged barley, not good 
enough for No. 2 and shall weigh not 
less than 44 pounds to the measured 
bushel. 

No. 4 Barley— No. 4 Barley shall in- 
clude all barley lit for malting pur- 
posfii, not good enough for No. 3. 

No. 1 Feed Barley-No. 1 Feed Barley 
must test not ln:ss ihan 40 pounds to tne 
measured bushel and be reasonably 
sound and reasonably clean. 

No. 2 Feed Barley— No. 2 Feed Barley 
shall Include all barley which is for 
any cause unht for the grade of No. 1 
Feed Barley. 

Chevalier Barley— Nos. 1. 2 and 3 Chev- 
alier Barley shall ciwiform in all re- 
spects to the grades of Nos. 1, 2 and 3 
Barley, except that they shall be of a 
chevalier variety, grown In Montana, 
Oregon and on the Pad tic coast. 

No Grade— All Wheat, Barley, Oats, 
Rye and Corn that are in a heating con- 
dition too musty or too damp to be 
safe for warehousing, or that Is badly 
bin-burnt, badly diunaged. exceedingly 
dirty, or otherwise flnrtt for store, shall 
be classed as No Grade with inspector s 
notation as to quality and condition. 



FOR SALE - LAND IN LARGE AND 
small tFHCt.q at wholesale prices. L. A. 
Larsen company. 215 Providence Bldg. 

A F.ARM FOR SALE-ICO AORES WITH 
buildings and impnivements. ^ mile to 
station; cause for sale, poor health. 
For particulars, write Mastinlli DanidJ, 
Brule, Wis., Box 31. 

FOR SALE - FORTY ACRES OF GOOD 
farming land with good buildings, only 
one-quarter of a mile from railroad 
station. Part of the land is in culti- 
vation and balance is covered with tim- 
ber. Price only $800. G. A. Rydberg, 
411 Torrey building. 



FOR SALE-LOTS .\T PRINCE RU- 
pert, British Columbia, the terminus of 
the Grand Trunk Pacific railway, now 
building. Big money makers. First 
bud-divLsion. White, C. B. Enkeraa, 
Fairfield building, Vanoouvfr, B. C. 

WILL TR.'VDE '■&) ACRES OF LAND IM 
section 29, township 53. range 11. for im- 
proved Duluth property. "Thomas Olaf- 
fion. 402 Central avenue, W. Duluth. 
Zenith 'phone. 3019-D. 



FOR SALE — LANDS IN SMALL 
tracts to actual settlers; small pay- 
ments down and balance on fifteen 
years' time; on or before privilege. 
Call or address, land department. D. & 
I. R. Railway company, 512 Wolvln 
building, Duluth, Minn. 



PERSONAL. 

PERSONAL-BUSINESS MAN WANTS 
position as cartaker of home for 
noine privileges. Referenced exchang- 
ed. Address W ll>5. Herald. 

NEW METHOD-COPYRIGHTED IN-^ 
formation free. Starts new growth of 
hair in tliirty days. Write Dr. Oliver I 
K. Chance, scalp specialist, 396 Syndi- ] 
cate arcade, Minneapoii.s. Minn, | 

PRIVATE HOME FOR LADIES BE- } 
fore and durinfc coniinement; expert i 
care; everytiiing conhdeiitial; infants { 
cared for. Ida Paterson, M. Lw 284 
Harrison avenue, St. Paul. 

ENGRAVING — JEWELRY AND SIL- 
verware. Duluth Engraving Bureau. 9 
Wlnlhrop block. Zenith pnoiie, 2160-D. 

PERSONAL - WANT TO BREED 
French poodle biu-h with tnorough- 
bred pooulo dog. 114 First avenue east. 
Hat 1. i 

PJBJHSONAL - LADX WANTED TO I 
snare room with lady, who has one in | 
steam heated builiiing on Supei ior | 
street; ideal looaiion tor winter. HigU- 
est references exchanged. Address D. 
400, Heraid. 

W ANTE D-B ABY TO BOARD; BE,ST 
of care, board reasofpiple. R IS. Heraid. 

Bed springs tightened, upholstering, 
etc. William Peterson, 1931 W. 1st st. 

matt- A. ,. 



WANTED-A NORMAL GIRL TO HELP 
care for children and go to school. I.IU 
London road. 



WANTED-A GIRL OR WOMAN FOR 
working housekeeper; small taniily. 
4ai West Fourth street, Superior W is. 
Old phone 355o-M. Apply S to 10 a. 
or evenings. 



in. 



WANTED - 
Mr.s. O. C. 
rior street, 



. COMPETENT 
Hai-tman's, ISOI 



COOK AT 
East Supe- 



WANTED-A COMPETENT HOUSB- 
maid; best of wages, Mrs. L. W. 
Leithliead. 16 South Eighteenth avcnuo 
east. 



PICTURE FRAMING. 

DECK^R^sT^lT^'sECOND^^Tv^^ 



WANTED-A GOOD WET NURSE. 
Call at room 405. Burrows building, iO to 
11 or 2 to 4. 



WANTED - GIRL 

housework; small 
First sitreeU 



FOR 

family. 



GENERAL 

112^ East 



GUSTAVE HENECKE. 311 B. SUP. ST. 



ASHES AND GARBAGE. 

Removed. Gust Holmgren. 428 S. Twenty- 
first avenue east. Old phone. 7J4-K. 



LOST AND FOUND. 

LOST-DARK BROWN BRINDLe'dOG; 

French bull, fat ears, short tail. snuMl 
white spot on breast, small brass nail- 
l»ead collar; name "Hall-Boston." Re- 
turn to 1815 East Superior street, for re- 
ward. 



WANTED - COMPETENT COOK. 
West Second street, near postolfice. 



432 



LOST-GIRL'S GOLD BRACELET. RED 
stone setting, between Presbyterian 
church and 'Tenth avenue east, or on 
East Fourth street: reward. Catherine 
Sherwood, 427 Tenth avenue east. 



OLD MIRRORS 

Germain Bros., 



KtfSiLVE^ED - ST. 
121 First avenue west. 



WANTED — 

housework; 
ond street. 



A GIRL FOR GENERAL 
small family. 409 West Sec- 



WANTED— COOK AND SECOND GIRL, 
or girl for general housework; three in 
family; best of wages. Mrs. Arthur C. 
King. 1003 London road. 



WANTED — GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework. 416 West Superior street. 



SWEDISH MASSAGE-A. E. HANSON, 
400-4U2 New Jersey building. Duluth 
phone, 1826-K. » 

Central Bath Parlor, 24 W. Superior street. 



WANTED 
Laundry. 



- HAND - IRONER. ACME 



LOST - ON VERMILION ROAD, GRAY 
mare. 4 years old. Reward of $10 for 
return to W. Kaner, 1227 East Seventh 
sireet. 



SITUATIONS WANTED— 
FEMALE. 



LANDS-LARGE OR .SMALL TRACTS, 
J. <V Naughton & Co., 531 Manhattan 
building. 



. Satisfac'.ory tailortn .-i. Siol'-z, 525 E, 4lh st. 



SITUATION 
keeper, city 



WANTED 
preferred. 



- xVS 

W. 24, 



HOUSE- 
Herald. 



WANTED TO BUY. 



! PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS. 

I Leonard, hoincopatitist. Providence Bldg. 
W.\NTE^D TO BUY— WHITE IRON | -^~ ...... ^ — 

Lake s.took bought and sold. 225 Man- 1 UPHOLSTERING & REPAIRING. 
haitan building. 



SITUATION WANTED — AS SECOND 
cook, city preferred. Z. 19, Herald. 



WANTED TO BUY 
second-hand trunk. B 



-<JENTLEMAN 6 
12. Herald. 



EDD OTT, UI W. Isi St. Both piijaes. 



WANTED TO BUY— OLD ClxjTHES 
bought. G. Shapiro. Zenith. Ia82-X, 



W.\NTED TO BUY-A SECOND^ HAND 
triple mirror, suitable for clock de- 
p gitment. Roy M. Prytz Co. 



OPTICIANS. 

C. C. STAACKE, 3<j6 NEW JERSEY 
building, lot) West Superior street. 



OPTICIAN3-WENNERLUND & 
son. 1925 West Superior street. 



PRIVATE HOSPITAL. 

MRS. HANSON, GRADUAt¥ MID- 

wifo; female complaints. 413 Seventh 
avc. cast. Old phone U94; Zenitn, 1225. 

FIRE INSURANCE. 



COMPANIES. 
Exchange Bldg. 



Pulford & How. 309 Exchange building. 



WESTERN 



AND RED 



Western 
cleaned, 
western 

We.stern 
an 
of 



WHITE 
WHE.VT. 

No. 1 Western White- No. 1 

White shall \j>? sound. well 
plump and compo.si'd of the 
varieties of white wlieat. 

No. 2 Wenteru White— No. 2 
White shall We sound, reasonably cl 
and composed of western varieties 
while wheat. 

No. 3 Western White— No. 3 Western 
Willie shall be composed of all west- 
ern white wheat rtt for warehousing, 
■weigliiag not less than 54 pounds to tae 
nieaoureii bushel atiil not sound enough 
or otherwise tit fo: ihe liigiier graJes. 

Rejected WeMtern White— Rejected 
W. -.stern While shall comprise all west- 
ern white wheat tit for warehousing 
but untit for higher grades. 

NOTE— Western Red Wh-at and West- 
ern Wheat shall correspond In all re- 
spects with the grades of Nos. 1, 2, 3 and 
Rejected. 



CLOTHES CLEANED & PRESSED 

La Roy, manager. 



FI.AX.SEED. 
No. 1 5orthwe»tern Flax.«ieed— No. 1 

Northwestern shall be mature, sound, 
dry and sweet. It .shall be Northerp Grown 
Tlie maximum tiuanllty of field, stack, 
storage or other damagtd seed inter- 
mixed shall not exceed twelve and one- 
half "12tiJ per cent. The minimum 
weight .shafl be fifty-one (,51) pounds to 
the measured bushel of commercial 
pure seed. 

No, 1 Flaxsee<l— No, 1 Flaxseed shall 
be northern grown, sound, dry and free 
from mu.stlness, and can ying not more 

ihan twenty-tive ii5) per cent of im- WRITTEN IN BEST 
mature or field, stack, storage or otuer i Cooley & UnderhiU. 207 
damaged tlaxseed, and weliihing not 
less than fifty (.50) pounds to th<.- meas- 
ured bush.d of commercially pure seed. 

No. 2 Flaxaeed- Flaxseed that is bin- 
burnt. Immature, field damaged or 
musty, and yet not to a degree to be 

unfit for storage and having a test | Clark, 113 W 1st St 
weight of not loss than forty-seven dl) 
pounds lo the bushel of commercially 
pure seed shall be .N'o. 2 Flaxseed. 

No Grade Flaxseed— Flaxseed that is 
damp, warm, mouldy, very mu.sty or 
otherwise unfit for storage, or having 
a w'ight of less than forty-.soven (4i; 
pounds lo the measured bushel of com- 
mercially pure seed, shall be No Grade. 

The following are abbreviations to bo 
used by inspectors in designating the 
gradts: 

R. Wt. for Red Winter 

O, for Nortaern 

H. for Haid 

Wn. W. for Western Wiilte 

Wn. R. for Western Red 

W for Wintfer 

W'. Wt for White Winter 

Mx. for Mixed 

i Y. Corn for Yellow Corn 

I W. Corn for White Corn 

IN. G. for •• No Grade 

Blv. for * Barley 

for Feed 

for Durum 



MOVING AND STORAGE. 

Peoples Moving <\c Storage Co. Every- 
thing moved, packed and stored. 20.4 
West Supoiior sireet, eiiiier 'phone, liOl 



DULUTH V.VN A. STOR.\GE 
pany, 210 West Superior ali'oet. 



COM- 



NEL- 



MEDIGAL. 

LADIES — DR. LA FRANCOS COM- 
pound; safe, speedy regulator, 25 cents. 

•♦Druggists or mail. Booklet free. Dr. 
La Franco, Philauelpliia. Pa. ^ 



SITUATION WANTED - BY YOUNG 
lady, position as sienographer. Jr. 1(, 
Heraid. 

WANTED - POSITION BY COOK IN 
private lainhy. 2215 West riiird street. 



SITUATION WANTED-BY A WOMAN 
to do wcrk by tne day. 322 First ave- 
nue east, downstairs. 



SITUATION WANTED — EXPER- 
ienced stenographer wants permaneiii 
position, with reiiaOle lirai, can furuisn 
uest of references. Address, Z. 12, Her- 
ald. 



SITUATION WANTKD - WOMAN 
wants to go out washing by the 3»y. 
Address, B. S, Herald. 



SUPERIOR STREET 
INVESTMENT! 



street. 
West 

'the 



in- 



This is a good one. 

The lot Is 50x140 feet. 

It is on upper side of the 

It is in the growing part of 
end. " 

There is a good building on' 
lot. 

It pays 7 per cent net on the 
vestn\ent. 

The entire front of the lot to a 
depth of 90 feet can be built upon 
for business purposes. Values are 
steadily increasing on West .Supe- 
rior street in this locality. 

New business blocks and manufac- 
turing plants are being built near 
this property. At present this prop- 
erty can be bought fOr $4,500. Lot, 
building and all. Does not require 
all cash. Can arrange satisfactory 
terms. 

There Is no s.afer or better invest- 
ment In Duluth. 



FOR RENT 



Building at 310 and 312 West First 
street formerly occupied by the Bur- 
gess Electric company and the Christie 
Lithograph & Printing Co. Building 
has two stories on graded floor, second 
floor and basement, steam htsatlng 
plant, freight elevator, etc. The whole 
building Is for rent, and will be rear- 
ranged to suit a satisfactory tenant. 

Apply to 

MendenhaU & Hotqies 



$2400 



Buys a six-room house with water, 
sewer and bath and 25-foot lot. The 
location is Al. Look this up. 

NORTHERN REALTY CO., 

225 Manhattan Building. 



KCtectlve June 
Daily EKcept Sunday | Dall7 



t 19OT. 
Except 



Sund 



»T 



Northbound . Sauthb ea ! 

♦ ■.<5ani saspm Lv.. Dututb ..Ar l«»om ..4>pm 

(:3i<iru 4:10pm .\r iCn^reUivcr Lv 11:10am S:S^pna 

fc:SSaui 43Spm Ar.Two Hbrs. Lv io:SSam S^^pm 

iix)cam 6:30pm Ar.. Allan Jet.. Lv 9:o^am S^ops 

laiacpui 7^5pni .\i-.Eveleth . Lv 740am 2:i5ija> 

ii:3cpm 7;40pm Ar.. Virginia. .Lv 74;am »-2c;nn 

ii:SS3iu 7^5Pm .Ar... Tower ..Lv 8:o7Hm 2:4jpm 

>S45pm 8:aopm Ar Ely Lv 7:isam i:oopm 



SPeCIAI«-SVMDA,Y 



AM PM 

7:45 Lr Duluth 



ONI<Y. 

-» — 



AM 



8:40 Lv 
10:20 Ar 
U:40 Ax 

U :10 Lv 
1L:50 Ar 



»•••••• 



.Two Harbors. 
Allen Junction 
....Eveletti 

"Tower 

..Sly 



PM 



.... Ar 4:4( 

.... Lv 8:60 

.... tv i.M 

it *••••■•••« ^^ 

• •■■••••••• ^^ 

••••••••••e 1^ 



v 1:00 
V 1:87 
v 12:45 



NOfrH:W]»IERN|lNE 



Leave Uuluth 
Leave Superior 
Anive E4U CUlte 
Arrive M&di«<ia 
ArHvr Milwaukee 
Arrive JtaeivlUe 
AntTc Chi 
aDsily 



• ti5pic 

tjapm 

]( esptn 

14c am 

i JO am 

.(cam 

C4L09 '^ 30 am 

BExcept Sunday. 



14 40 am aj 45 prn 
(00 am loops 
«3opm s«r 1^ 



L» Duluih 
Lv Superior 
Ai St. Paul 

Ar MpU ; 05 pm ( 3S P<B 

Pullman tieepert and ^Kaif 

car* to Cblca^, I'arlot and 

cafe ran to Twin vJltlea. Office 

— 3Q1 W. Superior 91.. Duluth 



6E0.R.LAYB0URN, l4Pho«nixBlk S northern pacific railway 



DYE WORKS. 



ZENITH ClTi' DYH: WOUKS— LARG- 
eai and most reliable. All work done 
in Duluth. Work called for and deliv- 
ered. Phones: Old, U54-K; new, ISSJi. 
£0) East Superior street. 

DULUTH DYE WORKS - FRENCH 
dry cleaning; fancy dyeing. Old phone, 
1J0:j-R, new, nyi-A. aau East superior 
street. Suits pressed by the month. 



EMPLOYMtiNT OFFICES. 



JOHN Ml'ELLER, 202 WEST FIRST ST. 



STOVE REPAIRING. 

REPAIRS FOR OVER IMM DIFFER- 
ent stoves in stock. Duluth Stove Re- 
pair works. 'Phones, 217 East Superior 
street. 



OLUND ivt ENUBERU. ut'G"^ 
Michigan .street. 'Plione, 14o6. 



WEST 



W. J. FEDDER3, 5ll^ W. MICH. ST. 



SITUATION WANTED— BY YOUNU 

lady typewriter, and experienced in 
geueiai office work. Call at oncti, Zen- 
itu 'phone. 1S84. 



SITUATION WANTED— BOOKKEEPER 
and bienograpner, with two yeara' ex- 
penu2ice. desires permanent posiUou. 
Can tuinisu good references. J. li, 
Heraid. 



SITUATION WANTED-LADY WISHES 
place to take care ot rooms. B. 10, 
Herald. 



TIMBER LANDS BOUGHT. 

WE BuT^rLviB^ir^W^LXrtOE'^OR 

small tracts, also cut-over lands. See 
us for quick deal. Hopkins dc Ebert, 300 
Torrey building. 



MUSIC. 

p 1 .\ N o s , pTionoSkaphs and 

everything in the lin<i of music. All of 
the popular songs and' two-steps. Send 
us your jrders. Zenith Music company, 
No. 6, East Superior alreet, Duluth. 



DVHUM (MACAKONI) WHK.\T. 

!Vo. 1 l>uruiu Wheat— Shall be briglit, 
sound. dr>, well cleaned and be com- 
posed of durum, commonly known as 
macaroni wheat, and weigh not less 
than GO poundd to tlie me:isured bushel. 

!Vo. 2 Darnin Wheat— Shall be dry. 
clean and of good milling quality. It 
shall include all durum wheat that for 
ai y reason is not suitable for No. 1 
durum, and weigh not less than 58 
pounds to the m»i.sured bushel. 

No. 3 Durum Wheat— .Shall ln<'lude all 
durum wheat bleaihed. shrunken, or 
for .iny cause unrit for No. 2. ami 
weigh not less than 55 pounds to the 
measured hushel. 

Xo. 4 Uuruni ^^Tieat— Shall include all 
durum wheat that is badly bleached, or 
tor any cause unht for No. 3. 



Fd. 

Du. 



MIXED WHEAT. \ 

In case of any appreciable admixture I 
of Durum. Western. Winter or West- 1 
ern grades of Northern .Spring Whe.it. j 
or with each other, it shall be graded ' 
according to the quality thereof, and 1 
classed as Nos. 1, 2. 1, etc. .MIXED I 
WHEAT, with insptctor's notation de- 
scribing Its character. 



MANXER OP TESTING. 

Wheat. Flax and Rye shall be tested 

after it" has been cleaned. The test 

I kettle shall be plaL-ed where It can not 

; be Jarred or shaken. From scoop, bag 

'or pan. held two inches from top of 

kettle, pour Into middle of same at a 

I moderate speed until running over. 

: striking off In a zig-zag manner with 

the edge of beam held horizontally. 

i NOTE— No grain shall In any case be 

?:raded above that of the poorest qual- 
ty found in that lot when it bears 
: evidence of being plugged or doctored. 
1 NOTE— Wheat scoured or otherwise 
; m-anipulatcd. the test weight will not 
be considered In grading sam«. 
' NOTE— The grades of "Purltied Oats" 
: or "Purlfted Barley" sliall correspond 
I with the other grades of Oats and 
Barley, except that same shall be desig- 
nated as "Puritied." 



1 BUY ST.VNDING TIMBER; ALSO 
cut-over land. George Rupley. 404 Ly- 
ceum building. 

I BUY TIMBER IN LAKE OR COOK 

counties. Also furnish abstracts of title. 
Alex McBean, VMo Burrow^ building. 



FOR RENT— FLATS. 

FOR RENT-NEW PAPERED EIGHT- 
room flat, possesion ai once. Ingalls' 
Flats, 216 East Fourth street. 



SITUATION WANTED— EXPERIENCED 
dressmaker wants sewing by the day. 
can give references, inquire al aiO West 
Ftjfcrth streeet. 

SITUATION WAJS'TED— TO GO OUT 
washing or house-cleaning. 210 Lake 
avenue south, 

i WANTED-PLAIN SEWING AND CHIL- 
areii's worii. E Hjij Herald. 

SITUATION WANTED— MIDDLE-AGED 
lady wishes place as housekeeper for 
wiuower. uali over cox's meat market, 
First avenue east and Superior street. 

SITUATION WANTED— YOUNG LADY 
desires position in music company; 
can assist In stenography, bookkeep- 
ing, clerk, billor, etc., musically In- 
clined. Address W. 22, Herald. 



HUNTER' 
PARK 




Leave i I Arriva 

4:00 p.m' .Ashland and F.ast *II:ISa.m 

8:0Oa.m' AshlanJ and East * <):30p.m 

7:30 p.m Minn, and Dakota Express • 7:55 a. m 
8:30a.m.. North Coast Limited.. .|* 6:25 p.m 



Lenve I 

t ♦rtwa.ml 
• 1:55 p.m! 
*ii:iop.m; 



"Duluth Short Lino. 

ST. PAUL 
... MIlfHEAPOLIS .. 



Arrive 
6:30 a.m 
2:05 p.m 
7:00 p.m 



♦Daily. tDailv Except Sunday. Phones2I4 

L nion Osixji anil 334 W«l Superior Street 



DULUTH, SOUTH SHORE A ATLANTIO 

No. 5. 



.'o. 1 N'o 

.. M.JP. M.l 
7:28 b 5:20 . 



No. 



FOR REiNT— ONE FIV&ROOM FLAT. 
122 Eighteenth avenue west. Zenith 
'phone, 75£i. 



SHELDON-MATHER 

First National bank. 



TIMBER CO.. 510 
Dul. plione, 1591. 



GARMENT CUTTING. 

BESrT'^TEWEm^'^lETHOD^^A^ 

culling, easily learned. Miss Gray, 
third floor. Gray-Tallant company. 



MILLINERY. 

M. A. COX. SiTEASrl^xTuRTH STREET. 

OLD GOLD BOUGHT. 

OuT"'GOLD''"AND^'"siLVER"'^m^^ 
by the M. Henricks«n Jewelry com- 
pany, S34 West Superior street, Provi- 
dence building. 



PRINTING AND BOOKBINDING. 

Prompt and up-to-date; prices right. 
Thwing-Stewart Co., 116 W. First St. 

QUICK AND GOOD PRINTING. CALL 
1G04 old 'phone Trade News Pub. Co. 



various 
cleaned 
thaii ^ 



CORN. 

No. 1 Com— Shall be corn of 
colors, sound, plump and well 
and should contain not more 
per cent of moisture. 

Xo. 2 Corn- Shall be corn of various 
colors, sweet, reasonably clean and 
should not contain more than 15^ per 
tent of moisture. 

3jo. 3 forn— Shall be corn of various 
colors, .sweet, shall be reasonably sound 
and reasonably clean, and should not 
contain more than 13 per cent of mois- 
ture. 

No. 4 Corn— No. 4 Corn shall include 
all corn not wet and not In heutlnff 
condition that is unfit for No. 3. 



Every Woman 

la Interested And should know 

shout the wondvrfnl 

MARVEL >^ hiding Spray 

I The new Tiyinal S/rlns*. j'ljec- 

ttunanJ Surtion. llMt— .saf. 

e»t— Most ron»enient. 

lti:iMaM* iMtUtlj. 




E. E. Est^rley, 

Spalding hot'l. 
• Phone. 1S'>3-X. 



manufacturing jeweler. 
428 West Superior street. 



DENTISTS. 



DR. BURNETT, 
rows building. 



TOP FLOOR. BUK- 



Jlk Tftir drerflat for It, 
f he (■aiiiiot gupiily the 
■ABVRl.. accept no 
Otli^r. lat send stamp far 
lUusiruiM bfKik— •wilMi. Tt gtres 
tuU imrticulam and 'lirei-tion* lu. 
Valuxbleto ladlM. .W.4HTKI. CO., 
•4 R. 3Sd ST.. KBW lORK. 



SCIENTIFIC; PAINLESS DENTISTRY. 
Lee & Turley, 114-110 West Superior St. 



POR 



SALE BY MAX WIRTH 
DRUGGIST. 



YEL.LOW CORX. 

No. 1 Yellow r*rn— Shall be 9S per 
ceiit yellow, sweet, sound, plump and 
Well cleaiit'd. and should contain no 
mitre thuti 15 per cent of moisture. 

No. 2 %>llow Corn- .Shall be 90 per 
cent yellow, sweet, shall be reasonably 
clean and should not contain more than 
ISVi per lent of moisture. 

No. 3 Yellow Corn-Shall be 30 per 
cent yellow, sweet, shall be reason- 
ably clean and reasonably sound, and 
should not contain more than 19 per 
cent of moisture. 

NOTE -Nos. 1, 2 and 3 White Corn shall 



RHICHESTER'SPn.LS 



%#_«;f^ THE UIAMO.NU nBA>'D. 

I.ndU-«! Ark your Urugiclst for 
I'hl-rbea.trr'a l)laaion< 
l'UI« in Krd and Uold iueuUic> 
t>-)xe.. seai» i with Rlue Ritbon. 
Take no other Bur of Toar 

Uranint. ^.i.fnrrin.rire!*.TEB"S 

UIAMnND liRAND FILI..S, fot 80 

yeiisknuwnii [Jest. Saiest. AWays Rel ible 

SOLD BY DitUGGISTS EVERYWHERE 





How much do you lose every mon«n 
when you have no tenant for that house— 
or apartment — or furnished room— or store 
—or oftlce— or shop? Enough, don't you 
think, to buy a good many lines of "for 
rent" advertising In The Herald. 



MUSICAL. 

MUSIC ANU .VLolC.'\i- AlEKCH.^.NDIiiE Of 
cTery detcnptioa. £di 
SOS pboaographa, Itai 
and wrchesTra lost.'a 

f seats, pianos & orcani 
ngvald WESTGA .■\RD 
7 aau 9 First Ave Wsat 




FOR RENT - THREE-ROOM. STEMAM 
heated flat. furnish.Ml for housekeeping. 
315 West Fourth street. 

FOR RENT-A MODERN FIVE-ROOM 
flat, with electric lights and hardwood 
floors at & East Seventh street, in- 
quire downstairs. 

FOR RENT-FIVE ROOMS, UPSTAIRS. 
East Firai. street. C. L. Rakowsky &, 
Co.. 201 Exehaiige bank building. 



STENOGRAPHERS. 

GRACE RARNi^rrTFIRSTl^^rAT. BLDG. 



SITUATION WANTED— MEN'S PLAIN 
washing and mending, at lOliJ West 
Michigan sireet. upstairs. 

SITUATION WANTED— EXPERIENCED 
dressmaker wants sewing by the day or 
piece. Inquire. 810 West Fourtli street. 

SITUATION W.\NTED-LADY STENOG- 
rapher, experienced in general ofhce 
work, can furnish references. R. 17. 
Herald. 

SlTU.\TION WANTED — FIRST-CLASS 
dressmaker wielies work by tbe day. 
Zenith 'phone. 2J35-Y. 



SITUATIONS WANTED — MALE. 

SIT CATION WANTED - BY YOUNG 
Swedish man. where he can learn a 
trade or busmess. A. Herald. 



CARPET CLEANING. 

CITY CARPET''"cLEAN7NG'^COr 528 
Lake avenue south; clean with com- 
pressed air. Oriental rugs a specialty. 
F Van Norman, manager. Zenltn, 
1366-X; old 'phone. 1259-R. 



DANCING ACADEMY. 

COFFIN'S — OPEN DAY AND EVEN- 
Ing. Private lessons by appointment. 
Class meets Monday and Friday, 7:30 
p. m. Both 'phones. IS Lake avenue 
north. 



IRON 

cheap 
Iowa. 



MINES AND MINING. 
aKd 



CJOPPEIR - MOUNTAIN 
well located. Box 462, Sibley. 



ARCHITECTS. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF" CONSTRUC- 
tlon. R. G. Borland, 410 Burrows build- 
ing. Old phone. 1083-K. 



W. R. Parsons & Sons Co., 614 Manhattan 
Bldg. All classes of ^buildings solicited. 



CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

DULlH^ir^NOINEPRING^^ 
Patton.*- Mgr.. 613 Palladio building. 
Specifications and superintendence. 

MINNESOTA ENGINEERING CO. — D. 
A. Reed, consulting engineer. Surveys, 

fdans. estimates, specifications, super- 
ntendence. Zenith, 633. 408-409 Provi- 
dence building. 



^_ FRANK L. YOU.N'G & CO., 201 Pal. Bldg. 



CLAIRVOYANTS. 



WANTED - A YOUNG MAN BOOK- 
keeper and stenographer would like 
woi-K of some kind in tlie evening, 
from 7 to 10 or 11. Have experleiioe as 
a store clerk. B. 46. Herald. 

SITUATION WANTED-A YOUNG MAN. 
ly years of age. would like inside po.:>l- 
tion. Will run elevator or otlier clean 
worK have good education. B 11, Hei- 
ald. 



^Mft 



r» 



'M 



Over 



Net 



THIS IS IT! 



13400 



Buys double house on 
Fourth street, near Seventh 
avenue east. 26 by 130 feet of ground; 
water, sewer, gas, electric light, bath 
in each; first-class condition. Al)out 
$1,400 cash required. Rents for $38 per 
month, means more than 11 per cent 
net. T^ink of it.— 4-9. 

^JQAA Buys one of the finest 
9^0vv building sites In the city, 
100 by 140 feet, on corner of Twenty- 
forth avenue east on Second street.— 
346-1. - 

^(-AAA Buys 100 by 140 feet on low- 
9vvVV er side Second street, be- 
tween Twenty-second and Twenty- 
third avenues eeist.- 354-13. 



a ti:00b 6:30 



4:10 
4:50 
bl0:15 
b S:00 
b S:15 



lA. M. 

ArblO:aO 

... bI0:l6 

P. M 

40iAr. .Houghton. .Lrv;blO:20 



Lv... Dulutli 
b 5:35 Superior 

A.M.J 



Caiumet 



. Ishpemlng .. 
. . Marquette ., 
..e. S. Marie.. 
, .. Montreal ... 
, ... Boston .... 



b 9:30 
P. M. 

bll :59 
bU:l6 
b 5:30 
bl0:16 
biO:UO 



aTIa p. m 

a 8:60 b 7:10 
P. M A. M 

ft 8:00:b 7:18iAr..New York. .Lv|b 7:00 



LfV... Montreal.. .Arib 7:80 
P. M 



ptsi: 

a 6:5o 
a 6:40 



A. M. 

a 7:55 
a 6:45 



alO:U 
A. M. 

a 8:iS 



b Dally, a Daily except Sunday, 
car on Trains Nos. 7 and S. 



Dining 



SITUATION WANTED-P06ITI0N BY 
a young man, 18 years of age. In a 
soda fountain; has had three months' 
experience; or any kind of work. Can 
furnish best otf references. Z. 18. Her- 
ald. 



Will Be Sold 
At a Bargain. 

Block on London Road at Fortieth Ave- 
nue Bast. For further particulars call 
at 121 West Superior Street. 



DULUTH, MISSABE ft NORTHERH RY 



P.M. 


A. M.l STATIONS 


A.M. 


T. M. 


3:50 


r:40'Lv. . Dulutli ..Aril0:30 


3:30 


4:05 


r:55:Lv.57thAv.W.Lv 


10:15 


3:15 


4;20 


8:15 Lv.. Proctor. Lv 


10:00 


3:00 




IZiUl'Ar. Coieraine Lv 


6tl0 






l0:40!Ar. MVn.Iron.Lv 




12:20 


r:io 


10:37 Ar. Virginia .Lv 


7:00 


12:40 


6:13 


10:29 Ar..Evelelh .Lv 


r:42 


12:47 




10J56lAr.. Sparta. .Lv 




12:24 




11^20iAr..Biwabik.Lv 




42:02 


6:56 


10:56:Ar..Hibbing.Lv 


hVs 


12:17 



Daiix except Sunday. 

Morning train from Duluth makes direct eoa- 
nectioD at Rainy Juaction with O. V. & R. L. Rj 
for Athawa and points north of VirKinia. 



THE 

Leave 
t 6tas«. 



L- 



BREAT NORTHERN, 

Arrive 
< t 9:50 p.m 

* itSsp.m 

* 6:02 A.m 

* 6:20 p.m 

* 7:nt.m 
tia:I5p.m 

1 1 *iSo p.m 

'Daily. tDaily Except Sunday 

Twin CItr tlccpan raady a> 9 p.m Olllc* Spsldlaf H«mI 



gT. PAVL ASD 

MmXAPOLU .... 

Crookaton, Grand Forks. 
Montana and Coaat, 



* lt3Sp.m 
*lX:I5p.m 

* 9t00 a.m 

* 8:35 p.m 

1 2:30 P.m..*»«» Klver. HloWng. Vl/(ini«. 

) St. Cloud. Wilmar and 
1 «»2»*.mj^ siottx aty,..,.. 



HOTEI^ I^CNOX 

Most thoroughly equipped In the 
Northwest. Sanitation perfeot. 

European, $1.00 and up. American, 
>2,00 and up. - 



SITUATION WANTED — BOOKKEEP- 
er and general office man at present em- 
ployed, wants to better position. Laud, 
brokerage or railway office preferred. 
A. 1 references. B. A., Herald. 



SITUATION WANTED— BOOKKEEPER 
and stenographer, with two years' ex- 
perience, desires permanent position. 
Can furnish good references. J. 11, 
Herald. 

SITUATION WANTED - POSITION IN 
office where there is a chance of pro- 
motion, by a first-class man; best of 
references given. Address A 100, Her- 
ald. 



ROSCOE. CLAIRVOYAJ^T. 
room 315, Superior. 



1026 TOWER, 



BUSINESS SCHOOL. 

CUNDY BUSINESS SCHOOL; LESSONS 
at any hour. 2815 West Third Btreet. 



SITUATION WANTED — A POSITION 
With some good firm offering chances 
for advancement, by a young man with 
part college education. Address, Jack 
Connelly. 506 Blast Second street, city. 



SITUATION WANTED - BY TOUNQ 
married man, position as steamfltter. or 
can handle any kind of steam machin- 
ery and keep same in repair; must 1m 
non-uzilon. Address. U. 106, Herald. 



15% - NET -15% 
15% _ NET - 15% 
15% _ NET — 15% 
15%— NET —15% 
15% — NET — 15% 



15 



% 



NET 




15%- NET -15% 
15% — NET — 15% 
15% — NET — 15% 
15% _ NET — 15% 
15% _ NET — 15% 



FINE DOUBLE HOUSE IN 
EAST END, 

Corner lot, street and avenue paved, 
stone foundation, modern. , Rents 
$1050 per annum. $8ooo will buy 
the property — requires but ^5000 
cash. Doesn't this beat stocks ? 



15 



% 



NET 



% 



Duluth & Iron Range RR I 







li 



I 



■^«MIMMM*> 



'-. " ' Mi! 




DULUTH E\^ENINQ HERAi-,Lf. "onday. September ie,i iw?. 




One Cent 

Adverti.semcnt 



Than 



C<'nts. 



SHOPPING 
BY TELEPHONE. 

Old New 

..^ 'Phone. "Phone 

lf£AT MARKETS — 

B. J. Tobon 22 22 

Mcrk Bro« eOT-M 18a 

LALNDRIKS — 

Yale Laundry 479 479 

Lutes' Laundry 447 447 

Troy Laundry 257 257 

DRUGGISTS — 

Boyce 163 163 

FLORISTS — 

W. W. Stekins 1356 1356 

BAKKRIES — 

The Bonv Ton 1729-L 1166 

RUBBER STAMP WORKS — 

Con. Stamp & Print. Co.. 102-K 765 
PLUMBING AND HEATING — 

McCJurrin & Co 815 983 

P. O. Pa.«toret 1754 592 

Archie MclHiugall ira 916 

^— ^— ^^^-^^■ »^^— ^— .^— ^^^^^^ 

REAL ESTATE, FIRE 
INSURANCE AND 
., RENTAL AGENCIES. 

John A. Stephenson, Woh-ln building. 
E. D. Field Co.. 'Ha Exchange building. 
L. A. Larsen & Co., 215 Providence Bldg. 
Charles P.jCralg &_Co.. ro VV. S up . Sj. 



Advertisement Les8 Timn 15 Cients. 

WANTED! 5 

Boy over 16 years old, bright, 5 
willing and ambitious; good chance O 
for right boy. 

$ GRAY-TALLANT CO. 5 



One Cent a Word Each Insertlon-^No 
Advertisement Le«s Than 15 Cents. 

^ o 

O WANTED. 5 

Q Girl for general house^vork; good Ci 
O wages; no washing. Call, 2401 5 
O East Third street. A 



One Cent a Word Each Ii^ertlos— No 
Advertisement Lew T^ian 15 Centa. 




<>i><>CKKHCrtKKH><K>CH>CKXK>a<H><^^ 



At once, 
furniture 



tlon. Apply 

FRENCH & 
FRENCH & 



WANTED! 
WANTED! 

experienced packer for 
warehouse; steady posl- 



BASSETT. 
BASSETT. 



I WANTED— EVERY WOMAN TO TRY 
Dr. LeGrans Female Regulator, guar- 
anteed. Kugler, Your Druggist. 108 
West Superior street. 



CHiKS<5<>i><>i>CH«Hii5i>{>«H:H50<^^ 



a WANTED. 



BUNDLE BOYS. 



PREIMUTH'S. 



WANTED — EVERY WOMA^, MAN 
and child that has rough skin or chaps 
to use Kugler's Karnatlon Kold Kream, 
tl;e great skin food, 26c. Kugler, Your 
Druggist, lOK West Superior street. 

MRS. 80MER8' EMPLOYMENT OF- 
fice, 17 Second avenue east. Both phones 

WANTED -. A COMPETENT LAUN- 
dress. Apply, 16 South Eighteenth ave- 
nue east. Mrs. L. W. Lelthhead. 



WliT 

^^FOR'RENT— HOUSES. 

^^^ 'V^NT-TEN-ROOM HOUSeTsUIT^ 
ti „-?/'ri^^ lamihes; water and Ifghl. 
No. Ib^i Eaiit Sixth street. 



One C-ent a Word Each Insertion No 

Advertisement Less Than 15 C^'nts. 

^^^or'^entCrooms! ^ 

FOR 



RENT-THREE ROOM; NO CHIL- 
dren. Apply G2b West Third street. 




^?« ItENT-NEW. MODERN, SEVEN- 
room house, heated. 4331 East Supe- 
strftt. ;3t>.oB per month. Inquire 



nor 
next 



door. 



»J<H>i>a<H>0<H>{>0<K><K>0<K><K>^^ 

WANTED — EXPERIENCED 5 

salesladi' for underwear depart- 6 

ment; good wages to competent 6 

party. n 



ELECTRICIANS WANTED 

Wanttd at once— Inside journeymen 
wlreraen, with A-1 references. 




112 West 
First St. 






WANTED - SPECIAL BOY TO 
run (rrand.^ and make himself gen- 
erally useful; must bt bright , of 
neat appearance and about 16 years 
of age. Apply, at once, J. M. "GjU- 
ding & Co. 



^ONEY TO LOAN. 

CHATTEL LO.A.NS-«ALAR11:d LOANS. 
DO YOi: NEED MONEY? 

We hav* money constantly on hand to 
loan to salaried people and others with 
or without security; also on pianos, 
furniture. horses, etc. Weekly or 
monthly puymtnts, to suit your own 
oonvenienct. If you want the lowest 
rates, call on us and we guarantee to 
save yuu money. Lt-aas mutic prompt- 
ly without delay or rtd tape. All busi- 
ness str.cily confldential. 

WEtJTERN LUAN COMPANY. , 

&J1 Manhattan Bldg. \ 

New 'piioae, W6. 'Old piiune, TSO-R. i 






.a 

\^ 

\^ 

lu 

]{,> WANTED — 

\Q saleslady for 

Q 

Q WANTED - MILLINERY AP- 

O ■ ~ 



FOR RENT - FOL'R-ROOM COTTAGE 
on Park Point. Apply, 16 Phoenix 
block. 



FOR RENT - TWO NICELl FUR- 
nished rooms in private family; central- 
hot water he at; old 'phone 1S*1-M. 

FOR RENT-FURNISHED 
Second avenue east. 



ROOM. 217 



FOR RENT - LARGE FURNISHED 
front room, hot water heat, electric 

^•^s u' ^Z'^^^' }!. *^«'^i'-ed. Old 'phone. 
B.i4-K. 120 Nmth avenue east. 



FOR RENT- TWO 
rooms. 4i3 East Sixth 



UNFURNISHED 
street. 



FOR RENT-NICE FURNISHED ROOM, 
light housekeeping allowed. lll»/i East 
F.ith street. 



FOR RENT - FRONT ROOM, FUR- 
nished, hot water heat, bath, tele- 
phone, gentlemen preferred. Central 
location on the car line. D. 22, Herald. 



One Cent a Word Each Insertion No 

Advertisement Less Hian 16 Cents. 

^OR^SALE^^MISCELLANEO^^ 

For Sale— Boilers 
promptly made. 



and Radiators. 
H. Gazett, 321 



Repairs 
E. Sup. 

FOR SALE - WH HAVE FOR SALE 

go"od 'ac/ifn '^'^r^' r.V^f ' accnmated and 
good action Duluth Log company. 214 
building. 



PaJladlo 



^^^ SECRET SOCIETIES. 

„ . ^ „ , jSasonio " ^^ 

PALESTINE LODGE. NO. 79, A. P. # 
A. M.— Regular meetins first 
and third Monday evening*- 
of each month at 8 o clock. 
Next meeting. Sept. 16. 190T, 
Work— Second degree. Jaroe*^ 
A. Crawford, W. M.; H. Nei* 
Dltt, secretary. 




?^^ SALE- WALNUT PIANO, USED 
three months, in fine condition. |!50; 
mnnth" 4*''"'"\ °^ '^^ ^ash and 16 per 
^^fn V?; ^^'■^"ch & Bassett. First street 
ana i hird avenue west. 



IONIC 




FOR SALE-IRON AND WOOD WORK- 

ih^*-*I"*^^l"*^'"y a"d supplies, pulleys. , 

Shafting, hangers, boxes, etc., new and i KEYSTONE CHAPTER, 
second-hand. Northern Machinery com ~' " 

pany, Minneapolis. 



LODGE, NO. 186, A. F. & A. M.- 
Regular meetings second and 
fourth Monday evenings ot 
each month, at 8 o'clock. 
Next meeting, Sept. 23, liW. 
Work— Second Degree. Janie« 
L. Crtimwell, W. M.; H. 8, 
Newell, secretary. 



?iilh?K^\~^^^ MAHOGANY PIANO. 

sit t^^.,^ ^*"" "i^nlh. French & Bas- 
w^t ""^^^ ""^^ ^^''■^ avenue 



FOR RENT-FURNISHED NINE-ROOM 
house, four rooms bringing rent. East, 
central and among the best locations in 
the city. Call, Old 'phone, 181b-K. or 
write. B. 7. Herald. 



BRIGHT. ACTIVE 
Jewelry dept. 



WANTED - MILLINERY 
prentice. Freimuth's. 



WANTED — WAREHOUSE CARPEN- 
ter. Apply to D. Anderson. Kelly^How- 
Thomson. 



WANTED— COAT-MAKER AT ONCE. 
H. J. Broeker, Cass Lake, Minn. 



WANTED-FOUR PLASTERERS AT 
A. CONGDON'S NEW RESIDENCE. 
THIRTY-THIRD AVENUE EAST AND 
LONDON ROAD. 



^^? 



MONEY LOANED ON FURNI- o 

gture ii!;d pianos at iOu Pulladio. O 
MINNESOTA LOAN CO. <J 



a 

o 
a 



""" ^O 

s 
g 

WANTED— GIRLS TO STRIP TOBAC- 
CO. Apply Ron-Fernandez Cigar com- 
pany. 



Q 
■D 



NOTIONS SALESLADY. 
We have a position lor an exper- 
ienced notions saleswoman, an ex- 
ceptional opportunity for a lady of 
ability wltn plenty of experience 
in notions anu who can come wcii 
recommended. Apply at once, to 
suiierintendent. 

PANTON & WHITE CO. 



FOR RENT-COMFORTABLE WINTER 
cottage on Park Point, from about Dec. 
1 to April 1 . Address, 8. 5. Herald. 

FOR RENT _ BE V EN-ROOM FUR- 
nlshed house, ga« and electricity; rent 
reasonable to rl«ht party 8. D. Will- 
iamson, 51C Torrey building. Zenith 

. phone 1136. Old phone 1309. 



FOR RENT - FURNISHED 
light housekeeping allowed. 
Second street. 



ROOM, 

210 East 



FOR 



FOR RENT-FURNISHED ROOM WITH 
board for two. with all modern conven- 
iences. 211 I-^fth avenue west. 



FOR 



RENT - TWO NICELY FUR- 
nished rooms; all modern conveniences. 
Old 'phone. 5009-L. 



FOR RENT - FIVE-ROOM COTTAGE, 
Park Point, Twenty-second street, part- 
ly lurnlshed; hardwood floors through- 
out. Apply to M. Heiiricksen. the jew- 
eler, 330 West Superior street. 



^"?o^ .nl^^'^'T - FURNISHED 
4A) Third avenue east. 



ROOMS. 



FOR RENT- FOUR 

Bixth street. 



ROOMS. 2324 WEbST 



r-i.r.r^^^^rP^'^ ^^NE OAK VOSE 
f/!;2 • "J**"^ ^.^^« **ian a year; beautiful 
tone and action; a 

sold on terms of 
month. French & 
and Third avenue 



year; 
rare bargain at $275; 
115 cash and $8 per 
Bassett. First street 
west. 



FOR SALE-UPRIGHT STONE & CO 
P.'5;"o.. mahogany case; good condition! 
♦5 per month. Howard. 
120 East Superior street. 




. NO. 20. R. A. M. 
—Stated cojivocaiions second 
and fourth Wednesday even* 
ings of each month, at 8 
J'clock. Next convocation. 
Sept. 25. Smoker. Henry Z 
PIneo, H. P.; Alfred Le Rich- 
eux, secretary. 



1135; ilO 
Farwell 



down, 
& Co.. 



FOR SALE-MAXWELL AUTOMOBILE 
in fine running condition, cheap 
dress. Z. 17. Herald. 



Ad- 



FpR RENT— ONE DOUBLE UNFURN- 
_lghed room. 218 West Su perior streeU 

FOR RENT - NEWLY FURNISHED 
rooms for two gentlemen. 113 Second 
avtnue east. Zenith 'phone, 1258-D. 



FOR S.-^LE— ELEGANT UPRIGHT Pi- 
ano, worth $3i5-.; used four months, $165 
teHes it. 319 West Fifth street. Call 
bunday or after 6 p. m. 



WANTED-SPECIAL DELIVERY 



S 



boys and ca^ girls. Apply to man- 



i?<k>0<h><h30-0<^Ck>0O<J<Kk3<k><hXk>v 






ager, Silberstein & Bondy Co. 



o 

O 



WAJ>JTED— GIRLS FOR BC>TTL1NG I>E- 
partment, over 16 years old. Duluth 
Browing & Malting Co. 



WANTED - EXPERIENCED COOK. 
Oct. 1. House has all modern conven- 
iences; best wa«es paid; must have 
references. Call, or address Room C13 
Lyceum building. 



FOR RENT — MISCELLANEOUS. 

FOR RENT - HOTELJ THIRTY^SIX 
rooms; newly refitted; best location In 
city. Apply to Louis McCullough, Clo- 
UMet. 



FOR RENT - FURNISHED ROOMS 
with or without board. All modern con- 
veniences. Call ,610 East Second street. 



SURGEON CHIROPODIST. 

DR. V/HALLET^^nixjOT^PEcTAI^ 
life Mesaba avenue, Zenith 'phone, tH6-Y. 



FOR RENT - ONE STEAM-HEATED 
furnshed room. 2(Ki East First street. 



DID IT EVER OCCUR TO YOU THAT 
m,.^'?L" i ^''. profitable to prowl around 
our book store or write fc)r what 
w-ant? We buy, sell, exchange all 
of books. Lundberg & Stone 
bu;>erJor street. 



231 



you 
kinds 
West 



COMMANDERY. NO. 18, K. T. 
—Stated conclave, first fues- 
day of each month. Next con- 
clave, Tuesday, Sept. 17th. Or- 
der of Red Cross. 8oloum- 
ing sir knights are oe- 
pecialiy* Invited. William A. 
Abbett, eminent commanderj 

Richeux, recorder. 




SCOTTISH RITE. 
Regular meetings every Thurs- 
day evening of each week at 
h o'clock. Next meeting, Sept. 
26. IM. Work— Entertainmeoit. 
J. E. Cooley, secretary. 



Hoover, 
tar^. 



ZENITH CHARTER, NO 28^ 
Order Eastern Star.-Regu- 
iar meetings at Masonlo 
Temple, second and fourth 
I'riday evenings of each 
month at 8 o clock. Next 
rneeting, Sepr. 13. Work— 
General business. Harriett 
W. ; Ella F. Gearhart, secre- 



FOR SALE-SMALL HEATER %4 COT 

^-^^^f.^s ^ntl other household 'goods! 
190/ West Second street. 



FOR RENT - THREE FURNISHED 
rooms lor light housekeeping; also 
large front bedroom. Alledcna terrace 
(06^ West Second street. 



MONEY TO LOAN-ON 
and all kinds of personal property; also 
buy notes and second mortgages. Union 
Loan company. 210 Palladio building 



FURNITURE, i WANTED - 
coats fixed 



DIA.MONDS. - 



MONEY TO L0.4^-ON 
watches, furs, rifles, etc.. and all goods 
of value. $1 to $l,t«y. Keystone Loan & 
Mercitntile Co.. 16 West Superior street 



MEN HAVE YOU OVER- 
before the fall rush starts. 
Cleaned, repaired, new linings put in, 
velvet collars put on. Frank Popkina" 
tailor shop. No. 1 W. Superior St. 



WANTED-A LADY COOK AT CLAR- 
endon restaurant, Garfield avenue and 
Superior street. 



BUSINESS CHANCES. 

BUSINESS CHANCES-LARGE BOARD^ 
ing house, furniture and two Jots In 
good location near business center of 
Virginia. Minn. Address Z. J. Perrault, 
Virginia, Minn. 



FOP RENT- 
i\)oms for 
Herald. 



\<i 

THREE UNFURNISHED :§ 
Ught housekeeping. VV. 3u. § 

S 

o 





W CHIC KERING, rt 



FOR RENT - LARGE FURNISHED 
ro(>m with alcove; modern conveniences 
With board or without. 22(5 Fifth avenue 



FISCHER, 

FRANKLIN. 

PIANOS, 
„.^„. EASY PAYMENTS. 
HOWARD. FARWELL & CO. 

120 East Superior Street. 
w"''f= .^t"- "'J-X; Old, 1752-K. 
W. J. Allen, manager; Fred R. 
Mann, expert piano and r'ipe 
organ tuning. 



EUCLID LODGE. NO. 198, A. F. & A. 
M.— Regular meetings first and 
third Wednesday evenings of 
tach month at 7:30 o'clock. 
Next meeting, Sept. Ih. Seo- 
oiid degree. J. H. Opperman, 
^\'. M.; A. Dunleavy. secro- 



W ANTED - FIRST-CLASS GIRL P^OR 
general housework; no washing, lala 
East Superior street. 



MONEY SUPPLIED-TO SALARIED 
peoT>le and others, upon their own 
notes without security; easy payments. 
Offices m sixty-three cities. ToUnan's 
609 Palladio building. 



WANTED-FOR THE U S. MARINE 
corps— Men between ages' 21 and 36 An 
opportunity to see the world. For full 
information apply In person or by letter 
to 5 South Fifth avenue west, Duluth, 
Minn. 



WANTED - GIRL TO 
try, St. Louis hotel, 
at hotel. 



WORK 
Apply 



IN 
to 



BAK- 
baker 



WANTED - COMPETENT GIRL FOR 
general housework; two in family. 5J4 
East Third street. 



___FOR^ALE— H O U SES. 

FOR SALE-A NE\\'^'"'7aNE^!R^)OM 
house, located In a most desirable 
part of the East end; liie house is 
modern in every respect; price U«,&tiO 
for further information' A 106 



WANTED- FOR U. S. ARMY; ABLE- 
bodicd unmarried men. between ages of 
21 and .'i; ..citizens of United States, of 
good character and temperate habits, 
who can speak, read and write English. 
For informatfbn, apply to Recruiting 
office, Torry building, Duluth, Minn. 



WANTED AT ONCE — TWO 

n.alds. St. Luke's hospital. 



HALL- 



WANTED - 
McCoy. 131 



SKIRT MAKER. MRS. 
West Superior street. 



Address 
Herald. 



FOR SALE HOUSE-NEW HOUSE ON 
Park Point. 2118 Minnesota avenue. Will 
be ready for occupancy Oct. 1. Seven 
rooms, including bath, fireplace, hot 
water heat, gas. water, concrete founda- 
tion, cement floor under entire house 
Lot 40 by 100; price W.OOO. One- third 
cash, balance on easy terms. Apply M 
Henricksen. the Jeweler. 330 West Su- 
perior street. 



FOR SALE-$2,0(>0 WILL BUY A 9-ROOM 
hou.«<e In good repair witn two 50- 
loot lots, at Hunter s Park, one block 
from car line. Aj.ply u. C. Hartman 
& Co. 



MEN WANTED TO COME TO US IP 
you are suffering from any disease 
peculiar to your sex. We cure Vari- 
cocele. Syphilis, Stricture. Gonorrhoea. 
Bladder and Kidney diseases Lost 
Vitality and all pelvic troubles. Es- 
tablisi-ied in Duluth. We cure to stay 
cured, and you can take our opinion 
as final. If your case is curable, we 
will cure you. Progressive Medical 
association. No. 1 West Superior 
street, upstairs. 



WANTED - DINLVG ROOM GIRL AND 
di.sh washer. Omaha Cafe. 623 West 
Superior street. 



WANTED - DISH WASHER. NO. S 
Nineteenth avenue west. 



FOR SALE-DAIRY. NEAR CITY Lo- 
cated on a 40-acre farm, with house 
and barns. Cheap rent. Good oppor- 
tunity for the right man. Fifteen 
cows and a splendid team of horses, 
besides wagons, plow, cultivator and 
other farm ^ implements. Price S1.2U0. 
B. 45, Heral6. 



BUSINESS CHANCES - BARBER 
wanting to buy a paying barber shop. 
Apply, Box 73, Rainy River, ~ 



Ont. 



FOR RENT - THREE OR FOUR UN- 
furniyhed rooms; no children. Call, 
Zenith. 1662-Y. 



FOR 



SALE - ROLL-TOP DESK 
typewriter. Call 27 Mesjiba block. 




CHAPTER, NO. 59 R. A. M.— 
Meets at West Duluth sec- 
ond and fourth Tue.-days of 
<ach month, at l.S^j p. m 
Next meeting. Sept. 10. Wor4 
— Hegiiiar business. E. O. 
Wallinuer, H. P.; A. Dunleavy, 
secretary. 



AND ; DULUTH 



FOR RENT- FURNISHED ROOM; CEN- 

tral; two gentlemen preferred. 17 
West Second street. 



fur 



FOR RENT — 
with hot water 
street. 



FURNISHED ROOM i 
heat. 608 West Second 



FOR SALE-ENGLISH BULL TERRIER 
1 year old, brindlt and white. As-k 
coachman, 23 Ea.st Superior street. 

FOR SALE-TWO 
pups. 17 Seventh 



FRENCH POODLE 
avenue west. 



LODGE, NO. 28 I. O. O, F.— 
Meets every Friday evening 
at Odd Fellows' hall, 16 Lak« 
avenue north. Next meeting, 
Sept. 13. First degree. D. J. 

1 Dorse y, noble grand;Tt. £. l-orgy, record- 

I ing secretary. 



FOR RENT-FURNISHED ROOM, ALL 
modern conveniences, references re- 
quired. 314 Ninth avenue east. 



FOR SALE-$85 TAKES 
piano, worth $2(K);4can 
il. Phoenix block.' 



FINE UPRIGHT 
be seen at room 



BUSINESS CHANCES-WANTED-$3. 
gn real estate security; will pay g 

101, Herald. 



Interest. Address A 



{.000 
o#l 



IFOR RENT - FURNISHED FRONT 
room and alcove; steam heat, 24 West 
First street, third flat. 



FOR SALE — SELF-FEEDING 

ing stove. Apply 312 East 
street. 



HEA T- 

Fourth 



BUSINESS CHANCBS-FOR SALE 
twenty acres in fine locality; beautifui 
six-room cottage; well, barns; twu 
miles frc^m car line; wiil sell In five on 
ten acre lots. F. Quandt, Arnold, Minn I _J 



FOR RENT- 
buard. 517 



-FURNISHED ROOMS AND 
West First street. 



^O/l SALE-50-FOOT LOT, UPPER SIDE 
of Vernon street, near school and car 
line, $C00; 1-3 caih; cheap. Btrt N. 
Wheeler, 40t» Burrows building. 



WANTED - 
houst-work. 
street. Mrs. 



GIRL FOR GENERAL 
Apply, 405 West Tiurd 
J. T. Hughes. 



FOR SALE-TEN-ROOM HOUSE WITH 
city water, sewer, electric light and gai* 
Centrally located at West end. Price 
$2,100. G. A. Rydberg. 411 Torrey build- 
ing. Zenith 'phone, 248-D. 



FOR SALE-VERY NEAT. FOUR-ROOM 
cottage. Park Point; corner lot, large 

f>orch. fine location; very reasonable 
f sold at once. Apply 2602 Minnesota 
avenue. 



FOR SALE— NICE LITTLE FIVE- 
cottagc at Proctor, $1,100; easy 
205 Palladio buiiding. 



ROOM 
terms. 



FOR SALE - NEW 
electric Ugiits and 
stone foundation lot 
Vernon street. 



S-ROOM HOUSE, 

gas, city water, 

50x100. 822 West 



FOR SALE - FINE SEVEN-ROOiM 
house on car line at Lester Park; hard- 
wood floors downstairs, white enamel 
finish up.stairs; lot luti by 140 feet; cement 
sidewalk. Address B. H: F. care of 
Herald. 



^___^0R SALE— HORSES. 
5<h><k><h>0<h>ChCh><hKk>ck><>{>^^ 



WANTED-A TAILOR TO PRESS 
clothes, steady work; good wages. Mei- 
lin & Co.. 404 West Superior street. 

a ELEVATOR OPERATOR. S j 

O We want an experienced electric <j 
passenger elevator operator, one 
who can furnish references. Aji- 
ply at once to superintendent 
Panton & White comj.any. 

i><H>0<>0<K>CK>CH><5'<>0<J<H>0<HC^ 

! WANTED-M.\N OR WOMAN WHO IS 
able to make a hou.^e to house canvas. 
■ Nothing to sell; chance to travel. Ap- 
I ply, D. Stewart, 17 West Seventh ave- 
nue, ground floor. 

I WANTED - CAPABLE SALESMAN TO 
^over Minnesota with staple line. High 
1 commissions with 1100.00 monthly ad- 
I vance. Permanent position to right 
I man. Jess H. Smith Co.. Detroit. Mich. 

WANTED— BOOKBINDERS AT JUDD'S 
printing office, 20 East Superior street. 

V.ANTED — CAPABLE BELL BOYS, 
good salary. Apply to G. A. Habner. 
Spalding hotel. 

WANTED-A MAN TO WORK ON A 
dairy farm at once. 2215 West Twelfth 
street. 



[WANTED - EXPERIENCED S>y:.ES- 
I lady for millinery. La Ferte's. 24 West 
I Superior street. 

WANTED IMMEDIATELY - COMPET^ 
ent girl for kitchen work; good wages. 
919 East First street. 

-.^ , •• i/-EXPERIENCEI» CLERK AT 
the Duluth Candy Kitchen, 307 West 
Superior street. 

WANTED — A LADY BOOKKEEPER; 
one who has had a few years' business 
experience. Apply, 609 Palladio building. 

WANTED-WOMAN TO Do IRONING 
and clean house one day each week. 
Mrs. G. A. Stierwood, 427 Tenth avenue 
east. 

WANTED — COMPETENT GIRL FOR 
general housework. Family of two. 
Mrs. D. F. Myers. 1127 London road. 



BUSINESS CHANCES-FOR SALE 
confectionery store and Ice cream par- 
lor; cheap, if taken at once. 2002 West 
l-lrst street 



BUSINESS OHAliCBS- ON A^'COUNT 
of sickness, must be sold, at a bargain 
grocery, confectionery, ice cream par- 
lor, all fixtures complete; horse, har- 
ness and light delivery wagon party 
leaving city. Call 1106 West Michigan 
street. 



BUSINESS 
Nora hotel 
Duluth. In 
and has at 

ste«iuy bc'arders 
ill health. 



FOR RENT— FURNISHED 
two gentlemen. 20 West 

FOR RENT- 
heat; hot 
flats. 



ROOM FOR 
Third street. 

-SUIT OF ROOMS; STEAM 
and cold water. 16 Mason 



FOR RENT-A NICELY FTJRNISHED 

room; $5 per month. 1520 Minnesota ave- 
nue. 



FOR SALE CHEAP - 
whole camping outfit, 
enth avenue east. 



DJJCK 
Inquire 



POAT. 
2S Sev- 




FOR SALE, CHEAP— ONE HEAVY DE- Noble, 
livery wagon. Johnson & Moe, Twentv- ' lace 
first avenue west and Superior street" ' ' " 



K. O. T. M. 

DULl'TH TENT, NO. 1. meetf 
every Wednesday evenmg at i 
p. m. at Maccabee h.jil, 2M 
\\>.st Firpt street. Visiting sir 
knights welcome. C. J. Hec- 
tor, commander; J. B. Gelln- 
eau. lecord keeper. Office In 
10 a. m. to 1 p. m. daily. 

MODERN SAMARITANS. 

ALPHA COUNCIL, NO. 1, 
meets at Elks' hall e\err 
Thurf-day evening at | I 
o clock. Benefici nt degre» 

first and second ThuisdaySj 
Samaritan degree second and 
fourth Thursdays. F. A. 

G. S. ; Lucy Purdy, L. G. S. ; Wal- 



cial 



FOR RENT— TWO ROOMS AT 302 EAST 
Seventh street. 



FOR RENT- LARGE. 
with board for two. 
street. 



FRONT BOOM, 
117 East Third 



FOR SALE-RAMBLER TOURING CAR 

22-H.-P., In fine condition; cheap for 
cash, or will trade towards desirable 
real estate. Address B 9, Herald. 

FOR SALE-FINE JERSEY BULL TWO 
years old. Frank Coulter, Arnold, 
Minn. 



CHANCES-FOR SALE 

r'rSly'^y^wm'J'di'^^tS ^>«..RENT -_FOUR UNFURNISHED 
all time: - ' ' 



no less than 130 
Reason for selling. 



FOR SALE— COWS. 

FOR SALE— J. E. JOHNSON^ARRTVES 
with a carload of fre?h milch cows 
Thursday, Sept. 19. 701 South Twenty- 
third avenue east, near lake. Zenith 
'phone, 1853-X. 



WANTED-A 
hcusework. 



GIRL FOR GENERAL 
1116 East Second street. 



WANTED-LADIES OR GIRLS EVERY- 
where to copy advertisements for us at 
home; salary &0c per hour in advance; 
spare time; no fakt ; no canvassing or _ 
dollar required. P'articulars for stamp la 
Morristown, N. Y. ' 



FOR SALE - GOOD YOUNG FRESH 
cows, $30 and $35 apiece; also cows that 
are coming in this fall at $40. Call quick 
for a bargain. J. H. Markeson, 220 
North Fifty-sixth avenue west. 



rooms. 1414 Jefferson street. 




Welbanks, 
scribe. 



scribe; T. A. Gall, tinan- 



A. O U. W. 
FIDELITY LODGE, NO. 105, 
meets at new Maccabee hall 
every Thursday evening at ft 
o'clock. H. E. Simons, M. 
W.; W. W. Fenstern,acher, 
recorder; O. J. Murvold, t.nan- 
cier, 217 East Fifth street. 



FOR SALE CHEAP-HOUSEHOLD 
furniture. Call after 6pm No 8 
Ea.st Fifth street. Flat A ' ' 



FOR RENT-TWO OR THREE FURN- 

Ished rooms, as preferred, for liglit 

housekeeping. $8 per month. Oct 1 

^Address Z. 11. Herald. ' ' 



rJFCxR SALE-RADIANT HOME 
er. 1511 East South street. 



HEAT- 



FOR RENT-FURNISHED ROOM- ALL 
modern. Apply. 5^^ East Fifth street. 



FOR SALE— GOOD 
heater. Call at 
west. 



COAL STOVE AND 
126 Eleventh avenue 



I. O. F. 
COURT COMMERCE, NO. 
3283. Independent Order of 
Foresters, meets first and 
third Friday evenings at R 
o'clock at Rowley's nail. No. 
112 West First street. Next 
regular meeting. Sept. iO, 1807. 
Tupper, C. H.; W. W. Hoopes, R. S. 



SAW REPAIRING. 



FOR SALE-E. CARLSON ARRIVES 
;^ith a carload of fresh milch cows 
Tuesday. Sept. 17. Twelfth street and 
Twenty-second avenue west. Zenith 
phone 1654-D. 



SAW REPAIRING 

saws to the Duluth 
Duluth, Minn., for 
band, cross-cut and 
ened and straightened 
work promptly attended to 



- BRING YOUR 

Lumber company, 
repairs; circular, 
hand saws sharp- 
Out-of-town 



FOR SALE - FT.TRNITURE 
new, hijrh grade, in use four 
Apply 728 East Fourth 
Mesaba block. 



BRAND 

month.s. 

street, or 24 




• f 



FOR 

good 
ment. 



SALE-MOTOR BICYCLE IN 
order at a bargain. Apply base- 
block, Superior, Wis. 




Hammond 



M. W. A. . 

IMPERIAL CAMP, NO. 22CC 
meets nt Maccabee hall, 224 
West First street, second and 
fourth Tuesdays of each 
month. J. W. Wood, V. C; 
P. Earl, clerk. Box 4U. 



Zeck Pill Co.. 



WANTED-COMPETENT 
wages. Mrs. Hepworth, 
street. 



COOK; GOOD 
1721 East First 



yL KANER HAS JUST ARRIVED 
with another car of fresh milch cows: 
some Jerseys among them. 1219 Baat 
Seventh street. Zenith 'phone, 1387 



BOARD OFFERED. 

BOARD AND ROOM-$5.00 PER WEEK' 
modern conveniences. The Dakota llf 
W'est Second street. New "phone, 1446 



; FOR SALE-NEW UPRIGHT PIA NO 

maho"-""!- q»se, $148; $10 down and $6 per 
2?°".^^o "oward, Farwell & Co m 
East Superior street. ' 



FOR SALE-HOUSfc. 'OLD 
523 West First strefct. 



GOODS AT 



301 East Third street. Old 'phone. 1744-L. 



FOR SALE-HOUSEHOLD 
ture. 220 West Fourth street. 



FURNJ. 



WANTEL>-A 
Duluth Van 



BARRETT & ZIMMERMAN, 
The largest horse dealers in 
America, have from 500 to 800 head 
trf all classes of horses constant- 
ly on hand. 

BARRE'in- & ZIM.MERMAN 

Midway Horse Market, 

St. Paul. Mum. 



O 
O 

o; 
o 
o 
o 

o 



BAGGAGE 
& Storage 



MAN. 
Co. 



CALL 



FOR SALE - GOOD. SOUND NINE- 
year-old horse, weight about l iw 

r^rfr^.^V^^u- J>^^-^y ^ Rasmusson'si 
Grand Liike Station, JWinn. 

FOR SALE-GOOd7 SOUND TEAM OF 

^^'■f,?'.^*'^'■"c:'^''' ^/"^y «"^ s'elgh. Call 
at €4 East Superior street. | 



WANTED — $20 CASH AND $10 PER 
month for eight months will provide 
for a future permanent position and 
nuike you profits of $1,000 per annum. 
For particulars address P. O Box 135. 
St. Paul, Minn. ' 

\rANTi:n- EVERY MAN AND WOMAN 
to try Nero Tablets, the great nerve 
regenerator: $1 per box. Kugler. Your 
Druggist. 108 West Superior street 



WANTED — COMPETENT COOK. MRS. 
C. A. Luster. 1619 East First street. 

WANTED - GIRL WHO HAS HAD A 

little experience in bookkeeping and 
who can do a little sewing work. Apply 
to room 10. over Gidding's. Call after 
6 p. m. 



WANTED - GIRL 
housework; three In 
Fourth street. 



FOR GENERAL 
family. 708% East 



JWANTBD-TWO NEAT YOUNG GIRLS 
for parlor. Victor Huot Confectionery. 



BOARD AND ROOM— 122 E. FIRST ST. 



FOR 
lbs. 



.SALE-BA\ .MARE. WEIGHT 1800 
. ° years old; also ano-.her big horse 
-Weight about 1.400 lbs.. 6 years old- 
guaranteed sound. 1219 East Sevenfh 



WANTED-TRACKLAYERS. $2.50 PER 
day; teamsters. $45 per month, for Ida- 
ho. Washington and Montana; also 
twenty-five bridge carpenters for Ida- 
ho, $3.50 per day. Free fare W J Fed- 
ders. 511^8 W. Michigan St.'. Diiluth. 

Wanted— Me 
short tinie 



WANTED-GIRL TO WORK IN BOARD- 
ine house; Scandinavian preferred. 2706 
W'est Huron street. 



WANTED— CHOCOLATE AND 
bon dipper; permanent position. 
Huot Confectionery. 



BON- 
Vlctor 



FOR SALE - CHEAP, BIO 
weight l,50(t; bargain, if taken 
2<at West Michigan street 



HORSE, 
at once. 



1 to leJiTn barber trade; only 
retiuired by our method; great 
demand for barbers. Call or write at 
once for beautiful "free" illustrated cat- 
alogue; have stood the test for sixteen 
years; only Institution of its kind In the 
Northwest. Moler Barber Col.. 27 Nicollet 
avenue, Minneapolis, Minn 



WANTED - 
house^'ork. 



GIRL 
314 East 



FOR GENERAL 
Second street. 



Dealers in X 

-. Wagons and Buggies. X 

^^^^^^ ^J'ul^th, Minn. X 



WANTED-BOY TO LEuA^RN DRUG 
business A. C. I^RIcheux Drug com- 
pany, 4(6 East Fourth street. 



Horses 



WANTED-BOY 
arountJ store 
Thiid avenue 



ABOUT 16 
and learn 
west. 



TO WORK 
trade. 110 



WANTED - A GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework. Mrs. H. B. Eva. 2135 Wood- 
land avenue. Hunter's Park. 

i WANTED - COMPETENT GIRL FOR 
general housework; small family. 1424 
East Second street. 

WANTED - EXPERIENCED SALES 
lady for millinery. La Ferte's, 24 West 
Superior street. 

WANTED - COMPETENT NURSE, 
with good references, for a baby 1 year 
old. 516 East Second street. 



PIANO TUNING. 

C. A. <n{K';(iRV."zKNn^^PHONEr 



60C. 



TRUNKS AND VALISES. 



BAVE 
Juth 
•treet 



•MIDDLEMEN'S PROFITS— DU- 
Trunk factory, 220 West Superior 



WANTED SALESMEN - TWO GOOD 

nun for local work. We w^nt only 
those capable of approaching the 
families in the citv; good 
the right mtn. 18 Third avenue west 




FOR SALE - ONE WALNUT PIANO 
used a few months; In excellent condi- 
tion, good a.s new; former price $400- our 
special price $300- sold on terms of $15 
and $8 per month. French & ~ 
First street and Third avenue 



Bassett, 
west. 



FOR 



best 
money to 



RELIABLE HELP ALWAYS TO BE 
had at Mrs. Callahan's Employment of- 
fice, 15 Lake avenue north. 



WANTED-A SAWMILL FIREMAN 
Apply at sawmill. Twenty-third 
west. 



avenue 



TENTS AND AWNINGS. 
POIRIER & CO., 105 E^^'u^^rii^r^ri^ 



WANTED - COMPETENT GIRL FOR 
general housework; family of two; $20 
Apply. Mrs. K. N. McLeod, 303 South 
Twenty-first avenue east. 



WANTED-GOOD GIRL FOR GENER- 
al work; good wages. 1627 East Third 
street. Mrs. W. P. Mars. 



HERALD 

WANT ADS 



Even thou^ yonr Interest is 
onl.v a cAsual one. study the 
"want ads" of THE HEJ^ALD 
anyway, you will find sonie- 
A"]^ tl»at will suggest a pos- 
sibility you hHd not tiiought of, 
and may yield a highly profit- 
able result on your invest- 
ment. 



SALE-ONE MAHOGANY PIANO 

slightly used. $200; sold on terms of n6 
cash and $< per month. French 
Bas.=ett. First street and Third 
west. 




NORTH STAR LODGE, NO. 
35, Knights of Pythias, meet* 
at 8 o'clock e\ery Tuesday 
night, at 118 West Superior 
street. William H. l.«.mson» 
C. C; H. McKenzie. K. R. 
and S. 



& 

avenue 



FOR 



SALE-AUTOMOBILE TIRES tlO 
up; carriage tires, $3 up; bicycle tires, 
$1.50 up. Vt,e vulcanize and retreat all 
makes of tires. Northwestern 
for international tires. J 
Snn ^^^ ^'^<^o"t^ avenue, " Minneapolis." 



agents 
Johnson 



STEWART, NO. 50, O. 8. C, 
meets first and third Wednes- 
days of each month at 8 p. m.. 
In Folz hall. West Superior 
street. John G. Ross, chief; 
Alex G. McKni&ht. i?ec:etary; 
John Burnett, financial secre- 
tary, 413 First National Bank. 

building. Next meeting, Sept. 18. Report 

of royal delegate. 

LOYAL GUARD, SUBORDINATE Divi- 
sion, No. 132, meets first and 
third Wednesdays oi eacb 
month. H. B. McKinky. cap- 
tain gtneral; H .V. Holmea, 
paymaster, 416 Fifteenth ave- 
nue east; E. F. Heller, re- 
corder, 17 East Third street. 



K 



V. 



Both Phones 



324 




TYPEWRITERS 

for sale. $25 up. 
ptrior street. 



FOR BENT - ALSO 
Edmont, 410 West Su- 



E 



CHEMISTS AND 

ANGERMEIER^ 



ASSAYERS 

14 WEST SUP 




ST. 



MODERN MACCABEES. 

ZENITH CITY TE-NT, Na 
1044, meets every first and 
third Friday of the month 
at Kalamazoo halj B. Com- 
mander. Charles E. Norman. 
1610 Minnesota avenue; record 
keeper and finance keeper, 

C. H. Loomis, residence 504 East Fourtlk 

street. 



■mr' 



SATIN SKIN SPECIALTIES 



Beauty 



o .> . . . - ^^^ Satin skin cream 

and Satin skin complexion powder. ^^"^ 



COURT 



IF YOU WILL BRING 



Suit to 10 Fourth avenue 
It for 60c; pants. 15c. J. 




west, we press 
Oreckovsky. 



(Continued on Page IZ.y 



\ 




A. O. U. W. 

DULUTH LODGE.' NO lO 
meets at Odd Fellows' ' hall 
every Tuesday evening at 8 
^Ar*^''^*^ ^- h- ^felchsel, M 
^•'t ^i» ^^ ^^°\^' recorder; 
1. J. St. Germain, financier 
121 First avenue west. 



street; 
hall. 



U. O. F. 

EASTERN STAR, NO. 

meets every first and thlri 

Tuesday of each month, at 

Maccabee hall. 224 West 

First street. Next meeting, 

Sept. 17. J. "Wilde, secretary: 

152 Mesaba avenue; J. B Gel- 

Ineau, C. R., 116 West Fourth 

Harry Milnes, treasurer. Office at 



' I - 

v'-'«-i 
T 

-I 



MODERN MACCABEES 

ST. LOUIS BAY TENT NO 
HJ45, meets- every first' and 
third Mondays, at Gillev's 
West Duluth. Matthew Et- 
tinger. commander, 308 Eigh- 
teenth and One-half avenue 
west. New 'phone. 3099-x. 
Finance keeper, Edward Shanks, 23 North 
Fifty-eighth avenue west; recordkeeoer 
C. C. Low. 6712 Wadena street i 




WOODMEN OF THE WORLD. 

ZENITH CITY CAMP, NO. 5, MEETS 
every second and fourth Mon- 
day at old Masonic Temple 
fifth floor. H. H. Saxton. c! 
C. ; J. H. Larkin, banker 201 
West Superior street; Jame» 
Blackwood, clerk, 412 Lak» 

avenue south. 








ROYAL LEAGUE. 
ZENITH COUNCIL, NO. Wt 
Koyal league, meets in Elk? 
hall first and third Monday 
evenings, at 8 o'clock. Jame» 
u barton, archon, coin-t- 



A. 



house; Andrew Nelson, 4U 
First National Bank buUdlnC 




MBMMI* 




1 






1 


1 


r' 




I , . 


' • 1 






r - 


■■ : V- 


r 













\ 



> 



liiw^DULUTH EVENING 



TWENTY-FIFTH YEAR. 



SPECIAL MAIL EDITION FOR: WEDNESDAY MORNING, SEPTEMBER 




MINNESOTA 

IStffilHiL 

oIet 




07. (ON TRAINS, FIVE CENTS.) TWO CENTS. 



TERRIFIC EXPLOSION ON 
JAP BAHLESHIP KILLS 
OR WOUNDS OVER FORTY 



Disaster Occurs in Shield 

of After tO-lncli 

Gun. 



Vessels Were Engaged at 

Target Practice Off 

Kure, 



Powder Evidently Caught 

Fire From Gas 

From Gun. 




THE NAVY 
RETURNS 

Crew of the President 

Leaves Salvador in 

Disgust. 

Ties Vessel Up at Aca- 

jutla and Returns on 

Steamer. 



NORTHWESTERN TRAINS 
COLLIDE NEAR RACINE. 
WIS., INJURING SEVERAL 



FOUR PROMINENT ELKS 
OF COLORADO LOSE UVES 
IN FRIGHTFUL ACCIDENT 



Tokio, Sept. 17.— Forty of the crew 
were killed and injured on board the 
Japanese battleship Kashima by th-r; 
explosion of a twelve-inch shell with- 
in the shield, after target practice ne.ir 
Kure at 4 p. m. on Sept. 9. The Kas- 
hima, under command of Capt. Koiz- 
umi, reached Kure at 6 p. m., where 
the wounded were placed in the hos- 
pital. The fatalities included a lieuten- 
ant, two cadets and one staff officer, 
the rank and name of whom Is not 
given. 

The exact details regarding the effecti 
of the explosion are lacking, but it 
was terrific and the ship is badly dam- 
aged. 

The explosion followed an attempt 
to remove an unexploded shell from the; 
gun. A majtrity of the bystanders, 
were fearfully mutilated. 

The casualties reported as the resuU 
of the expl' sion are as follows: 

Killed— Five officers, names not given 
and twenty-two men. Severely v^ournl- 
ed. two officers and six mien. Slightly 
wounded, two officers and six men. 

The cause of the explosion is under 
investigatltn. It occurred inside of the 
shield of the starboard after ten-inch 
gun. 

It was not the shell which exploded, 
but powder which evidently caught fire 
from the gas emitted from the breech 
when opene-d for the purpcse of re- 
loading the giin. The hull of the Kas- 
hima is not damaged. 



San Francisco, Sept. 17.— The officers, 
cook and the whole crew of the steam 

schooner President, which sailed from 

this port two months ago to be the 

navy of the Salvadorean government, 

returned yesterday on the City of Para,' 

having abandoned the President at the! 

I wharf in Acajutla, Salvador. After | 

i Chief Engineer George R. Lindsay 

, walked from the President, along the 

wharf at Acajutla to the City of Para, 

backed by Martin Christensen and 

... , , r , * ! Harry Benner. C. N. Nelson, the cook 

Ninety-seventh Anniversary of the i , ^. . ^ ,i,«„^ *v.^ „„^ «o.v,*^,^a 

r^ -^u * , f tu T J J r^and the crew, he defied the gun fighters 

Ceiebration of the Independence of 

the Republic on Monday. 



ELECTION 
IN CHICAGO 

The New City Charter 
is Up for Ratifi- 
cation. 



PRESIDENT DIAZ 
Of Mexico, Who Presided at 




ROCCAN 

SITUATION 



South Bound Freight 

Crashes into North 

Bound Passenger. 

Two Ministers of Racine 
College Narrowly Es- 
cape Death. 

Racine, Wis., Sept. 17.— Slippery rails 

Chicago, Sept. 17.— A special election caused a collision between the head 

of President Flgueroa to touch or inter- i ^^a held here today for the purpose i end of a southbound freight and the 

fere with ihtm, waving in sign of h'sj^f determining whether or not the i rear end of a northbound passenger 



Early Vote Seems to be 

Going Against the 

Measure. 



The Wreck Caused by a 

Slippery Condition 

of Rails. 



r- 



t 



!fr^-- 



„«**■'*• 



>-^ 



■yr. 



'^^ 




Eight Persons Crowded 

into an Auto Made 

for Three. 



immunity his 



international certificate j new charter granted 

! Chicago at the last 



Shows Improvement and 

Strong Hope of Peace 

is Entertained. 



Delegates Who Met Gen. 
Drude Are Now Con- 
sulting Tribesmen. 



Paris, Sept. 17.— The French govern- 
ment i.v greatly encouraged by the im- 



MUST FURNISH 
$6,000.000 BOND 

Judge Grosscup Names 

Amount for Standard 

Oil Company. 

Chicago, Sept. 17.— The Standard Oil 

Company of Indiana in order to obtain 

a supersedeas staying execution on itSj 

provement in the Moroccan situation ; property to satisfy the judgment iif ' 

and strong hope is entertained that toe $29,240,000 recently imposed by Judge 

! rebellious tribesmen whom the delt- Landis in the United Sitates district 

gates who conferred with Gen. Drude ;)n 'court may furnish bonds to the amount 

: Sunday are now consulting, will agree ! of _$6,000,(>00, 



to the ctiy of 
as an engineer. i Chicago at the last session of the 

There v;as trouble aboard the Presi- Rhould be adonted 

dent before she sailed from San Fran-, '^^'^'^^"'^^ should be adopted. 
Cisco and when Lindsay delivered ovor, For many years Chicago has labored 

the President to Acajutla he was ready, under the disadvantage of an inade- j senger coach and diner, 
to throw up his job. With him in thisi j^j^g system of raiaicg revenue, the 
sentiment was the whole crew. .u. v,™^.j4.w 

Then Lindsay says the Salvadoreans! P'^sent charter being adapted to the _ members of the dining crew 

tried to get his men drunk, but failed. : needs of a city of not over one-fourth j J.^ove a^':ememb^^^^^ crew 

J^^fat'^Ac^^ruufSut^inSlire^fdTis'^^^ ^'^^ ^^ ^^'^'^^^ *^ ^'•^^^"^- -^he j J.^ \f ^\fr^r"e'^iu. ^^e^r h'n'; 'L\ 
iarty^^tm' on bL"V thrCity%r P^^^^^ ^^-ter provides for a change in 1 Sage, engineer of the freight slightly 

the methods of taxation, doing away ! bruised; Mrs. John Goltz of North 

I Freman, Wis., a passenger, bruised and 
1 cut and ribs hurt; D. W. Driscoll, St. 
I Louis, anltle sprained by jumping troni 



train on the Chicago & Northwestern 
railway about 9 o'clock this forenoon, 
resulting in the injury of several pas- 
sengers and the demolition of a pas- 

The Injured 
are: Francis Alexander, hands cut; 
Henry Williams, foot crushed. The 



ADMIRAL WALKER, 
! One of the Best Kncv*m Naval Officers 
of the Country. Who Died at York 
Beach, Me., Very Suddenly. 



Machine Gets Away While 

Going Down a 

Steep Hill. 

Runs into a Pole, Hurl- 
ing Four Occupants 
to Death. 



Liid sailed for home. 



Y|lth a number of different taxing I 
bodies, and concentrating the power 
of tax levy for city, park, school and 
library purposes in the city council. 
I The proposed charter also provides 
I that the city may by a referendum vote 
i issue bonds up to 5jper cent of the 
I total actual valuation of taxable prop- 
erty in the city; consolidates into one 
the three park systems which will 
lit conducted under on board appoint- 
ed by the mayor, and approved by 
the council. At the present time the 
state of Illinois has a large voice in 



car. 

There were several others slightly 
injured, but their names have noi been 
learned. 

Kev. Henry D. Robinson of Racine 
college and Kev. McMillan of the same 
institution narrowly escaped being 
killid. They occupied the front seat of 
the coach on the side where the freight 
struck it. Glass and pieces of the 
wreckage struck them, but they were 
nut hurt. 

Prompt action by Engineer Harry 
i Paddt-n of the passenger train alone 



MUCH SUFFERING 
AMONG ESKIMOS 

Failure of Fishing Sea- 
son Will Work Many 
Hardships. 

Battle Harbor, Labrador, Thursday, 
Sept. 12.— (By mail steamer to St. 
Johns, N. F.)— Dr. Wilifred Grenfel, 
the well known missionary, who for 

the past month has been cruising on;tribution 

the mission yacht Slrathcona along the ' deiniiities to be exacted from the Moors 

for the loss of life and property, which 



the management of the Chicago park ; averted a serious wreck. Realizing a 
systems, although it contributes nothing co]ig,on was inevitable, he put on full 
whatever for tneir support. i steam and almost got in on the siding 
}l ^^^ ^'''Z charter carries, the city , ^,,^^.^ j,^^ freight raked the coach and 
will be divided into f*f ty wards, each • diner 
of which will be represented in the I ' ., 



at a I 



torneys on both sides. The counsel for 

!the oil company had contended stren- 

a'uously for a bond of not more than 

the 



city council by one .Iderman 
salary of $3.oO(i per v/»ar. 

All long-term pubis* utility grants 
must be submitted to t^e people on a 
referendum vote, if a p(k.ition to that 
effect is presented by 10 per cent of 
the voters. 

There is great opposition to the 
adoption of the charter, chiefly because 



THIRTY-THIRD DEGREE 
MASONS MEET IN BOSTON. 



HUMAN BOMB 
IS ARRESTED 

Russian Girl Was to Sac- 
rifice Life to Wreck 
Building. 

Her Uniform Was to be 

Heavily Padded With 

Guncotton. 



Boston, .Sept. 17.— Scottish Rites Ma- 
sons of the Thirty-third degree, more 
than 3('fi in number, were present it 



ito t.iepcace terms, which include: i This was determined today by Judge 

Fiist. The punishment ol the authors , Grosscup in the United States circuit 
lot the Casablanca massacres and tht ' t<-'urt, much to the chagrin of the at- 
j ringleaders ol the movement. 
! Second. An agreement that no tribes 
I men shall enter with arm.s within ^ 

~ radius of VZ kilometers of the city , '^l;^j!:J^^_''.'''!l.^^^^;^^^^^^^^ ^ne ■ Beyond this, no further taxes can be 'jurisdiction here today. Grand Corn- 

Third. The acceptance in principle .)! f^'^^JT^a^ Kjeh as the judgrnent im- ' levied. The possibilities of increased 'mander Henry L. Palmer of Milwaukee 
th. Payment ..t a war contribution the bond b, judgment p^^ ^^^^, ^^^^^^^ ^^^ so > opened the three days' conference, 

amount of which will be hxed lereafierPose^^^^^ two ! gr^at, however, that there is a strong, Among the important matters to be 

negotiations between the ^ 1'^.^,^'-'^" LonJL V^^^^^^^ to irfs adoption. considered is the report of the deie- 

^■'"'*''"Vhe sun'ender Thc^^^^^^^^^ supersedeas shal i it i« .xn..t..l , hat thP vote todnv will leates of the Northern jurisdiction to 



of the power of the taxing bodies to the opening session of the ninety-ninth 
levy taxes on property as high as 7! annual meeting of the supreme coun-il 
per cent of the assessed valuation. , of the Scottish Rite of the Northern 



by 



fuifilinient of these cou- 



Fourlli. 
insure the 

''it is oointed out that the war coa-'at Whiting. Ind.. and the other to be 
It IS po.ntta o"^^^^||;|J^,^ ^^ ^jjg 1,1. for $2.(K)0.(K)0 to cover the property nf 



has no 



the company outside of Whiting, Ind. 



be about one-half of that of an ordinary the international congress at Brus.'^eis. 
city election. The general opinion I Fifty Masons who have been elected 
early in the day seertied to be that | to the thirty-third degree were candi- 
the vote was going against the adop- dates for initiation at the evening ses- 
ticn of the charter. Ision. 



Northern Labrador coast, reports much 
suffering among the Eskimo settlements 



of that district, due to the failure of ^pj.jjjj. j,„ fypt^er landings of trooi)S will 



will be a matter of future adjustment, j 
If peace is arranged on the Abc^^ , ^y^^i^^y^^^^i^i^^r^^j^ 



the fisheries during the season which 
ended this week. The native fishermen, 
except in the north were fairly succes.5- 
ful, but the visiting fleet of sever.il 
hundred vessels, most of them from 
Newfoundland, had poor luck. Among 
the vessels which visited the coast thi'^ 
sumnur was an American warship 
which supplied the Moravian mission- 
aries. 



be made, and pending the result of the I 
negotiations the orders for the embark-^ 
ment and forwarding of reinfoicemenis i 
have been rescinded. 1 

The delegates of the Moorish tribes 
expected to give the final response of 
the tribesmen Thursday. 

Another good leature of the situation 
is a definite agreement with Mohammed 
El Gabbas, the Moroccan war minister, 
fur tht immediate installation of police 
at Tangier in accordance with the 
terms of the Algeciran convention, 
namely, native police under France- 
Spanish instructors. 

i The ultimate outcome of the struggle 
between the rival sultans of Morocco 
is a matter with which the French gov- 
ernment is not concerned, the mandate 
of France and Spain being limited to 
tht restoration of order and security at 
the Moroccan ports. 



REAR ADMIRAL 
m\m DEAD 

Well Known Naval Of- 
ficer Passes Away 
Suddenly In Maine. 

York Beach. Me., Sept. 17.— Rear Ad- 
miral John G. Walkir, U. S. N., retired, 
died suddenly Sunday night at the 
home of a friend at High Pasture, 
York Cliffs. Admiral Walker was 72 
years of age, and a native of New 
Hampshire. He was known as the pro- 
moter of the famous squadron of evolu- . . „.,)♦„ 
, , . . , ,^ i label on the baggage and to 
tlon, which became known as the j '^^^ ^^^^^ labels bearing the names of 
"Wliite squadron" and of which he was j junk dealers. The Jersey City and 

local police have now made three ar- 
rests, which they declare bear on the 
case. 

James Ralston of Jersey City, store- 
keeper on the pier, is locked up here 
charged with the larceny of a bundle 
of wearing apparel, valued at $2f>0. The 
complainant is Hurnus Ravm, 
of Brooklyn, who aleges that 
the goods were taken from 
the pier. The Jersey City police have 
under arrest Max Kahn and Isaac 
Schaeffer. proprietors of a junk shop, 
on the charge that they had in their 
place goods taken from the pier. 

The Jersey City police say that they 
found these goods by the use of search 
warrants. 



THIEVES GET 
MliCHBAGGAGE 

New York. Sept. 17.— Thousands of 
dollars worth ot baggage havo been 
stolen In the last three months from the 
Cunard line steamship pier. 51, North 
river the police say, the plan of the 
thieves being to change the owners 
label on the baggage and to substitute 



''Everything Goes by Favor*'-" 

Said the Old Lady as She Kissed the Cow. 



|****^.i^^-***-***#******-;?***^-^^^ SW^^^S^^^fMf^M^^^^'i^^-^^^^i^ 



appointed commander. 

Admiral Walker had been ill for some 
time, but his dtath was quite unex- 
pected. He had been spending several 
weeks with his family at the cottage 
ot Miss S. A. Pickering of Salem, Mass. 
Deatii was due to heart disease. 

It is expected that the body of 
the dec?.ased officer will be taken to 
Boston. A daughter of the admiral 
left for that city to arrange for ser- 
vices there. It is understood the In- 
tention of the admiral's family is to 
have the body cremated, after which 
the ashes will be sent to Washington 
for interment at the National ceme- 
tery. 

Washington, Sept. 17.— Aside from his 
generally distinguished service in the 
navy. Rear Admiral John G. Walker, 
who died at York Beach. Me., had held 
several important assignments, the 
most conspicous of which was chairman 
of the Isthmian Canal commi.«;slon, .nn 
office he held from 1899 to 1901. During 
his regime he accomplished much to- 
wards paving the way for the great 
work now b-ing done on the isthmus. 



NOTHING HEARD OF BRUCE. 
Berlin, Sept. 17. — A telegram from 
Advent bav via Hammerfest, statt-s 
that nothing has been heard from the 
\Villiam Bruce expedition, which left 
the l-ase of supply almost one month 
ago with the intention of returning on 
Aug. 28. 



FOR ORPHANS OF MASONS. 

Thomas Patton of Philadelphia, Leaves 
an Estate of Millions. 

Philadelphia. Sept. 17.— Under the will 
of tht late Thomas R. Patton. treasurer 
of the grand lodge of Masons of Penn- 
sylvania, who died recently, his entire 
estate valued between $2.tKiO.0O0 and $3,- 
0CK;»,000, is devised to the grand lodge of 
Pennsylvania for the education nnd 
support of male orphans of master 
masons. Peter Boyd, an attorney,' of 
this city, is made sole executor of the 
estate. 




St. Petersburg, Sept. 17.— The police 
today arrested a young girl, nick- 
named "Wanda," who is accused of 
participation in a plot to blow up the 
headquarters of the secret police, situ- 
ated on the Moika canal, whose tor- 
ture chambers have aroused bitter 
feelings on the part of the Revolution- 
ists. The police claim that "Wanda" 
planned to become a "walking bomb," 
and enter the headquarters building 
in the middle of the day, when it la 
generally full of police, wearing the 
uniform of a gendarme officer lined 
with walls of guncotton and carrying 
powerful bombs. "Wanda," the police 
add, hoped by blowing herself up to 
reduce the entire buiiding to ruins and 
kill all the officers composing the statf 
of the political police. The plot v,'as 
betrayed, and the police, in addition 
to taking "Wanda" into custody, ar- 
rested a Jewish tailor, in whose shop 
thiy secured a half ready uniform, 
which was Intended for the woman. 

In consequence of the murderous de- 
signs of the Revolutionists, the secret 
police have decided to give up their 
present quarters, removing to an 
isolated stone building on Kamenny 
island, where an elaborate electric 
signal .system will be installed in order 
to prevent undermining. 



Colorado Springs, Colo., Sept. 17. — .4 
powerful racing automobile occupied by 
seven prominent Elks and a chauffeur 
and built to hold but three passengers* 
[while running at a terrific rate, crash- 
ed into a telephone pole at the bottom 
I of the West Hurfando street hill here 
[early today and waa wrecked. Four of 
the occupants were killed ovtright, and 
the others were more or less seriously 
hurt. The bodies of the four dead were 
mangled almost beyond recognilioii. 
The dead: 

W. H. RALSTON, a dealer in elec- 
trical sui>pliea. 
H. WINNAL. 

JOHN S. GKEY, formerly of New 
York. 
BlilTTON L. GRAVES, druggist. 
The injured; James English, t^reorge 
E. Buckley, F. 11. Ward, A. W. Mark- 
schellel. 

The party had been to the Elks' club- 
house at Manitou to .tiiend a social 
session and were returning home. The 
accident happened at 3 o clock Ju.sl 
after the automobile with its merry, 
jesting passengers crowded into the two 
seats, on the hood and on the steps, 
: plunged at a terrific clip down the hill. 
' Markscheflel, who was driving, 'ft 
isome manner lost control of the wheel 
land the powerful machine swerving 
llrom side to side across the car tracks, 
I ran into the gutter. For fully fifty feet 
the heavy car plunged onwaiu. thu 
I right front and rear wheels running In 
I tht gutter and the two left wheels a 
foot liigher on the curb. Suddenly the 
I right front wheel struck some obstacles 
land the iv.achlne turning around waa 
thrown a distance of about forty-five 
; feet down the hill. 

' The car probably wouW have whirled 

' down the hill for a stHl greater dis- 

I lance, but for a telephone pole, which 

I barred the way. It was this pole that 

' subsequently caused the death of two 

' and possibly three of the victims. Grey 

i was thrown out of the car and jammed 

' against the telephone pole. The entire 

left side of his face was flattened and 

his skull was laid open, the Impact 

t<aring the top of his head almost In 

two. 

I Ralston evidently was thrown agnlnst 
j the pole or against the board fence on 
I the other side of the walk. His skull 
I was fractured, as was that of Winnal. 
I Winnal was hurled a distance of fifty 

The machine, a six-cylinder, forty 
1 horse power, recently ran over and 
! killed C. F. Dasey at Overland Park. 



JAPS REWARD 

AMERICANS 

Stevens and Dennison 

Get $10,000 Each and 
Annuity. 

Toklo, Sept. 17.— The Japanese gov- 
ernment has rewarded W. D. Stuve.ns 
and W. Dennison for their services dur- 
ing the Russo-Japanese war. It was | 
officially announced today that Mr. | 

Stevens had been awarded a grant 3f I 
510,000 and Mr. Dennison $10,000, and ! 
an annuity of J840. * , I 



Washington, Sept. 17. — W. D. Stevens I 
was coun.'^elor at the Japanese embassy { 
in this city for a number of years, and ; 
Just prior to the outbreak of the Jap- j 
anese-Russian war, he went to Korea ! 
and was stationed there during the j 
conflict. He was able to render dis- 
tinguished services to the Japanese gov- [ 
ernrnent by his legal advice. i 

W. Dennison was connected during 
the war with the Japanese foreign office 
in Tokio as counsellor. Both these Am- 
ericans are held in high esteem by tho 
Japanese government. 

MISSING MAN DEAD. 

Found Sitting on a Log Where Death 
Had Overtaken Him. 

Crystal Falls, Mich., Sept. 17.— 
(Special to The Herald.)— The mystery 
surrounding the strange disappearance 
of Henry Rosenquist, who went berry 

picking and did not return, was ex- 
plained when, after diligent search, a 
posse came acres his dead body. It was 
found about a mile northwest of the 
Bristol mine, and from the position In 
which it was when found, it looks as if 
he had seated himself upon a log to 
rest when an attack of heart failure 
came on and he fell forward upon his 
face, dead. 

Mr. Rosenquist has been in ill health 
for a number of years, but has been 
able to move around and do odd jobs 
about the house. 



A FAST TRAIN 
JUMPS TRACK 

Lehigh Valley Express 

Badly Wrecked Near 

Easton. Pa. 

Easton, Pa., Sept. 17.— A Lehigh Val- 
ley express train from Buffalo to Newr 
York, was wrecked early today near 
Pattenburg tunnel in New Jersey, 
tliirteen miles from this city. A num- 
ber of trainmen and passengers were 
injured but none of the latter fatally. 
The train was running at high speed 
when the locomotive jumped the track 
and plunged into the mountain side. 
The engineer, Herbert Godley, of this 
city, was injured Internally and tho 
l>aggageman sustained a fractured arrn. 
The passengers injured were riding m 
the smoking car. Most of the others 
were in their berths and while they 
were much shaken up they were not 
badly hurt. 

Godley is the engineer who was run- 
ning the Black Diamond express last 
winter when it left the track on th* 
Delaware river bridge between this city 
and Phlllipsburg. N. J., and narrowly 
escaped going into the river, seventy 
feet below. 



THAW TRIAL 
INJECEMBER 

Probable That Date Will 

be Fixed Upon by 

Counsel. 

New York, Sept. 17.— When the crln»- 
inal branch of the supreme court open* 
next month and the case of Harry K. 
Thaw, charged with the murder of 
Stanford White, is called, Martin W. 
Littleton, senior counsel for the de- 
fense, will demand immediate trial for 
the accused Pittsburger. 

District Attorney Jerome, it is un- 
derstood, will oppose an immediate 
hearing of the case, and on the ques- 
tion of the dale of trial will come the 
first skirmish of Thaw's new defend- 
er with the representatives of the state. 

It is believed that In the end both 
sides will agree on the date in Decem- 
ber for the trial. 



n 



i 



1 



r 



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mm^ 




5 



4 



THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD; TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1907. 



WEATHER FORECAST— Showers tonight and possibly Wednesday. 



DID WEDEL 



"WEAR, WEAR, WEAR" RUN AMUCK? 







Were tlie instructions the tailor gave 

THESE NEW FALL SUITS 
FOR BOYS 

When he made and sent them to the 
Oak Hall. For these were the words 
we whispered in his ears — (the best 
boys' tailor we could find) — "We want 
suits that will wear better than aiiy 
other suits at equal prices ; we want 
the best suits that can be made, with 
extra care to style and fitting as well." 
He not only made suits that will 
wear, wear, wear (you can see that in the 
materials, the stitching, the making), but, 
an unheard of thing, he has put in an extra 
pair of pants with every suit, so that par- 
ents wh(^ i)uy their boys' school outfit here 
will get greater value for $5.00 than they 
have often paid $7.50 for. 

THE BEST SUIT IN THE WORLD 
FOR BOYS.. 



$5.00 



The Clothes the Boys Like. 




Superior Street at Fourth Avenue West 



WiiTEi 



TAILOR ESS in our Busheling Dept. 
Steady work— liighest wages. 

OAK HALL CLOTHING CO 

Superior Street, at r.iiirth .-Xvenue West 



NEED NEW SCHOOL 
EVERY YEAR 



"Duluth will need a new school build- 
ing every year from now on," said a 
member of the board of education this 
morning. "At the rate the city is 
grrowin*? a new building should be con- 
atruct»><l every year to properly care 
for thp pupils." 

At the next reg-ular meeting of the 
board, held the first Friday in October, 
the tax levy for the coming year will 
be considered and an appropriation • t 
$50,000 for the building fund will pro))- 
ably be a.'sked, for the purpose of con- 
structing a new building. 



PAPERS ARE 
GOOD^ONES 

Different Phases of Army 
and Militia Life Dis- 
cussed. 





noon., and 
will attend 
Brush." at 



'Erlcsjo'i lor quaUiy and iow prices. 



The Store 

for Boys 



Not only in our Men's de- 
partment, but in our Boys' 
and Children's, are we pre- 
pared for the biggest season 
wc have ever had. Mothers, 
it will pay you to see the 
nobby styles and the jexcep- 
tional values we are offering 
in Boys' and Children's 
Clothing. No old styles, but 
the very newest and best, at 
prices sure to attract you. 

Boys' Latest 
Suits- 

$2, $3, $4, $4.50 
and $5.00 

Knee Pants 

New Kickerijockers in cor- 
duroy and cassi meres — great 
wear resisters, and splendid 
value — ages 3 to 17 years. 
Ti^ht-fitting stvles 50c, 75c. 
$1.00 and $1.50. 

Boys' Overcoats 
and Reefers 

We have ne\er shown as 
many handsome styles and 
patterns. No matter what 
you need in Boys' and Chil- 
dren's reliable Clothing, we 
are prepared as never before 
to satisfy your every want 
fully and econoitiically. 

ECHAS. W. 
RICSON, 



Clothier, Hatter, 

Furnisher, 

219 WEST SUPERIOR ST, 



Today w411 bring to a close the an- 
nual meeting of the Minnesota Na- 
tional Guard association, which con- 
vened in Duluth yesterday morning 
A business session, at which officers 
will be elected, is t)eing held at the 
Commercial club rooms, this after- 
Uiis evening the visitors 
the performance of "Sago 
the Lyceum. The morn- 
ing program consisted of a boulevard 
drive. Although the weather is any- 
'aing but agreeable, the militia men 
.seem to be enjoying their visit to 
Uuluth. 

Yesterday an Interesting session 
was held on board the steamer 
Ooplier, which carried the party to 
Eiicampnie'nt island and back. The 
first subject up for discussion was 
"Preparation For an Emergency 
Call." Kejnarks on the preparation 
necessary were made by Maj. C. T. 
Spear of St. Paul, Capt. H. W. Malt- 
by of Mankato. Lieut, F. B. Nolton of 
Duluth, Capt. Oeorge K. Shepard of 
St. Paul, and Lieut. Smith o-f Worth- 
ington. The system used in prepar- 
ing for a call, such as was expt'Cled 
during the ivc^jnt range strike, waa 
gone into In detail. 

Col. C. McC. fleeve of Minneapolis 
gave a very vivid and intere.sUng ac- 
count ,af "The Military Review at 
Agra, India, in January, 1907." This 
review was gotten up by the British 
government to impre.ss the ameer of 
Afghanistan with thp importance of 
the mihtary power of Gr«-.at Britain, 
and to show him the futility of mak- 
ing any effort to oppose such a 
p<jwer. The reviewing was a notable 
one, and was graphically de.scribe<l 
by the colonel in detail. A particu- 
larly interesting part of this descrip- 
tion dealt with the charge of 40,000 
cavalrymen I:>efore the spectators. 

"Courts-Martial" was the subject 
taken up by Maj. George C. Lambert 
of St. Paul, ex-adjuiant general, and 
Col. \AiIIiam Gerlach of St. Paul r.^ad 
an intf>resting papt»r on "Our Duty." 
The colonel is the United .States 
army .)fticer, attached to the Minne- 
sota National Guard. Lieut. George 
Dulaney of Minneapolis read a valu- 
able papt^r on "My Observation of 
Continental Arnaies." 

Target practice was indulgt^d in at 
Encampment island, and some good 
scores were m.ide. Last night there 
was a liberal sprinkling of national 
guard offi -ers in the audience at the 
Metropolitan, where an unusually 
clean and entertaining show is the 
attraction this week. 

(~>wing to the fa'-t that .«teveral offi- 
cers down for addresses were unable 
to attend the meeting, the program 
eus originally mapped out Is not being 
followed very closely. 



Lame B»«ck. 

! This is an ailment for which Cham- 
I berlain's Pain Balm has proven es- 
pecially valuable. In almost every in- 
stance it affords prompt and permanent 
rt'li^'f. Mr. Luke LaGrange of Orange, 
Mich., says of it: "After using a 
plaster and other remedies for three 
we'^ks for a bad lame back, I purchased 
a bottle of Chamberlain's Pain Balm, 
and two applications effected a cure." 
For sale by all druggists. 



MAY BE LOST 
IN THE WOODS 



] Where Is William Langan? 

, Mr. Langan is an inspector, employ- 
ed by the health department. Last Sun- 
day, he and some friends were enjoying 
a picnic and outing beyond Hunter's 
Park. Mr. Langan wandered away from 
the rest of the party and has not been 
seen by his friends since. They fear 
that he was lost in the woods. The po- 

, lice have been notified and arc making 

ia search fo;- him. 



/ 



Detroit and Return $12.00 

I $12, via the South Shore; tickets on 
: sale S-pt. 8, 11. 15 and 20. connecting at 
} St. Ignace with steamer of the D. & 
I C. N. company. To Buffalo $2 higher. 
Limit, three weeks. For sleeping car 
and steamer reservations, apply to A. 
J. Perrin, General Agent, 430 West Su- 
perior street, Duluth. 

Black Suits. $15! 

At the "Fitwell" Clothing Parlors. 
112 West Superior. 



X 



Aged Man is Being Tried 

for Shooting James 

Howard. 

Fatality Followed Fourth 

of July Drinking 

Spree. 



Charged with wilfully and unlawfully 
killing James Howard, without jusL 
cau.se or provocation, Lewis Wedel, 
aged 60 years, is facing a jury on the 
murder charge brought against him ift 
tlie name of the state. 

The alleged murder is claimed to have 
followed a celebration of the Fourth of 
July by Wedel. Howard and several 
other men in an old logging camp near 
Skibo, in the town of St. Louis. Accord- 
ing to the state's information the uiv^n 
went on a drunk that lasted a couple 
of days, Howard being shot at an eariy 
murning hour, July 6, last. 

The maximum penalty for murder in 
the third degree is thirty years im- 
prisonment in the stale penitentiary 
and ilie minimum penalty is seven 
years. 

Story of the .Shooting. 

The story of the shooting was out- 
lined to the jury by County Attorney 
Norton, as follows: 

Wedel. Nels Bordick, James Howard 
and a man named Derr, had been mak- 
ing their home in an old abandoned 
logging camp, comprising several 
shacks about half way between tne 
mill and the Skibo station, on the Iron 
Range road. The nun had been drink- 
ing lieavily since July 4, when tliey 
had a celebiation among themselves at 
the camp and at the station. The night 
of July 5, they retired to their bunks 
al)out 10 o'clock, Wedel, Howard and 
Bordick going to one shack and De»r 
and Johnson to another. 

It is alleged that Bordick was 
awakened by a noise about 3 o'clock 
in the moining and, looking out, ne 
saw Howard on his knees with on 3 
hand against the door which was part- 
ly open. It is claimed that as Bordick 
looked he heard a ritle shot and saw 
Howard pitch forward with the ex- 
cla. nation "God. I'm shot." 

Bordick, it Is alleged ran outside to 
see what had occurred and found Wedel 
standing outside with a Wiachesler 
ritle. Wedel is .said to have pointed the 
gun at Bordick and threatened to put 
a hole through him if he did not get 
out. The state claims that Bordick got 
away as fast as he could and ran 'to 
the sawmill. 

The next morning the other men in 
the camp are said lo have asked Wedel 
what he was shotting at. and the latter 
said he did not know. A search was 
then in.stituted and Howard's dead 
body wa.< found. The bullet liad passed 
through his body and penetrated the 
door. The mon, accompanied by We- 
del, went to Skibo, where the coroner 
was notified of the fatality, and Wedel 
surrendered himself. 

Kye Witness T«'stlfles. 

Nels Bordick, the fiist witness for 
the slate, is 02 years of age. His tes- 
timony was practically along the line 
of the county attorney's statement to 
the jury. He claimed he knew of no 
reason for Wedel's strange action. ' 

Asked what took place when he saw 
Wedel with a gun Bordick replied: 

"He said to me, 'Git. you grayheaded 

or I'll put a hole through you, 

too." 

"And you got?" was asked. 

"Yes. you bet I did." 

"How far did you run?" 

"I was pretty scared. I ran clear up 
to the mill where I worked, a little 
over a Quarter of a mile." 

( lainis yU'ii Were Ohum.s. 

Bordick clainv^d that so far as he 
could judge, none of the party was 
drunk when they went to bed the night 
before the shooting. He said there had 
been no quarreling, and the best of 
feeling prevailed, the men being chums. 
He said Howard, the dead man. was 
about 40 or 50 years of age. 

The cross-examination of Bordick by 
Judge John M. Martin, attorney for 
Wedel. indicted that the defense may 
claim that there was .some trouble l>e- 
tween the men and that Howard and 
Bordick had been making trouble for 
Wedel in some way and had broken 
into the defendant's shack. 
The Jury. 

The following persons comprise the 
jury: Frank E. Duffy. Charles O. 
Gustafson, Andrew C. Jenteft, Sander 



JOIN NOW 

the rank.s of progressive purchas- 
ers who 1^ 1 in the 

Ludwig 
Piano 



a perfect instrument. Its ready 
responsiveness to the performer's 
rcfuiirenients and it.s careful and 
tliorough construction make it an 
ideal piano for any home. 

The new fall stvles just now re- 
ceived in fancy wood, oak, ma- 
hogany and walnut. 

Those who own and use a Lud- 
wig piano are the best judges of 
their merit. They know from 
actual test and experiment that the 
Ludwig piano is better and will 
stay in tune longer than many 
other pianos that are sold at higher 
prices by other dealers. Our terms 
and prices are so easy that anyone 
can buy a piano. Call or write. 



Duluth Music Co. 

EDMUND G. CHAPMAN, 

Manager. 

222-224 West First St., 

Duluth, Minn. 



"Correct Dress for IVomen,'* 



if Informal Opening Reveals a 






Wonderful Array of Wearables 

In this, our first complete showing, we beg to submit to the women of 
Duluth and vicinity the ultimate results of our preparatory labors. 
Could we but reveal to you the amoun-t of brains, thought, energy, 
skillful designing, tailoring, the judicious buying and 
great amount of enthusiasm w^hich has been expended 
in bringing about the results we offer, we think the 
majority of on-lookers would stand aghast at its stu- 
pendous magnitude. — However, 

. We cordially invite every woman who 
cares the least jot for her personal appear- 
ance to come and visit the establishment 
during this informal opening* 

Every garment shown is stricdy "up-to-the-hour" in 
every detail. The type of style is wide and varied, 
and includes any thing the heart of women might 
desire, whether she is a conservative woman of means, 
a society belle, a practical business woman or a young 
school miss. We ask no better opportunity to illus- 
trate this feature than is afforded by your personal 
investigation. 

Stylish Misses^ and Girls^ Jacket Suits — 

$16.50 to $25.00 

Smart Business and Street Suits — 

$25.00 to $50.00 

Ultra Stylish * 'Dressy" Suits— 

V $50.00 to $ 1 00.00 

Exquisite Evening Costumes — 

$49.50 to $175.00 

Snappy Runabout Dresses — 

$16.50 to $60.00 

Our stocks of Furs, Coats, Skirts, Waists and acces- 
sories are also now complete and represent all modes with- 
in the rangfc of desirability. 



X 




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.4 



_^^ 



P 



-a 



V 



•- '• ^" Our L^Irresistable and Gossard Corset Demonstration 

Is an important auxiliary to the costume display in that the corset is the back-bone of the wardrobe, 
and these are the most perfect-fitting corsets which genius has yet been able to invent. 



•*. 



Duluth. 



3. M. (StJ^iitttg ^ (Ett 



i 



Cincinnati. 



Westgaald, David H. Kerr. Ole Al- 
ber'son Peter O. Munkady. Fred M. 
West, Farroil H. Greene. Patrick H. 
Tierney. F. C. Wielarid and G. Clem- 
enson. 

Tlit^ New l*un> F«mhI and Driiar liaw. 

We are pleased to announce that Fol- 
ey's Honey and Tar for coughs, coldd 
and lung troubles is not affected by the 
National Pure F(X)d and Drug law as It 
contains no opiates or other harmful 
drugs, and ^ve recommend it as a safe 
remedy for children and adults. Sold by 
all druggists. 

willIold its 
annlalmeeting 

The annual meeting of the Duluth 
Humane society will occur at the city 
hall tomorrow evening at 8 o'clock. 
This is one of the most important 
gatherings of -the year, and it is de- 
sired that every member and all other 
citizens who are interested in the good 
work that is being done by the society 
for the protection of children and of 
dumb beasts, w^l make an effort to be 
present. 

The annual reports of the officers 
will b.^ pre.sented and the officers will 
be chosen fftr the coming year. 

It is expected that the matter of .se- 
lecting an b-gent to fill the vacancy 
caused by the death of H. C. Withrow 
will be dlscus.sf^. 

Erickson Paintings. 

The exhibition of paintings by Da- 
vid Ericsori, b6lr\g conducted by Mr. 
Ericson Irf roioms 14 and 15 of the 
Columbus blotfk,- First avenue west 



•and Superior street. Is attracting con- 
' slderablrt attention among lovers of 
j art in Duluth. Mr. Ericson has mount- 
I ed high in art circles of America in 
j recent years and his paintings hav* 
[won honors in exhibits in all the large 
j cities and in Paris. He studied under 
I Whistler, and his paintings after that 
noied aitisfs style have received fa- 
vorable comment in every exhibit in 
which thev were entered. 

Amonq the paintings on exhibit In 
; Duluth are: "Moonbt^ams" and ''Land 
of Dreams," two of his most famous 
works; "The Philo.sopher," "The Jap 
anese," "Sunlight." "Peter Pan," "Be- 
calmed," "Lullaby." "The Brothers," 
"Festivity," "Fireworks," "Portrait." 
"Night." "The Orange" The exhibit 
will continue for a month. 



I MONEY FOR NEW ORLEANS. 
\ New York, Sept. 17.— Currency to the 
: amount of $100,000 was today trans- 
I ferred by telegraph to New Orleans 
j through the sub-treasury here. This 



makes a total of $40<).000 sppt to New 
Orleans during tlie l:ist two Jays. 

Local Brevities. 

"Fitwell" raincoats are wind and 
rain proof. 



ODD FELLOWS 
SELECT DENVER 



St. Paul. Sept. 17.— (Special to The Her- 
ald.) — Denver. Colo., was selected bv the 
sovereign jfrand lodge of the Independ- 
ent Order of Odd Fellovv., ds the plaoe 
of meeting next year, at its meeting to- 
day. Gen. Manley A. Ranev of Iowa, 
was re-elected commanding: jreneral of j 
the Patriarchs Militant and he will be 
the first officer of that rank lo wear the 1 
new insignia of his office, which was 
created by the grand lodge. 

Aside from this tliere was little but 
routine business accomnhshed bv the 
grand lodge. This afti'moon If the 
grounds at the ba.<;cball park are .suffici- 
ently dry the competitive drills of the 
different uniform cantons will be held 
there, otherwise tliev will be held on 
the stage of the Auditorium, which ia 
ample for a whole regiment. Tonight at 
the Auditorium the reunion of past grand 
representatives will be held at which a 
musical program will be given. 



C/> 



c/> 




c/> 



SIGNS 



rrs r-> 




H. A. HALL &. CO.y Decorators^ 

SEE US FIRST. Telephone 634. 119 East Superior St. SEE US FIRST. 



y 



WINTER 



is coming and before long stove season will be here. Let 
us re-nickel the parts of your stove before you set it up. 
Our prices are right and workmanship the best. 



ASK US TO QUOTE YOU. 



Both Phones 1909. 



RICHARDSON ELECTRIC CO. 



210 West First Street. 




I 




THE DULUTH EVENING HERALt>' ■ TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1907. 



■♦- 




Another Splendid Triumph 
for Gray-Tallant 

NOUmery 



\ 






HERALD'S WEST DILDTHDEPT 









T 



ODAY'S attendance proved our 
position as arbiters of fashion— 
the Autumn show of Hats needs 



but to be seen to be appreciated. 





ITH fullest confidence of your appreciation of the ex- 
cellent taste of the varied assortment of bewitching styles 
.,^>.^j —we heartily invite you to come tomorrow and share in 
the pleasures of the occasion— several models just arrived this 
afternoon will be added to the display. 

/ind of not least importance is the fact ibat we 
continue that same uncommonly reasonable 
p ricing which has been sucb a strong factor 
in the upbui lding:, of our magnificent CMilUnery 
business. 

Again we say— welcome tomorrow— you and your friends 
—welcome to admire or to buy as pleases you. 




m 



WANT MORE 
FACTORIES 

The Commercial Club to 

Boom West Duluth 

Vigorously. 

Many People Want Flats, 

But None to 

Offer. 









'A 






.J5-^-^. 



-r,. 



TRAFFIC IS 
VERYHEAVY 

Passenger Departments 

Doing Exceptional Busi- 

iness This Season. 

The Northweft'8 two most famouB "body 
Bnatchtrs, ■ Fiank T. Lally of the Bur- 
lington road and E. R. Porch of the Erie, 
are in the city today, dispensing good 
cheer and Instituting a vigorous search 
for business. For the benefit of the un- 
Iniated, It may be sa:d that "body snatch- 
er," in the pa,rlance of the railroad, stands 
for traveling passenger agent. While 
deadly rivals in buyinesa, Messrs. Lully 



and Porch seem always to travel together, 
the better to study each others methods, 
perhaps. 

"Thi- Jamestown exposition was a huge 
di.sappolntmtnt so far as booming busi- 
ness for the railroads was coiK-erntd," 
said Mr. Porch this morning. "It re- 
sulted in about the lowtst rales to East- 
ern points that have prevailed in a gn d 
many years, and it was naturally sup- 
posed that a heavy travel eastward would 
follow. While passenger traffic was some- 
what above the average, it was not as 
heavv as conditions seemed to warrant. 
Business should have been much better 
with ali ro.'ids having Eastern connections. 
even though the exposition Itself did not 
come up to expectations. The rates alone 
were attraction enough to cause a record- 
breakina travel." j, 

"All the roads did a rushing business 
except the Erie." interposed Mr. I.,ally. 
"No attraction, no matter how great, 
would cause people to travel over that 
line." 

"Any business at all looks big to the 
Burlingtfin ptcple," rejoined Mr. Porch. 
"Our lightest month t.f the ytar would 
seem like a scries of summer excursions 
to the Burlington. Why, do you 
knew— ' 

"They're oft," sang a local ticket agent 
in greatt glee, and everybedy stood back 
and shut up until the hourly oratorical 
bout between the two rivals was brought 
to a conclusion. It was declared a draw. 
i "Passenger business is holding up in 
fine style here in the Middle West," d^- 
' clared Mr. Lally. after peace had been 
declared. "It usually shfiws a substan- 
tial falling off about the first of Septem- 
ber, but this fall is an exceptionally good 
one' with the passenger departments and 
travel is about as heavy as it was during 



is. Your local agents 



the summer month 
will tell vou that." 

It is a fact that the fall passenger busi- 
ness in and out of Duluth is very much 
heavier than usual, and that up to the 
present time it almost equals the summer 
record. 



They Are On the Job 

Kaeli week ilny from S a. m. to f^ p lu., 
iit >IiMM l.indlierK'N l>uneb<M>n aud 'I>a 
HooiUM. 20 Went Superior Street (Ip 
NtalrMi, nerving Ihoxe daint.v Break- 
KkKtM. App^ticiuK l.unehcM. and hearty 
Uiisnerd. The cooks are from the Old 
Couatry. 



"DETECTIVE" IN TROUBLE 

Range Gardian of the Peace Breaks it 
Himself. 

William Glancey. another "detective" 
claiming to be employed as strike- 
breiiker on the range, was arraigned 
in court this morning on the charge of 
drunkenness and given a ten-day sen- 
tence by Judge Cutting. 

Glancey claims to hail from Chicago 

and made an attempt to put up a hard 

luck story in order to get oft easy. 

i The court evidently has little patience 

; with these men who, posing as officers 

I of the law, use that as an excuse to 

! carouse, brandish weapons and break 

I the peace, as has been proven in sev- 

I oral c:isfs tliis summer brought to the 

attention of the loe.-il offH lals 



if 



ITS UKE YOUR 
FOOT PRINT " 






,: • 41 --■ "■■■ i -'.<.<■: 






FOR MEN WOMEN AND CHILDREN 



ASK YOUR DEALER 



The beginning of operations at the 
plant of the American Carbolite com- 
pany, the probability that the Zenith 
Furnace company will soon enlarge 
and improve its plant, and the begin- 
ning of actual work of erection at the 
site of the new^ plant of the United 
States Steel company at Spirit Lake 
are indications that the future of West 
Duluth is not altogether shaded with 
gloom. 

From now on, judging from state- 
ments made by a member this morn- 
i ing, the West Duluth Commercial club 
! will redouble its efforts to secure new 
I industries for West I>uluth, which is 
primarily the manufacturing district 
of Duluth. West Duluth depends for 
Us pro-sperity and actual existence on j 
I its manufacturing Institutions and 
! every one added means just so many 
more men to swell the population and i 
I inc rease the prosperity of the western 
portion of the city. 

The Commercial club has always 
made it a point to encourage the 
founders of industries in West Duluth 
in every way they can. Help is given 
In securing the most suitable site and 
the moral support of the club is given 
every factory. The people behind the 
new brick factory were given to un- 
derstand at the meeting last Friday 
night that anything the club or club 
members could do for them in assist- 
ing them to locate would be done 
cheerfully and a committee was ap- 
pointed to render them a.-^sistance. 
The Fennia Soap factory is expected 
to start operations soon, the Duluth 
Box company is building a plant with 
double the capacity of the plant 
burned a few weeks ago, and it is 
said several other indu-^tries will come 
In soon. 

"West Duluth people in booming 
West Duluth arc handicapped in a 
measure by a scarcity of bouses to 
rent and the absolute lack of heatel 
flats." said a real estate dealer this 
morning. "Not so much the lack of 
houses as the lack of flats. In this 
modern day of apartment houses, 
where the lares of the heatmg stove 
are unknown and the kerosene lami> 
is a thing of the past, there are a 
great number of people who will not 
erect a home of their own. nor rent 
a house from another- They want 
flats. Men working in offices in West 
Duluth will not live in this portion ol 
the cit" because there are no flats and 
they can find heated apartments In the 
main part of the city. They would 
rather pay carfare and take a little 
more time to go to their work than to 
live in a house in West Duluth. 

"A man looking lor a good invest- 
ment proposition cauldn't ask for 
anything better than modern apart- 
ment houses in West Duluth. The 
man who will put up n large flat 
building will receive ample returns on 
his money. 1 have applications enough 
In my office alone to keep a large flat i 
building fiiled with desirable tenants : 
all the year. West Duluth is coming, 
but it will never arrive until projier j 
at commodations for families are pro- I 
vided." 1 

COWS CROSS WALKS. | 

— i 

Bovines Make Trouble for Street Com- j 
missioner and Poundmaster. ! 

There's a certain owner of cows in , 
West Duluth who's in for a bunch of ' 
trouble. Street Commissioner Connolly 
and Poundmaster Shannon are both } 
on his trail and unless there's a change i 
In the customs of his cows soon, he 11 ' 
find himself in court for their actio.^s. 

It seems the cous are driven out 
every morniiig and back to the barn 
every day. Instead of traveling around 
by the beaten baths they are driven 
through a shorter route across lots, 
and in the process they cro^ss two sJde- 
v;alks at the corner of Fifty-ninth ave- 
nue west and Grand avenue. 

The steady passage of the cows has 
proved disastrous to the (Sidewalks. 
The hoofs have worn deep holes, and if 
the cows keep it up much longtr. there 
will be nothing but a lot of splinters 
where there once were good sidewalks. 
The owner has been warned by both 
the street commissioner and the 

poundmaster. but the cows heed not the 
worning. He is being given a chance 
for a few days, but if the cows don't 
take to another track, their owner will 
be the principal in an action in court 
for obstructing the sidewalks. 

Sold at Aactlon. 

The property of the Utio Ecklund es- 
tate, on the southeast corner of Fifty- 
€ixth avenue west and Raleigh street, 
was yesterday sold at public auction 
to Walter Van Brunt, the price be- 
ing $5,260. The property consists of a 
seventy-five foot corner lot, improved 
with a saloon building. The sale was 
conducted by Oscar Ecklund. ad- 
ministrator of the estate, and was at- 
tended bv a goc»d crowd. The bidding 
was spirited, Mr. Van Brunt being 
nard pressed by several ether bidders 
before he finally secured the property. 

Infant Passes Away, 

Nels, the infant s..n of Mr. and Mrs. 
S C. Larson, died last night at the 
family home, 329 North Fifty-eighth 
avenue west, of convulsions. Inter- 
ment will be in Oneola cemetery. 

' Birthday Party. 

Miss Rose Connolly entertained a 
number of friends^ last evening at the 
home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
James Connolly. 108 Sixty-third avenue 
west, the occasion, being her birthday 
anniversary. Those present were: 



Misses Nan Polasky, Marion Polasky, 
Annie Lahlun, Grace Anderson, May 
Connelly, Kate Connelly, Ella Connel- 
ly, Julia McNulty, Irene McNulty, Bes- 
sie McNulty, Mame Stanney and 
Messrs. Robert Connell, Herbert Con- 
nelly, Stanley Parsons, Harry Par- 
son, Luther Kuchunbecker, John 
Hendrlckson, Louis Henri, Fred Mc- 
Nulty, John Stanney. 

West Duluth Briefs. 

Rev. D. W. Lynch, pa.stor of St. 
James* church, has gone to his former 
home In Madison, Wis., to visit 
friends for a few days. 

Guy Nettieton of L»etroit, Mich., Is 
visiting hiis parents. Mr. and Mrs. A. 
E. Nettieton. of 5709 Cody street. 

Ted Fredel of fecanlon, is visiting 
"West Duluth friends for a few days. 

Edwin Holland left last evening for 
a trip down the lakes. He will visit 
in Detroit and Buffalo. 

Elmer McDowell of Woodstock, 111., 
is visiting his mother. He will re- 
jnain in Wt«t Duluth about a week. 

H A Terry went to Hibbing to- 
day and will visit the range towns 
on business for about a week. 

Watch and jewelry repairing. Hurst. 

Excavation was begun yesterday 
for the new residence to be erected 
for Dr D. E. Sea.«hore, on the cor- 
ner of Fifty-seventh avenue west and 
Elinor street. The plans call ^'^\J^ 
m(Kiern rt«idence, to cost about 5b,- 

William H. Cruickshank of Butte, 
Mont., is visiting his parents at their 
home. 56W Grand avenue. 

J W Crooks of Port Arthur, Can., 
i a former West Duluth druggist, vlsit- 
led friends here yesttrday. 

A complet outfit of household furni- 
ture two delivery wagons, one 
double harness, one single harness 
land one house. J. J. Lauerman, 503 
I North Fifty-eighth avenue. 
! Wanted— Girl for general houj=e- 
iwork. Good wages, small family. bOi 
I North Fifty-seventh avenue west. 



Atout tlie Demonstration 

No matter what style figure is to be fitted, there is a 
mode in the Redfern Corsets to meet every requ.r- 
ment. 

Come and consult Miss McCauley about the liedieni C r- 
set—she will tell you what model is best suited to yuur 
ftcure and how to wear one so that all tbe graceful lines, 
will be brought out. 

You will be surprized to see how one's figure can be 
improved just bv properly adjusting the corset. 
Miss McCauley asserts it is possible for you to nave 
a stylish and symetrical form, regardless of your 
natural shortcomings, if you will wear the specific 
model of Redfem Corsets. . 

When one considers Redfern popularity m Fans .y^ 
well as in this country, this demonstration grows n\ 
imjKirtance. , 

Added fac'.lities for rapid and convenient fittings. 

In tlie Realm of Women s Suits 

For those who treasure this first peep at the new 
Suits this news is of interest. Saturday P. M. bonnet 
in with a fresh coterie of those same Suits that we:o 
,natcht up so readily last week— beauties that breaih ; 
stvle from Collar to Skirt hem— judging from the 
way Duluth's 400 took to them. There arc Suits of 
that beautiful Hunter's Green Broadcloth and fine 
Serges so artistic with their soft dull stripes. Just a 
glimpse of the shipment. The rest await your -^mije 
of approval— $29.00 to $75.0a 




ro'wns o 



fC 



eremony 



ARRESTED ON 
SERIOUS CHARGE 

David N.Whcclcr Charged 

With Crime Against 

Young Girl. 

David N. Wheeler of 6132 East Supe- 
rior street was arrested this morning 
upon complaint of Robert Rhodes, 
charging the former with a statutory 
crime against the person of his daugh- 

er Uernice Rhodes. =^8*'^ ^.^ Y;V'[%S^ 
alleged crime was committed la.>»t rues- 
day evening, according to the al ega- 
fions of the complaint, at the residence 
of Wheeler. He w:is bound over to 
await the action of the grand jury 

Officer Bartlett. stationed at Lake- 
side made the arrest. According to 
the Htorv, the girl has been staying at 
the Wheeler home during the absence 
'of her parents who were away Ticking 
; berries. During their absence and while 
Mrs. Wheeler was away it 'Vhl'^e^H 
'that the act was committed. The giij 
Itold her parents upon their arrival 
and the arrest of Wheeler followed. 

He was brought before Judge Cutting 

'this morning and bound over to the 

! grand jury after pleading not guilty 

to the charge. Wheeler, wno is a mai- 

ried man. has been employed as a trav- 

U irig salesman and has been a resident 

I of this city several years, being well 

known in the locality in which he re- 

I sides. The case has caused consider- 

iable excitement because of the promi- 

inence of the parties. 

The Wealth of the Nation. 

The wealth of the United States as 
fixed by the last census is 107 billion 
dollars, a sum so vast as to be im- 
possible of comprehension. It is more 
than the combined wealth of France, 
Germany and Russia, and twice that 
of Great Britain and Ireland. It is also 
impossible to comprehend the curative 
powers of Hostetter's Stomach Bit- 
ters until you have given it a fair 
trial. Then you'll realize what a won- 
derful remedy it is for curing and 
preventing dyspepsia, indigestion, con- 
stipation, biliousness, insomnia, poor 
appetite, female ills or malarial fever. 
It is also excellent for restoring strength 
after the svstem has been weakened by 
a long sick spell. We guarantee it 
absolutely pure, so no one need hesi- 
tate in trying a bottle today. Your 
druggist, grocer or dealer will supply 
: you with the genuine. 

I HE CLAIMS ASSAULT. 

i 

Ralph FIsKet, Superior Street Merchant, 
Defendant in Case. 

: Ralph Fisket was arretted this morn- 
ing uron complaint of W. B. Harris, 
jwho alleges that en the 13th day of 
jthe n'onth he v^-as assaulted by the de- 
fendant on West Suverior street. Fis- 
kttt owns a store at 5211 Superior street 
and it is stated that Harris has been 
I tenant of his but failed to pay the 
irent and that an altercation arose from 
Ian attemj.t to get the matter settled. 
iFisktt pleaded not guilty and the case 
' was set for Friday forenoon at 10 
o'clock. 



Because every American is a Princess in her own 
right Princess dresses enjoy continental popularity 
from ocean to ocean. These new ones in one and 
two-piece combinations in the famous Gibson and 
other efifects come in soft clinging Voiles, Messalines, 
Crepe de Chines and Taffetas. Every one helps to 
cive the wearer that "charm of manner" so much 
sought after. $35.00 to $75.00. 

Tliat Tailor SKop on tke Tkird Floor 

Since its enlargement and alteration it goes by that 
name now. It is down to the minute in its fittings 
and appurtenances— from the sewing machine need- 
les to the Madame d' Affaires, everything that method 
and experience could suggest has been used for its 
betterment. It employs at this writing 25 skilled 
needle-workers- in the height of the season maybe a. 
half-dozen more. Its fittings are perfect. 
Why all this information you ask? Simply to infornT 
your our store friends "HOW QUICKLY WE CAM 
NOW PERFORM needed alterations." 

New Autumn MVaists 

A smart woman recently drew this dividing line_ 
Waists over $10.00 she christened Blouses— the rest 
Waists. Looking over the new Waists yesteida; . 
there are just about as many of the one as the otl:- 
in our "Waistery" on the second floor. Scores of nt- 
styles arriving dailv. All sorts of Silk, Madra'^. 
Lawn, Flannel. Net and Lace Waists. Long sleeves 
on the tailored waists; short sleeves on the fancy 

sorts. 

Prices range from $L00 to $25.00. 

Get tlie Hang of tlie New Skirts 

There arc little pointers on style that a woman will 
never hear of unless she comes to this store to see 
the constantly arriving new things— tho we do our 
best to tell the important facts in the newspapers 
daily. Take for instance the New Plaid Models- 
only 2 or 3 of a kind, and when they are gone some- 
thing entirely different : and so it goes thru the Skirt 
Store. Crisp new Panamas in solid colors at $6.00 
and up the price-hill to the 25th turnpike— $6.00 to $25.00. 

Ne^v Foreign Broadclotlis 

are the Autocrats of the foreign dress stuflFs. What 
"the cover of thorns is to the porcupine," broadcloth 
i^ to the fashionable wardrobe. Three celebrated Lii- 
roptan factories send us these— Moravian, Genoa. 
Victor, Emerald and Princess. Unmatchable blackv 
and exquisite evening shades. Prices run from $3.50 
down to $L25 per yard. Then there are the Fancies, 
in shades of dull richness that is the trade mark of 
merit of those French and German factories — unap- 
proachable anywhere else in the world. 
We nearly forgot those fancy stripes and plaids, self- 
plaids and the popular Pekin stripe. They cost $1.75 
to $2.75. and are v^orth a great deal more. 
PLAIDS BY THE DOZEN, 50c. They don't look 
like 50c! on a bright-faced school girl ; they look dou- 
ble that price. All the combinations dear to plaid lov- 
ers are among them. Bring the children, yard, 50c to $L60» 



I 



\ 



RELATIVES WERE WORRIED. ^^ ^|^^ Lilliputians 



' Mrs. A. McPherson called at the po- 
lice headquarters last evening stating 
that her father. 75 years of age, had 
,been missing since morning and asking 
I the department to assist in locating 

ihlm. 

' The old gentleman had been missing 

1 since morning and relatives were 

lar.xious. fearing that something had 

; befallen him. He was located later in 

Superior and the department notifie;!. 

The old man had taken a notion to 

make a visit to friends across the bay 

and did not notify his relatives of nls 

proposed trip 




Not Gullivers, but to Younger Duluthians this^ timely 
information is directed. A bearskin-coated youngster 
is as safe from chills when out "taking the air" as th-. 
blissfully sleeping in the cradle at home. A nev 
shipment brings baby Lamb, curly and plain Be.ir 
Skins in whites, reds and browns — 2 to 5 years — as 
high as $9.59— as low as $3.75. 

A good line of dear little black Broadtail Cloth lined 
2 to 5 years— $5.00. 

Fancv' novelties in reds, browns, blacks, grays and 
blues'with and without fur trimmings— 2 to 5 years — 
as big as $18.50 and as small as $5.00. 



Imported Batk Roting 



Neat, effective and striking designs and colorings. 
The good kind that will not rough up and appear 
shabby after a little service. 

One quality comes with a border for trimming if de- 
sired. Come in and see them while assortment is 
complete. 

Have you seen the new Butterfly Kimona Cloth? We 
show the only complete line in the city. Grounds 
are dark green, scarlet, dark brown, Alice and navy 
blue, tan, white, light blue and pink. 



n 




■t 




ll^l»*^ I 



w 



THE DULUTH EVENING HERAlD: TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1907. 



^ 



It's All in the Make. 



That vast difference between the "Ultra 
Smart" and the "Ordinary" Garment. We 
justly claim for our garments the distinc- 
tion of being superlatively Good for the 
style is worked in by the skilful tailor's 
needle and not put on by the use of an iron 
— hence Gidding Garments retain the fine 
shape and perfect lines until the fabrics have 
been rendered past redemption by sheer 
wear. 

3. M. (Bihhm Sc (Eo. 




CONCEI^IINe^ 



A Tailored Skirt to your 

measure for ^^.oo— Dress 

Goods Section 



J^m 



t.^dvartce Display of 

Furs— drop in and ses 

them. 



DULl'TU. 



ClNCiXNATI. 



Indigestible Foods 

Sorae have so strong an orcfankation that they 
can continue the use of indigestible foods for years, 
but the time comes — and that usually in their early 
life— when the worn-out stomach fails to respond and 
they awaken to the fact that they are seriously 
diseased. As a rule, it is a safe practice not to put 
into the stomach anything that is not nourishing and 
easy of digestion. 





The delegutea from the Twentieth 
Century olulb of this city to the 
thirteenth annual meeting of the 
Minnesota Federation of Women's 
Clubs were appointed yesterday at 
the meeting of the e.xecutive board 
of the club, which was held at the 
library. The delegates will be the 

president of the club, Mrs. F. L. 
iiarrowcj, and Mr.s. Michael Kelley 
and Mrs. L. A. Larson. One alter- 
nate waj appointed. Mrs. N. F. Hugo. 
Miss Mary Statham was appjinied 
historian oif the club, and Mids Jen- 
nie Moody chairman of the depart- 
j nienl o-f philanthropy and reform. 

The meeting wili be held this year 
at Faribault. Oct. 1, 2 and 3. The 
Ladies' Literature cla.ss will meet 
Tuesday atterni>on of next week, at 
which time the delegates from that 
club to the meeting will be ap- 
pointed. 

A special meeting of the Saturday 
club will be called for the apiwint- 
ment of the delegates of that club to 
the convention. 

« « « 

The date and subject of the lectures 
to be delivered in this oity before the 
members of the Twentieth Century 
club, by Mrs. Kate Wy.son Clark, 
were decided upon at the executive 
board meeting yesterday. Mrs. Clark 
Is widely known as a lecturer of 
much interest, and her varied liter- 
ary and public life makes her a 
woman of more than ordinary cul- 
ture and charm-s. She will !*peak be- 
fore the club Oct. 22. 23 and 26, and 
iht subjects of her talks will be: 
'•Solomon vs. The M<>dern Woman," 
"The Effect of Women's Clutw Upon 
Domestic Life," and 'The Essentials 
and Nou-EasenbiaLs of Life." 



SEPTEMBER WEDDING 



WHEAT FLAKE CELERY 




te easily converted by the digestive powers atid stjp- 
plies abundantly the nutritive wants of all parts of 
the body. 

Palatable - NuirHious - Easy of Digestion and ready to Eat 

Caa ke served hot, Pat lo a iMt oven for a few minutes; or coofc In boiilng milk. 

My Signaturm ^-^ Ax-v/^ <2 



All Grocers 



package 




at the coritTJof Third avenue ea-st 
and SacondBstAset. The bride will be 
attended by*her cousins. Miss Pauline 
Krtijner, of this city, and Miss May- 
me Brockhoff of Waxlena. Minn. Tne 
grojm will have a^ his attendants 
Robert Peffer and August Mansotf. 
The wedding s.^rvlce will t)e read by 
Father Hufimagel. 

Honor Former Pastor. 

The members of the Bethel Swed- 
ish naptlst church will entertain at 
a rectiplion thi.s ev.ming at the chuioh, 
Ninth avenue c-ast and Third street. 
The guests of honor will be Rev. and 
Mrs. Frederick Linden of Seattle, 
Wash. Mr. Linden was formerly pas- 
tor of the Bethel Baptist church in 
this city, and occupied iiis for- 
mer pulpit last .Sunday. Mr. and 
Mrs. Linden are on their way tu 
Seattle after a three-months' Euro- 
pean trip. The meml»ers of the 
hurch and the former friends of Mr. 
and Mrs. Linden, in t'his city, are in- 
vited to attend the re>ceptton thi.s 
evening. 

To Attend Meeting. 

The quarterly raJiy of the Lake Su- 
perior Baptist Young People's asso- 
ciation will be held Friday evening of 
this week at the First Baptist churcli 
of Superior. A large number of tho 
churches are planning to attend the 
meeting, a' report of the Minnesota 
state convention, which was held in 
July of this year at Lake Minnetonka. 
will be reported by Miss Gertrude 
Schiller and Miss Anna Malett of 
this city. Supper will be served th' 
Duluth delegates at «):45 o'clock, and 
the regular ine*ting will begin at 7:4:. 
o'clock. 



Silk Headquart-irg Hi^ad of the Lake s. 

Superior St.—LaKe A-Oe.— Michigan St, 



The 



% 



Blanket Sale 



/ 



::!%. 



,'5'f* 



mim 



This big annual event is attracting 
scores of thrifty women, who know and 
ai)i)reciate good Blankets, coupled with 
low prices. These goods are all new and 
fresh. Blankets we offer are the best made 
in the world. For instance. North Star, Amana, St. Mary's and 
California Blankets. These makes include the softest, fleeciest and 
fluffiest wool Blankets made from fine selected wool. The prices we 
•quote will undoubtedly be a great saving for those who need blank- 
ets. Our advice is to buy your Blankets now. 



^^--i^N 






?,^^ 



\ 



^p:^^ 



Fine Cotton Blankets 



H. M. Gerson, 



LADIES' TAILOR 

I $22 Jefferson St. Duluth. Minn. 

Z-,nth FhTiu J'JJiiY. OIJ Ftuni.' 1721-1.. 



I 



OliiEOTO^Y OF 
^lySEilEiT! 



WHERE TOGO TONIGHT. 

LYCFUM— "Sage Brush," by the 

Mack-Lcjne players. 
AIETU" )p( »LITANr— Burh-sque. 

FINE BIlTaT bijou. 

Remarkable Bird Act Chief Attraction at 
the Popular Theater. 

The best spe>cial feature act of tha 
eea&jn is holding the boards at the 
Bijou this week. It is a trained- 
bird act. conducted by Rosa Naynon. 
and is costing the theater manage- 
ment $500 for the week. The coUec- 
tion contains more than 100 birds, 
and the cages, etc., need a large van 
•when thoy are to be moved. The 
l>nds are traiii'^d to do marvelous 
stunts, and act with a surpii.-»nig in- 
telligence. Prominent among the 
feathered actoi-s are macaws, mag- 
pitrs. pigijons, parrot^ para>iuets and 
cockatoos. 

This i.-in't the only good act at the 
Bijou this weesk. "Amos" does simxe 
fine juggling, and Gracey and Bur- 
jiett do a clever comedy sketch. 
Owen and Gambler have a gotxl mu.'*i- 
cal stunt, an.l H. Parkhurst has an 
excellent song. Franklyn Salisbury, 
Mii»s Bessie Sheldon. Miss Grace 
Ferrand and F. D. McMillan have a 
clever one-act c^omedy. The moving 
pictured are e.-»pecially g-Hjd. 

"Ill Old Kentucky." 

The everlasting favorite, "In Old 
Kentucky," will !x' the offering at 
the Lyceum Tliursday, Fri<iay and 
Saturday, matinee and night. A 
bigger, brighter and belter production 
than ever is promise<l, with a numl)er 
of the original people in the cast. 
The Pickaninny Band Is still one of 
the n>ain feature.s of the show, and 
this year they are tifly strong, with 
9ome of the be;5i slng..rs and dancers 
In the countrj' among them. A band 



concert will f>e given in front of the 
theater before each perfortnance. The 
prices will be 25 cents to $1 at night, 
and 25 cents to 75 cents at the Sat- 
urday tnatlnee. 

"SaRe Brush." 

"Sage Brush," Willard Mack's own 
drama, is proving om* of the biggest 
hits of the entire Mack-Leone en- 
gagement at the Lyceum, and the 
poinilar author-mar-ager-actor wa.s 
given a hearty reception last even- 
ing. It will be r.'peated tonight and 
twice tomorrow. 



DANCING 

At Fairmont Park Thursday Niglit. 

Blewett's Orchestra. Admission 50c 

EVERYBODY COME. 



Miss Judd to Become Bride 
of A. H. Davis. 

The we4idiiig of Miss Emma Judd, 
daughter of Mr. and Mr.s. C. E. Judd. 
to Alexander H. Davis, will take place 
Wednesday. Sept. 25. The weddiisg 
will take place at the bishop's re.si- 
dence, and the bride will l>e attended 
by her oousin. Miss Shanley, of St. 
Paul, and the groomsman will l>e E. 
F. Burg. A small reception for the 
families and immediate friends will 
be held from 2 to 4 o'clock in the af- 
ternoon, at the home of the bride's 
parents. Mr. Davis and his bride 
will leave for a wedding trip, and 
after Nov. 1 vnW be at home at 1731 
East First street. 

On ac-: )unt of the illness of Mrs. 
J. T. Hale's grandmother, Mr.s. Strong. 
Mrs. Hale and Mrs. C. F. Mac- 
donald have withdrawn their invita- 
tions for a card reception, which was 
to have been given Fridaj' afternoon. 
of this week in compliment to Misa 
Judd 



Honor Guests. 

Mr. and Mr.s. Rol>ert Hood enter- 
tained at dinner last evening at their 
home. 17 Fifty-eighth avenue east, in 
honor of their guest«. Miss Ada 
Oforge and Mrs. M. Boilln of Vir- 
ginia, Minn. The guests were: 
Mis.sf*s— 

Gertrutit^ lAir ol Rose Si"hit)islci, 
Suiionor. Ula Baker. 

Alfreda Kyntng. Latla Baker. 

Mes.srs. 

Joseph Gannon, Archie Butchart. 

Church Wedding. 

The w -dding of Miss Catherine 
Marie Perfer, daughter of Mr. and 
Mis. Arnold Pefier. and Paul John 

I Thorn, will take place Tuesday, Sept. 

\ 24, at St. Anthony d© Padua church. 



Bridge Reception. 

Mrs. William K. Stone was hostess 
at a bridge ■o-eceptlon this afternoon 
at her home, 110 We.st Third street. 

Informal Party. 

Mr. and Mr.^ B. VV. Hintz enter- 
tained at dinnel- last evening at their 
home. 42IV2 Eiast Fourth street, in 
honor of Missi Claire Ferris. Cover.s 
were laid fc^r six. 

Personal Mention. 

Miss Helen ostroni. who has passed 
the summer with Mr. and Mrs. A. D. 
Thom-son. rgtuiJned yesterday to the 
East, where she will attend colege. 

• • • 

■ 

Mrs. L. H. Corcoran and children 
have returned from a vi.sit at Saginaw 
and Toronto and otlier points in East- 
ern Canada. 

• * * 

Mrs. John Panton and Miss Margaret 
Panton left yesterday for the East 
where Miss Panton will attend school. 

• • » 

"Mr. and Mrs. E. A. Tessman havr- 
gone on a Eastern trip. They will 
visit Washington, New York, Boston 
and the Jamestown exposition before 

their return. 

■ • ♦ • 

Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Pike of 101 Me- 
saba avenue are spending a ten days' 

outing at Eagle Nest Lake. 

' '• •♦ » 

Mrs. J. Klrbyof 114 West Superior 
street has returned from the East. 

Mr. and Mrs. H. R. Armstrong of 
1516 East Second street have returned 
from a scrveral weeks' visit to Port- 
land .andf other Pacific coast -points. 
« • « ' 

Mrs. S. B-nnett of Ness City. Kan.. 
and Mi.«<s Shipman of Dallas, III., 
who were the gues's of Mrs. K. B'^n- 
nett of Cheater terrace, left today for 
St. Paul. 



1 1-4 large size white or grey cotton Blankets — good 
heavy fleece colored borders — good for cot- QQ#» 
ton sheets — Advance sale price a pair vv7^ 

10-4 white or grey Blankets — fleeced cotton, with 
very pretty colored borders — Advance sale (^Q/% 
price, a pair tJ vV» 



12-4 heav}' grey cotton Blankets — soft heavy fleece — 
very warm — made from a selected cot- tf ^ ^0 
ton — Advance sale price, a pair «J/X« W 

10-4 tan cotton Blankets — good weight — soft finish 
— red or blue borders — Advance sale price, 'Tff^* 
a pair ■ 9M\^ 



Pretty, Sott Wool Blankets 



In this assortment you have a beautiful line to select from. Every blanket a value of merit at its regu- 
lar price. You save from 50c to $1.00 on every pair. 

1 1-4 white all-wool — good heavy wool fleece — made for wear and service — blue 

and pink borders — regular price $6 — Advance sale price, a pair 



$5.00 



1 1-4 white wool Blankets — good weight — red, blue or 
pink borders. The best value on the mar- ^Q 0(^ 
ket today — Advance sale price, a pair ... **'*'••'*' 



1 1 -4 grey wool Blankets — light grey color-— assoj;ted 
colored borders — good wearing — Ad- 
vance sale price, a pair 



$3.50 



1 1-4 all-wool plaid Blankets — black and white and 
red and black — soft selected wool — good Gtt^ /^ Q 
wearing blankets — Advance sale price, pr.vV* *^ 

All-wool grey Blankes — very soft in finish — good 
weight — made from a selected wool — brown, blue 
and pink borders — Advance sale price, tf 7 IZf^ 
a pair %^ i •OV 



Handsome Bath Robe Blankets 

Our assortment of Robe Blankets will surpass anything ever shown in'the city — Robe Blankets in cot- 
ton and wool, all new and clean — patterns of all descriptions to suit everybody. Robe Blankets will be in 
great demand and our advice is to buy early and get a choice selection. 

Imported Bath Robes — 72x90 — a Fancy Wool Bath or Lounging ] 50 pairs Cotton Robe lilankcts 

beautiful range of exclusive pat- Robe Blankets all new colors and ' — plaids of brown, red, grey and 

terns, colors of green, brown, grey ,, ui 1 .^ i r I tan — will make up beautiful—, 

r ', *;..»■ 1 Af patterns — one blanket enough for , n 1 u* . 11 . 

— for the nrst time on sale Mon- * .-» ' washes well — bought to sell at 

a robe— Advance sale, gff QQ j $i.65_Advance sale 



day — advance sale- 
price each 



$2.69 



price each, 



price, a pair. 



$1.25 



BRIDGE CRUSH 

Results in Serious Injuries to Old Man 
and Police Sergeant. 

New York, Sep^. 17.— "The Brooklyn 
bridge crush" serious enough on ordi- 
nar>' occasions has been rendered much 
more so by the Mardl Gras festivities 
at Coney Island. John C. Fallon of 
BiMoklyn, an old man and Sergt. 
Michael Fitzgerald of the bridge squad 
of police, are suffering from Its ef- 
fects. 

In a frantic rush for car seats Fallon 
j was jammed between cars and hurt so 
I badly he will prol)ably die. Fitzgeraid 
! was swept off his feet by the crowd 
j and trampled on. He was considerably 
bruised. 




wmi nEiMi 




Damson plums. 18 cents a box. 

Peaches, $1.65 a crate. 

Pears. 40 cents a basket. 

Conf'ord grapes. 45 cents a basket. 

Cauliflower. 15 and 2f> cents a head. 

Black rasjiberries, 18 cents a box. 

Celery. 5 cents a stalk. 

Pork tend-^i loin. 30 cents a pound. 

Western fish. 

The market is typically a full mar- 
ket. Bushel baskets of cantaloupes 
stand around in the way; crates of 
peaches are piled up higher than a 
tall man's head; the pears are yellow, 



large, ripe «Hiid- delicious, the Tokay 
grapes add The *t?5uch of red that is 
es.sentlal to a, truly beautiful picture of 
autumn rip<^efe.sf-"a jar of vari-colored 
and beautiful asters help to bear out 
the illusion; one no longer shudders at 
a trayful of pork tend<-rlolns; sweet 
potatoes are to ^e had if one has the 
price; pumpkins are standing around in 
the way; so are »i<iuashes; citrons have 
made their appearance, and most of the 
marketers are standing around in dingy 
looking summer, finery. 
Autumn ia Jiere. 



INSAN^OTHER 

Kills Three Children With Hammer and 
Cuts Up Bodies. 

Midale. Sask.. Sept. 17. — Mrs. John 
Anderson, wife of a farmer residing a 
mile and a half from Midale, on the 
.Soo line, took her three children, all 
boy.s, to a potato patch and there 
knocked them on the head witli a 
hammer, after which she cut them 
up In a horrible manner with a big 
knife. 

She had not shown any signs of in- 
.sanity before, but had been ill and was 
suffering from religious mania. She is 
35 years of age. Her husband was not 
at hmne. 

The woman shows no remorse for 
what she has done and expects to be 
hanged. She believes it was some kind 
of blood sacrifice. She was taken to 
Regina. 




T Eii 




SAVE YOUR FEET 

and give them Comfort by wearing^ 

NATURAL 
SHOES 




$5.00 

(Mca • Sizcf) 

Made in all learners and 
sizes "Neat and Stylish, 
Leafing no resemblance to most 
"so called ' Comfort Shoes- 



Designed by a Surgeon. 
Prevent toot Weakness. 
Give proper support to 
feet already weakened. 

Perfect Comfort 

Get diem at your dealers. 

If he does not tell them, 
write us direct 

NORTH STAR SHOE CO. 

Minneapolis, Minn. 



ANNOUNCES 
OFFICER 

Rev. Madsen Makes 

Known Heads of 

Church Bodies. 



Other News From the 

West End of the 

City. 

Instead of the . regular sepvioea in 
the First Norwegian- Dani.sh M. E. 
church, Sunday evening. Rev. H. K. 
Madsen conducted a buainess meeting 
and announced the church officers 
for the ensuing year. 

The trus-tees are John J. Moe, pres- 
ident; P. G. Hanson, treasurer; O. M. 
Jorgenson, .secretary; A. O. Ander- 
son. John Sorenson. Otto Otterson. 
Andrew Otterson. Ed Dahl and Liouis 
Jentoft. The building committee is 
composed of the trustees and P. L. 
Morterud and Dr. B. O. Tufty. A. 
O. Anden-^ion is treasurer. Andrew 
Otterson. secretary, and J. J. Moe, 
president of the building committee. 

The stewards are Hartwtck O. Han- 
son, recording steward; H. J. Fink, 
district steward; J. S. Strum. S. 
Brande. E. O. Rfppe, John Stal, S. 



Larson. P. L. Morterud and Xels 
.Selsath. 

The revision committee compri.ses 
H. J. Frink. P. L. Morterud and A. 
B. Ander.«on; mis.sionary committee, 
Mrs. P. L. Morterud, Mrs. E. O. 
Reppe, Mrs. Hilda Gir>erts; reception 
committee, John Sorens<Jn. J. .S. Strum 
and Nels SeL-^eth; Sunday school com- 
mittee. A. Sten.sijy. N^e-ls Selseth and 
J. S. Strum; temperance ommittee. 
Jolin Sorenson, Henry Anders^jn and 
S. Larsoti; music co>mjnittee. A. O. 
Anderson. Mrs. H. K. Madsen, Hart- 
wick O. Hanson. 

The class leaders for the year are: 
Nels .Sorum, A. Stensby. Andrew 
Peter9*>n. Enill Antonson. Robert 
Peterson and J. S. Strum. 

Mrs. H. C. Munson Is president of 
Uie Ladles' Aid society, and Mrs. 
Madsen is s*^"r"tary. Miss Annie 
Christlanson is president, and Miss 
Clara Olson. S' cretary. of the sewing 
circle of the Epworth league. 

A. B. Andenson is president of the 
Epworth league. J. J. Moe Is super- 
intendent of the Sunday iKjh'X^l, A. 
O. Anders-jn. choirmaster, and Mis^ 
Olson, oi^anist. 

All of the ohuroh officers w«re for- 
mally announced and introduced 
Sunday evening. Some of them gav.' 
short talks. J. J. Moe epoke im the 
best way of taking care of the build- 
ing fund; P. G. Hanson's topic was 
"Running Exp>n.ses." A. B. Ander- 
son's "The Importance of G<xk1 .Sing- 
ing;" Hartwiek Han.<*on's "The Best 
Way to Pay the Minister's Salary;'* 
Nels Sorum's "Blessings of Small 
Meetings." and J. Sten3b>''g "The 



FALL 
GOODS 

Our storft is. now crowded witii 
Fall Gooda. alf tlie latest styles in 
H:it3 Taps, Ties. Shirts, to say noth- 
ing about the liirger lines of Shoes 
and RuhbeVj'. " 

Step in and see us. 

Von Wagner & Sauer, 

1905 1%'c(U SnpeHor Street. 
The Storo With Goud tiouda. 



Nece.'^sity of Small Meetings and 
Prayers." 

Mr. Madsen gave a brief talk, in 
which he revlewe^l the year's work. 
He said some people might criticize 
him for bringing business into the 
church on Sunday evening, but that 
he b».'liev'->d that bu»iness was neces- 
sary in the church, and the cliurch 
necessary in business. 

At the close ,>f the exercises, all 
the church officers kiwU in praj er at 
the altar, making a most impressive 
conclusion. 

HANSON^WEDDING. 

Miss Annie, Daughter of P. G. Hanson, 
to Wed Railroad Man. 

The wedding of Mi.ss Annie Han- 
son, daugliler of P. G'^orge Han.son. to 
Hans P. Hanson, will take place thi.? 
evening at the home of the bride's 
parents. 2115 West Third street. The 
marriage service will be conducted by 
Rev. H. K. Madsen. pastor of the First 
Norwegian-Danish M. E. church. 

Mi.ss Hanson, the bride-to-be, is a 
leader in West end society, and has 
a host of friends, while Mr. Hanson is 
well known In the city. He is a con^ 
ductor on the Duluth, Missabe & 
Northern 

After the wedding tonight, the happy 
couple will leave for the Pacific coast 
on a bridal tour. 

Typliold Cases Numerous. 

Typhoid fever cases are getting 
num Tous in the West end. 

For a while there was .something of 
a diphtheria epidemic, but now it 
looks as if typhoid were going to 
settle down for a little run in the 
western part of the city. 

One physician reports that he had 
five new cases of the disease at the 
end of the week. .Some were on Gar- 
field avenue and some farther west. 

There are still a number of diph- 
theria cases that are being closely 
watched. 




Many Will Study. 



Many West end young folks are 
pjannig to take advantage of the 
course of study offered by the Y. M. 
C A. night school, which will be 
conducted this fall and winter in one 
of the rooms of the Adams school. 

One fe.iture of the course that Is of 
gredt importance is the English gram- 
mar studies for the students who were 
born in other lands and whose know- 
ledge of the correct use of the Eng- 
lish language is slight. 

West End Shortrails 

Dr. Osterberg spent the week-end 
at Grand Lake. 

Mrs May Olson and Misses Ella 
Olsen and Margaret Peterson are the 
guests this week of Mr. and Mrs. H. 
Ped'^rson of 223 Vernon street. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. G. Batty of the 0.s- 
l).)urne block left la.st evening for 
.\shland to attend the wedding of Mrs. 
Patty's brother. Hans Jen.sen, at that 
place. The bride and bridegroom will 
return to Duluth with them and Mr. 
and Mrs. Eatty will entertain for them 
Wednesday evening. 

J. J. Schullz has purchased the res- 
taurant in the Clarendon hotel build- 
ing. 

H. L. Norgaard of Spring Valley. 
Minn., is in the West end. He will 
visit his son. Carl Norgaard, for sev- 
eral months. 

Miss Violet Sherwood of West Third 
.street has recovered from an attack of 
la grippe. 

A. R. Rotsuff yesterday shipped his 
household goods to Two Harbors and 



will follow very shortly with his fam- 
ily. He has purchased a barber shop 
at that place. 

The Ladies' Missionary society of 
the First Swedish Baptist church held 
its regular monthly meeting Sunday 
afternoon In the parlors of the church. 
The ladies had hoped to have Rev. 
Frederick Linden, who is visiting In 
the city for a few days, speak, but it is 
impossible for him to accept the invi- 
tation. 

The regular quarterly meeting of the 
Sunday school of the First Norwegian- 
Danish M. E. church was held in the 
church parlors last evening. 

The Ladies' Aid society of the First 
Norwegian-Danish M. E. church is go- 
ing to conduct a ]>azaar Wednesday, 
Thursday and Friday of this week. 
The bazaar is an annual event and the 
proceeds will be turned Into the new 
church fund. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Wallin enter- 
tained the la.si of the w«ek for Mr. 
and Mrs. Bjorge. who are about to 
leave for the Pacific coa.st country, 
where tliey will make their home in 
the future. 

Rev. H. K. Madsen will preach his 
first sermon ot the conference year 
next Sunday morning in the First Nor- 
wegian-Danish M. E. church. Rev. 
Mr. Madsen has been back from the 
conference for two Sunday.s, but has 
nut yet had an opportunity to preach 
the first conference sermon. On the 
first Sunday his pulpit was filled by 
delegates to the Swedish conference 
and last Sunday Mrs. Dick Waaler 
snoke in the morning and a church 
business meeting was held in the even- 
ing. 



(a cantar is a little over ninety-nine 
Bounds), shows a large increase over 
all records of the past decade. It is 
estimated to be worth $160.(KK),000. 



( EGYPTS COTTON CROP. 

Carlo. .Sept. 17. — The C(jtton crop of 
Egypt, which exceeds 7.000,000 cantars 



It pays to advertise in The Herald. Ask 
Silberstein <t Uondy Co. 

BRIEF TELEGRAMS. 

It was announced at Buffalo Monday 
by the directors of the national water- 
ways congr»-.ss that Edward H. Butler, 
proprietor of the Buffalo Evening News, 
has been appointed a director to succeed 
Harvey D. Ooulder of Cleveland, re- 
signed. The congress meets at Wash- 
ington in December. 

Burlington freight train No. 47 was 
wrecked two miles out of Seward Neb.. 
Monday. Kngineer G. L. Graves lieiiig 
killed and Fireman August Nllea seri- 
ously injured. Both of the injured em- 
pl'jyes are residi-nts of Lincoln. 

The Michigan conference of the M. E. 
ch'inh has adopted a resolution asking 
United States Senators Burrows and 
Willians Alden .Smith to Intnxiuce Into the 
senate an amendment to the United States 
constitution to prohibit polygamy. It was 
adopted without debato. 

while playing with a revolver at Wash- 
ington. D. <"'.. J'>lin B Horton, 6 years 
old, Monday accidentally shot .and killed 
his o-vear-old friend. Robert L. Donald- 
son. The boys had been playing "hold 
up. " 

Judge S.anl)orn In the United Statfs 
circuit court Monday, decided that surety 
companies that sign bonds for postal em- 
ployes who titke money from the malls 
are responsible for the full amount 
stolen. 

After calling up his wife by telephone 
and telling her that she was "Too mean 
for him." and that he would never come 
home again. Joseph Gallebeck, a German 
owning a meat market at Springfield. 
111., went to a field and shot himself in 
the temple. He died Instantly. 



A Mild 
Laxative 



Ask your doctor to name some of the results of 
constipation. His long list will begin with sick- 
headache, biliousness, dyspepsia, thin blood, bad 
skin. Then ask him if he would recommend 
your using Ayer's Pills for constipation. Just one 
pill at bedtime, a few times, that's all. 

We hkve no Meratal W* pobliah g a AswO* 

th^ form nlM of all our praparationa. X.0W1 






\ 




f 



I 



1 



f 



"^ 




» 



-— - 



■»-»■■ * ■ » ^ 



,< ■■■ - I w* 



THE DULUTH EVENING HERAL^: ^TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1907. 



^^\ 



NEW CAR IS 
A TRIUMPH 

Missabe Gets One of the 

Finest Ever Seen In 

West. 













A&@ 



The Victor Talking Machine 



One of the finest oasseneer cars ever 
owned bv a Northwestern railroad will 
arrive in Duluth this eveninK Or to- 
murrow, for the Duluth, Missabe & 
Northern. It is an observation-cafe car 
and will be placed in commission next 
we*-!* on the train which leaves Duluth 
m the morninK for Hibbln*?. returninR in 
the afttrnoon. 

This car Is a veritable rolUne oalace. 
said to be one of the handsomest oit-ces 
of work ever turned out bv the Barney 
itL ymiih company of Dayton, Ohio. AM 
oi the latest improvements and luxuries 
have been included. 

One important leaiure of the new car 
is the use In us construction, of deaden- 
ing felt, which obviates the natural vt 
brutlon of the car when in motion. 

Another important feature is the steel 
platforms, winch cannot telescope. Tests 
have bten mude with these platforms 
and they are said to be all that is claim- 
ed for them. 

The new car is seventy feet lonK and 
9% feet wide. It has the wide Pullman 
vestibule, is built in quarter-sawed oak 
and polished plate and opalescent Klass 
Is used throughout. It is heated bv 
•team. 

There are eighteen chairs in the obser- 
vation end and six chairs in the smok- 
InK room. Twelve persons can be accoiu- 
•Rodated at one lime in the diniUK room. 
The chairs in the dininK and smoking 
rooms are all leather covered. The lloor 
Is covered with Wilton carpet and siIk 
curtains are used exclusively. The trim- 
mings are m Persian brass and the ves- 
t>buie trimmlnKs are in bronze. The 
washstands are nickel. 

Just what will be done with the ob- 
eervatlon-cafe car now in use on the 
morninj; train will develop later, but it 
Is said to bi- included in plans for im- 
provi ments in the service on the Cole- 
raine branch In the not far distant fu- 
ture. 

A sisttr car to the palace which has 
Just been bought will be ordered as soon 
as business on the road, after the al- 
ready projected improvements have been 
made, warrants ?ucli a move. 

WomT fsay there Is nothinjrto equal KIRK'S 
JAP RUSE transparent soai> for WASHING 
THE HAlIi. All drutfk'isis and kTOCcrs seil lu 



Hia Masteris Voice 



The Greatest Entertainer in the World 



RCCut.PA'r.crF. 



aOTY BBDIEF: 



LET US PLACE OWE IW YOUR HOME— ON 
EASY MONTHLY OR WEEKLY PAYMENTS 




Have you heard this most marvelous of musical entertainers? Heard with 
what life-likeness it reproduces the voices of the great singers? How marvel- 
ously well it reproduces the music of the greatest Bands and Orchestras? How 
with this great entertainer — the greatest the world knows about — you can hear 
the finest Grand Opera — sung by the world's greatest artists — hear Sousa and 



his famous Band — Elman with his wonderful Violin — Comic and Popular Songs, 
etc., right in your own home? If you have never heard the Victor you have 
been and are missing hearing the great wonder of the age. We invite you to 
visit our Victor Parlors at any time and hear it — and you'll not be without one in 
vour home. 



We Mention a Few of Our Special Combinations— We Have Many Others That Will Interest You. 



Our $ 1 9.20 

Victor Outm 

Consists of the VICTOR JUNIOR 
machine, with exhibition sound box — 
and one dozen Victor ten-inch records of 
your own choosing. A fine machine for 
the money. 

Terms $4 Cash and $4 a Month. 



I 



Our $24.20 

Victor Outtit 

Consists of Victor machine Z — a 
very good machine, the best obtainable 
for the money — with i dozen Victor 
ten-inch records of your own choos- 



ing. 



Terms $5 Cash and $5 a Month. 



Our $29.20 

Viotoi- Outfit 

Consists of Victor machine No. 1 — 
an oak cased machine with japanned 
brass trimmed horn — and one dozen 
ten-inch records. 

Terms $6 Cash and $5 a Month. 



Our $38.20 

Victor Outfit 

Consists of Victor machine No. 2 — 
a fine oak cased machine — with flower 
horn and one dozen Victor ten-inch 
records. 

Terms $7 Cash and $6 a Month. 



\ 






Our $47.20 

Victor Outfit 

Consists of Victor machine No. ;5 — 
a fine large oak cased machine with 
flower horn — and i dozen ten-inch 
records of your own choosing. 

Terms $8 Cash and $6 a Month. 




Our $57.20 

Victor Outfit 

Consists of Victor machine No. 4 — a 
fine mahogany cased machine, with flow- 
er horn and 1 dozen Victor ten-inch rec- 
ords of your own choosing. 

Terms $10 Cash and $7 a Month. 



When \ou Want 

A good jiockft knife try a Bokrr 



bin rid. they are good, 
cuuipany. 



Tree 
iielley Hardware 



Boktr's '!><•<• Kmnd Si'iswors 
And shtars will satisfy you; they have 
othtrs. K< llt-y Hardware company. 

CronlM^rK Gets Vt-nliet. 

Gust i'ronbtrg wa.« givtn a vcnlict of 
1141.3.; against William Atwell and 
others, by a jury in Judge Dibells room 
yesterday afternoon. Ti»e suit was In- 
stituted bv t'rcnherg to recover for a 
bill of goods furnished the foreman in 
one of the camps on the range said to 
be operated by Atwell & Rock. The 
defendants claimed that the operation 
was not a partnership affair and each 
distlaimed liability for the stuff the 
(oreman ordered. A stay of thirty days 
•was granfrd the defendants in case 
th« y desire to file a motion for a new 
trial. 




Our $67.20 

VIc.tor Outfit 

Consists of Victor machine No. 5 — 
a fiiie quartered oak cased machine — 
with flower horn and one dozen Vic- 
tor lo-inch records. 

Terms $12 Cash and $7 a Month. 



Our $107.20 

Victor Outfit 

Consists of Victor machine No. 6 — 
a fine solid mahogany machine — 14 
karat gold plate mountings and ma- 
hogany horn — with 1 dozen Victor 
ten-inch records. 

Terms $20 Cash and $10 a Month. 



The Vicior 

Victrola 

Price $200 



The finest taking machine ever 
made — machine and record cabinet all 
in one— finest mahogany cased — We 
invite you to call and hear it 



^^a 



Our stock of 

Records 

We carry at ALL times a complete 
stock of ALL Victor records, includ- 
ing foreign and grand opera — We re- 
spectfully solicit your record business. 



We Also Carry a Complete Line of Edison Machines and Records. 




I 



take part in the program are Misses 
Hattle Leoy. C'ru Daniel F.^ye Hohbs. 
Christine Thiers and B<lwin llueis 
The musical numbers will be furnisned 
by the Flaaten conservatory. 

Sfttles St'ventoon Cases. 

Representing various plaintiffs in dann- 
age eases against the Oli%H;r Iron Min- 
ing company. Theodor«> HolUster .md 
John R Heinn have effected settlement 
of seventeen o1" the actions noted foi 
trial at the present term of court. Dis- 
mis.sals of the cases will be filed with 
the clerk of the court today and tomoi- 
row. ^^_^^^^_^^^__^__ 



JndKo Wrttkins Holds Court. 

Judge Francis A. Watkins of Carlton 
county is officjating at the probate court 
thi.s week in the absence of Judge Mld- 
<llecoff. who has be-n called awav from 
the city on l)u.«iness. 

Benefit K« ritnl. 

On Thursday evening, Kept. 10. n. bene- 
fit recital in aid of the relief work 
dene by Joshua B. ("ulver. No. r.97. Wom- 
en's Relit f corps, will be given at 
Fl.iaten's hall. Among those who will 



lEVENlNG SCHOOL FOR| 
DAY WORKERS 

I Opens Scpl. 30lh Y. M. C. A.l 



' 11 o'clock at the age of 93 years. She 
^..,^_...>^^^ »'.».«,,.<». U|had been a resident of Superior for 

syPERiiOB MEWS bts" Srr„nri,r.''".ivi '' 

Divorce Case Heard. 

The divorce case of Christina Eck- 
lund vs. Erick Ecklund was heard in 
Superior court today. The couple were 
married In Sweden forty years ago, 
and are 66 years old. They had six 
children, now grown up. Mrs. Ecklund 
alleged cruelty and non-support, and 
the decree will be granted as soon as 
terms for the division of the property 
are arranged. 



Overcoats 

FOR MEN 

ON CREDIT 




Barnuiii ItcsUlcnt Dies. ' 

A telegram to trimds in Duluth this 
morning, announced the <leath at Bar- 
num. Minn., of Zina Goodell. aged 86- 
years one of the pioneer residents of 
Carlton county. Mr. CKjodell broke his 
leg July 4 last, and on account of his 
advanced age. the injury caused compli- , 
cations, which resulted in his death at 
an earlv hour this morning. The deced- 
ent is survived by two children, a uaiigh- 
ter and a son. The latter, Charles L. 
(Joodell. who maintains an office in this' 
City was on his way to the western part 
of the state when a telegram of his 
I father » death reached him at Brainerd. 

.\bu8e<l an Officer. 

I Morris Welsh was arrested last eve- ; 
1 niiig after considerable trouble, during' 
I which he abused the officer and created; 
1 considerable disiurliance. The court im-] 
I 'posed a line of $10 and costs or ten days. 

Yoiii Kl|»i>u«" Ser\'itx'8. 

Yoni Kippur. the Dav of Atonement. 

I the most rigid penitential dav In the Jew- 

i isli calendar will be ob.servc.'. at Temple 

I ] linimanuel tonight ana tomorrow. Tho 

1 service tliis evening will begin at 7:30 

o'clock. The subject of the sermon i.s 

"Out of the Darkntss Into the IJght.' 

The morning service tomorrow will be at 

10 o'clock, afternoon service at Z o'clock 

land memorial service*! at 3:30 o'cluck. 

I ' v^ub.iect of sermon. ••Immi>rtality." Con- 

Uiiiing ser\'lce at 4:30 o'clock tomorrow 

^ifternoon. 

Dies at Minneapolis. 

Announcement has been received in Du- 
■•:th of the death of John \V. LVForcst 
it .-^sburv hospital in Min-eapolis Satur- 
aav .Mi. De Forest was 34 years of age 
\.\\A was formerly employed bv the 
-standard Oil company here. He left for 
i .Minneiipvilis about four years ago. rie 
I was a single man and is survived bv his 
mother. Mrs. L>. M. I>eVore, living at 
115 Second avenu-i east in St. Paul, and 
one brother 

.'\nnlversary of His Death. 

Cant T. H. I'ressnell, deputy clerk of 
the United States court, says that t<iday 
:s the anniversary of hi.s second death. 
He savs that the newspapers had him 
killed off in the battle of Anlietam. Sept. 
17 1862. wliioh was the second time that 
year. Two vears later. In XtKA, thev lia«l 1 
him dead ;igain. In all three battles he , 
was slightly wounded, but not seriously. ; 
"That's one thing the newspapers have • 
not been able to do," said the captain; 
"they huvtn't been able to kill ine iff 
: vet." 



WILL REDUCE LEVY. 

Board of Education Has Estimate of 
School Expenses. 

The furnace committee of the board 
of education had a preliminary dis- 
cussion concerning the school levy, 
yesterday, and It is probable that the 
amount will be reduced $11,000 this 
year from the levy of last year. A 
meeting will be held this evening to 
pass on the report of the finance com- 
mittee regarding the levy. 

The estimated cost of running the 
schools next year is $212,000. The es- 
timated amount of aid to be received 
from the state and county Is $35,000, 
leaving $177,000 to be provided for. The 
board levied $188,063 this year. 

One of the Items of expense that 
will be cut out this year is that of 
lighting the buildings. Last year It 
cost $1,400 for lights. Last year $13,- 
000 was set aside for improvements at 
the Lincoln school and $1,250 for furni- 
ture. There w ill be no such expense 
this year. The board will set aside 
$5,000 this year toward a fund for 
play grounds for the children. 



Dies at Advanced A^e. 

Mrs. Robert Whahn died at the 
home of her daughter last night about 



J. S. Lane's Editorial 



HOUGHTON! 

Thursday, Friday and Saturday 
1 will show to the people of 
Houghton the finest line of 

FURS 

ever brouglit te tlie copper country. 
Stunning styles— reliable qualities- 
reasonable prices. 

H. G. GROSS 

HANUFACTITRING FURRIER 



Land Brings High Price. 




L B Co 

~ootkti to ruT, 



Lul Cases I'ostponetl. 

I i Owing to the absence from the city of 
; Assistant City Attorney T. J. McKecn, ^ 
! the hearing of tlie cases against the local i 
[ sait^onkeepers for lifting the lid has been) 
postponed until tomorrow. 



$1.00 



A Week 
Payments 

If not ready, pick out and lay 
aside till you want it. 

FRED W. 

EDWARDS 

IJII.ITII. SI Tiniiou. 
Over (.iddiuK'M Hooiii 210 
ixt .%v«>. \V. & ;. Triinx Blk. 
Superior St. 'i02-t T«M\er Ave. 

TAKE KI-EV.VTOR. 
OPEN SATURDAY EVE\ING> TILL 10:30 



,f= 



'Jki 



FEiSiiM 






.Samut-l (.;iu\er of (.iluver. N. I)., is in] 

j the city today, and vlsittd the board of i 

I trade this morning. Mr. Glover has one ; 

of the largest wheat farms in North Da- 1 

t kota. 

I J. .\. McGean. president of the Ameri- 1 
can Liinsf td c-ompanv is in Duluth on . 
business. | 

Oliver W. Wiggins. Jr., who has been i 
the guest of his father for a week in ' 
this city, has returned to Milwaukee, 
where he is a^sista'it paymasaer at the 
National Military Home. 

T. H. Barter of Los .■Vngeles. Cal., is a 
guest at the home of his brother. A. I. 
Burter. 

Mrs. G. L. Fitzwilliam of Ely. Minn., 
is registered at the McKay. 
F. A. Wildes of Hibbing. Minn., is 
t registered at the McKay. 



About Shadows 

It takes a neat, trim, stylish 
tailor-made suit to cast a neat, 
trim and stylish shadow. 

There is grace and attractive- 
ness in every line of the suits and 
overcoats I make, because only 
the best fabrics and workmanship 
enter into their construction. 

You need not be ashamed of 
vour shadow if you wear a Lane 
made garment. 

I make suits and overcoats to 
order for $;iO, $35 ©r $40 that no 
other tailor in Duluth would dup- 
licate for less than $40, $45 or $50 
— clothes that no ready-made, 
hand-me-down chap could give 
you at any price. 

I guarantee every garment to 
fit. to wear and to keep its shape, 
and if everything is not perfectly 
satisfactory you get your money 
back. 

Won't you see me before you 
order your Fall and Winter suit 
or overcoat ? 

It's a good stunt. 
Yours trulv, 

J. S. LANE, 



Splon L. I'errin, representing the 
United States Steel corporation, pur- 
chased today liOO acres of land In Sec- ! 
tion 17, To-vvnship 48, Range 14, on the ' 
line of the Interstate Transfer com- : 
pany, the Steel corporation railroad, | 
which is to connect with all lines now i 
entering Superior and to enter. The | 
land was purchased at prices varying \ 
from 1100 to 5200 an acre, whereas not 
many months ago it could have been 
purchased for from ?10 to |2C an acre. 

Extension Work Begun. 

The construction of the AUouez ex- 
tension of the street car line will be 
resumed tomorrow, and the Nemadjl 
bridge will be closed to team trafTic 
for the day, possible the following 
day. The route the car line will fol- 
low in Allouez seems still to be a 
matter of doubt. It Is expected that 
the route will be determined as the 
work progresses. 

Elects New Librarian. 

Miss Ethel McCullough of Elwood, 
Ind., has l)een elected public librarian 
at Superior to succeed Miss Margaret 
Palmer, resigned. The new librarian 
ij expected to take up her residence in 
Superior by Oct. .7. Miss McCullough 
has been city librarian at Elwood for 
the past four years, where she has a 
splendid record for efficiency. 

Child's Testimony Settled It. 

Corroborating evidence furnished by 

her 4-year-old child enabled Mrs. Ly- 

, diea Keenan of Gordon, Wis., to get a 

; divorce in the superior court yesterday. 

Mrs. Keenan Jaased her application on 

the claim of desertion, but lacked the 

necessary witnesses to substantiate her 

claim. The court finally called the child 

I to the stand and questioned her, the 

\ answers being entirely satisfactory to 

j the mother's cause. 

i Healthy kidneys filter the impurities 
from the blood, dnd unlese they do this 
good health is impossible. Foley's Kid- 
ney Cure makes sound kidneys and will 
positively cure an:fornj.'^ of kidney and 
bladder disease. If Itrengthens the whole 
system. Sold by all druggists. 

Tr>' the "FitwelK* for your fall suit. 
$10 to 130. 

TEI.EGRAPHERS ASK AID. 
Washington, Sept. 17.— The promised ap- 
peal of President Small of the Telegraph- 
ers' union and President Gompers of the 
American Federation of Labor, to organ- 
ized labor throughout the country for fi- 
nancial assistance to the striking tele- 
graphers, was iESTjed ^» today from the 
federation headquarters. 

See the "FltweU's" |15 suit line. 



THE SITUATION 
IS STILL QUIET 

Nothing New Locally 

on the Boilermakers' 

Strike. 

There is little new locally In the 
railroad bollermakers' strike situation. 
Both the Great Northern and the 
■Northern Pacific claim to be doing 
about as much work as usual in their 
shops at the Head of the Lakes. Ac- 
cording to a special dispatch froim St. 
Paul, eighty men le-ft the Saintly 
City this morning in a sp<>cial train 
to open the Northern Pacific sho^ps at 
Brainerd, where ninety-one men 
walked out. A dispatch to The Her- 
ald from Brainerd tnifore the arrival 
of the men Is to the effect that no 
men are at work in the boiler shops 
this morning. 

While no strike-breakers from out- 
side points have as yet arrived in 
Duluth and Superior, it is rather ex- 
pected that some of this class of men 
will be arriving before the end of the 
wc-ek. It is thoug-ht that the trouble 
may be settled by arbitration. There 
IS some talk of a s^'nipathetic strike 
on the part of other railroad em- 
ployes, but It will take time to show- 
just what Uiis talk amounts to. 
There Is said to l)« no immediate 
pro{?pect of a sympathetic strike, but 
it may come later, unless an adjust- 
ment of existing difficulties is soon 
brought about. There is a question 
as to this, however. 

The Northe.rn Pacific claims that its 
work in I>uluth has not thus far 
been seriously interfered with by the 
strike. The main shores are at other 
points along the line. The Great 
Northern shops in Superior were much 
harder hit. but officers of the i>oad 
assert that they are getting along 
very nicely, and that new men will 
be secured to take the places of the 
strikers, unless the latter imme-diately 
decide to return to work at the 
terms offered by the company. 



APPRAISERS 
ARE ASKED FOR 

Representing the United States of Am- 
erica, Charles C. Houpt, district attorney, 
today tiled two more petitions askmg for 
a board of appraisers to determine the 
value of certain lands in Itasca and Cass 
countries needed by the government for 
overflow lands. 

In one petition the lands referred to are 
In Itasca county, near and partly sur- 
rounding the gcivernmcnt rtservioirs of 
il^eech lake and Pokeama. The names 
.of over a hunderd owners of the lands 
are given and there are several hundred 
lucres of land Involved. 

I There have been nearly half a dozen of 
: these petitions previously filed by the dis- 
trict attorney for lands around the other 
reserves on the upper Mississippi in- 
cluding Sandy Lake and Pine River bas- 
ins, besides those mentioned in the peti- 
tions filed today. 

The government will spend altogether 
about $70,000 im the improvements to be 
made in the reservior system. 

Wear "Fitwell" clothes. 



iOLDT^mE 
iDJ^iilOINIi iRlli@^ 

We make a specialty of 
Engagement Rings. Soli- 
taire Diamond Rings of 
almost every size; also 
Rubies, Pearls, Opals. Sap- 
phires, etc.. set either with 
or without diamonds. 

When QUALITY is con- 
sidered, our prices are al- 
ways THE LOWEST. 

315 WKST Sl'PKIllOR ST. 

I::«<abll!4br«I Quarter of 

Ontury. 



HUNTERS 

Wishing to locate on good 
passes for cluck shooting — 
write for particulars. J. A. Lar- 
son, McGregor, Minn. 




ANNOUNCEMENT! 

In view of the approaching 
winter season — the time when 
the graphophone is brought 
to the front — the subject of 
records engages the house- 
hold. 

MARCONI 

VELVET-TONE RECORDS 

Fit any disc machine and they 
double its value to the owner. 
Made of patented material, 
they have so velvety a sur- 
face that the annoyance of 
the usual scratching is entire- 
ly eliminated. 

Hear one played and you have the 
proof. EACH 75 CTS. 



NEW ISSUE^F STOCK. 

Minneapolis, Sept. 17.— (Special to The 
Herald.)— At a meeting of the stockholders 
of the. Soo held today, it was voted to 
authorize an Increase of stock of f21,00i,- 
000, only $4,200,000 of which is to be issued 
this year, one-third preferred and two- 
thirds common, both common and pre- 
ferred to have equal right to subscribe 
for both kinds at par. Payment to bo 
made in five Installments of 20 per cent 
each, the proceeds to be used In payment 
for the extension to Duluth and Superior 
and for t<rmlnals at those points chiefly. 
This extension is now und( r construction 
and will hv completed this year. 



the tigers during the month of October- 
date not yet fix<d— and Mokanna will 
want only thirty tyros (candidates). 

"We want to see the mugs and green 
mazuma of all good K. P. 's. Do you 
want to get on the tiger while he is 
here? 

"If so, send your name and check to 
the secretary at once, and bring your 
bones later. 

'The fee for getting all this (and more 
too) has been fixtd at Jl.'i, but where your 
railroad fare comes to $& or more, we re- 
bate the V to you. Better buy a come- 
back ticket, as we will not guarantee that 
you can walk home. I did— R. I. Tipton, 
royal vizier. George M. Crulkshank, sec- 
retfiry. Address: Next to City Jail. 8co 
full particulars in next issue."' 

Social Kcfsslon. 

The first of a series of nine nocial 
evening's was held last night by Zenith 
Council of the Royal League. About 200 
members were present, and they spent 
the evening in dancing and card-playing. 
Supper was served. 



r 



The Weather. 



You'll have to take off that sum- 
mer suit soon. Fall weather is here 
and the "Fitwell" Clothing Parlors are 
ready to fit you out with fall and win- 
ter suits and overcoats at from $10 to 
J 30. Give us a trial. 



Attention Eagles 

Y«ta ar* requenled to meet nt 
our bnll nt 1 :30 p. in. WrdncM- 
day, Sept. IS, to attend the fun- 
eral of our late brother, Uun 
Burke. Bring badgoM. 

K. N. KKI.I.EV. Secretary. 



V 



/= 



^ 



qy^LBTY 



Is always the first con- 
sideration at this store. 




L 



\ 



JEWELRY 

In beautiful designs, srand 
v.iriely lo select irom. ^ 



325 W. Superior St. 




Columbia Phonograph Co. 

i8 Third Avenue West 



UNIQUE INVITATIONS. 

Al Sirat Temple WiH Feed the Tigers 
in October. 

Fully 150 members of the order of D. O. 
O. K. from range towns and cities In the 
vicinity of Duluth are expecttd to bt? 
pFesent at the October gathering of the 
order In this city, and unUjue invitations 
are now being sent out by Al-Sirat Temple 
No. 135, while elaborate preparations are 
being made to give the visitors the "time 
of their lives." The invitations being 
generously distributed read as follows: 

"Selam. Salam. Slam. 

"To votaries, tyros and other cannibals, 
take heed. 

"Al-Sirat Temple is preparing to feed 




Bitter Root Land 

Five acres pay $5 per day. Ten acre* 
pay tlO per day Particulara 
KJVLOSKN-Kr.HnrSON FRl'IT CO, 
220 \%e«t M8<-bU;an Street. 

The Prevailing Market 
Prices 

On Pure Granulated Sugar Is $5.65 
j per 100 lbs. — 15 lbs. for $1.00. First 
Patent Flour, 98-lb. sack, $3.15. 



CLOTHING 



112 WEST SDPEUOl STMEt. 



Moving & Storage 

Everything moved, packed and stored. 
PEOPLE'S MOVING & STORAGE CO. 
207 H W* Sup. St. Either phone 601 




tmmm 



*mmm 



I) 






'\.^..if »i^ 



»*-?► ^rr- *?».'■ 



-^"VrTy ."vT'^Trvvijrt^'itv v.y- 




THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD >- TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1907. 




MMBi 





oi m 




Friday for Waukesha. Wis., to attend 
I 'arroll college. Mr. Copps matriculates 
while Mr. Ellsworth is a sophomore. 
Will Ellsworth left today to resuma 
his studies at Hamline. I 



LICENSES 
SUSPENDED 

Tug Captains Punished 
for Violating Har- 
bor Rules. 



morning tho stoaiuor wa-s full of wator. 
Tug.s were working «>n the boat all 
day and the puii\p was k»^pt going but 
at noon she was report-jd as still set- 
tling .somewhat although siio was sup- 
po.s.'.l to be on the bottom. The reason 
for this is probably tliat tho water In 
the slip has risen somewhat on account 
of the northe;iat storm. 

Tho Olasgow will be raised and prob- 
ably pinop.i in the drydook here as soon 
as possible. Some hopes have been en- 
teruuned that she would be able to 
take her cargo down tho lakes after 
j temporary repairs were made without 
I soing into the drydook. but this does 
i n>t seem likely today. 

The City of Glasgow is owned by 
Hutchinson & Co. of Cleveland und is 
2J7 feetirt length by 41 f*>et b^am with 
a ;,'r<)3s tonnage of 2,400. Siio was built 
in 1831. 



O'Meara and Tracy Both 
lonsibie for Re- 
cent Collision. 



Respi 



CSapt. John H. O'Meara. master of the 
tug Oarrinston and Caot. Tracv D. Cart- 



Pa.4st>(l Dotpoit. 

Detroit, Sena. 17.— « Special to The Her- 
ald.)— Up: Northern Star, 8 Monday 
night: Nicholas, 9; Keefe, 10; William 
K' rr. 10:30: Panay, Niagara. 11; Selwyn 
Eddy l:2i) Tuesday morning; Holland. 3; 
Laughlln, i:l'>; Morgan, 5:30. Down: Poe, 
Mary Elphicke. S Monday night- Sop r 
and barge, Japan, S:30; H. H. Rogers, 
Morse and wlialeback. Hoover & Ma.son. 
II; Hurlbut, Clint, 12:30 Tue.sday morning; 
St»-arn 2; Richardson, 3; M'^rrtmac, 3:40; 
Morrelt, Alfred Mitchell. 5:30; H. A. Haw^- 
good, o; Norseman, 6:40; tug Sohenck, 
Dry Dock. 7. 

Up— Yesterday: Rutland, 8:40; Pen.>b- 



land of the tUK Walton B.. have both : ■''f'Jt. l'^:2«>; Duluth. Colburn, 11:30; Curtis 
had their oilot license suspended bv t^'^\^^Jt'^[oSt B^.thTeher^i:"^!'*!' Paul 
local United .State.s steamboat msoectors 3.3Q. ximick, 5: Marion. 6:4'}. Down: 
for a period of fifteen aays for violations Colgate. 7:4'>; Flower. 8:15; Eads, Pal- 
of the harbor rules, which resulted in 1 '"*"'* and whaleback, 9; Sachem and barge 
*K.. !i.i.„ v.^,w,..r. rn„ \va\, „x H an.i ^■^^- Maritana, Thomns. 10; Utica. 1*:30 
the co.iisiun between tne Wakou B. and .^...pjienson. Fritz. Wallula. U; C 



the st.-amer Tlonesta over a week ajco 
Captaias M. F. Chalk and John Mona 



Clarion, 
Maje.stic. Harper. 11:30; Calumet. 12:40 p. 
ni.; Fayette Brown. 1; Corey. Barlh. l:.';u: 



frhan, tUd in3p?ctor3. h 'td a iiearir.g on the Mecosta. 2; Beatty.' 2:30; E. D. Carter. 3; 
Ca^e last TUursdav and the tvyo pilous ; Ed* liborn, Jenney. Plankinton. McV'ittie. 
•Were examined and both admitted havime j 4:2 1; Starucea, 't; Jones. 5:40; Emerald 6; 



III re»jard u 



Tiolated the harbor rules 
oertain whistling signals. 

In tile decision of the in^oectors. which 
was filed yesterday afternoon, is sta.- 
ed thai at the piiru where tiie collision 
took place the caann Is from Duluui 



Bixby, Orion. ti:3*X 



Tlip .Saiilt I*a.ssaj»'es. 

Sault Ste. Marie. Sept. 17.— 'Special to 
The Herald.)— Up: Hanna. 9:4() Monday 
niglit; Degraff. Goodyear. 11; Neilson, 

old Superior. West Suoerior and the Mis- j midnight; Balleg. 2:30 Tuesday morning; 

Babe ire docks intersect* with eacn oth- j Marie »pa, Westcott. Corey, Ames 2:40; 

er and that on this account the pilots | Mataat'a, Gary. 4; Pontiac. 4:30: William 

Should be ospecialiv careful to sound I Miils, ij; Wrigiit. 6:30. Down: Hebard. 

their whistles when roundiUK aii.v of the! 10 Monday niglit; Maripo.sji. Socapa. 10:3); 

curves -nto liie brid»;e. Steinbrenner. Wad", midniglit; Waldo. 

It IS further stated that as both mas- 1 Ball Brother.s, 1 Tu-.sdav morning; North- 

ters had idnutt-d violated rule li, which ern Wave, 1:30; Ueed, Luzon, 0. 

(s that vess»-Is shall whistle, or tiiat I Up— Yesterday: Presque Lsle 9- Saun- 

elther of tliem ha-l taken any precaution ders. Harlow, 10; Lyman S:nith' 11 3i)- 



LOUIS JORGENSON 
DOES HEROIC ACT 

Plunges Into River at 

Grand Rapids and 

Saves Boy. 

Grand Rapids, Minn Sept. 17.— (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.)— Louis Jorgenson. 
superintend.^nt of the paper mill here. 
Is entitled to a Carnegie medal for sav- 
ing the life of little Frank Smith wiio 
had fallen Into tiie river and was being 
swept to his death when Mr. Jorgenson 
plunged into the stream and pullud him 
to .safety. 

Mr. Jorgenson was enjoying his noon- 
day rest at his home after eating a 
hearty dinner when his son Norm-an, 
rushed in and excitedly told him the 
Smith boy had fallen Into the river and 
was drowning. The superintendent 
liastoned to the spot whore the boy had 
fallen into the big eddy that sets back 
from the swift current of the rapids 
and flows along the shore by Mr. Ray- 
n\ond's house. The boy had been play- 
ing on some logs in the edge of the 
eddy from which he had fallen Into the 
water and Mr. Jorgenson reasoned that 
if he was to be .savtd at all it must be 
because he was still held In the swirl 
of the eddy and had not been swept 
out Into the fierce current of the rap- 
ids, in which event rescue would have 
been impossible. Acting on this reason- 
ing Mr. Jorgenson carefully scanned 
the eddy a.-^ far as iiis eyes would pene- 
trate and finally detected a dark nuuss 
of something moving along the out-r 
edge and being rapidly borne toward 
the rapids. In ho plunged, dived under 
three feet of water, reached the sub- 
merged and floating object, and found it 
was Indeed the littl" boy. Mr. Jorgen- 
son quickly bore the little body, to all 
appearance that of a corpse, to shore, 
and energetic and skillful measures fur 
his resuscitation were at once set In 
progress. 



hands of the printer, and will be out 
shortly. 

Considerable inter»"st is l)f>ing taken 
In the fair, and it momises to be moro 
successful than»ii4# fair heretofore 
held. ff^ 

COULDltl|sTAND IT. 

Men Objected to BiWabik Accommoda- 
tions and Stay at Eveieth. 

Eveleth. Minn., Sept. 17.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — Inade.juate hotel accom- 
modations in Blwablk has caused Fore- 
man Ed Hanson, of the MBsaba Tele- 
phone company's construction depart- 
ment to arrange f.>r his men's housin^j 
in Eveleth. The men will sleep here 
and take breakfa.st, go to Biwabik on 
the Iron Range morning train, and re- 
turn on the evening train. Only din- 
ner will be taken in Blwabik. The com- 
pany tried to take care of the men In 
Biwabik, where-an extension is being 
made for a mine. The men balked after 
a trial. 

This daily trip for the men will con- 
tinue for three week.**. 



RANGES IN BRIEF 



^ Hibbing— The sixty new cottages 
planned for the use of tiie employes of 
the Hull-Rust mine will bo ready for 
occupancy some time in Oci'>ber. About 
one-fourth of the number have been 
enclosed the past week. 

Grand Rapids— The Neumann Bros.' 
sawmill, which was burned to the 
ground last fail is loon^ing up in bet- 
ter shape than ever. Tlie mill proper 
has been in running order for a con- 
siderable time, and now tlie Neumanns 
are bringing in a carload of lath mill 
machinery, which was purchased by 
William Neumann on a recent trip to 
the Twin (Mties. 

Two Harbors— Work has been started 
laying tracks to the Spring mine, oper- 
ated by G. A. .Sinclair, six miles in 
from Mesaba. This mine is on the Du- 
luth & Iron Range road and will ship 
through this port. 

Grand Hapid.s — <Jharles Kelly, wlio for 
a time was employed as clerk in the 
Bangle store In Deer River, hut who 
later lived in Lower Michigan, is now 
employed as clerk in T. A. McHugh's 
cash store. 



MANY ENROLLED. 

nibbing Schools Open With Over 1.000 
Pupils on Books. 

Ribbing. Minn.. .Sopt. 17.— (Special 
to The Herald.)— With over 1.000 
pupils enrolled and forty- two teach- 
ers in the corps of instructors, the 
Hibbing 3ch<x)l3 opened for the school 
term yester<iay, under very favor- 
able clreunistances. It Is expected 
the enrollment will iiicrease daily, 
and that j\-ithiM ^^, few weeks tha 
number of* pupils " will total aJ)out 
1,.")00. Tlie ."substantial growth of the 
city in a family 'J»ay was evidenced 
by the large ' eutUment the first 
day. 



uosiani'.ai gio\ 
niiiy jjay was 
5e eufcUmeiit 

r 



as to s;oin« slijw. b.nh mast'*rs or pilots 
of the tu>rs are whoUv at fault for tlie 
collision an dth^vv are therefore both 
ju.sT)'^nd'''d for A neriod of fifteen days 
Comrnet:cin< Sept. IS. 



SEEKING A REMEDY. 



Shoaling at Ontonagon May be Stopped 
by Diverting River. 

A preliminary r^rjort his just been 
ntiaie by Maj. Fitch regarding the On- 
tonagon. Mich., river, with a view to 
asceriaming whether or not the chanKiaer 
0* the course of the river would do away 
■with the necessity uf dredgiiu; its mouth 
every year. 

So muoli silt is annually dcDosited by 
the river at its niuuih that considerable 
dredsin*! is nece.s-sary before even vessels | gonda 
of llKht draft can enter the harbor. ' '^ 



Maunoia. no-m; Earling. 1 p. m.; W S. 
Mack. Venus. 1:30; Odanah. 2; Weston, 
Simla. Frick. i':3); K- nsington. 4; Hough- 
ton. Smeaton. Princeton. 5; Big Gratwick 
N»ey,awah. 6; Matoa. G::W; Turret Crown. 
7: .S.>noma. H-^cko-^k. Joliet. 8. Down- 
Murpi.y. Uganda, <):2'); Gavley. Hart, 
Siis.ri'hanna, Shaw, 10:3'); Hoyt, New 
Mather, Steel King, noon; Cuddy, 12:30 
p. m.; At'.iabasca, Coralia. Corliss 1; 
Michigan. Ward Ames. 2; Cort, Carrinii- 
ton. Mars. Morrow, 3:20; Big Wolvin. 
4:20; Small Gratwick, Craig, a Mi); Agawa. 
5; Wilkin.sson. S; Arizona. .Scotia Ply- 
mouth, 8:.30; Van Hise. Manola. Anna 
Minch, Ge<jrge Peavey, 9. 



teniedv for tills may be souaht by di- 
verting the course of the river. 

The board of enRineers at W^^ushlnffton 
in charge of the riv.-rs and liarbors of 
the ojuntry have made several examina- 
tions retjardlnsr the matter. If any oer- 



Vf.-isrl >I<)venients. 

South Chicagj— Arrived: London D. M. 
Wiiit!i-^y. Cleared, grain: J. .Sharpies. 
Port Huron. Light. Zenith City, D. O. 
Mills. W«>.)dr'iff, Watson, Superior. 
Toledo— Arrived: Burma, Fulton, La- 
Cleared, coal: Cumljerland, 
A! Green Bay. Light: Sheldon Parks. Buf- 



falo. 

Erie— Cleared, coal: Mowatt. Bour- 
man. Viile; Brutannica. Chicago. Light: 
N. S. .Smith. Toledo. 

Milwaukee— Arrived: Saxon. Omaha. 
Cleared: Livingston.-. Martin. Muller. E.s- 



Bon or firm Is interested in this matter. ] canaba; Senator. Duluth; Fitzgerald. Mll- 
they may tile oDinious or suggestions In j ler. Superior 



wrltin)?. within nin.-tv davs with tho 
board at their iffiv? m Washington. 507- 
GOB Colorado building. Washington. D. C. 



AN ACTIVE YEAR. 

I 

Canadian Shipping Has Done Big Grain 
Business So Far. 

Canadian shipolns on the erre.-it lakes 
has had its most active year in the 
^ain trade thus far. From Port William 
ajid port Arthur from the OD'enlrtii' of 
navigation. April 3'>. to July 31. the fol- 
lowing grain shipments were mad^: 
■Wheut. •i:.2:.5.14l iwsiiels: oats. T.OiJUti&J 
bushels: bar^^v. GW.TIT bush'^'ls: flax. 2S1.- 
410 bushels. Th.* bulk of this was carried 

in Canadian y.-.ss-ls. Foreiaii vessels ' for ore. lower lakts; Paris Gilbert' 
carried G.S3.S.<)6;> bushels of whea'.^ 'JtW.olS 1 Helena. Davo.-k, W. L. Smith. John 

t© 



Two Harbors— Arrived: E. L. Wallaco. 
Corsica, Magna, Siemans. Maida. Supe- 
rior City. Malta. Cleared: C. Wallace 
Fl-.-two<>d. Moravia. Lake Sliore. Baker 
Small Mather. Lake Brie; S. Phipps. 
Lakf^ Michigan. 

Green Bay— Arrived: Fitzgerald 

Escanaba— Arrived: Pentland, Black 
Rc>ok. De-parted: Stackhi)U3e, Small 
Wolvin. Albright. Lake Erie; Whitaker 
MUwq.ukee. 

Chicago— Arrived: Naple.s. Ramapo 
Syracus*'. Tuscarora. S.-nuylkill. Clear- 
ed, merchandise: Landgon. Ogdensburg- 
Schuylkill, Commodore, Ram,i,p,i Buffa- 
lo. Grain: Vulcan, Buffalo. 'Lisht- J D 
Ma.rshall, Grand Marai.-;, R. R. Rhodes' 
Milwaukee; Kongo. Oscoda. 

■ , Port of Duluth. 

Arrivals: J. J. Hill, J. r. Gllchri.st. 
Jay C. Mor.se, w. R. Linn, <'oulby light 



i.-^ti U.JU.J. •/■.... ..vj--...- ..c -ji. ,. ..^— . ,^>^.»»- ..»^ .. ...t_ J.. I,.,. IV, v\ . 1.,. nniitn John 

..ats. and 38,521 of barley. Shioments Stanton, Fitch. Maitland. W d' Rees 
M')ntrcal wer- 13.'i.')»>.*)5 bushels, and tO'Co.il. Lake Eri>-; Parent. Northern 



Buffalo. S.'Jt)7,6»J«) bushels 



LOSS TO SHIPPING. 

Total Figure for TWelve Seasons 
Amounts to $16,220,201. 

.-4-a.sons up 



King. Russia. N.-w Vork. Codorus m.-r- 
chanlise, Buffalo; Tionesta, passengers 
an,l merc.hai.dise, Buffalo; Lozen, God- 
fr.-y, lisrht for lumber Lake Erle- 
Stre<'t. turned back to Two Harbors 

D-partures: D. M. Clemson. George 
F. Williams. Hubbard. Dunham, Zim- 
merman. Uranus. Wldlar Walker Mil- 
inokett. Sierra. Wawatan. W. L. Brown 
ore. lovvr lakes; Huronic 
to and and merchandise, Buffalo 



passengers 



During '-iie tweiv- 
Includinj? laOG from ISin the losses to 

el^ipping on the Gr-at Lakes have been How to .\vol(l Appendicitis^ 

Injmense, the aggregate being $1(1,230.301, i Most victims of appendicitis are those 
an averaKe of Jl,iH;i,333 per seas-ju. ac-h^'^'^ ^'"^ habitually constipated. Orino 
oo'rdiUK' to the meteorlo^ical charts lust i ^axa'.ive Fruit Syrup cures chronic con- 
Issued by the .weather bureau of the i *'^'P*^''-'h by stimulating the liver and 
government. j bowel.s, and restore^ the natural action 

Apportioned by years, the totals are; ] of the bowels. Orlno Laxative Fruit 
Seas 
pSfl. 
$655. 

l\*H3.sr,o 

it will be seen that much the jfrea,test 
loss on any of th* .-seasons was durin< 
tho year. 1906. In that ye<ir the heaviest 
loss was jn Lake Suoerlor. where the 
total an.ounted to $2.4S.").»J60. 




GLASGOW FllLL OF WATER. 

Steamer Springs Leak and is on Bottom 
at Superior. 

While taking on a cargo of ore at the 
Allouez do<-ks the steamer City of Glas- 
frow sprung a big leak yesterday after- 
noon and a tug and diving outfit was 
sent for immediately, ('apt. Vroman. 
manager of the Great Lakes Towing ! 
COfnpany. and a diver went over at 
once on the tug Sinclair. 

The steamer was towed o%-er to Tower 
bay slip and shoved into tha mud and 
temporary safety, after which a steam 

fiump was put aboard. Tlie cause of the 
eak has not been determined but this 



JURY FINDS 
HOGAN GUILTY 

Burns and Miller Enter 

Pleas of Guilty to 

Indictments. 

Found guilty of grand larceny In the 

second degree, John Hogan will re- 

a diver went over a"t j ceive sentence some time this week. 

The maximum punishment for the of- 
fense is a five-year term in the ataio 
penitentiary. 

Hogan was convicted yesterday aft- 
ernoon of stealing a watch from Georg-j 
Bell early in the summer. A. ^\''elner, 
a proprietor of a second-hand store on 
lower Lake avenue, identified Hogan 
as the person who sold him the watch 
for $2. which is claimed to have be- 
longed to Bell. The jury found Hogan 
guilty in about five minutes. 

Mike Burns, who pleaded not guilty 
to a charge of larceny, changed his 
plea to guilty and was given a ninety- 
day jail term. Burns is a carpenter 
and previous to his present trouble 
always bore a good reputation. 

George Miller pleaded guilty to taking 
mortgaged property out of the county 
without permission of the mortgagee. 
He was given a sixty-aay term in tho 
county jail. 



GOOD RECORDS OF 
EVELETH PUPILS 

Those Neither Tardy Nor 

Absent and Studious 

Ones. 



Eveleth, Minn.. Sept. 17.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— Supt. B. O. Greening 
furnishes the following list of pupils, 
who were neither tardy nor absent 
from school during the year 1906-07: 

High school building— Kindergarten: 
Cora Goard; First grade, Alice Bolte- 
clitte, Lula Kaugas. Elmer Johnson, 
Raymond Johnson, Edwin Culbert; 
second grade, Andrew Anderson, Alex 
Brandt, Alma Damberg, Alvin Kaugen, 
A.nnie Paciotte; third grade, Gust Alm- 
qtlst. Gust Anderson. Monica Farley, 
Vir'illiam Furlong. Henry Hill, Hazel 
Johnson, Turaa Kaugas, Dora Zim; 
fburth grade, Sigriel Anderson, Aileen 
Corbett; fifth grade, Alex Brandl, Luiis 
Johnson. Mary Bruice, Paul Wadstone; 
i^^xth grade, Lucy Furlong, Mabel 
Wadstone; high school, Harry Ander- 
.sbn, Be.itrice Camon, Charles Sharpe 
and Edwin Anderson, 

In the Fayal building— First grade, 
Theresa Xava, Esther Peterson: sec- 
diiil grade. Bella Brown; third grade, 
Robert Brown. Hilda Frans, 
Liehtinen, Charles Xava, .Selma 
fourth grade. Mamie Kenta. 
Johnson, Walter Millette. 
vy right; sixth grade, Olga 
seventh grade, Lawrence Andrews, 
Margaret Corbett, Cella Koskie, An- 
na Xeimi, Tre.s.^o Puisor, Myron Ring- 
stad, Axel Turnquist, Charles Daw- 
son. 

In the Eveleth building the studious 
f>nes are: Kindergarten. Lempi Maijala, 
IHlda Johnson. Johnny Johnson. W^al- 
lace Christopher, Eddie Hutula: first 
grade, Adolph Cadotte, Julia Kuatl. 
Ellen Sundstrom. Hazen Maxwell, 
Lempi Tafferl, Harved Peterson, As- 
sambo Nutula, Edwin Reed, Esther 
Kunnar; .second grade, Ida Erickson, 
Ellis Hutula, Arthtunr Lampi; third 
grade, Romona Donovan, John John- 
son. Henry Peterson. Arvid Wutula; 
fourth grade. Ellen Wadstone, Florence 
Christopher, Arvid Ever.son, Morris 
Nordstrom. Peter Ormand, Arthur 3a- 
ari. Ernest Lampl; fifth grade. Beu- 
lah Chase and Mary Shutte. 



Arvid 
Nelmi; 
Milton 

Mabel 
Knuti; 



HOLD FAIR LATER. 



Date of Itasca County Show Has Been 
Put Over One Week. 

Grand Rapids. Minn.. Sept. 17. — 
Special to The Herald.)— The dates for 
the Itasca county fair have been chang- 
ed from Sept. 27 and 28. to Oct. 4 and 

5. because the new county building that 
Is planned for the fair grounds here 
will not be finished by the earlier date. 
The premium list this year will be 
rnuch larger than ever before in the 
hfstory of the association. Almost $1,000 
for premiums has been .secured, and 
this will make a very potent incentive 
for all having exhibits to bring them to 
the fair. The premium list Is in the 



CHANGE FOOD 



And Lose That Uneasy Feeling 

A man who has always been a "skin- 
ny chap," although hardly ever ill, 
tells of the way he put ori flesh and re- 
duced his irritability and nervous con- 
dKion. 

By chance he had a taste of Grape- 
Nuts food at the table of a friend and 
enjoyed the flavour so much that he 
began to have it every meal. He says: 

"In a short time I found myself an- 
other person, the old feeling of discon- 
tent and uneasiness left me entirely. It 
became a pleasure to go about my 
•work, whereas, before, for years, I had 
always had the feeling of being a 
little weary, V>ut now I seem to have 
a surplus of en-»rgy for everything; 
my weight has increased 11 pounds in 
four w-eks, and am still gaining. 

"I have never been very sick and am 
aatlsfled if my pre.sent improvement 
In health continues, I shall not be. 

"The change that this food has made 
In my life has been remarkable and so 
satisfactory that I am glad of the op- 
portunity to tell you." Read "The 
Road to Wellvllle," in pkgs. "There's 
a Rea.son." 



Foul Breath 

Easily Cured 

i This Simple Prescription Is Offered 
as a Relief. 



LATEST iiy STRIKES, 

Servant Girls of Hibbing Reported to 
Have Caught the Fever. 

HibWng, Minn., Sept. 17. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — New it is a strike 
oif the domestics eiAployed in this lo- 
cality. As the curKnt rumor has it, 
the girls working^Jta pQbllc and pri- 
vate establishm- nc? in Hibbing and 
vicinity have been eno-^uraged into 
making a concerted demand for a 
minimum wage of $30 per month, and 
unless this is conc-^-ded will walk out 
next Thursday, jn the eve of the 
beiglnning of the county fair, which 
will naturally cripplfe the employers 
of that class of lalyir in hotels and 
restaurants. John Kolu and J. A. 
Jones of the We^stern Federation of 
Miners are ^cn»dited with having 
sown the se^ds of dist^ntent amxing 
the domestics w«hich may precipitate 
the walkout. 

WANT LATERAlTsEWERS. 

Property Owners Present Petition to 
Two Harbors Council. 

Tw\> Harb'>r«, Minn., Sopt. 17. — 
(Special to The Henald.)— Property 
holders petitii>^^ -"i^ho city coiineil 
last night for tho^ o«>nstruction of 
several lateral aawers, as follows: 

All of Eighth avenueC'-whioh will b« 
six blocks ar»a crossing.^; ;)08 feet on 
the east end of Tenth avenue, to con- 
nect with the new scho-^l hou.se in 
course of cjnstruction there; Third 
avenue, from i i>oint 2i» miles east of 
the east line of Hazel street to a 
point 2"X) fe*^t west of the west line 
of Spruce street} and Seo«3:id avenue, 
from the east line of Willow street 
to a point 300 feet east of the east 
line of Hazel .street:. 

The petitions were referre<i to the 
committee, and the latter will report 
Oct. 7; meanwhile opposing pr«>perty 
holders are expecfced to offer their 
protests. 

Property owners also petitioned 
for the paving af the alley in block 
3, on the ground that this is one of 
the imiwrtant alleys .>f the city, and 
should be plaacob-',in condition for 
traflSc. \, '•* 

A committee tt-as named to secure 
a site for the c*mp of the Thomas & 
MoCoy Contracting eomjxany. which 
has been awafd-si the sewer con- 
tract. The company su'.Mnitted Its 
bonds, which wtu-e accepted. 

> H-H '- 

No fear need be felt of the Indigestl- 
bility of hot bl*^uits if they are made 
light and flaky by the u.se of Hunt's 
Perfect Baking Powder. Our extracts 
are the best. Try .them. 

TWO DiNKIES TOGETHER, 
ENGINEER LOSES JOB. 

Eveleth. Minn.. Sept. 17.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— Two dinkles collided on 
the Drake & Stratton stripplngs Mon- 
day afternoon. No. 45. which was driv- 
en by Gust Mara, was not noticed by 
the engineer of a dinky that was haul- 
ing a line of dirt cars. The dinkles 
crashed into each other. 

Afi a result of the collision the front 
end of the injured dinky was smashed. 

The engineer, who was to blame, has 
been discharged. No one was injured. 



NOT IN FAVOR OF 
AMALGAMATION 

Local Commercial Teleg- 
raphers Not to Merge 
With Railroaders. 

While no formal action was taken, 
members 3f the local union of the j 
Commercial Telegraphers of America 
decided at their meeting last evening 
that they were opposed to a merger of 
their national union with the Order of 
Railroad Telegraphers. Instead, they 
declared themselves in favor of strong 
agreements and bonds of friendship 
between the two organizations, but still 
maintaining them as independent so- 
cieties. 

This idea of merging the commer- 
cial and the railroad telegraphers' or- 
ganizations was conceived by Chicigo 
union of the commercial telegraphers 
and has been considered by the other 
local unions throughout the country 
for the past week. 

The plan was not formally brought up 
at last night's meeting in Duluth, but 
an informal di.scu.ssion on the proposi- 
tion brought forth the sentiment in- 
dicated above. 

The two iocal commercial telegraphers 
feel that an amalgamation of the two 
orders would bring about di.sastrou.s 
dissension. The railroad telegraphers 
outnumber .the commercial operators 
nearly two to one. 

Practically the only other matter 
considered by the strikers at their 
meeting last evening was a plan to .se- 
cure a local theater and give a benetlt 
theatrical performance. 



MAXIM GORKY HAS 

MARRIED ANDRIEVA. 

New York, Sept. 16.— That Maxim 
Gorky and Mme. Andrleva. the wom- 
an who accompanied him on his trip to 
Ameri.-a. are now married, is the news 
brought from Europe by Harold Mc- 
Grath, th^- author, who arrived yester- 
day on the steamer Finland. Dr. Mc- 
Grath and his wife spent the summer 
on the Island of Capri, near were 
Gorky lives, and he states postive'y 
that the marriage has taken place 



Stomach and Bowel Decay Causes 
These Fearful Odors. 

The improper decay of human wa<?t^ 
matter, and the storing and damming of 
such matter in the bowels, cause gases to 
arise which filter through the system and 
finally escape via the lungs and th-j 
breath. This condition is caused from 
improper action of the nerves and muscles 
which control the stomach and bowels. 

If these agents do not properly eject 
tills human sewage from the system, it 
backs up into the blood and is carried off 
through the lungs. 

The nerve centers need revitalizing, so 
that the proper stimulating effect can be 
givt n to the bowels to call forth their 
natural functions. 

Mix one ounce of Obifrut Compound Ex- 
tract, and seven ounces of port wine or. 
If vou prefer unfermented grape juice. 
Take dessertspoonful three or four times 
a day, before meals and at l>ed time. 

This simple prescription Is composed or 
the active principles of rare and tropical 
fruits and contains no narcotics, alcohol, 
n.ineral or animal matter, but Is a pure, 
natural fruit compound extract. It is a 
groat Invlgorator and is especially ef- 
fective in all tired and worn-out nerve or- 
ganisms, restoring natural functions In a 
very short time. 

Our readers will find Obifrut Compound 
Extract on sale at all flrat-claas druggists. 



WILDES GOES EAST. 

Hibbing, Minn., Sept. 17.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— State Inspector of 
Mineral Leases F. A. Wildes, Jr., who 
has just returned from .St. Paul where 
he attended the meeting of the state 
tax commission and assisted in the 
tabulation of the valuation and ton- 
nage of the Mesaba and Vermilion 
range mines, left todSiy for the James- 
town exposition. AltJert St. Vincent, a 
mining engineer, will act for Mr. 
Wildes during the latter's absence. 



EVELETH NEWS NOTES. 

Eveleth, Minn., Sept. 17.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — The Johnson Supply com- 
pany has bought AutJ. E. Jauclcila's 
house furnishing business. Jauckila is 
now engaged in .selling land for the 
D. & I. R. railroad. 

George Shutte. an old employe of the 
opera house buffet, has departed for 
the Twin Citle^. iA:\L>. Ferry of Vir- 
ginia, has beerf secured by Mr. Doyle 
to take his place. jL . 

John Anderson anH Otto Strand will 
give another dance In the Monitor 
hall Saturday f^^«e^ing. .Sept. 21. And- 
erson and Striaid Igave a successful 
dancing party In t^e same hall last 
month. PetersdH*s •Y)rcheatra will play. 

Miss Alice Coombs of Litchfield, has 
gone to Minneapolis to attend the Min- 
neapolis .school -of oratory. To Duluth. 
she was accompaH4#d by E. C. Jone.s. 
Miss Coombs has been the principal 
of the Fayal school. 

Earl Ellsworth and Harold Copps left 



.Attack of l>iarrh(H>a Cured by One 
J>o.se of CliuniberlaJiiS Colic, Chol- 
era and Diarrhoea Iteinedy. 

I was .So weak from an attack of 
diarrhoea that I could scarcely attend 
to my duties, when I took a dose of 
Chamberlain's Colic, Cholera and 
Diarrhoea Remedy. It cured me entire- 
ly and I had been taking other med- 
icine for nine days without relief. I 
heartily recommend this remedy as be- 
ing the best to my knowledge for bowel 
complaints.— R. G. Stewart, of the Arm 
of Stewart & Bro., Greenville, Ala. 
For sale l>y all druggists. 

SENT ToloUNn JAIL. 

Lind Said to Have Made a Partial Con- 
fession. 

Carl R. Lind, who was brought from 
Eveleth yesterday to be held to the 
grand jury on the charge of numerous 
forgeries on the ranges, is now in the { 

county jail. It Is claimed that he has ] 
practically made a confession to the i 
police here that he was Implicated In , 
the passing of the checks, forged with ■ 
P. McDonnell's name. The forgo J ^ 
checks ranged in amounts from $1<> to : 
$15. Lind was identltted by two of his] 
Duluth victims a.s the man who pre- 1 
sented the bogus checks to be cashed. ; 
Tlie accused Is .said to liave conducted j 
a dancing school In the West end and i 
promoted .several wrestling and boxing | 
bouts In the city. It is expectied that I 
he will enter a plea of guilty to the j 
forgery charge against him. | 

BUILD RAILROAD I 
TO RABBIT LAKE 

Planning for Shipping | 

Ore From Cuyuana 

Iron Range. 

Brainerd, Minn., Sept. 17.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— A crew of men are at 
work surveying a line between the shaft 
near Rabbit lake, which Is l>eing sunk 

by the Brown-Rogers Ore company, and 
Cedar Lake, on the Northern Pacitxc 
railroad. There are aLso reports that a 
spur is being surveyed to the Plckands- 
Mather shaft near Loerch. Those in a 
position to know predict that ore will he 
shipped from the Cuyuna range next sea- 
son. The Brown-Rogers company is 
erecting a 30-room l>jardlng house at the 
shaft and will, it Is said, put in a store 
there. 



Exhibition of Paintings 

By David Ericson, at Rooms 14 and j 
15, Columbus block, over Giddlng'a | 
store. i 



WOMAN IS KILLED; I 

MAN IS ACCUSED. ' 

Wa.seca, Minn., Sept. 17.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — Mrs. Clifford Julian was 



D. E. H., Sept. 17, 1907. 




If your copper stocks shrunk in value, 
that's no reason that you shouki walk 
around with a rainy-day face and clothes 
that begin to look shabby. No sir, not any 
more than that w^hen your shares were way 
up, you should throw away your money on 
some high-priced Retail-Tailor. The latter 
was false pride and the former is false 
economy. 

In other words: Wear Columbia 
clothes, Stein-Block tailored or Sincerity- 
Make. Good enough for a Magnate and 
a price-magnet for those who think they 
are poor. Best on Superior street and none 
better on Broadway. 

Suits from $35 down. 

Overcoats and Raincoats from $50 down. 

COLUMBIA CLOTHING CO. 

Foot Note: Hanan Shoes for Men and Women. 



I 
I 



^'-■-1 






s . 



>1 



If 



EYE, EAR, NOSE 
and THROAT 

EXAMINATION FREE 



508 and 510 Barrows Building 



! shot and almost instantly killed late 
I Sunday In the Commercial hotel here. 
I Rudolph Munson of Albert Lea, and 
j Mrs. Clifford were together when the 

shot was ftred. The former rushed into 
' the hall and fell into the arms of a 
|chaml>er maid and expired. Munaon 
'followed the woman into the hall and 
! tried to get "a statement from her as 
! to how the shooting occurred but death 
i came too quickly. 
I Munaon was arrested and placed In 

jail awaiting further developments. Ho 
'claims that Mrs. Julian .shot herself. 
I Several guests at the hotel state thai 

the woman has been sicting strangely 
j for several days and that she had 
I threatened to take her own life. 



STRUCKBY TRAIN. 

William Simmons Loses His Life 
Near Wetmore. 

Wetmore, Mich., Sept. 17.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— With his skull fractured 
the body of William Simmons of this 
place was found on the Duluth. South 
Shore & Atlantic tracks near here. 

The manner in which the man met 
death Is not deflnitely known. The In- 
dications are, however, that he was 
struck by a train during^ the night. 



\ 




DEFECTIVE PAGE T 




-J 



] 



\l 



•?■ 



± 



iWR«^9Hi^^ 



k# 






THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD:. TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1907. 







m ™ 




Friday for Waukesha, Wis., to attend 
Carroll ci>Uege. Mr. Oopps matriculates 
while Mr. Ellsworth is a sophomore. 

Will Ellsw'orth left today to re.sunia 
his studie.s at Hamline. 



LICENSES 
SUSPENDED 

Tug Captains Punished 
for Violating Har- 
bor Rules. 



morning the stf>amer was full of water. 
Tugs were Xvorking on the bo;it all 
day and tlie pump was k>-pt going J)ut 
at noon she wag leport-^d as 8till set- 
tling .somewhat although .she was sup- 
posed to l)e on the bottom. The roa-son 
for this i.s probably that th-- wiitor in 
I thu' shi> lias ri-son somewhat on account 
, of th:> northe:ist storm. 
' Th^ Olasgow will i)e raLsed and prob- 
! ably pi le.si in tiie drydock iiere as soon 
I as p.»ss:ble. Some hopes liave l)een on- 
teruiinvd that she would be able to 
I take lier cargo down tlie lakes after 
i temporary repairs W'"'re made witiiout 
i going into tht- drydook. but this does 
not .seem likely today. 

Tti> City of Glasgow is own<^d by 
Hutoh!n.-<on & Co. of Cleveland and is 
2J7 f..-.-t-in 1-ngtli bv n f»'.t ix'im with 
a .gross tonnage of •:,4»». Siio was built 
in \tai. 



O'Meara and Tracy Both 
Responsible for Re- 
cent Collision. 



LOUIS JORGENSON 
DOES HEROIC ACT 

Plunges Into River at 

Grand Rapids and 

Saves Boy. 



and will be 



GUI ) 



, hands of the printer 
j shortly. 

Considerable interest is l>*>ing taken 

'in the fiir, and it pi-omlsi^s to l)e moro 

successful tlianwaw fair heretofore 

I held. 



RANGES IN BRIEF 



it pi-< 



Hibbing— Th. 



sixty new cottages 



COULDlfT "stand IT. 



Planned for the use of the employes of 
Hull-Rust 



the Hull-Rust mine will be leidy for 
0'eui)an.y som>' time in Oofdjer. About 
one-fourtn of tlie number liave been 
enf-los'jd the past w>^.jk. 

Grand R ipids— The Neumann Bros." \ 
sawmill, which was burned to tlie 
ground last fall is loon^ing up in bet- I 

Men Objected to BiWablK Acccmmoda- ^ [^:; t'^^f il^V^.x^r^i^'g Jder '•^!;^ T"!;;;^ ! 

tinn« ;inil ^tav a» FvPiPth siderable time, and now the Neumanns . 

llUlli dna May ai CVCieill, are bringing in a carload of latii mill ; 

Eveloth, Minn .S,.pt. 17.— (.-Special to • "^■'•••h'»*Ty. wht-h was purchased by) 

The Herald.)— Inad.-quate hotel aecom- I ^'^'i^l'i"! N •'i"'in" on a recent trip to 



niodati-'ns in Biwabik has caused Fore- j 



ihf» Twin Citi»>s. 
^ ,^ i-j M ^ ... 1.- m J I Two Harbors— Work has been started 

Grand Rapids, Minn .Sept. IT.-TSpe- 1 man Kd Hanson, of the Musaba Tele- hj^yi^^ tracks to th- Spring mine, oper- 
cial to The Herald.)— Louis Jorgenson. | phone company's construction depart- 1 ..^igj i,v G. A. Sinclair, six mile.s in 
superintend. -nt nf tlie paper mill liere, jment to arrange f(>f his men's housing 1 from Mesaba. This minf is on tlie Du- 



is entitled to a Carnegi-' medal for sav- 



Pa.sseil I>ptroit. 

Detroit, S«pa. !?.— .Sp.'ial to The Her- 
ald.)— I'p: Northern Star. 8 Monday 

niglit: Nicholas. 9; K-efe, 10; William ' plungcii into the stream and pulled liim 
10:30; Panay. Niagara, 11; Selwyn ' to .sai.'ty 



in Eveleth. The men will sleep he.-e!luth & Iron Range road an-i will ship 



nig the life of Ittle l-iank .>niuh who,a,i(j take breakfa.st. go to BIwalJik on ' through this port . ,, „ , , 

had fallen into tae river and was being ,^ j R^nee mornlne train and re-' Grand Rapid.s-Charles Kelly, who for 

sw-pt to his death wh-n Mr. Jorgenson l"^-*'^*^" iht^!.J,VwfJ^ tlin ?inlv din- ' ^ tim- was employed as clerk in the 

tuin on the evening train *^"1>;! ' Bangle store in Deer Riv.3r. but who 
ner will be taken m Biwabik. The com-n.^^,, ,j^.^,, j„ Lower Mi.higan. is now 



I Mr. Jorgenson was enjoying his noon- pany tried to take care of the men in | employed as clerk in 
'day rest at his home after eating a , Biwabik, where-aa extension is being , cash store. 



K- rr. _ . . 

Eddv 1:20 Tuesday morning; Holland, 3; 

LuigKlin 4:1;>; Morgan. 5:30. Down: Poe _ 

Mary Elptiickp. S Monday night;_ Sop r | hearty dinner when his son Norman. ! n,ade for amine. The men balked after 

*'"' a trial. 

This daily trip for the men will con- 



T. A. McHugh's 



tug Oarrln<ton and CaDt. Tracv 
land of the tu»i Walton B.. 



and barge. Japan, saO; H. H. Rogers, ' rushed in and ex.itedly told him the 
Morse and whalebick. Hoover & Ma.son. i Smith boy h:id fallen Into the rlv.:>r and 
ir H'lrlbul, Clint, l:i::W Tuesday morning; jwas drowning. Th« superintendent , 

St.-arn 2; Richard.son, 3; M-^rrimao, 3:40; hastened to th." spot whore the boy h:id M^'""® ^^^ tniee week.^. 
MorreO AUred MUchell. 5:30; H. A. Haw^- | fallen into the big eddy that sets back 
go )d J, Norseman, 6:40; tug Schenck, from the swift current of the rapids 
Capt. John H. O'Meara. m.xs:er of the j Dry Dock. 7. (and flows along the shore by Mr. Ray- 

D Cart- L'p-Y.-sterd.iy: Rutland, S:40; Pen.->b- .niond's house. The boy had been play- | 

K.VO wth!-;. •l*,°S,,":^^rroiStof";i? .'.'.i^/?r„?r^,';ift,o"L;,'-;a,ferf„r, mi l nibbing schools open WIU. over 1.000 

• 3- St Paul I ^''>''^*''' ■''•nd Mr. Jorgenson reasoned tnat i ^ „ .. _ . 

6 W Down- 'f 1^"^ was to bo savt d at all it must t>e 
4.); Flower. 8:15; 'sads. Pal- ''^•''lus'" ^\'\ was still held in the swirl 
... 1. , ; m«r L^a whil-hifl- <)• ^lir-h.-m and hirire f>I the eddy and had not been swept 

Of the harbor rules, which resulted ''^ I'^'tl \i,^t^^^^rhonikT^^^^^^^ i"to the here,, current of the rap- 

the collision between the Walton B. an<lLj'..,Ah^,n.son Fritz WU'lula' 11- Clarion' '"J«- *" which event rescue W'ould have 
the st.amer Tlonesta over a week ajto. I Maj-stic, HarpT, "11:30; CahimeV, 12:4^ p. i '><-en linpo.ssi!,le. Acting on this reason 
Caoutias M. F. Chalk and John Mona-lm.; Fayette Brown, 1 :.Cor.'y^ Barlh. l:3y; i -^ 

ehan. tlij ir.sp .-.-^ — . ... ^. . . 

case last TUursdav and the two pilots ! Ed»nborn, Jenney. Piankinton, McV ittie 
■Were .'x.tnun.'d and both adunCed hiviaKi4:-i; .Starucca, 5; Jones, 5:40; Emerald 6; 

~ (>:30. 



tiad their nilot license suspended by the , j^^^^..^^ Horton. 1; BHhleh 
local United .St.ites steamboat inspectors 1 3 ■;>()_ Niniick. 5: Marion, 
for a period of fifteen ^lavs for violations [Colgate. 



em. 



Mr. Jorgenson carefully si^anned 

. ^ . . _ , Vv, V I V* .-.■-..;-♦'., 9" ^^-.if,-'- ^'"in- V ' n n,rt\^r- I- the eddy as f;ir as his '"yes would pene- 

tlij inspectors, h -Id a aeanr.g on the; Meooata, 4, B-^att>, Z.Jf), £.. u. caiter, j, 



tratt 



MANY ENROLLED. 



Pupils on Books. 

HlbMng. Mum., .Sopi. 17.— (Special 
Ui The Herald.)— With over 1.000 
pupils enroUe-l and forty- two tea.ch- 
ers in the corps ^yf in3truct<>r3, the 

the school 



m regard to 



Bixby. Orion, 



viola L'-d tile n.irb')r riles 
certain wh.stling sig.'iais. 

In the decision of the inspectors, which Tlio .Saiilt Pa.ssa:;T* 

uras filed yesterday afternoon, is sta'.- Sfiult Ste. Mari ■. S-^pt. 17.— iSp<^cial to j 
€d tiia: Jit th- point vvlierc tiie collis:on| The Herald.)- 1 p: Hanna, i):4i) Monday, 
took place the oii.inn-ls from l>uluui. . ni<!it; Degraf?. Goody, .ir, 11; N'-il.son, ^ 
old Suuerior, West SuDr>rior and the Mis- 1 midnight; Baling, 2:30 Tuesday morning;, 
sabe ore docks mterseo:* wuii. eaca otfa- i Marie ipa. Westcott. C'»rey, .Vm^'s^ J:4<V, ; 
er and that ou this account tiie oiiots j Mataata, Gary, 4; Fontiac. 4::J0; William 
Bhoul'l ot.> especialiv careful to sound ! Mills, ti; Wrigiit, ti.M. Down: He!)axd, 1 
their wiiistl-'s wh>'r^ roandaiK an.v of the! 10 Monday night; Maripo.sa. Socapa. 10:3); 
curves .nto th^ bndge. Steinbrenner, Wad'^, midniglit; Waldo, i 

It is fur'her stated that as both ma^- 1 Ball Br-jthers, 1 Tuv-silay morning; North- 1 
ters h.ul idnutted violate.1 rule ti. Which ern Wave, lUSO; Red, Luzon, tj. 
la tiiat v".ss.ls shall whistle, or thai I Up— \v-sterday: Pr.\s<iue Isle, 9; Saun 
either of lli-m h ul tak>»n ar.v precaution ders, Harlow. 10; Ly.man Smith, ll;3t); 



and tinally dete.ted a dark mass | Hibbing sch.>:>ls opened for 
of som-thiiig moving along the out'-r , t.^rm yesterday, under very favor- 
edge and being rapidly borne toward j al^le cireuni.stances. It is expectci 
the rapids. In he plunged, dived under i the e.nr.>Ilme.nl will incrtvise daily, 
thr.c feet of water rcach-d the sui>-|and that within a few weeks th.- 
merged and Hoating i^bject. and foun.l it i ,,„niher of* oiii>lu ' will tota,! about 
was indeed the lit tl.« boy. Mr. Jorgen- """^""^'^ '" PupHa will total aooui 
son niiiekly bore the littb' body, t.j all 



appearan.--' that of a corpse, to shore, 
and energetic and skillful measures for 
ills resuscitation were at once set In 
progress. 



frts to goin»t slow, both inxs'.-rs or oiiots 
Of the ruif.s are wholiv at fault for the 
collision, an Jth»'v are tiier.ifore both 
iuspetid'-d tor a z>er:od of fifteen 
Commer:cui< Sept. IS. 



days 



SEEKING A REMEDY. 



Maunola, n<>)n; E:irl:ng, 1 p. m.; W. S. 
Mick. Venus, 1::W; udanah. 2; Weston. 
Simla, Frick, 2:3); Kensington, 4; Hough- 
t.)n, Smeaton, PrincHon. 5; Big Gratwick, 1 
N -epawah, 6; Matoa. iJ:*); Turret Crown,' 
7; S.>noma. Heoko-'k. Joliet. S. Diwti:' 
Muip!;y, Uganda, i):20; Gayley. Hart.: 
Susrvi'-hanna, ShaA*. 10:30; Hoyt. New 
Mather, Steel King, noon; Cuddy, 12:30 

-. ,.../» . . 11 V tt^^^^A P- "'■■ Atiiabascx, Coralia. Corliss. 1; 

Shoaling at Ontonagon May be Mopped ! Michigan, ward Ames. 2: Con, Canin-- 

t.in. Mars, Morrow. 3:20; Big Wolvin, 



GOOD RECORDS OF 
EVELETH PUPILS 



number of pupils ' will 

1,.">00. The substantial growth of the 

city in a faniiiy wa^y was evidenced 

by the large ' eni>llment the first 

day. 



t 



LATEST IJPSTRIKES. 



4:20; .Small Ciratwick. Craig. 5:30; Agawa, 
'5; Wilitin.sson. S. Ariz.jiia. Sc.>tia, Ply- 
month. ^:.30; Van Hise. Manola. Anna 
Miucli. Ge-irge Peavey, 9. 



by Diverting River. 

A preliminary rjuort nas iust been 
male by Mai. Fitch regarding the On- 
tonagon. Mich., river, with a view ta 

asooriamins whether -T not the caangia^c VivsbH .M«>vfnu'iit.s. 

of the cour.se jt th- river would do away ^.S'J.i»*f» Chicagj- Arrived: I>mdon. D. M 
wirh th- ne.jessity of dredg:n« its mouth i ^^ '•it:-':''- Cleared, grain: J. Siiarples, 
every year P o- H'lr.m. Liglir. Zenith City, D. O. 

So niueii'iilt is annually deposited bv:M'!'s. Woodruff. Wai.son, Sup-:>rior. 
the river at its mouUi that consid rablel T..i>d.>-Arrived: Burma. Fulton, Ea- 
dredg^u-' 's nec-'ssary before even vessels ; sonda. _ Cleared. coal: Cumberland, Cora Groard; First grade, Alice Bolte 



Those Neither Tardy Nor 

Absent and Studious 

Ones. 



NOT IN FAVOR OF 
AMALGAMATION 

Local Commercial Teleg- 
raphers Not to Merge 
With Railroaders. 

While no formal action was taken, 
members of the local union of the 
Commercial Telegraphers of America 
decided at their meeting last evening 
that they were opposed to a merger of 
their national union v.ith the Order of 
Railroad Telegraphers. Instead, they 
declared themselves in favor of strong 
agreements and b.jnds of friendship 
between the two organizations, but still 
maintaining them as independent so- 
cieties. 

This i.iea of merging the commer- 
cial and the railroad telegraphers" or- 
ganizations was conceived by Chicag.) 
union of the coJiimercial telegraphers 



Eveleth. Minn.. Sept. 17. 
The Herald.)— Supt. B. O. Greening 
furnishes the following list of pupils, 
who were neither tardy nor absent 
from school during the year 1906-07: 

High school building — Kindergarten: 



draft .:an enter th.^ 



liarbor. 
ov 



di- 



of ll«lit 

Jreniedv ior ttiis may 'oe soualit 

yertiupj tae course of the river. 

The board of ensiuecrs at W.ushineion 
in charge of the nv >rs and harbors of 
the country have made several e.xainina- 
tlons re^iardiMS the matter. If any oer 



A 'Green Bay. Light: Sheldon Parks. Buf 



Bour- 
Eight: 



falo. 

Erie— ^leare.l, coal: M.jwatt 
man. Vill-; Brittannica. Ciiicago 
N. S. .Smith. Toledo. i 

Milwaukee— Arrived: Saxon, Omaha, i 
Cleared: Living.=?ton.-. Martin. Muller. Es- 
BQii or firm is interested in this matter, j canaba; Senator. Duluth; Fitzgerald. Mil-, 
they mav til" oDirii.uis or suggestions in ; ler, Superior. 

iwrrlting. within nln.'ty days with the] Two Harbors— Arrived: E. L, Wallace, 
board at fh.>;r iffi'.» m Washington. 507- C.>rsica, Magna. Siemans. Maida. Supe- 
600 Colorado build:n=j. Washington. D. C. rior City. Malta. Cleared: C. Wallace. 

Fleet woo.l, Moravia, Lake Sliore, B.iker, 
Small Mather. Lake Brie: 3. Phipps, 
Eike Michigan. 
Green Bay— Arrived: Fitzgerald. 
Es.-anaba- Arrived; Peiitland, Black 
Rr>ck. Departed: Stackhouse, 
Wolvhi. Albright, L.ike Plrie; Whitaker. 
Milw.'j.ukeis, 
_ ,. ,. , .^ ,11,, Chicago— Arrived: Naplos. Ramapo. 

Canadian shipriln^ o:i the trreat lalc^s Syracu.s*>. Tuscarora. S.-(iuylkill. Clear- 
lias had its most active y.-ar in the od. merohandi.se; Landgoii, Ogdensburg; 
«rain trade thus far. From Port William Schuylkill. Commodore, Rain.i.po, BuOa- 
'^ -ll'J. Graiin: Vulcan. Buffalo. Light: J D 



AN ACTIVE YEAR. 

j. — 

Canadian Shipping Has Done Big Grain 
Business So Far. 



And Port Arthur from the oo'onin^ of 



! Marshall. Grand Marais, R. R. 
Miiwaokee; Kongo, Os.joda. 



navigarion. April 30. to July 31. the fol- 
lowing grain shipm-nis were made: 

wheat, •i-.:.^:.'). 141 ousiiels: oats. :,0l>L660 lN»rt of Duhttli 

bushels: barl.-v. Jlt'.Ti: bushels: Sax. 2S1.- Arrivals: J. J. Hill, J. C Gilchrist 
410 bu.-*heis. The bulk of this was carried j Jay C. Morse, W. R. Linn. «'oulby, light 
In Carialian ve.ss'ls. Foreign vessels ; for ore, lower hikes; Paris. (lilbert 
carri.'d 5. ««.«)»;;) bushels of whea'. %J.olS i Helena. l>avo.k, W. L. Smith, John 
Of oats, and M/Sll of barley. Shionients Stanton, Fitch, Maitland. W D. Rees 



clitte. Lula Kaugas, Elmer Johnson, 
Raymond Johnson. Edwin Culbert; 
second grade, Andrew Anderson, Alex 
Brandt. Alma Damberg, Alvin Kaugen. I 
.Vnnie Paciotte; third gra.le, Gust Aim- I 
utiist. Gust Anderson, Monica Farley, : 
! W^illiam Furlong, Henry Hill, Hazel 
i Jolinson. Turaa Kaugas, Dora Zim; 
I fburlh grade, Sigriel Anderson. Aileen 
; Corbett; fifth grade, Alex Brandl, LkjIs 
John.son. Mary Bruice, Paul Wadstone; 
i e-ixth grade, Lucy Furlong. Mabel 
I Wadstone: high .=5chool, Harry Andcr- 
' .son, Beatrice Cam.jn, Charles Sharpe 
Small land Edwin Anderson. 

In the Fayal building— First grade, 
Theresa Nava, Esther Peterson; sec- 
.3!nd grade. Bella Brown; third grade, 
Robert Brown. Hilda Frans. Arvld 
liehtinen. Charles Nava. .Selma Xeimi; 
fourth grade, Mamie Kenta, Milton 
Walter Millette. Mabel 
sixth grade, Olga Knuti; 
seventh grade, Lawrence Andrews. 
Margaret Corbett. Celia Koskie. An- 
na Xeimi, Tresso Puisor. Myron Ring- 
stad. Axel Turnquist, Charles Daw- 



Servant Girls of Hibbing Reported to 
I Have Caught the Fever. 

j HibUng, Minr... Sept. 17.— (.^pe-cial 

I to The Herald.)— Now it is a strike 

of the domestics eii|ployed in this lo- ' and ha.s been considered by the other 

callty. As the curlent rumor has it. i local unions throughout the country 

., ,. IT,.,. , J I f'3r the past weeK. 

the girls working^ pQblic and pH- The plan wa.s not formally brought up 
vato establishm- :itT i!i Hibbing and at last night's meeting in Duluth. but 
vicinity have been encouraged into | an informal di.^.cu.ssion on the prop.>si- 
making a concerted de^manil for a j tion brought foriii the sentiment in- 
minimum wage of $30 p^r month, and | dicated above. 

unle?,s this is conc-'de*! will walk out • The tw.) c>cai commercial telegraphers 
(Special to ^^^^ Thursiay, )n the eve of the j f^el that an amalgamation of the two 
beginning of the cotuity fair, which . orders would bring about disastrous 
will naturally cripple the employer*? j dissension. The r:ailroad telegraphers 
of that class of lal>'>r in hotels and | outnumb«.'r the commercial operators 
restaurants. John Kolu anl J. A. nearly two to one. 

Jones of the Western Federation of ! Practically the .Mily other matter 
Miners are , credited with having I considered by the strikei>< at their 
at>wn the seiSd.s of dis'»ntent among . meeting last evening was a plan to se- 
the domestics whioJi may precipitate 
the walkout. 



Rhodes, Johnson 
Wright; 



son. 



t» Montreal wer-- ;:5. •..>;. SiJO bushels. 
Bluffalo. :J.J07.5»>> bus:; els. 

LOSS TO SHIPPING. 



, , , ,, . .... ., In the Eveleth building the studious 

and to coal. L.ike Erie; Parent. Northern 1 ^.^^s are: Kindergarten. Lempi Maijala, | holders are 
^>.'"«;.-^«''-^-''=^l.^'-^%>.^[k Codorus. nier-:,;;,,,^ Johnson. Johnny Johnson, Wal- Protests. 

lj,Hiesta.^passenger.s ,^^,,^ ehristopher. Eddie Hutula; first! Property 



Total Figure for TWelve Seasons 
Amounts to $16,220,201. 

During the twelve seasor^s up to and 
tncludinK lO^KJ from li«w the losses to 
B^^iDDing on the Gr-at Lakes have been 



WANT LATERAL SEWERS. 

Property Owners Present Petition to 
Two Harbors Council. 

Two Harb >rs. Minn.. S>pt. 17.— 
(Special to The Hetmld.)— Pr'>pdrty 
holders petition*! 'tho city council 
last night for the; O'>n9truction of 
several lateral sowers, as follows: 
All of Eighth^ avenu<-whi.Th will be 
six blocks and crossings; M^i feet on 
the ea-st end of Tenth avenue, to con- 
ne«c-t with the new scho.)! house in 
Oijurse of construction there; Thii'd 
avenue, from i ixiint 2'h) miles east of 
the east line of Hazel street to a 
point 2"X) fe^et west of the west line 
of Spruce stivet; and .Seoiind avenue, 
from the east line of Willow street 
to a point 300 fe«:^t east of the east 
lino .jf Hazel .<*treet. 

The petitions were referred to the 
coTumittee, and tlie latter will roport 
Oct. 7; m«.anwhile opposing property 
expected to oiTer their 



cure a local theater and give a benetlt 
theatrical performance. 



.Attack of Diurrh<H>H Cured by One 
J>u.-»e of C'l(aiulH>rlaiirF> t(>!i«", Chol- 
era and Diarrhoea Keinedy. 

I was so weak from an attack of 
diarrhoea that I could scarcely attend 
to my duties, when I took a dose of 
Chamberlain's Colic, Cholera and 
Diarrh )M Remedy. It cured me entir. - 
ly and I had been taking other med- 
icine f'lr nine days wlth.)ut relief. I 
heartily recommend this remedy as be- 
ing the best to my knowledge for bowel 
complaints.— R. G. Stewart, of the firm 
of Stewart & Bro., Greenville. Alsu 
For sale by all druggists. 



L-han li.se, Br;rt":ilo; 
and ni>»rc.hai..!is. 



Buffalo; 



fry, lisrht for lumber, Lak.> "' Erie; ' srade, Ad.»lph Cadotte. Julia KustI, 
Str-^et. turned baek to Tw.) Harbors. 

Departures: D. M. Clemson. George 
F. Williams, Hubl)ard. Dunliam, Zim- 
merman. rr;inus, Widlar, Walker, Mil- 
inokett. Sierra, Wawalan, W. L. Brown, 
ore. lower lakes; Huronic 
and merchandise, Buffalo. 



owners also petitioned 

for th.> pa\ing of the alley in block 

.Sund.strom. Hazen Maxwell. '3. on the ground that this is one of 

I the lmi)')rtant all»^ys of the city, and 

condition for 



should be 



passengers 



iust 
tlie 

are: 

IS'JT. 



immense, the aggregate being $l'i.J-i.J.;»L 
an averase of $1.343,i]3 per seas.ja. ao- 
oo'rdin«i to the meteorl.>«ical char.s 
Issued bv the weatlier bureau of 
government. 

App^>:tioned by y • irs the totals 
eeas.m ot" 1S9G. *1.9iW.'i;:8: !««•;. $:te..'.2e: 
I*®?.*)"); I'wt.S. $1.:'>J.'>X>: 1S99. t«il3.75»): 
|655.17.'i: 1*)1. il.l40.3O'»: l*t. $i.3»ir).;;>)i); 
$9)«.17r.. l\m. I5::1.7W; ISOo. $4.iJ55.-.iOO: 1*>). 

It will be S'^en that much the greatest 
kxts on any of the .seasons was during 
the year. llWiS. In that year the heaviest 
loss was on Lake S'K)erior. where the 
total aii.'junted '.o t.'.lS.').»MO. 



How to .\void .\p|KMidiclti.<«. 

Most victims of appendicitis are those 
who are habitually constipated. Orino 
Laxative Fruit .Syrup cures chr.mic con- 
stipation hy stimulating the liver and 
bowel.s. and restores the natural action 
of the bowels. Orino Laxative Fruit 
.Syrup does not nauseate or gripe and Is 
I'WJ. mild and pl«?asant to take. Refuse sub- 
1*)3. i stltutes. Sold by all druggists. 



Elbm 

Lempi Tafferi, Harved Peter.son, As- 

sambo Nutula, Edwin Reed, Esther 

Kunnar; .second grade, Ida Erickson, tramc .^^ „ ^ 

Arthtunr Lampi; thinl j ^ c^^?^"^'"^ «*»•'' "^"If*^^, 

' a site for the ca'np of the Thomas & 



plaocd- ,in 



Ellis Hutula. 

grade, R >mona Donovan, John J.>hn- 
son. Henry Peterson. Arvid Wutula; 
fourth grade. F:ilen Wa.istone, Florence 
Christopher. Arvid Ever.son, Morris 
Nordstrom. Peter Ormand. Arthur Sa- 
ari, Ernest Lampi; fifth grade. Beu- 
lah Chase and Mary Shutte. 



to secure 



HOLD FAIR LATER. 



McCoy Contracting cmnxiny, which 
has been awar'i.«i the sewer con- 
tract. The company subnaitted its 
ix)nds, which wtu-e accepted. 

.. K-H 

No fear nei^l be felt of the Indigestl- 

bility of hot biscuits if they are made 

I light and flaky by the use of Hunt's 

I Perfect Baking Powler. Our extracts 

I are the best. Try .them. 



GLASGOW FILL OF WATER. 

Steamer Springs Leak and is on Bottom 
at Superior. 

While taking on a cargo of ore at the 
Allouez d.)eks the steamer City of Gias- 
Ifow sprung a big leak yesterday after. 
noon and a tug and diving outfit wa.3 
sent for immediately. Capt. V'rom:in. 
manager .»f the Great Lakes Towing 
company, and a diver went over at 
once on the tug Sinclair. 

The steamer was towed over to Tower 
bay slip and shoved into tlio mud and 
temporiry safety, after which a steam 

fiump was put aboard. The cause of tlie 
eak has not been determined but this 



Date of Itasca County Show Has Been 
Put Over One Week. 

Grand Rapids. Minn.. Sept. 17.— 
Special to The Herald.)— The dates for 
the Itasca county fair have been chang- 
ed from Sept. 27 and 28. to Oct. 4 and i 



Eveleth. Minn.. Sept. 17.— (Special to 

The Herald.)— Two dinkles collided on 

i , ,_ . 1, Mji .1, .ithe Drake & Stratton strippings Mon- 

:j. because the new county building that Lj afternoon. No. 45. which was driv- 

|is planned for the fair grounds here , ^^ j, q^,^^ j^jj^g., was not noticed by 

iwill not l>e hnished by the earlier dau-. • ^j^^ engineer of a dinky that was hai-.l- 

The premium list this year will oe , j^^ ^ line of dirt cars. The dinkies 

I much larger than ever before in /he clashed into each other. 

history of the association. Almost $1.0)0 ^ .^ result of the c.illi.sion the front 

been .secured, and ' 



for premiums has 
this will make a very potent incentive 
for all having exhibits to bring them lt> 
the fair. The premium li.st Is in tho 



CHANG^FOOD 

And Lose That Uneasy Feeling. 

A man who has always been a "skin- 
ny chap." although hardly ever ill. 
tells of the way he put on flesh and re- 
duced his irritability and nervous con- 
dition. 

By chance he had a taste of Grape- 
Nuts food at the table of a friend and 
enjoyed the flavour so much that he 
began to have it every meal. He says: 

"In a short time 1 f'>und myself an- 
other person, tlie old feeling of dl.scon- 
tent and uneasiness left me entirely, it 
became a pleasure to go al>iut my 
■work, whereas, before, for years, I had 
alway.s had the feeling of being a 
little weary, but now I set-m to have 
a surplus of energy for everything; 
my %veight has increased H pounds in 
four weeks, and am still gaining. 

"I have never been very sick and am 
•atisfied if my pre.sent improvement 
in health continues. I siiall not be. 

"The change that tlii.s food has made 
In my life has been remarkable and so 
Batisf ictory that I am glad of the op- 
portunity to tell you." Read 'The 
Road to Wellville." in pkgs. "There's 
a Rea.son." 



JURY FINDS 
HOGAN GUILTY 

Burns and Miller Enter 

Pleas of Guilty to 

Indictments. 

Found guilty of grand larceny in the 
second degree, John Hogan will re- 
ceive sentence some time this week. 
The maximum punishment for the of- 
fen.se is a five-year term In the stato 
penitentiary. 

Hogan was convicted yesterday aft- 
ernoon of stealing a watch from Georgo 
Bell early in the summer. A. Weiner, 
a proprietor of a second-hand store on 
lower Lake avenue, identified Hogan 
as the person who .sold him the watch! 

for $2, which '^^,,^'^|j'j;;^,f"^^„h^^^JJ^i Stomach and Bowel Decay Causes 

These Fearful Odors. 

The improper decay of human wasti 
matter, and the gtoring and damming of 



TWO DINKIES TOGETHER. 
ENGINEER LOSES JOB. 



Foul Breath 

Easily Cured 

This Simple Prescription is Offered 
as a Relief. 



end of the injured dinky was smashed. 
The engineer, who was to blame, h.as 
been discharged. No one was injured. 



WILDES GOES EAST. 

Hibbing, Minn.. Sept. 17.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— State Inspector of 
Mineral Lea.ses F. A. Wildes. Jr., who 
has Just returned from .St. Paul where 
ho attended the meeting of the state 
tax commission and assisted In the 
tabulation of the valuation and ton- 
nage of the Mesaba and Vermilion 
range mines, left toiiay for the James- 
town exposition. Albert St. Vincent, a 
mining engineer, will act for Mr. 
Wildes during the latter's absence. 



SENT TO COUNTY JAIL. I 

I 

Llnd Said to Have Made a Partial Con* ; 
fession. 

Carl R. Lind, who was brought from I 
Eveleth yestenlay to be held to the | 
grand jury on the charge of numerous j 
forgeries on the ranges, is now in the 
county jail. It Is claimed that he has ■ 
practically made a confession to th^i 
police here that he was implicated In j 
the passing of the cliecks, forged with ; 
P. McDonnell's name. Tlie forge J, 
checks ranged in amounts from $1') t.j ■ 
$1'). Lind was identified by two of his: 
Duluth victims a.s the man who pre- 
sented the l^ogus checks to be cashed. ' 
The accused is .said to liave conducted 
a dancing school in the West end and 
promoted .several wrestling and boxing . 
l>outs In tlT^ city. It i^ expected that j 
h^ will enter a plea of guilty to the 
f.)rgery charge against him. 

BUILD RAILROAD 
TO RABBIT LAKE 

Planning for Shipping 

Ore From Cuyuana 

Iron Range. 

Brainerd. Minn.. Sept. 17.— (.Special to j 
The Herald.)— A crew of men are at i 
work surveying a line between the sh.aft : 
near Rabbit lake, which i.s l)eing sunk ' 
by the Brown-Rogers Ore company, and 
Cedar Lake. ')n the Northern Pacific 
railroad. There are al.so rep<jrts that a 
spur is being surveyed to the Pickands- 
Mather shaf n-'ar Loerch. Those in a ', 
position to kn')w pr. diet that ore will Ke ; 
shipped from the Cuyuna range next sea- . 
son. T!ie Brown- Rogers company is j 
erecting a 30-room b<>arding hou.se at the i 
shaft and will, it is said, put in a store 
there. 



EVELETH NEWS NOTES. 

Eveleth. Minn.. Sept. 17.— (Special to 




longed to Bell. 

guilty in about five minutes. 

Mike Burns, who pleaded not guilty] 
to a charge of larceny, changed his. 

plea V> guilty and was given a ninety- -,j^ ^^^j^^^ ■ ^j^^, bowels, cause gases to 
day Jail term. Burns is a carpenter .^,.,^^ which filter through the system and 
and previ<jus to his prt^sent trouble finally escape via the lungs and th-j 
always bore a good reputation. 'breath This condition is caused from , 

George Miller pleaded guilty to taking improper action of the nerves and muscles jThe Herald.)— The Johnson supply coin- 

■ - . -. --J ^ .- I . bought dut J. F. Jauckila's 

shing business. Jauckila is 
d in sealing land for tlic 

... luaitis Lij^ ...I,, ....- ^^^^ 1 D. & 1. K. railroad. 

The^ne ve Sers need revitalizing, so | a-fge ^^^utte an old eniplo>-e of the 
that the proper stimulating effect can bai opera house buffet^,,has departed tor 
giv-.n to the bowels to call forth their , the Twin Cities. M.vD. Ferry of \ ir- 
■ ■ .rknirn •ainr>ir<<r. natural functions. ginia. has beeif .secured by Mr. Doyle 

MAVkIFII ANllKlrVA ■ Mix one ounce of Obifrut Compound Ex- to take his place. ^ 
iTiril\l\ll.l/ nill/l%li^Tn* ; tract, and .seven ounces of part wine or. j^^n Anderson arw Otto .Strand will 

U;- vou prefer unfermented grape Juice, j ^.^.^ another dance In the Monit.>r 

New Y.>rk. .Sept. 16. -That Maxim ^^'^^^ 'I':^;"fl^,'i'!/"'*A^^^^ And- 

Gorky and Mme. Andrleva. the wom- - .^t's^Sl^ prV'script^on-^ls '^^^^^^ and Strkd Vave a succes-sful 

an who accompanied mm on his trip to , jj,^ active principles of rare and tropical ; dancing party in t#ie same hall last 
America, are now married, is the news fruits and contains no narcotics, alcohol, month. Peters<<0's orchestra will play, 
brought from Europe by Harold Mc-in.ineral or animal matter, but is a pure, j Miss Alice Coombs of Litchfield, has 
Grath. the author, who arrived yester- natural fruit compound extract. It is a 'gone to Minneapolis to attend the Min- 
day on the steamer Finland Dr Mc- k^cat invigorator and is especially ef- ngapolis .school of oratory. To Duluth 
Grath a.nd his wife spent the summer i f^'^"^-'^'^ '" ^^" ^""^^ *"** worn-out nerve or- 
on the Island of 



MAXIM GORKY HAS 



Exhibition of Painting 

By David Ericson. at Ro.ims 14 and j 
15, Columbus block, over Gidding'a . 
store. 

WOMAN IS KILLED; i 

MAN IS ACCUSED. 

Wa.seca. Minn.. Sept. 17. — (.Special to 
The Herald.) — Mrs. Clifford Julian was 



jKanism.i. restoring natural functions In a 
C apri, near were [ ^.^,p„ ghort time. 
Gorky lives, and he states postively | our readers will find Obifrut Compound 



that the marriage has taken place. 



I Extract on sale at all first-class druggists. 



she was accompanied by E. C. Jones. 
Miss Coombs has been the principal 
of the Fayal school. 
Earl Ellsworth and Harold Copps left 



EYE, EAR, NOSE 
and THROAT 

EXAMINATION FREE 



508 and 510 Burrows Building 



D. E. H., Bept. 17. 1907. 




I 

> 

I 



If your copper stocks shrunk in value, 
that's no reason that you should walk 
around with a rainy-day face and clothes 
that begin to look shabby. No sir, not any 
more than that when your shares were way 
up, you should throw away your money on 
some high-priced Retail-Tailor. The latter 
was false pride and the former is false 
economy. 

In other words: Wear Columbia 
clothes, Stein-Block tailored or Sincerity- 
Make. Good enough for a Magnate and 
a price-magnet for those who think they 
are poor. Best on Superior street and none 
better on Broadway. 

Suits from $35 down. 

Overcoats and Raincoats from $50 down. 

COLUMBIA CLOTHING CO. 

Foot Note: Hanan Shoes for Men and Women. 



V -^ 



shot and almost instantly killed latoi 
Sunday in the Commercial hotel here. ] 

Rudolph Mun.son of Albert Lea, and 
Mrs. Clifford were together when the 
shot was fired. The former rushed into 
the hall and fell into the arms of a 
chamber maid and expired. Munson 
followed the woman into the hall and 
tried lo get • a statement from her as 
to how the shooting occurred but death 
came too quickly. 

Munson was arrested and placed in 
Jail awaiting further developments. H-j 
claims that Mrs. Julian shot herself. 
.Several guests at the hotel state that 
the woman has been acting strangely 
for several days and that she had 
threatened to take her own life. 



STRUCKJY TRAIN. 

I William Simmons Loses His Life 
I Near Wetmore. 

[ Wetmore, Mich., Sept. 17. — (Special to 

The Herald.)— With his skull fractured 

the body of William Simmons of thl.=i 
place was found on the Duluth, South 
Shore & Atlantic tracks near here. 

The mannf'r in which the man met 
death is not definitely known. The In- 
; dications are, however, that he wa» 
I struck by a train during the night. 



\ 



DEFECTIVE PAGE f 





1 



- % 



_^ 1— ■ 

THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: TUESDAY. SEPTEMBER 17, 1907. 




-^i^;^- 









— * 



your 







FOV 




Buck's Ranges 



Have specially ventilated sanitary ovens, free from cracks 
and joints that collect dirt and dust. This insures clean, whole- 
some food. 

Buck's White Enamel is not a paint— but a white glass en- 
amel burned into the pores of the iron. 

Every Range has a hot blast fire box construction, thus 
giving you a quicker, hotter oven with less fuel consumption. 

Every Range has patent duplex grates which admit oxygen 
to the burning fuel in such quantities that all fuel is consumed 
and all heat-giving power is used. No half-burned coal to in- 
crease your fuel bills. 

Every Range has a Steel Oven, it cannot warp or crack, 
it is absolutely air tight, heats very quickly and bakes to per- 
fection. 

The Fire Box is extra wide and comparatively shallow 
which allows the greatest amount of air to come in contact 
with the burning fuel, thereby causing quick and complete com- 
bustion. 

The Flues are extra large, give a perfect draft and a com- 
plete circulation of heat around the oven. 

The Range Body is made of blued washable steel— of extra 
heavy thickness— lined inside with heavy asbestos board. It 
will never burn out or rust out. 

If You Want the Best 
Get the Buck's! 




AYS' FREE TRIAL 




We will deliver and set up in your home AB- 
SOLUTELY FREE OF CHARGE any Buck's Range 
or Heater that you may select. You may use and 
test it to your own satisfaction, demonstrating bet- 
ter than any other way the absolute superiority of 
the famous Buck's Stoves. 

At the end of Thirty Days, If you find the stove 
or range all that we claim it to be you may pay us 
five dollars and five dollars each month until paid. 
If not entirely as represented we will remove the 
stove from your home, the test has cost you nothing. 

FRENCH & BASSETT do this to demonstrate 
beyond a doubt the superiority of Buck's stoves 
and ranges over any other make. If they were not 
absolutely certain that these stoves and ranges 
would more than prove every test this wonderful 
offer would not be made. 

TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THIS WONDERFUL 
OFFER. Let us deliver a Buck's stove or range to 
your home. 



Buck's Heaters 



Cut your fuel bills way down to the lowest notch. 
Every Heater has an extra large fire pot, with straight 
sides and heavy duplex grate. This combination consumes 
every particle of fuel. 

The Cold Air is taken off the floor by a large flue. This 
forms a complete circulation of warm air in the room, with 
warm floors. 

Every part is fitted by hand. There are no leaky joints, 
no small flues to get clogged with ashes. 

Buck's Heaters have a special patented flue con!?truction 
that other heaters do not have. This insures the consumption 
of every particle of fuel and the production of the greatest heat. 
No Heater made has as great a heat radiating surface as 
Buck's. We can easily prove where Buck's Heaters lead the 
world. 

Every Heater has a ventilated magazine which absolutely 
prevents gas from escaping into the room. 

Every Heater is a double heater. Heats up-stairs room, if 
desired, or this heat may be thrown into the rooms down-stairs 
as desired. 

Extra large ash pans and non_clinker grates make the 
Buck's Heaters the cleanest home heaters on the market. All 
the ashes from shaking the stove goes up the chimney and not 
into the room. 

Buck's Heaters Are 
Best by Test! 



t 





Be Sure Your New Range or Heater Bears This Trade=Mark 

If it does you will have the very best that money can buy and that man can make. A Buck's range or heater is the 
perfection of stove making. No range or heater can possibly be better made. 

We fully guarantee every Buck's range or heater that we sell. It means stove satisfaction. 




We take your old 

stove and make you 

a liberal allowance 




Gorner First St. and 



Tlve, West 



(More Buck's stoves and 
I ranges in use in Duluth 
I than any other make 




~i — 



I 






wp Kwj ' AJ*-*! -Tjcmgyy 



1 




THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 190T. 



THE EVENING HERALD 

AX IXI>EPEXDENT XKWSPAPER. 



Published at Herald Bldg., First St.. Op. P. O. Square. 
THE HERALD COMPAXY. 

Phones: Counting Room, 324; Editorial Rooms, 1126. 



TEN CENTS A WEEK 

EVERY EVEXIXG — DEIJVERED BY CARRIER. 

Single copy, daily $ .02 

One month 45 

Three ni.inths (in advance) ,' 1.30 

Six months (in advance) 2.60 



by the bold voyagers who first set forth from the west- 
ern coast of Europe and pushed out in their frail barks 
into the sea of unknown dreads. 

In those days men knew nothing of the broad expanse 
of ocean except from what they could see of it. They 



noTi5I.jiOssip. 



"One of the greatest drawbacks to au- 
tomoblling In th^c^n^ry is the fact that 
fanners permit ^he^rj horses to run loose 
in the road." said L. M. Hibbard of 
saw, from the shore, that the ocean sloped down to the Minneapolis at th^ St. Liouls. "Cows 

horizon, and that vessels that went a few miles sank I '^^'^'^®"*' <lo«3 an* cats, etc.. in the 

»i L It X f ix . 1- 1 •• road are not so T 

partly or wholly out of sight, depending on the distance a mean proposiu.jn 

courage let them go. What more natural than their fear ' ri«"nwn *^^.!'i ''"•, 

"A horse will m 
i-i I Li. ^Li 1 I .-. ^ aside from the n 

might never be able to get back again, but might slide off , behind h 

into some far-off abyss of horror all the more fearful 



11 m. 



but 



d. but a horse la 
If he is allowed to 
e country roads at 

e no effort to turn 
ng. snorting engine | 



THE WEATHER. 




A ti d Btill the 
Weather is unsettled. 
Yesterday afternoon 
"t cleared off and 
1 o o Ic e d promising, 
hut this morning the 
wind was in the 
northeast and fresh, 
.he skies were over- 
cast, and tlie clouds 
were heavy with 
threats of rain. The 
weather man thinks 
it will be showery to- 



TWENTY YEARS AGO 

Taken From the Columns of The Herald of This Date, 




One ye:ir (in advance) 5.00 because it was unknown. 

Entered at Duluth Postofflce as Second-Class Matter. | Again, men on coasting voyages saw that the further 

south they went, the warmer it became. They naturally 
reasoned from this that if one went too far, he would 



DULUTH WEEKLY HERALD. 



Per 

Six months 

rhrc* months 



.23 



LARGEST CIRCULATION IN DULUTH 



TO SUBSCRIBERS: 

It Is Important when desiring the address of your 
paper changed to give both old and new addresses. 



year $1.00 

.50 run into a sea where the water was boiling hot, and 

where his ship would be engulfed in some whirlpool of 

steam from the nether depths. They knew nothing, of 

course, of the torrid zone and of the other temperate 

zone that lay beyond it. 

But mariners, seeking by water the way to the Orien- 
tal empires from which barbarians barred them by land, 
braved these dangers, far more terrible than those that 
Peary or Wellman will face, and by braving them 
showed that they did not exist. 

The experience of these intrepid navigators has been 
paralleled in the life of every human being, who has 
shivered at dangers of imagination growing out of ignor- 
ance, and has seen them disappear into thin air when 
braved with courage and faith. 



A GLOWING OPPORTUNITY. 

The report ^f the Northeast Experiment farm at 
Grand Rapids for 1906 is out, and it contains some very 
pertinent and timely matter for the consideration of 
those who have at heart the development of the country 
tributary to Duluth. 

The experiment farm is just what its name implies: 
a farm established by the state to see what can be done 
with the land 111 the section in which it is located. It 
experiments with various crops and various soils in 
various ways, to see what the different soils are best 
adapted for, and how the different crops can best be 
handled. The Grand Rapids farm is in exceptionally 
competent and intelligent hands, and the work of Super- 
intendent A. J. McGuire will be of immense value to 
Northeastern Minnesota if its farmers and its promoters 
take the results of his experiments to heart. 

It is significant that there is nowhere a man more 
earnest in his faith in the possibilities of the soil of this 
section than Superintendent McGuire. He says in his 
report: "The future of Northern Minnesota is no longer 
a speculation. It is only a matter of time. Its agricul- 
tural possibilities are past the experimental stage. There 
are various reasons why it is not receiving' its share of 
immigration, but more particularly it is due to the fact 
that in the past its disadvantages were better known than 
its advantages." And nobody is doing more than Mr. 
McGuire to make its advantages known and to turn its 
disadvantages into advantages. 

He puts his finger on the vital spot in the develop- 
ment of Duluth and its surrounding territory when he 
says that during 1905 10,000 cars of vegetables other than 
potatoes were shipped into Duluth and Superior, practi- 
cally all of it grown outside of Northern Minnesota. 
The same thing is true of the butter, meat and eggs con- 
sumed in Duluth and tributary communities. 

Every dollar's worth of vegetables, milk, butter, eggs 
and even meat consumed in Duluth ought to be raised 
within a radius of 100 miles of the city. They could be 
raised there, to the common profit of producer and con- 
sumer, because the producer could make handsome re- 
turns while providing fresher and better produce than 
Duluth now receives at prices considerably lower than 
those that now rule. 

The soil is here, the market is here, and all that is 
needed are the farmers to till the soil and raise stock 
upon its idle areas for the market, which will gladly 
absorb all that can be produced. There is no danger of 
overproduction. The market is certain to grow faster 
than the supply. 

There is nowhere in this country a finer opportunity 
for profitable cultivation of the soil than exists today 
around Duluth. A prolific soil, cheap land, a profitable 
market near by. form a combination that spells wealth 
to the producers who will seize the opportunity and 
€stabli.-.h themselves upon the land. 



road ahead of the 
rate his fright 
him. Usually it 



plug on down the flight and possibly tomorrow, though he 
aohine at whatever , '•"* optimistic today and expects the north- 
be able to carry I Ji^f'st wind to shift to westerly tomorrow. 
.. ..-._, Impossiible to pass The range of temperature in Duluth yes- 

tne animal, as anylfcurt will only causa 'l^'^s-y was narrow, from a minimum of 
It to Increase ips afeed. I'll l>e< I have]*' ^^ a maximum of 54 degs. 
boen in a ma<«ii^ when horses have .^ i'"^^^ ago today it was cloudy and 
traveled ahead of ua for four or five ; ^nreatening, but no rain came except a 
miles. I suppose the owner of the ani- M®,!!?. ^^^o^ors the night before, 
n.aia were furious because we drove 1 ^"^ ^"" ^'^^^ t^^is morning at 5:47 and 
them off. lii^t the boasts would not stoD ' !;f's tonight at t>:17, making 12 hours and 
or get out of the way until we struck I *®c,'"'""i^^ of sunlight, 
a cross road. A cow will step out of 1 St^* **'"• R'chardsou of condlUons: 
the way and pay little attention, and the' ^"®, Oregon coast disturbance 
same is true of other animals but ther'"^^^'^ "» center to Alberta while 
horse 13 different \%^^^ central Monday nioniiag over I^^^^ 

"It will be only a matter of time until i --^^''iP'' ^'^■^ advanced to the eastern 
the automobile route between Duluth 1*-*"*'*'^" provinces. Both low pre.ssures 
and the Twin Cities will be^ a vervnon r^*^^," ^^'^ ^'^^^^ '>f '•^'"^ 'lurins Monday 
ular one. It would be Dooularnow^f *^}'< '^«^ "^«^*^^ *" ^^^ ^"'^'^ Region, upper 
i'^^..r:i^l=^..^r':?.^^ bmerTondi^io^^^ Missouri valleys and 'ex- 



**»Bell & Miller of the Ideal coffee Just before going to dinner. Cashier 
house, have leased quarters and will j Ware counted and prepared for delivery 

establish a similar institution at Ash- i *'' ^^® ^"1«.*!^a.^,^^'^" Range Railroad 
,„„^ u ■ ■ X. ■ . I company $20,000 In currency. He laid 

land, beginning busine ss next week. | the package down and upon his re- 

♦•♦Tv,/. oi.,»,^i ^f th^ »«i u- , turn was unable to find it. He does 

•♦The alumni of the Michigan unl- n^t remember where he put It. and th» 
versity gave a reception to their dis- question is who took it? 

tlnguished instructor. Judge Cooley. and 

wife at the West hotel. Minneapolis. | ♦**Mrs. A. D. Taylor returned home 
last evening. Fred Reynolds and ; from a long visit to Canada by tha 



Judge White of Duluth, were present. 



Campana this morning. 



has 
the 
ake 



ular one. It would be" popular "now 

provements'wm V"on^';jrju''.Si^'\"nd^Tn'P"'^^ S'^"^'^ '•^»" ^»«« ^^u 

eisht or t-n years or Dotsiblv beforVr a'^^^ Texas Florida and Tenne.ssee. 
expect to see a fine ?oadw'av between i ^"i^nl of high barometric pressure overlie 
*.u" ,, r^,'io«ay oetween 1 Middle Atlantic states and the L^ke Re- 

r in the 
pressures are 



CONDITIONS ARE SOUNa 

No matter to what absurd depths stock quotations 
may go, the situation in this country is sound, prosperity 
is undisturbed, and if there has been a marked recession 
in activity it is because lack of facilities made it neces- 
sary, and the country and every person in it will be 
better off than before because of that recession. 

E. H. Gary, chairman of the board of directors of the 
United States Steel corporation, puts the situation com- 
pactly and truthfully in an interview reported elsewhere 
in The Herald tonight. 

He says that the country, in order to keep up the 
pace at which it was going, had to have between $500,- 
000,000 and $1,000,000,000 more capital. It cuuld not get 
it, so it had to slow up. 

However, within a few weeks will begin the market- 
ing of the fall crops, and these should bring in, under 
normal conditions from now on, $7,000,000,000. 

This will supply the additional capital needed. The 
money that is now going into the harvesting of these 
crops will be released to be used in manufacturing indus- 
tries, and with the additional capital derived from the 
sale of this year's crops abroad, where the markets are 
hungrily waiting to buy them at high prices, industrial 
activity will be resumed immediately. 

Indeed, the tide has already turned everywhere except 
in the copper industry, which is suffering a reaction 
caused by too much booming of the prices of copper 
metal and copper stocks. The curtailment of production 
will put copper metal on a substantial basis very shortly, 
and copper stocks will follow it there. The sittiation 
will be all the better because the temptation to immedi- 
ately boom copper metal prices will not be strong, and 
they can be maintained upon a level that will stimulate 
purchases while giving ample profit to the producers. 



TherJ is ev^rv rt\ ^''^'l ""^.^'^^ Lakes. ; gloi.T attended by cooler weafhe 
be one anVno rt^J:'.^ "^^^ l'^'"^ ^^^°"'!il«^^ district. Falling pressu 
not be" ^ '^'"^^"^ "^^^y ^^^'^'^ should causing higher temperatures in the Da"- 

|kotas and Colarado. The barometer is ris- 
ing rapidly in tho plateau region. Condi - 



***County Clerk Pressnell went to 

tajk« 



***J. P. Beck, the paymaster, and 
his assistant. John Mailman, left this St. Paul last evening and will 
morning on the Duluth & Iron Range | part in the sham battle today 
to pay off the employes of the rallro.ad 
company and the Minnesota Iron com- 
pany. The amount let loose will be be- 
tween 160,000 and $70,000. 



co'ngSSfathit'" ^^fy}^" ?'"®*' ^^^^^ areltions favor showery woathef in this "lo- 
fArt tnit ,-^ themselves on the •• " 
wreck, fhi^.^'r" ^''""^ *'*^'^» "'^ serious 

fit e recifd Uiff', """5 ^""^ '^'^'^^"^ ^^^^ the 
Hiie record will be kept up." s,iid M I 

ve^ulZU'i:^'"'"--^-''''^ ^t t'i^ Lenox, "-rhe 
pessimists advis- u.s to wait until Novem 



Abilene 
ber befon."~}v^a.K,V" '^'^"t"- '^"^" govern- 1 Battleford 
Some of [he mfw > ""^ ^^^ '^'""^ '■'^*^«'*'^- 1 Bismarck 
hisTorv of na ?.?•''■. 'i^'^^^^'*''"^ storms in tlie EJoston 
nistor> of navigation on the Gr' at Lake, 

^^^?_':><=.CH'"'-^^'l i'l NoveTuber 



the cality during tonight and Wednesday. 

Following were y^sterdavs highest 
temperatures as recorded by the weath- 
er bureau; 



90! Marquette ... 
52 I Medicine Hat 



-•' I Memphis 



wil.^?»l^V ';T''-';V^ "lo^boii^ve that hLs^ory 
M.JU repeat Itself in this regard this .ea- 

au'ie 7uI!iZ *'. ^^*' P^<^1« of Duluth re- 
on thi hi^ rV'^ V'*^ passenger busines., 
snmm^. ^}F ''l'*'-' freiglit.rs during the 
frilhT^ "^'^"^^•^ There is scarcely a 

lonL^th^t ''"/•''■" ^^^ h^'-'"^'- all summer 
long that does not carry a bunch of 

passengers, and this Is particularly true 

of the ore carriers. Tl o total for the 

ra\'e"o.?,"1 "^ '"'" P'-^^'t^y »^A« fliures! 
df ^1 S^^' '^''?^ '*•* * rule are not so preju- 
D^fnl« l«i?^,^ carrying passengers as some 
nTfhl,^ ^^■'- ^^« """e b-^at^ are most 
?^n .ol" ^''^'PP^'l with regular quarters 

f?<ht %ort"*rh''/^"*^ '^ ^^^ people are the 
H,^ \.i *• \^''^ ^^"^ '"«'■« apt to add to 

camaih^K"'':^ ^^^'^''' ^«>'as« for the 
captain than otherwise. The wrong sort 

a?^wav:%?T" ^"^"f- b"^ us^'lly there 
are ways of suppressing them." 

• • • 

staHed'^'lVrh^*^. """^ °^ bu.siness can be 
started without un.scrupulous nersona 

nlt^i^'j^."!,?."'^ ''•y'"^ to%^t mone^by 

rago at the Spalding. — 



• .*>! Milwaukee . 
. .7'J ;Miiuieclosa . 
,.h»i I Montgomery 
, .5- jMoorhead ... 
..Si New York . 

..St I Norfolk 

..86 [Oklahoma .., 
. .SJIOinaha 



..flO 
..W 
..S4 
..S2 
..56 
..S6 
..60 
..82 
..84 
.M 
90 



Buffalo 

Cairo 

Calgary 

Chai-leston , 
Chicago .... 
Cincinnati . 
Davenrvjrt . 

Denver 

Detroit 

DeviU Lake 72' Prince Albert ....4t> 

I>>dKe WlRapid City 72 

I>uluth 54'R»>gina 62 

EJdmonton 58 '.St. l»uis S8 

El Paso 88|.St. Paul 08 

Escanaba 74 San Antonio 90 



***The following real estate transfers 
have been recorded: 

Martha A. Crane to Richard Mar» 
shall, lot 10, block 129, Portland dl- 
♦♦•The rumor that the Chicago Mil- 1 vision. $600. 
waukee & St. Paul railroad has pur-; William McRae to Frank H. Cuttlngr, 
cha.sed terminal and elevator ground at lot 37, block 127, Third division, $750. 

West Superior is perhaps true as re- 

gards the elevators. Terminal ground, | ♦**Miss Jessie Cole of Akron, Ohio, 
however, has been owned in Duluth oy , Is visiting Duluth friends. 

this company for some time past, and | 

the headquarters will be at this point, I ***Mrs. I. C. Aldrich and family from 
of course. j Minneapolis, have joined Mr. Aldrich 

'here and will make Duluth their futuro 



♦♦♦George Room, a member of the 'home 
Montreal police force, is a guest of 
Alderman Kennedy at the Michigan 
hotel. 



♦**The Union National bank has been 
the victim of a mysterious robbery. 



***A farewell reception win be given 
to Mrs. R. S. Munger and daughter, 
Alice, they being about to depart for 
Pari.s, where Miss Alice will be placed 
in school. 



MINNESOTA OPINIONS. 

Austin Transcript: It is stated that 
the drainage of .swamps would add 80,- 



DULUTH A ND THE HERALD. 

North Branch Review: The London 
ru^,^ ,^^, - , , -• — , Genllowoman ai^ks: "Why are nit'n bet- 

OOOiloo acres of rich land to the agn- , ter looking than women?' -Duluth Her- 
„.i,,..^, _...., .. .^. ........ .-...,.., ^j^ 

The Review would suggest that it is 
usually because they look like their 
molhors. 



«.• v>.^,.f \-fh..,- c- ^uhi^i^l resources of the United States. 

I !p*^' ,,'^,'^^*^"r(. ^ L*»^e ^^ Lincoln's rat holes, this will 

8^ Portland. Or 64 bear i...%kino- intr. 



bear looking into. 



Grand Haven 74 

G-reen Bay 8:i 

Havre W 



.72 
.64 
.80 



Helena 

Houg-hton .... 

Huron 

Jacicaonville . 
Kansas City 
Knoxville .... 

I>a Cros.se 82 

Little R-jck 88 

Los Angeles 60 



8;in Francisco ...6S 
jSanta Fe 76 



Luverne Herald: Re%ised Edition of 

Reasons, "Why Governor Johnson Should 

be re-elected—tExpurgated and Knlarged. 

i Reason No. 60— Minnesota cannot afford 

I to be outdone In politeness by Wiscou- 

I sin and Iowa. 



S. Ste. Marie . 

.Shroveport 

Spokane 

Swlfth Current 
..80 iWa.shinKton .. 

...90|Wichlta , 

...82 Wlnnemucca .. 



Winnioeer ... 
Yellowstone 



..72 
..92 
..62 
..'>.S 
..84 
..S8 
..74 
..60 
..68 



Departm-:>nt of Agriculture, Weather 



for ga.soline enginef ' fo7'launches*^'a'^*nn i P^^eau, Duluth, Sept. 17. -Local forecast 



A TRIFLING ERROR. 

It becomes the painful duty of The Herald to set 
upon the right track its amiable but argumentative and 
somewhat boastful friend the Superior Telegram. 

The Telegram in its issue of lost night says, with a 
manner that indicates that it has scored another point in 
favor of Superior and against Duluth. that Superior is 
the western terminal of the lakes, intimating that Duluth 
is a mere way station. Says the Telegram: 

Boats which clear for Lake Erie take clearance 
papers for Buffalo, the eastern terminus which en- 
titlea them to land at any intermediate port. Com- 
ing west the clearance papers are taken to Superior. 
If for any reason the boat needs to land h,-re. Clear- 
ance for D'.iluth du^3 not include Superior but clear- 
ance for Superior incl-ide.s Duluth, b-cau.s'e ofTicially 
that city is Intermediate between the two terminals. 

It inakes no great difference except that it might con- 
fuse s':>me of the vessel captains who happen to read 
the Telegram, but this statement is all wrong. Vessels 
always take clearance for the most distant port they are 
likely to reach, which entitles them to stop at any inter- 
mediate port. But there is no difference in this respect 
between Duluth and Superior, the government never 
having decided which is the more remote port from Lake 
Erie. .\ vessel may go to Superior on a clearance for 
Duluth, and it may go to Duaith on a clearance for 
Superi:)r. 

The Herald admires very much the commendable 
manner in which the Telegram sticks up for Superior, 
but it mustn't deal in misleading information that is 
likely to cause useless annoyance to vessel captains 
without benefiting Superior in the slightest degree. 



oxamni.^ Tv,« >" ^" " launche.s as an 

t^hir,^ ^^^ demand for them is some- 
thing unmense, and now th^re aro dea^r« 
in the market who pick up engines tiiat 

annVir- uiP"^^"^ *"*' PO"'''^ them until they 
appear like new. and th^n sell them for 

kZ. "T'*'"^''- "^"^ '••'"^'t being that the 
^>"y«/- d'^^JS not immediately discover the 
condition of the engine "'^cover tne 

elne,^^«r'"*i'"'*\^ "^ ''"5"'" of marine en- 
no^rf.f* " amateurs at the business and 
cannot easily detect the diff^renc^ be- 
Lof^K ,V^ 'i''^ and a new m.achine. They 
get hold of a worn-out article and then 
^Im'^n^.^Vw^"*'*"^^ '''■^au.s.. the parlicull? 
.sample they happen to have does not 
old''^;n T"^ practice of dl.spo.sing of these 
old engines as new should be stopped 
some way Its a bad blow to a popular 
and healthful sport." t-^mr 

• • ♦ 



for twenty-four hours ending at 7 p. m 
Wedne.sday: Duluth, Superior and vicin- 
ity. Including the Mcsaba and Vermilion 
Iron range.s— Sliowens tonight and possibly 
Wedne.sday; not much change In tem- 
perature; fresh to brisk easterly winds 
shifting to westerly during Wedne-sday. 
H. W. RICHARDSON. 

Local Forecaster. 



Warren Register: It Is the specter of 
a re-nomination for Governor Johnson. 
which, like Bajiquo's ghost, will not 
down, that makes so many Republi.iiin;; 
shy when tlieir names are mentioned m 
connection with the governorship of 
Minnesota next year. 



Little Falls Herald: The suggestion 
of Johnson for a third term for gov- 
ernor gives most of the Republican press 
a conniption fit. 



Windom Reporter: Charlie Towne la 
talked of as a Democratic po.ssibility fof 
the presidential nomination. Let us see — 
Charlie used to live in Duluth, and then 
there was another Duluth man who 
won fame. We believe his name waa 
Whlteman. 



THE TRUST MOVEMENT. 

Suppose, just for the sake of argument, that we admit 
the contentions of the trust promoters that trusts and 
combinations of big business are a positive benefit to 
society; that they reduce expensive friction, eliminate the 
wastes of competition, and permit cheaper production 
and cheaper marketing of the commodities they handle. 

In admitting that we go farther than many of us are 
ready to go, yet we take a stand that has much logic and 
philosophy underlying it. 

But, even after we have gone so far wc are still, to 
adopt a current phrase of much suggestion, "from Mis- 
souri; we will have to be shown." 

What we will have to be shown is where we come in 
on it. We find that after a decade in which the elimina- 
tion of competition has made extraordinary strides, we 
are no better off than we were before, if we are as well 
off. Our wages are perhaps higher, and our employment 
steadier, but we have pretty generally had to get our in- 
crease in wages through the force of our labor organiza- 
tions, and our steadiness of employment would have 
come in good times even if there never had been such a 
thing as a trust. 

Vet the trust process has had full sway, and has been 
permitted to io pretty nearly anything it wanted to. p^ul; c. Pre.sly. Clonuet, Minn.; Mrs. J 
Why have we had no benefit out of it? L. Owens, J. MoCaffey, Virginia; Minnie 

ri„ .1 I c. I 1 A. JohUBon, Virginia; N. P. Nelson, Mm 

iicv.ause the benehts have gone to the promoters who neapolis; Mr. and Mis. F. D. MUler 

got the dift-erent plants together an« then issued stock in fli^^rc. 5"vvh'.elS^. J%" D^sis^S?^: 
the resulting trust amounting to several times what thev apoli.s; E. H. Bither, Bovoy, Minn.; Mr. 
t^-i,A *^^ tu^ ■.,^- III.. , and Mrs. Elpuney. Morning Sun. Iowa; 

paid tor the individual plants, requiring us, the consura-lMr. and Mrs. L. P.. Kelly, Ashtabula. 

ers. to pay dividends on this watered stock; because the 
people that control the trusts have been able to take 
practically all of the benefits of the trust movement, if 
there are any benefits, for themselves. And there must 
be benefits, too, because these beneficiaries have accumu- 
lated immense fortunes. They have denied the benefits 
of consolidation to the people, and have taken them all 



T'A^*?® St. Louis: Mrs. E. J. Murohv 
FT"4rh=i.^-'P,"- R-^'i'naon, Mlnn.aSs! 
Two Harbors, Minn.; M. H. Heisey, Si. 
Paul; A^ Nelson. Cloquet. Minn.; F C 
Lindt. St. Cloud. Minn.; M Skoglund, 
N' f^'il-,^- A. Koers, Biwahlk. Minn.; 
N. A. Holmer Virginia; K. W. McLag- 
gan. Gordon, Wis.; J. McDonald, Hibbing; 
A. Anderson. M4iwaulwifr; A. P. Kirscli 
Crojkston. Minn.; Mr. and Mrs. D p.»t- 
tigrew, M. L. Higher, Minneapolis; T. H 
Winn, St. Paul; W. M. Toole. Louisville, 
Ky.; G. A. Spielman. Brighton, Iowa; Mr. 
and Mrs. W. Gardn.-r. Cass Lake. Wis.; 

E. M. Smith, A. H. Powers, Hibbing; J. 

F. Cudy; Cloquet. Minn.; Mrs. J. P 
Trebilcock, Coleralne, Minn. ; A. L. Mc- 
Laren. Chicago; P. Purcell. Mrs. F. Pur- 
cell, Madison, Wi.s. ; H. B. Smith, St. 
Paul; G. Carl.son, Hibbing; E. Flnck, Vir- 
ginia; V. Powers, Hibbing; F. B. Ros.som. 
Virginia; Mrs. T. H. Jenkins. Nellie 
Davis. Hibbing; Mrs. T. W. Jackman, 
Buffalo; F. W. Zerry, St. Paul; Miss 
Mary Jones, Mancliester. England; M. 
Hughes. Hibbing; Mr. and Mrs. H. Pel- 
lers. Port Arthur; G. Hunit^r, Tower, 
Minn.; Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Brownell, Two 
Harbors; J. H. Hogan, Kerrick, Minn.; 
Bertha Lavign, T%vo Harbons; J. J. Mad- 
den, Dedham. Wis.; F. Bailey. Racine. 
Wis.; J. J. Carroll, Toledo. Ohio. 

• • • 

At the McKay: C. W. Buttz. Butt«- 
ville. N. D.; F. Beul. Petrolia; A. C. El- 
liott. Mora, Minn.; C. S. Hale, Minne- 
apolis; Mr. and Mrs. Moorey, St. Paul; F. 
Harris, Minneapolis ; J. H. Carlson, Hib- 



Clv'cago. Sept. 17.— Forecasts until 7 p. 
m. Wedne.sday: Upper Michigan, Minne- 
sota and the Dakotos- Local rains tonight 
and Wednesday; slight temperature 
changes. 



.UUGHING GAS. 



Cleveland Leader: 
thoughts. Jones." 

'1 was Just wondering if it would 
safe to touch you for $10." 



A penny for your 
be 



Washington Star: "Remember." said 
the serious patriot, "that you are mak- 
ing history." 

"Well." answered Senator Sorghum, 
"I'll do my best. But history Is lika 
most results of human endeavor. I nev- 
ed yet saw any made to suit everybody." 



Utica. N. Y., Press: A Duluth court 
recently granted twenty divorces in one 
day. in .several other cases which cam* 
up a continuance was granted, and a few 
of the cases were stricken from the calen> 
dar. Cruelly and des<-rtlon were the 
most common reasons given, and the 
woman was the applicant in most of the 
cas<.-s. Minnesota men must bo .straying 
from the path of rectitude in quite large 

numbers. 

Appleton Press: Some of the country ed- 

itors now think it would be much nicer Albert L>-.% Tim<»s-Enterprlse: George 
all around if we had a Republican gov- ' B(>rn;ird Shaw says that three meals a 
ernor. Maybe. We thought so at the day are exce.ssive, which l<^ads The Du- 
electlons of 1904 and liWtf, but since then Juth Herald to remark that tlit-y cost 
we have changed. 



mon*»y too, th.'s.- days. It might be that 
cutting to two m'^als a day would not only 
Cove Pione'^r; Present day condit'ons* •>'- more h<'altliful for the participator, 
are demonstrating that poor Ignatius I but would al.so have a tendency to greatly 



lessen the cost of living by cutting down 
the demand for food stuffs. Why not try 
it for a while? 



l>>nnelly was simply in advance of th^ 
times in foreseeing the dang-^rous en- 
croachments of corporate greed upon t.he 
rights of the people. He was the first 

man of any prominence, in this staif Minneapolis Telegram: Whatever ben»> 
at least, to sound- an alarm and make ' ^^^ Duluth will bent-iit this section of the 
open warfare against the monopolistic'^*'""''"'' ^ "^ '^'"'^ '^"'i' ^ short distance 
iiolders of watered stocks. He suf- ' ^^'^^^ there, and the bigger Duluth gets, 
fered sneers, insult, ridicule and the most : ^'^'' '^'^^ter our markets will be.— Motley 



brutal malignment for espousing th.» I ^''tcury. 

very things which are today making! ■^"** whatever benefits Motley and Du 

Roosevelt. La Follette Folk and others ' '"^^'^ *^"*^ ^'*"*'- section of the country will 



popular heroes. 



benefit Minneapolis and the rest of the 
state. 



f5auk Rapids Sentinel-Pree Press- R.Vli- 
ert M. La Follette has announced him- u^"''*^-"? ,"''J!"*y= ^^^ ^he least of the 
self ;i3 a candidate for president He ' ^^ ""^^ Duluth has evf'ry rea.son to be 
won't be nominated That's no reason i P'"*'"*^ '^f a'"*^ ^^'' News Tribune and The 

he shouldn't be nominated. There is i '''•^T"'".^ ""'"'^''^V ^"^'^ P^P*-'"'-^ ^^•^" ''»"'« 
none. xutre is>.vv-itli the very best newspapers In the 
I country. 

all' 



Philadelphia Press: "Jack Strong looks 
llk>^ a pretty healthy fellow." 

"Healthy? I should say! Why, ho 
doesn't even get ri ... 

of being examined 



There wll! in 
uninstructed delo- 



Brainerd Tribune: 
' probability be more 
ga 

staie convention than ever before in the 
history of the state. 



Virginia Rnternris<^: If the Duluth News 
tes7n■'^he'VxT'Minna;ota Rep^^^^^^^ '"'Y-^, 'S'^ black, place your beta 

tie convention than ever before in /)!;« ^^"^^ "^ ^''^'^*'* ^^ i''" ^'''^ ^^ ^■"»- 



North Branch Review: George Bernard 
Shaw says three meals a day are exces- 



nervous at the thought j deSy a man was '^i^^^i^.?".';!'' ^i?'' slve.-Duluth Herald. 

Ifor life insurance." Idlv n ^e^ Yo7w JhThir'\,l!\'' *'^^^'' i Si^iw must have been a country news- 

Chicago Tribune: Ambish-Is there tracting public atiTntionH^ ?„ii^,, ^J „. ., ^, 

anyt-hlng in this story wnting business? 1 dealing In real f^tat^ h<Th fanm "o^^ ' ^'"n'^aP'-'l's Telegram: Duluth is In 

Naggus-Is there? Rich girl fell in love city property TW;.,n-fr.. and j the public eye more than any oth.^r city In 

with stor>. written by frlen,r of mine and as nic^'^lover d^^^ wilf ^^^1'*' "'« ■''^''''^- ^"'^ "'^ ^^"' excellent dally 



married him. Should say so. 

Baltimore Ajnerican: "That composi- 
tor is awful mad with the literary edi- 
tor." 

"Why?" 

"Because the liter.iry editor threw his 
poetry out of thf* window and then told 
him to follow copy." 

Chicago Record- Herald: "I never 
spent a Jollar without getting value re- 
ceived." boasted the shabby-looking old 
millionaire. 



"Well, dad," r-'plied his son 



do here, either. 



we newspapers are doing more to put it there 
than any of us ordinary mortals are 
able to compreh'^nd.— Pine City Pioneer. 
Whf^n you cjnie right down to it, can 



of®^H,'i *^^"^*".'" H*^'^''!: One of the best 

?he Dubu''c""Jchooir"«y'''' '^ ^^^ grist : you "think ':n•m■u;M^^7f■■anyt'hing^;lse th"^ 
market schools are preparing fori puts a city in the public eye? 



A Ti-ibuui to Minnesota. 

Kansas City star: It is surprising that 
the three chief assistants of the at'ornpy 
general Of the United States. Mr. K.!- 
\.,^^;,,: Severance and Mr. P-mJy 
pmI"^*^ a' ..£?,'"*^ ^'""" ^^^ state of Minne: 



^^..i^"?'lr^nf;?"^L«;l-r state; hav;^ 




^, , ^"^'^S^e m making political comparisons Its! 

, -. "The conscience fund ""asses have an assertive honest v' 3 n^ i 

Is a curious Institution," said the j !fi effective Indepondonce. --^^ *"**! 



Washington Star 



stranger In the city. 
"Yes," answered 



Th»y 



fl.^^'o^;"ll -^?'?5?^'^''t a>iurality"of 161.^ i 



Ohio; H. A. Townsend, Wadena. Mmn. ; 
R. J. Patrick, Eau Claire, Wis. 



THE TERROR OF THE UNKNOWN. 

Wellman, who would have braved the dangers of the 
polar re^.4ion in an airship, has given it up, for this year 
at least, and is coming home. Peary, who has faced 
these dangers before in a ship and wanted to do it again, 
was forced some time ago to abandon his plans for this 
time and to put them over to next year. 

And the world, undismayed at the failure of these 
two courageous explorers to get away, wags on without 
missing a turn. 

Probably so long as there is a spot on the face of 
the earth that man has not yet set foot upon, there will 
be men aching for a chance to tread them, if for nothing 
more than to be able to say that they have done what 
nobody has done before them. The practical results 
of the polar search are not plainly visible, if any exist 
yet there are several men straining every effort to reach 
the pole, and there will always be men of that mind until 
the pole is finally reached, after which it will be an old 
Story. 

Call it foolhardiness or braverj' as you please, it is 
hard to withhold the tribute oi admiration of the daring 
of an Andree, who set forth in a balloon for the pole and 
never came back, or of a Peary or a Wellman, who may 
meet the same fate when they are able to set forth. 

Yet the dangers, real or imaginary, that confront 



At the Lenox: Mr. and Mrs. C. L. 
Bates. Benson, Minn.; Mr.s. Delia Jumo. 
Rhinelander, Wis.; J. J. Schutz, Hough- 
ton. Mich.; Mrs. XI. A. Williams, Buf- 
falo; J. H. Hllshmay, Pennsylvania; E. 
T. Bliss, Chicago; L. Nyholm, Minne- 
apolis; P. Spade, Chicago; w. A. Mahan. 
St. Ignace, Mich.; C. W. Kelly. North 

fh»rv.c»1,r.><, ...t,:i« t-u I L 1 . ' Dakota; E. M. Gunn. Schenectady, N. 

inemseives, while the people have complacently given ;Y.; J. R. Gray. St-n-ens Point, Wis.; Mr. 

them tariff schedules that prohibited the entrance from kf^^.f ^/- r"" ,^^eefJh?'&oS, ^1s".?"ll: 
abroad of competition that would have forced them to ' l^- Porneir. Minneapolis; G. T. Daly, St. 
^aA.,~^ +1,.;.. „_• I ..1 • .- Paul; A. A. Caswell. A. Prirt, Anoka, 

reduce their prices and their nrohtv Lviinn.; A. G. Smith, A. E. Lirkin, H. E, 

^aul; W. A. Mahan. .St. 
... , ,. ,-f,"— , Mich.: W. E. Tubbs, River Falls, 

you will want to abolish the trusts and return to the old I Wis.; A. H. Guniper, Swan River. Minn.; 

F. E. Leonard. St. Paul; F. J .Schnid^r. 
St. Louis; N. A. Anderson, .Stillwater; 




Cleveland L^ad>r: "What's the surest 
sign that a man is getting old?" 

"When he begins to tell peopl.» that he 
feels just as young as he ever did." 

Philadelphia Press: "I'm sorry they've 
accomplished so little at The Hague" 
said the mild-mannered man. "War is a 
terrible thing; terrible." 

"Oh! I don't know 



h?"1fic?at. '"^^ -^ ""*^^"- ^' -^ P"^- 



Reflection.s of a l>aoh4>lor. 

hi'ir^d^'^hl'^''"-. ^'-^' ^''•'■^ ^'•'^ S'> hard. 
..^n^.tl^^i'*' ^ diamond won't make an 



Paper. 

He was a small Investor, 

Affairs he c>)uldn't boss. 
So when ills stocks went tumbling 

He suffered paper loss. 

No matter who belittled 

The sure elT^ct of that. 
Ills landlord shortly told him 

To hunt a paper flat. 

His butcher, ti>o, determined 

His credit had to stop. 
And so he had when hungry 

To eat a paper chop. 

And since his sw.'eth">art frowned ■© 

Upon this sort of life, 
He had to be content^^d 

With just a paper wife. 

Hf thought thf con.stItutlon 

Might save th» rights, mayhip; 
Th-; outf-onie only s!;ow<>d him 
j He wore a paper cap. 

l-MrLANDBURGH WILSuN in the Now 
York Sun. 



i!r;iression. 



All tho Alphabet. 

Bo.oton Glob>^: Each of th'! following 
,. , _s(-ntpnc>^3 contains all the letters of the 

>ou can learn a good deal about wo- i^lP^^ibet: 
ii"u ^ ""^ trying to understand them ' Th^ quick brown fox jumps over the 
When a girl won't deceive her father i'^^^ '^'^f- 
aoout her beaux she hasn't any fathor Pack my box with five dnz^n liquor Jugs. 



■v ^ . r-^plied the other. ^ , - — >.• i. o.^>y itmiiT 1 — ' - -..-.. ..,,,^„. j..^^. 

ifou don t mean to say you approve i , *-^'^'" , ^-'"'^ very u.seful to k.'Pn meii ' J^'^'^ quickly extemporized five tow 
>t?' "^ I from doing all their talkine- a4rain,f ,h"|bags. 

government. 



of 

"I certainly do. 
mai»s." 



Im 



a publisher of I 



If you do not admit the logic of the trust movement, ' f'^^f,"' *''' ^'^"^' ^- ^ Mahan. .St. 



E. Anderson. Braham; E. Rogers, Vir- 
ginia; C. L. Tanner, Frazee, Minn.; Mr. 
and Mrs. F. French, Marquette; J. M. 



that 



THE PASSING S tiOW. 

Never knew of a storm, financial or weather 
lasted always. 

* ♦ ♦ 

Fashion outlawed straw hats Sept. I, but the man of 
independence and courage will wear his as long as it 
feels comfortable. 

* * * 

An Italian poet won $10,000 in a lottery, and says he 
will write no more poetry. And yet they are putting 
the lotteries out of business I 

* ♦ • 

A shortage of Teddy bears is reported, but a good 
many people are more interested in their desire to see a 
these intrepid searchers arc no greater than those faced shortage of stock exchange bears. 



competitive system. Yet it is doubtful if that could pos 
sibly be done economicall)'. 

But if you do admit the benefits of the trust move 
ment that Hne<s nnt ni..an tlnf ,,r.„ fl,«.- k u j .t. i Martin. Virginia; T. Taylor, Edmonton, 
mcni, mat aoes not mean that you thereby abandon the Alberta; G. L. Roper. Two Harbors; W. 

fight against them, for the proper fight, if the movement '^"'' ^^- L*'"** , , , 

is logical and beneficial, is for control in the interests of At the Spalding: T. Williams, gkel- 

the oeoole ton. Conn.; C. F. Heidbrink. Daylon, 

.^ , Ohio; J. M. Schwartz, St. Paul; W. R. 

If the trust movement is left without control the Macdonald. Chicago; W. W. Kleine. 

people are robbed because human selhshness, unregu-iE R Poi-nh. St. Paul; H. W. Miller. 

lated. runs riot in the possibilities of the trust movement. I g^'"^^f°ikS: Mr°''rnd"°Mr^:'"'F''*"sing; 

Putting the curb of public control upon the methods Minneapolis; Mr. and Mrs. F. G. Jewett! 

and earnings of the trusts might divert a proper share of | Wugent,' Dowaglac.' M'ich'.;^w"Bennon; 

Minneapolis; W. H. Healy. Fort Dodge, 
Iowa; J. R. Payne. Chicago; Minnie J. 
Don. Lincoln. Neb.; Mr. and Mrs. J. I. 
Sauvel. Smlthville, III.; Mr. and Mrs. F. 
D. Lyon, Minneapolis; W. E. Harwood. 
Eveleth; E. Bystrom. Hud.son, N. Y.; 
W. H. Young, Ashtabula, Ohio.; H. R. 
Rochester. Dayton. Ohio; J. E. Rich- 
ards, Perham, Mlna.; Mrs. E. Grans, 
Port Arthur; Mrs. H. A. McKibbin, Mrs. 
L Powley Port Arthur: R. E. Daniel. 
Calumet, Mich.; C. M. Rose. St. Paul; 
E M. Robinson: Minneapolis; Mr. and 
Mrs. E. Ynngmpji, Philadelphia; G. W. 
Markeli Wilmington, Del.; J. H. Os- 
borne, London, England; Mr. and Mrs. 
H W. Smith, Waltham, Miss.; O. M. 
Lesser, Los Angele«, Cal.; S. S. Allen, 
Columbus. 



their benefits to the people at large. 



The Dope Sheet. 

"I am a student." he exclaimed 

In student's priile and fa.shion; 
"My hobby's ethnologj-- 

A veritable passion." 
Perhaps he iS'-h*- studies hard 

All through" his tdle spaces— 
And isn't etiir-ologj' 

The study dC tl»« races? 

— BuRalo Newi. 



School Days. 

H*>Ilo, there kids! 
Ain't you glad 

For the good time you've had. 
And don't you think 
School Is on the blink? 
Of cour.se you do; 
You wouldn't be true 
To yourselves if 
You didn't want to hit it a biff 
And kick It in the pants. 
And knock its chance 
To get Its hooks 
Into you for the books. 
That's your style- 
But hold up awhile 
And thlnki 

Wouldn't you be gezlnk 
If you had no schools to teach 
You how to reach 
For the highest and best things? 
To give you wings 
•To fly with aibove those who crawl 
All over this terrestrial ball'' 
Do you want to dig 
And live like a pig? 
Or do you want to fly 
And live on p|e. 
And pull the plug 
In a big red chug-chue? 
Sai', 

Are you built that way 
Or the other? Do you want 
The crown of effort or its cross' 
Its gain or loss? 
What? 

You want the hot 
Stuff? 

That's enough! 
Get after your books! 
Stick to them all day. 
And things, by and by. 
Will be coming your way 
— W. J. LAMPTON in' 
World. 



The tryjuble with having mon^y of 
your own s you can't be happy without 
other people's, too. ^i'j « moui 

.^^^ ^^1. * "^^" knows better than to 
nvest his tnoney .so as not to lose all of 
It he has already g on.j and done it. 

Pointed Paraffraph.s. 

Chicago News: Much that passes for 
patience Is merely lazine.ss. 

1,^'"^*^.^^" /^^®"^*'*« goats; they can't 
help hutting In. 

Experience is the cream of life, but ajre 
often sours it. ^ 

When a horse stops suddenly in the 
street it shows Its bringing up. 

What's the matter with the hands of a 
baseball player ag a fly trap? 

Man has faith in anything he has never 
tried to reason out. 

When you hear anything that is too 
[good to be true It is time to stand from 
' under. 

Some women can turn a man down so 
gr'ntly that he doesn't know what struck 
him. 

A doctor tells a patient to put his tongu.-" 
out and expects his wife to keep her 
tongue In. 

If it be true that a pretty girl attracts 
only silly men. sensible men are as scarce 
as hen's teeth. 

WTien a thief has an opportunity to 
steal he always steals something besides 
the opportunity. 

An average woman can get more real 
enjoyment out of a funeral than a man 
can get out of his own wedding. 

Until automobiles can be operated with 
one hand the old-fashioned horse and 
buggy is good enough for a girl and her 
best beau. 



Trouble Coinlne:. 



Washington Post: A Chicago contem- 
porary announces that "tight sho^s are 
to b<» In style henceforth." Peopl-^ with 
corns are not likely to develop a hli?h re- 
gard for tlu" party who has set this new 
trouble on fo<ot. 



MiLsical Xote. 

Chicago News: Anybody can play a 
hand organ, but there is no good and su^ 
ficient rea-son why anybody should. 



AMUSEMENTS. 



New York 



Nature Story. 

Algy met a bear. 
• « • 

The boar was bulgy; 
The bulge was Algy. 

—Fry's MagazliM. 



LYCEUM 



Tomorrow Niight and ^>dneaday 
Mntinee and Nlgrht. 

MACK-LEONE PLAYERS 

In U'lLLARD MACK'S 

"SAeE BRUSH" 

Xighta 10. 25. gOc. Bt«t«., 16 and 28c. 
Thurtiday, Friday and Sat. Mat. Sat. 

"IN OLD KENTillKY" 

IVieht, 25c to »1. Mat,, 25o, to 75c. 



Two lliings. 

Atlanta Constitution: The hills look 
mighty high, and that's why we want to 
go there; but getting to the top ts one 
thing, and rolling down is another. 



The Unbusted. 

While some delight to bark and bite. 
And get up a trust-busting fight. 

Has Mr. Baer 

For such a care? 
Well, no; not by an anthracite. 

— IndlanapollB News. 



METROPOLITAN 

"THE HOUSE OF MIRTH." 

ToBlKht and All Tbie \%'eek, In the 
BoHt Burlenqae Shew You Ever Saw, 

THE ROLLICKERS 

KOTEi TblM U a $2 attraction, play- 
lus at the Met's popular prlccM. 
BARGAIN MATIXEE TOMORROW. 



Wext IJVeek — 'THD JOL.LY CilRLS." 




DEFECTIVE PAGE T 





I'r 







t. 

1 








1 

» 


- -- 



i 






» 



II 






i 



8 



THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: TUESDAY. SEPTEMBER 17, 1907. 




THE EVENING HERALD 

AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER. 



Published at Herald Bldg.. First St.. Op. P. O. Square. 
THE HERALD COMPANY. 

Phoucs: Counting Room, 324; Editorial Rooms, 1126. 

TEN CENTS A WEEK 

E\*ERY EVENING — DELIVERED BY CARRIER. 

Bingle '"<">py, daily $ .02 



by the bold voyagers who first set forth from the west- 
ern coast of Europe and pushed out in their frail barks 
into the sea of unknown dreads. 

In those days men knew nothing of the broad expanse 
of ocean except from what they could see of it. They 
saw, from the shore, that the ocean sloped down to the ' Minnoapolia at 
horizon, and that vessels that went a few miles sank 
partly or wholly out of sight, depending t>n the distance j a mean propasiTTon 



HOT^^jOSSIP. 

"One of the gr-^atest drawbacks to au- 
tomoblling in tiifl country is the fact that 
farmers permit ^hatr, horses to run loose 
in the road." said L. M. Hibbard of 



THE WEATHEK. 



dogs ani] 
not so 



St. Liouis. "Cows. 

oats. etc.. in the 

d. but a hor.se Is 

., - _ , If he is allowed to 

courage let them go. What more natural than their fear ; hirown^s^weet 'wiif *" *=<>""^''y '''^^'^ ^'■ 

will m5e no effort to turn 
the puCng. snorting engine ' 
but WW plug on down ih.j night and possibly ttjmorrow 




tiiat if a vessel got too far down this slippery slope it "^ h'jrs 

. . , . ,*, , , , *^'\ / ,. ,* _ I aside from 

One month 45 ' might never be able to get back agani, but might slide oft beliind liim 

Three month.s (In advance) J-i^S into some far-oflf abyss of horror all the more fearfulj j!'^?^^ ahead ;,ftiie'-|iach1ne>t Whatever ,^ 

Six months (in advance) 2.60 •' rate his fright m^ ixj iihle to carry /I'i^t wind to .slut t to westerly tomorrow. 



And istill the 
Weather is unsettled. 
Yesterday afternoon 
't cleared oft and 
looked promising, 
but this morning the 
wind was in ttie 
northeast and fre-sh. 
he skies were over- 
cast, and the clouds 
were heavy with 
threats of rain. The 
weather man thinks 
it will be showery to- 
though he 



(in advance) 
One year (in advance) 



.5.00 because it was unknown. 



Entered at Duluth Postoffice as Second-Class Matter. 



DULUTH WEEKLY HERALD. 

Per y^ar $1.00 

Six months 50 

Thrc^ months J85 



him. Usually it tac- Impoi^sible to pass The range of temperature in Duluth yes- 



TWEN TY YEAR S AGO. 

Taken From the Columns of The Herald of This Date, 18S7. 



***Bell & Miller of the Ideal colToo Just before going to dinner. Cashier 

house, have leased quarters and wil' ! Ware counted and prepared for delivery 

establish a similar institution it A«h '< ^^ ^^^^ Duluth & Iron liange RiUlroa4 
estaoiisn a .-,imilar institution at Ash- ..^j^^^^^^y j,,^^,^,^ ,^ currency. He laid 

land, beginning business next week. , the package down and upon his re- 

iii.*^.!- 1 1 7~~IZ ■,„, ^.■ , i turn was unable to And it. He does 

*»*The alumni of the Michigan unl- \ ^,^x. remember whe 

versity gave a reception to their di.? 



A • .■ xu .. ii r _*.u^ ^^'^ animal, as any *>iirt will onlv causo ^*^'''^*y yfnA narrow, from a minimum of wm-^ ct ti-,.^ 

Again, men on coasting voyages .saw that the further it to Increkse iu aS^d ril bet I iTave *' ^^ a maxur.um of 54 degs. \^^^^^ tv-n^ 

south they went, the warmer it became. They naturally i J'"''^ /f] a ma^hinar' wh.-n horses have', .^ year ago today it was cloudy and t,;,i„^ wv,.!! 

. , , . , ., , , ,' traveled ahead of ua for four or ttve ; ^."'^^V""'"*^- ^""^ "" '"'^^n came except a 

reasoned from this that if one went too tar, he would miles. I suppose the owner of the ani-,'*^^ showors the night before. 

n.als wt-re furious bi'cau8»» we drove ' '^^^ ^"" ^'''^'^ -'""^ morning at 5:4? and 
off, bill the beasts would not stop 'S^''^^ tonight at 'i;lT. making 12 hours and 



run 



into a sea where the water was boiling hot, and . [{^ 



re he put it, and the 
question is who took it? 

tinguished instructor. Judge Cooiey, and I 

West hotel, Minneapolis, i ***Mrs. A. D. Taylor returned home 
nlng. Fred Reynolds and ; from a long vi.sit to Canada by tha 
Judge White of Duluth. were present. ' Canipana this morning. 



em 



LARGEST CIRCULATION IN DULUTH 



TO SUBSCRIBERS: 

It Is important when desiring the addre.ss of your 
paper changed to give both old and new addresses. 



A GLOWING OPPORTUNITY. 

The report ^ji the Northeast Experiment farm at 
Grand Rapid.s for 1906 is out, and it contains some very 
pertinent and timely matter for the consideration of 
those who have at heart the development oi the country 
tributary to Duluth. 

The experiment farm is just what its name implies: 
a farm established by the state to sec what can be done 
with the land in the section in which it is located. It 
experiments with various crops and various soils in 
various ways, to see what the diflferent soils are best 
adapted for, and how the diflferent crops can best be 
handled. The Grand Rapids farm is in exceptionally 
competent and intelligent hands, and the work of Super- 
intendent A. J. McGuire will be of immense value to 
Northeastern Minnesota if its farmers and its promoters 
take the results of his experiments to heart. 

It is significant that there is nowhere a man more 
earnest in his faith in the possibilities of the soil of this 
section than Superintendent McGuire. He says in his 
report: "The future of Northern Minnesota is no longer 
a speculation. It is only a matter of time. Its agricul- 
tural possibilities are past the experimental stage. There 
are various reasons why it is not receiving its share of 
immigration, but more particularly it is due to the fact 
that in the past its disadvantages were better known than 
its advantages." And nobody is doing more than Mr. 
McGuire to make its advantages known and to turn its 
disadvantages into advantages. 

He puts his finger on the vital spot in the develop- 
ment 'A Duluth and its surrounding territory when he 
says that during 1905 10,000 cars of vegetables other than 
potatoes were shipped into Duluth and Superior, practi- 
cally all of it grown outside of Northern Minnesota. 
The same thing is true of the butter, meat and eggs con- 
sumed in Duluth and tributary communities. 

Every dollar's worth of vegetables, milk, butter, eggs 
and even meat consumed in Duluth ought to be raised 
within a radius of 100 miles of the city. They could be 
raised there, to the common profit of producer and con- 
sumer, because the producer could make handsome re- 
turns while providing fresher and better produce than 
Duluth now receives at prices considerably lower than 
those tliat now rule. 

The soil is here, the market is here, and all that is 
needed are the farmers to till the soil and raise stock 
upon its idle areas for the market, which will gladly 
absorb all that can be produced. There is no danger of 
overproduction. The market is certain to grow faster 
than the supply. 

There is nowhere in this country a finer opportunity 
for profitable cultivation of the soil than exists today 
around Duluth. A prolific soil, cheap land, a profitable 
market near by, form a combination that spells wealth 
to the producers who will seize the opportunity and 
eslabli-.h themselves upon the land. 



where his ship would be engulted in some whirlpool of j or set out of the way until we struck I "\'"'""1?^ of sunlight 

. , , , .1 T^u 1 .1. r * cross road. A cow will g-en out of i S.^^^ ^^^- Richardson of conditions: 

steam from the nether depths. They knew nothing, of the way and pay little attention and the ' ^^^ Oregon coast disturbance has 

course, of the torrid zone and of the other temperate --« |^ Trt.rfnt'''''' ""'""'^•' ""' '^-\frV.'%A%JltV.vl^ n^S oTei^^liJ^ 

••It will be only a matter of time until '^"S*""]?'" '^*'* advanced to llie eastern 
- ••• ^-OM»^ K^rji.>n L,i.,"wi*-an'*J»an provinces. Both low pre.ssures 



zone that lay beyond it. 

But mariners, seeking by water the way to the Orien- 
tal empires from which barbarians barred them by land, 
braved these dangers, far more terrible than those that 
Peary or Wellman will face, and by braving them 
showed that they did not exist. 

The experience of these intrepid navigators has been 
paralleled in the life of every human being, who has 
shivered at dangers of imagination growing out of ignor- 
ance, and has seen them disappear into thin air when 
braved with courage and faith. 



CONDITIONS ARE SOUND. 

No matter to what absurd depths stock quotations 
may go, the situation in this country is sound, prosperity 
is undisturbed, and if there has been a marked recession 
in activity it is because lack of facilities made it neces- 
sary, and the country and every person in it will be 
better off than before because of that recession. 

E. H. Gary, chairman of the board of directors of the 
United States Steel corporation, puts the situation com- 
pactly and truthfully in an interview reported elsewhere 
in The Herald tonight. 

He says that tiie country, in order to keep up the 
pace at which it was going, had to have between $500,- 
000,000 and $1,000,000,000 more capital. It could not get 
it, so it had to slow up. 

However, within a few weeks will begin the market- 
ing of the fall crops, and these should bring in, under 
normal conditions from now on, $7,000,000,000. 

This will supply the additional capital needed. The 
money that is now going into the harvesting of those 
cr-ips will be released to be u.sed in manufacturing indus- 
tries, and with the additional capital derived from the 
sale of this year's crops abroad, where the markets are 
hungrily waiting to buy them at high prices, industrial 
activity will be resumed immediately. 

Indeed, the tide has already turned everywhere except 
in the copper industry, which is suffering a reaction 
caused by too much booming of the prices of copper 
metal and copper stocks. The curtailment of production 
will put copper metal on a substantial basis very shortly, 
and copper stocks will follow it there. The situation 
will be all the better because the temptation to immedi- 
ately boom copper metal prices will not be strong, and 
they can be maintained upon a level that will stimulate 
purchases while giving ample profit to the producers. 



the automobile route between Duluth 



and tile Twin OitlJs" wllf^be a "very "*T^';p" I T'' *''','' ^hecau-se of raims durins" Monday 

ular one. It would be 

the roads w>'ra In b»»ttr 

provfmenf>i -win ""-'■'■':'>—""''""■•/'"■ 1 treine nortnwest. some rain also ten 

;>b^n;;^rt^n"y'i'a;s?'^ '"""''• '^'""' "'' ''""""''■ 

^^^*' ' " ""■■" "■ '■'"' ■ • the 



rffr^.tiQ^ .f.w^;; *^'' 1*^' "'Sht in the Lake Region, upper 

popular now if .Mississippi and Missouri valh-vs and ex- 

conuinon. im-jtreiug northwest. Some rain also ten 




♦♦*J. P. Beck, the paymaster, and • •♦♦County Clerk Pressnell went to 
his a.sslstant, John Mailman, left this i^t. Paul la-st evening and will taJte 
morning on the Duluth & Iron Range part in the sham battle today. 

to pay off the employes of the railro.ad ' 

company and the Minnesota Iron com- j ***The following real estate transfers 
pany. The amount let loose will be be- ' have been recorded: 



tween $60,000 and $70,000. 



to Richard Maj> 
129, Portland dl- 



Martha A. Crane 
shall, lot 10, block 
vision, $600. 

WillLam McRae to Frank H. Cutting, 
block 127, Third division. $750. 



kotas and Colarado. The barometer is rls- 

• • • ling rapidly in thi^ plateau regi.jn. Condi- 

on the Great Lakes areltlons favor showf>ry weather in this lo- 

themselves on the cahty during tonight and Wednesday. 

h.ive been no serious I Foiiowins were V'\<*terdav"s hiKhest 

recorded by the weath- 
siiiinmt... ^•.■i"" "■ "■'»"• ^v- "<iia i»i. 1. er bureau; 
bummers of clevoland at the Lenox. "The 



"Marine men 
congratulating 
fact that there 



wrrtr>k-« T»,ij",7^A.' *"■'■' M^pii no srjiou-i' roiiowing we; 

^n- reeor.1 w n '. '^"!^ '""^ ''"P'"- ^^""^ ^"^'^ temperatures as 
record will h^ i«.pt up." said M. I. 



pe-ssimists advi.s-^ 
ber h« 



A TRIFLING ERROR. 

It becomes the painful duty of The Herald to set 
upon the right track its amiable but argumentative and 
somewl-.at boastful friend the Superior Telegram. 

The Telegram in its issue of lost night says, with a 
manner that indicates that it has scored anotlier point in 
favor of Superior and against Duluth, tl'.at Superior is 
the western terminal of the lakes, intimating that Duluth 
is a mere way station. Says t!:e Telegram: 

Boats whii^h dear for Lake Erie take cb^arance 
p.-iptrs for IJuiTalo. the eastern termiiuis. which en- 
tirl.'s tliem to hmd at any intermediate port. Com- 
ing w.-st the ele.irano*^ papors arp taktn to Superior, 
If for ar.y reason the boat neods to 1 m-i U>'re. Clear- 
ance for D'.iluth do^s not in. lude Superior, but clear- 
ance for Superior incbiios Duluth, b.-caus.^ offitially 
that city is int-^riucdiate between the two terminals. 

It makes no great difiference except that it might con- 
fuse some of the vessel captains who happen to read 
the Telegram, but this statement is all wrong. Vessels 
always take clearance for the most distant port they are 
likely to reach, which entitles them to stop at any inter- 
mediate port. But there is no difference in this respect 
between Duluth and Superior, the government never 
having decided which is the more remote port from Lake 
Erie. A vessel may go to Superior on a clearance for 
Duluth.. and it may go to Duluth on a clearance for 
Superior. 

The Herald admires very much t!te commendable 
manr.er in which the Telegram sticks up for Superior, 
but it mustn't deal in misleading information that is 
likely to cause useless annoyance to vessel captains 
without benefiting Superior in the slightest degree. 



THE TRUST MOVEMENT. 

Suppose, just for the sake of argument, that we admit 
the contentions of the trust promoters that trusts and 
combinations of big business are a positive benefit to 
society; that they reduce expensive friction, eliminate the 
wastes of competition, and permit cheaper production 
and cheaper marketing of the commodities they handle. 

In admitting that we go farther than many of us are 
ready to go, yet we take a stand that has much logic and 
philosophy underlying it. 

But, even after we have gone so far we are still, to 
adopt a current phrase of much suggestion, "from Mis- 
souri; we will have to be shown." 

What we will have to be shown is where we come in 
on it. We find that after a decade in which the elimina- 
tion of competition has made extraordinary strides, we 
are no better off than we were before, if we are as well 
otf. Our wages are perhaps higher, and our employment 
steadier, but we have pretty generally had to get our in- 
crease in wages through the force of our labor organiza- 
tions, and our steadiness of employment would have 
come in good times even if there never had been such a 
thing as a trust. 



Abilene 
..r-.- K .■"•■' ^'^ ^'^^^ ""^'1 >rovem- ; Batlleford 
^^r^Jll^Vu ^a'*''i< of the sood record. ; Bismarck , 
his^^rv^V't '"?-^- Ji-^astrous storms in the ' &Jston . . 
.,^^ L2' navi^^ition on the Or- at Lak.^s : fiuffaJo ... 
ave occurr-d in November, but that is j Cairo 
no .special rea.son to believe that hi.story Caljrarv V 
^11 repeat Itself in this regard this sea- Chaiieston 

1 ^ u 

aiii» m""'^^'" *^ '^'^ people of Duluth re- Cincfnnati 
alfzo the extent of the pa.s.senger businos.sDavenD.Jrt 
summ^ Hi*^ '/!''•' f'-«'5i»t. rs during the Denver 
?i^]lv C'^ month.s. Th.-re Is scarcely a I Detroit 
freighter .-nters the har»)or all 
long that does nor 



rt 



carry a 



summer Devils Lake 
bunch of i Dodffe 



pai,.M>ngers. and this Is particularly true Duluth . 
^ini;'" "^^"^ carri^^rs. Tlie total for the I lidmonton .. 
.^eason runs up into preetty large figures. El 
L,aK.? captains as a rule an- not so preju- Es 
Tl'^^^ '^'^uW- 'tarrying pas.sengers as some Gr 
people believe. The ore boats are most ■ Ore.-.. 
Of them equippe.i with regular quarters I Havr^ 
for passengers, -.ind if the people are the i Hel.-n 



r hjht sort, th-y an- tnore apt to add to 
the pleasant ne.'i.s jf tlie voyag« f,)r the 
captaih than .>th.>rwi.se. The wrong .sort 
sometimes come alon^. but usually ther^ 
are ways of supprcs.sing them." 
• « * 

^fL;!^?^'®^'','^^"*'! """ of business can be 
.startf^d without un.scrupulous p-r.son^ 

nl^'.'n'"^/'!.?."'^ ''■'''"^ ^'^ 'f'^t mon.^y by 
m^Aua of It. • .sai.i c. H. r,eorg-> of Chl- 

f.tf^^f 1 '" Sl'^''^"-«- "Take th„ demand 
r^v.,^^r*'''n?,,'''!f "'''''' '"'■ launches as an 
r'xanv)l.>. 1 h.' demand for th.-m is s.^me- 
thmg nnmpiise, an,l now ther^» aro d.>alera 
in the market wh.> pick up engin.-s tliat 
hayeseen consi.l-^rable wear, fix th.^ni up 
a little, repaint and polish tli.-m until th.4 ' 
appear like new. and th.-n a*dl th.^n for' 
new machines, the r.-sult being that th.» 

^V^lw.***-'-^."?^ Immediately discover the 
condition of the engine. 

"The majority of buyers of marine en- 
gines are amateurs at the business and 
cannot easily detect the diff^'rence be- 
tween an old and a new machine. They 
get hoM of a worn-out article and then 
blam<^ all engines h.cau.s.- th.^ particular 
sainpla they happen to have .loes not 
work. Tlie practice of dispo.sing of thesa 
Old engin.-s as n^w should be stopped 
-some way Its a bad blow to a popular 
and healthful sp»>rt." 

« • • 

T.A^*^*^ ^*- L^uJ«: Mrs. E. J. Murphy 
Virginia; C. H. Rihlnson. Minneapolis 
F J. Sibley. Tucson. Ariz.; M t>. Aubolee. 
two Harbors. Minn.; M. H. Ifersey S' 
Paul; A. Nelson. Cl.>quet. Minn.; F c' 
Lindt, St. Cloud. Minn.; M Skoglund 
St. Paul; E. A. Koers. Biwablk. Minn ' 
X. A. H.Jimer Viixinia; K. W. Mcl^g- 
gan. Gordon. Wis.; J. McDonald. Hii)bing; 
A. An.i.^rs.in, Mllw.nrit^; A. P. Kirscli, 
Crojksion. Minn.; Mr. and Mrs. D. P-i- 
tigrew, M. L. Higher, Minneapolis; T. H. 
Winn, St. I'aul; W. M. Toole. Lo ilsviile. 
Ky. ; ij. A. Spielman. Rrigliton, Iowa; Mr. 
and Mrs. W. Gardiur. Cass Lake. Wis.; 

E. M. Smith. A. H Powers, Hibbing; J. 

F. Cudy; Clo.iuet. Minn.; Mrs. J. P. 
Trebilcock. Coieraine, Minn.; A. L. M.;- 
I^aren. Chicago; F. I'urcell. Mrs. F. Pur- 
cell, Madison, Wi.s. ; H. B. Smith, St. 
Paul; a. Carl.son. Hibbing; E. Flnck. Vir- 
ginia; V. Powers, Hibbaig; F. B. U.is.<om, 
Virginia; Mrs. T. H. Jenkins, Nellie 
Davis, Hi!)l>in<; Mrs. T. W. Jackman, 
ButTalo; F. \V. Zerry. St. Paul; Miss 
Mary Jones, Manchester, Engliind; M. 
Huglies. Hii>l)ing: Mi. and Mrs. H. Pel- 
lers. Port Arthui'; O. Hunter, Tower, 
Minn.; Mr. and Mrs. J. \V. Brownell, Two 
Harbors; J. H. Hogan. Kerrick, Minn.; 
Bertha Lavign. Twj Uarbor.s; J. J. Mad- 
den. Dedham. Wis.; F. Bail'-y, Kacitia, 
Wis.; J. J. Carroll, Toie.lo, Ohio. 

w • « 

At tha McKay: C. W. Buttz, Buttz- 
ville, N. D.. F. Beul. Petrolia; A. i,'. El- 
liott. Mora, Minn.; C S. Hale, Mlnne- 
ap.jlls; Mr. and Mis. Moorey. St. Paul; F. 
Harrl.s. Mmneapolis; J. H. CarLson. Hib- 
bing, Mrs. U. C. Startman. Two Harbors; 
O. <i. Kolberg. D. Guslafson, Rej Wing, 
Mum.; J. S. <iorrie. Leadville, Col. ; J. 
-. , . , , . Paul. Boston; Mr. and Mrs. D. D. Loovis, 

let the trust process has had ftill sway, and has been St. Paul; Mrs. A. M. Kline. Chtc^igo; H. 

L. Wilson, Minneap.3lis; C. Miller. St. 
Paul; C. Prtslv. Cloouet. Minn.; Mrs. J. 
L. Ow.ns. J. M-Caffey, Virginia; Mintiie 
A. Johntion. Virginia; N. P. Neis-jn, M;n- 
n.>ip)lis; Mr. and Mrs. F. D. Miller. 
S.-anlon. Minn.; F. Seanell. Holyoke. 
Minn.; C. O. Wh-eler, J. O. Da\is. Minne- 
apolis; E. H. Either, Bovey. Mnn. ; Mr. 
Elpuney, Morning Sju. Iowa; 



Paso 

Escaniba 

and Haven 
O-reen Bay . . 

re 

A 

Houghton 

Huron 

JacKaonville .. 
Kaiis.LS City 
Knoxville .... 
I.ia Crosse .. 
Little Rock 



...9i) 'Marquette ... 
.Jyi ' M'dicino Hat 

...72 jM-mDhls 

...W 'Milwaukee .. 

, .."'J Minnedosa ... 
..!>•; Montsomerv 
..5.; i.Moorliead 

...^2i.\ew York .. 

... St 'Norfolk 

. ..86;uklahoma .... 

. ..S.jiOmaha 

,..S>j Port Arthur . 

...8;J Portland. Or. 

...72 Prince All^ert 

...90'RaDid Citv .. 

. . .54 I Rogina 

...GSl.Sl. 



...flO 

,..S4 
...Si 
..56 
..S6 
...6o 
,..S2 
...84 



***The rumor that the Chicago Mil- 
waukee & .St. Paul railroad has pur- 
cha.sod terminal and elevator ground at 'lot 3 

West Superior is perhaps true as re- j 

gards the elevators. Terminal ground, j ***Miss Jessie Cole of Akron, Ohio, 
however, has been owned in Duluth oy is visiting Duluth friends. 

this company for some time past, and I ^^,, ., ^ , , ., .. 

the headquarters will be at this point. I „***^Ira. I. C. Aldrich and family from 
of course I Minneapolis, have Joined Mr. Aldrlcn 

I here and will make Duluth their future 

home. 



♦♦♦George Room, a member of the 
Montreal police force, is a guest of 
Alderman Kennedy at the Michigan 
hotel. 



♦♦♦The Union National bank has be*^n 
the victim of a mysterious robbery. 



MINNESOTA OPINIONS. 



Austin Tran.scrlpt: It is stated that 
..the drainage of swamps would add SO,- 
■^» ! OOO.iXW acres of rich land to th 
•^ : cultural resources of the United States. 
■'*♦' ; Like Abe Lincoln's rat holes, this will 
bear looking into. 



♦♦♦A farewell reception will be given 
to Mrs. R. .S. Munger and daughter, 
Alice, they being about to depart for 
Paris, where Miss Alice will be placed 
in school. 



DULUTH AND THE HERALD. 



,.S4 
..46 

,.72 
,.G2 



Luverne Herald: ReWsed Edition of 
Reasons, Why Governor Johnson ShouM 



N.)rth Branch Review: The London 
GenU'^woman a.sks: "Why are m'n l)et- 
agr'-iter looking than women?'— Duluth Her- 
ald. 

The Review would sugges 
usually because th.^y look 
moth.jr3. 



that 
like 



it Is 
theJr 



i.a«iio ^ I »..~,.,..v„ ,...j vj.^,.i..w. u^.i..^,...! ►^..v.^.., Win.lom Reporter: Charlie Towne l8 

« •^t 5?„, r« I '^^ re-elected— .Expurgated and Enlarged, i talked of as a Democratic po.ssibility for 

• ^ ' • *^^"' ""Reason No. 50— Minnesota cannot aftord the presidential nomination. Let us see- 



Los Angeles aW 



. ..74 S;ui Antonio .. 
. .74 San Francisco 

..& Santa Fe 

..I'J'S. Ste. Marie . 

..Tl i.Shreveoort 

..64 SP'fkane 

,..*) Swlfth Current 
..*) Washiniflon .. 

,..*) Wichita 

...82 j VVinnemucca .. 

, ..S2 . WinniDee 

.SS Yellijwstone .. 



..90 

,..6S 
..76 

...72 
..92 

...62 
..r,s 
..^ 
..SS 
..74 

,..60 
..GS 



to be outdone 
sin and Iowa. 



in i>.jliteness by Wiscoii- 



Department of Agriculture, Weather 
Bureau, Duluth, S^pt. 17— Local forecast 
for twenty-four liours ending at 7 p. m. 
Wedne.sday: Dulutli, Superior and vicin- 
ity. Including tlie Me.saba and Vermilion 
Iron rang.'S— Sliower.s tonight and po.ssibly 
WedU'^'^day; not much change in tem- 
P'^rature; fr-sJi to brisk easterly winds 
shifting to west.rly during Wedne-sday. 
H. W. RICHARDSON. 

Local Forecaster. 



Warren Register: It is the specter of 
1 re-nomination for CSovernor J.^hnson. 
wliioh, like Bajiquo's ghost, will not 
down, that makes so many Rei)ul)lioan;> 
shy when their names are mentioned in 
■.•.)nneciion wuh tlie governorship of 
Minnesota next year. 



Charlit; u.sed to live in Duluth, and then 

there was another Duluth man who 

won fame. We believe his name wa« 
Whiteman. 



I'tica, N. v.. Pr-ss: A Duluth court 
rec'Mitly gran'e.i twenty divorces in one 
day. In several other cas.'s which cam© 
up a contlnuan.e was grant-'-l, and a few 
of the cases wer.^ stridden from tlie calen- 
dar. Cruelty an,i .lesertlon were the 
Little Falls Herald: The suggestion most common rea.^ons given, and the 
of Johnson for a Ihir.J term f.jr g »v- 1 woman was the appiicant in most of the 
ernor gi%es most of the Republican press cases. Minnesoti men must be straying 
a conniption fit. | from the path of rectitude in quite large 

I numbers. 

.\ppleton Press: Som.' of the country ed-| 

itors now think it would be much nicer! Albert L-.a Tim'=>s-Enterprl.se: George 
all around if we had a Republic. m gov- ; B.-rnard Shaw says that three m"als a 
ernor. Maybe. W^e th.jught so at the ; <Jay ar»! exee.<sive, which I'-ads ''i'tie Du- 



Clv'cago. S.»pt. 17.— Forecasts until 7 p. 
m. Wednesday: Upper Michigan, Minne- 
sota and the Dakotas— Local rains tonight 
and Wednesday; slight temperature 
changes. 



.UUCmNGGAS. 

Cleveland Leader: "A penny for your 
thoughts. Jones." 

'M wag Just wondering if it w.juld be 
safe to touch you for $10." 



elections of liJtM and 
we have changed. 



liWtf, but since then 



' luth Herald to remark that they cost 
mon.'y t'». these days. It might tje that 
cuttin'jr to two nvals'ii day w.nild not only 

„ b«* more h.»alihfiil for the participator, 

are demonstrating that p-»r Ign.tthi.s ' but would also have a tendency to greatly 
D>nnelly was simply in advance of tii,. •'"•''•"""" ^be cost of livir.g by cutting down 



^ove Pione.^r: Present d.iy conditions* 



times in foreseeliig tiie dangerous 



the deinan.i for fO')d stuffs. Why not try 



croachments of corporate greed upon the I ^*^ ^"'' ^ while? 

rights of the pe-jple. He was the first I ,,. 

man of any prominence, in this .stai>- !, Minneapolis Telegratn: 



Whatever bene- 



at least, to soun.l- an alarm and make '^*'' I^^l^'Ui will ben. lit this seetion of the 
open warfare against tho moiDuolistic i *''^""""-' ^''- ^'"^^ ""'•^' •'■ "'''J'"*- distance 
holders of watered stocks He suf- ' ^'■*"" there, and the bigger Duluth erets, 
fered sneers. Insult, ridicule and the most I V,^*' bctt.n- our markets will be.-Motley 
brutal malignment for espousing the "''.'"^"i"'*', 
very things which are to-iay making , r'"^ '^'"'V 



Roosevelt. La Follette. 
popular heroes. 



xiay maKing 
Folk and others 



Washington .'?tar: "Remember." said 



Sauk Rapldg Sentinel-Free Press: Ri>b- 
ert M. La Follette has announc.'d him- 
self as a candidate for president. Ho 



ever benefits M-itley and Du- 
luth and tliat sectl.>n .)f the C'>untiy will 
benefit Minneapolis and the rest of the 
state. 



the s.rl.ms patriot.- "that you are mai^- won't be nominated. That's no reason i ^C^;,;^' ^';:; J, j'' ^r^;Th nai .'r'riak" r 

*".^^;^:"?['^'■^•" ,«..«. nous""'"'''"' ^" nominated. There i^\bm^''^."ycry'y>J:t'l:^;iI^J^\n' 
•_'WeM," answer^M .Senator Sorghum. "J"»-. | country. 



"I'll lo my best. But history Is !:ko 
most results .)f human endeavor. I nev- 
ed yet saw any made to suit everybody." 

Phlladolphia Pr-^s: "Jack Strong looks 
like a pretty healthy fellow." 
•Healthy? I should say! Whv. ho 



Luverne Herald: Not the least of the 
things Duluth ha.s every rea.son to be 
proud of are th.* News Tribune and The 

ank 

the 

ntry. 



I Brainerd 



Tribune: 
be m'ire 



There wil! in all 
uninstructed .i.^l. 



Vlrerinla Ent'^rpri.s,»: If the Duluth N'WS 
j Tril>un.> says its black, place your beta 



I probability 

eate* in th*. nnv^f \ri.,„ . . ,7" "c" "^ 1 i" ■ I irioun.' says us oiacK. piace yo 
BAiKb in lae next Minnesota Republican ; tint if« white if v.m uii«:i, tr. n-in 
State convonti.jn tiian ever before in tiio ^^Iute, u jou vM.-,h to win 

history of the state. 



doesn't even get nervous at the thought ; d.man?*a mall^was'^''l'^'"-??i;.r.?"tH'' r^'''- 
of being examine d for l ife insurance." j day in New Y. " '^-'•'^"^-^^'^''d the other 

fortune 



ork 



North Branch R.nl"W: George Bernard 
Shaw says tlir.-e meals a day are exces- 
sive. —Duluth Heral.l. 
I Shaw mu.st hav"' b.'cn a country n^wi- 



w f>n niy> .um ^^'^ '^^^ am;ussed a paper man when he got that i.l-ja 
>r *je.uw,iiuo or more without at- 
Chicago Tribune: Ambish— I.s there I tractinsr public att^^nti-jn. H.> made it hv 
anytihlng in this story writing business? 1 dealing hi real estate both 
_N.i.ggus-Is there- Rich glH fell in lov., | city pmperty. They can't raise nearly the .state. And its two .excellent dally 

Uiat way as we newspapers are doing more to put it tli"re 
than any <}f us ordinary mortals are 



With storj- written by friend of mine and is nice clover down 



Mlnn'^apiilis Telegram : Duluth is in 
farm and the public eye m<)re than any otli.^r city in 



married him. Sh.^uld say so 



Baltimore American: "That coraposl- 
t'>r is awful mad with the literary edi- 
tor." 

"Why?" 

"Because the lit'^rary edit.ir threw his 
poetry out of the window and then told 
him to follow copy." 

Chicago Record- Herald: "I never 
speiit a il.>llar without getting va'.ue re- 
ceive.!," boasted the shabby-looking old 
millionaire. 

•W-11. dad," rp^plie.i his .wn. "I'm not 



do here, either. 



Sauk Center Herald: One of the best 

?l "^ country's products is th 
the public schools are 
market. 



able to c.)mpreh«^nd.— Pine City Pi.jueer. 
When you come riglit down to it, can 
grist ' you think of much of anything else that 



preparing for. puts a city in the public eye? 



A Tribnui to Miniiiviota. 

Kansas City Star: It is surprising that 
the three chief a.ssistants -if the at'ornev 
general ,>f the UniS-d States. Mr." Kel- 
iOgg. Mr. S.'verance an, I Mr Purvly 
sliould all come from the state ,>f Minii^I 
sota. Doubtless some other stat.\s have 



permitted to «o pretty nearly anythiiiij it wanted to. 

Why liave we had no benefit out of it? 

Because the I)cnefits have gone t.) the promoters who 

got the ditlerent plants together and then issued stock in 

the resulting trust amounting to several times what they , 

• J f ^, .,..,, , , •' .and Mrs. Llpuney, M.jrning 

paid tor the individual plants, requiring us, the c>nsuin-'Mr. and Mr.s. L. P. K^^lly, A.shtabula 

ers, to pay dividends on this watered st.Dck; because the 
people that control the trusts have been able to take 
practically all of the benehts of the trust movement, if 
there are any benetits, for themselves. And there must 
be benefits, too, because these beneficiaries have accumu- 
lated immense fortunes. They have denied the !)enetits 




Washington vStar: "The conscience fund 
is a curious In.stitution," said the 
St . . 



lion. Its integrify strikes a high av-J 
ge in making political comparisons It.s' 
sses have an ass.>rtive hon.-sty and I 



era 

mass 

an effective 




"and 



ha 

any taxes for a long time 



THE TERROR OF THE UNKNOWN. 

Wellman, who would have braved the dangers of the 
polar re-;ion in an airship, has given it up, for this year 
at least, and is coming h-jme. Peary, who has faced 
these dangers before in a ship and wanted to do it again, 
was forced some time ago to abandon his plans for this 
time and to put them over to next year. 

And the world, undismayed at the failure of these 
two courageous explorers to get away, wags on without 
missing a turn. 

Pr'>bably so long as there is a spot on the face of 
the e;irth that man has not yet set foot upon, there will 
be men aching for a chance to tread them, if for nothing 
more than to be able to say tliat they have done what 
nob.idy has done before them. The practical results 
of the polar search are not plainly visible, if any exist 
yet tliere are several men straining every effort to reach 
the pole, and there v/ill always be men of that mind until 
the p.-'lc is finally reached, after which it will be an old 
Story. 

Call it foolhardiness or braverj' as you please, it is 
hard to withhold the tribute of admiration of tlie daring 
of an Andree, who set forth in a balloon for the pole and 
never came back, or of a Peary or a Wellman, who may 
meet the same fate when they are able to set forth. 

Yet the dangers, real or imaginary, that confront 
Xhese intrepid searchers are no greater than those faced 



Ohio; H. .\. Towns.?n.l, Wadena, Muin. ; 
R. J. Patrick, Eau Claire. Wis. 

« -• • 

At the Lt>nox: Mr. and Mrs. C. L. 
Bates. Benson. xMinii.; Mrs. Delia Jum.), 
Rhuielander, Wis.; J. J. ScliuLZ. Hough- 
ton. Mich.; Mrs. M. A. Williams. Buf- 
falo. J. H. Hilslimay, P.Minsylvania; E. 

T. Bliss, Chicago; L. Nyh'd'n. Mlnne-jsaid the "mild-mannered man 
apolis; P. Spade Cnicago; \V A. Manan. terrible thing; terribl 
of consolidati.m to the people, and have taken them all , g^^^^nace, ^^^^^^\.^;;l;,y'^^^l^ 

themselves, while the pci^ple have complacently given ' Y ; J. R. Gray. St.^v.^ns Point, Wis.; Mr. 
them tariff schedules that prohibited the entrance from | ^JVch f j' R " Weelc-h.^S^'oonVr, wIs.^h! 
abroad of competition tliat would have forced them to ' l-» Forneir. Minneapolis, G. T. Daly. St. 
,..,.. , , ■ . I Paul; A. A. Caswell A. Pr.irt. An.)ka. 

reduce their prices and their prohts. LMinn ; A G. Smith. A. E. Lirkm. H. E. 

If y.,u do not admit the logic of the trust movement, j f-'i:;^^,-,.,^^;^^"'^.. ^^lA rIvIV" Falls. 

you will want to abolish the trusts and return to the old I Wis.; A. H. Guniper, Swan River. Minn.; 

■-"" !p E Leonard. St. Paul; F. J .S.-hnider, 
St Louis; N. A. Anderson. .Stillwater; 
E. Anderson. Brahani; E. R.jg-^rs, Vir- 
ginia; C. L. T.inner. Fr.izee, Minn.; Mr. 
and Mrs. F. French. Marquette; J. M. 
Martin. Virginia; T. Taylor. Edmonton, 
Alberta; G. L. Roper. Two Harbors; W. 
Gill, St. Louis. 



Cleveland li^ad-r: "What's the surest 
sign thit a m.in is getting old?" 

'When he begins to tell people Miat he 
feels just as young as he ever did." 

Phila.leiphia Press: "I'm sorry they've 
! accomplished so little at The ' H.ague," 

War la a 
le ming; terrible." 
^'Oh! I Jon't know," r-^plied the other. 
' Y'^M ^'^^^ niean to say you approve 

"I certainly 
mai>s." 



re I 
that I 

- - -. 3 to! 

/^vr, .u . ., P'5"Moal pr-ferm-nt by 
^."''"^,^-^*l'" '3"*y ^'J citiz..ns or as pub- 



I nien who s.^ek 
lie officials 



Reflootioii.s «»f a I>ach<'!or. 



PaiKT. 

He was a small Investor, 

Aft lirs he c.juldn't boss. 
So %vhen his st.>cks wnt tumblinjf 

He suJtei.d paper loss. 

No matter who belittled 

The sure eff-ct of th.it. 
His l.uidlord sh'irtly toM him 

To hunt a pai)er flat. 

His butcher, too, determine,! 

His credit had to stop, 
And so li.» had when hungry 

To eat a paper chop. 

Anfl sine" his swee'h->art frowned so 

Uii,>n this sort of life, 
He ha.l to be cont»>nted 

^\ilh just a pap.jr wife. 

H*^ thought the constitution 

Might save th'^ rights, mayhap; 
The out-'^ome only show.'j him 
He Wore a paper cap. 
— M. L.ANDBl'RGH Wlt^uN in the New 
York Sun. 



do. I'm a publisher of 



competitive .-.y^teni. Vet it is doubtful if that could pos- 
sibly be done economically. 

But if you do admit the benefits of the trust move- 
ment, that does not mean that you thereby abandon the 
fight against them, for the proper fight, if the movement 
is logical and beneficial, is for control in the interests of 
the people. 



At the Spalding 



T W 



I'iims, .Skel- 



i ton. Conn.; C. F. Heidbrink. D lylon, 

Ohio; J M. S.hwarta. St. Paul; W. R. 

If the trust movement is left without control, the Macdonald. Chicag.); W. W. Kleirie. 

, ui J u L >^ . '"" iNorthtleld. Minn.; J. Mather. F. T. Lally, 

people are robbed because human selfishness unregu- ! E R Porr-h, St. Paul; H w. Miller. 

lated. runs riot in the possibilities of the trust movement. j£^''^^fn%e: Mr^^a"mr^Mr'i;"'F:'*''!sing: 

Jewett, 

and earnings of the trusts miKht divert a oroner «iliarp r>f I w ,',»"" t ' rkowne'i-ic' MT."h'.:"w "Bennon! 



,_. Bonlke, Mr 

Putting the curb of public control upon the methods M'"""^P">'^! ^^^- •^"'^J^^r?- f;.*^- ^ 
I r ..u i. .. • 1 ,• . lHil)'.)ing; J. Leland, Bulil. Mum.; 

1 earnings of the trusts might divert a proper share of Iwugpnt, Dowaglac. Mich.; w. B 

their hpnetifc tn thp nennl<» it liircre I Minneapolis. W. H Healy. Fort Dodge, 

ineir ocnenis to tne people at large. lowa, J. R Paynf». Chicago; Minnie J. 

Don, 'Lincoln. Neb.; Mr. and Mrs. J. I. 

,Sauvel. Smithville. 111.; Mr. and Mrs. F. 



THE PASSING SHOW. 

Never knew of a storm, financial or weather, that 
lasted always. 

.c * * 

Fashion outlawed straw hats Sept. r, but the man of 
independence and courage will wear his as long as it 
feels comfortable. 

* * * 

An Italian poet won $io,ooo in a lottery, and says he 
will write no more poetry. And yet they are putting 
the lotteries out of business! 

* * * 

A shortage of Teddy bears is reported, but a good 
many people are more interested in their desire to see a 
shortage of stock exchange bears. 



D Lyon Minneapolis; W E. Harwood, 
Eveleth;' E. Bystrom, Hu.ls.in. N. Y.; 
tV H. Young. Ashtabula. Ohio.; H. R. 
Rochester. Dayton. Ohio; J. E. Rich- 

lards. Perham. Minn.; Mrs. E. Grans. 

I Port Arthur; Mrs. H. A. McKibbin. Mrs. 

IL Powley. Port Arthur; R. E. Daniel, 
Calumet. Mich.; C. M. Rose. St. Paul; 

lE M. Roblnsor^: Minneapolis; Mr. and 

1 Mrs E. Yungnmn. Philadelpliia; G. W. 
Mark.^11 Wilmington, Del; J. H. Os- 
borne. London. England; Mr. and Mrs. 
H W. Smith, Waltham, Miss.; G M. 
Lesser, Los Angeles, Cal.; .S. S. Allen, 
Columbus. 



had. 



biflf. 



The Dop«' Slieet. 

"I am a student. ' ii'* exciamie4 

In student's prile an.i fash:on; 
"My h.obhy's ethnology— 

A veritable passion." 
Perhaps he i*— h*' studies hard 

All through his tdle spaces- 
And isn't etltttal>>|D' 

The study M, tl»« races' 

— BufCalo Newv. 



.Si'hool Days. 

H-^-llo. there kl.ls' 
Ain't you glad 
For the gojd time you've 
And don't y.ju think 
School Is on the bhnk? 
Of course you do; 
You wouldn't be true 
To yourselves if 
You didnt want to hit it a 
An.l kick It in the pants, 
And knock its ch.ince 
To g<^t its hooks 
Into you for the b.joks. 
That's your style- 
But h.>li up awhile 
And thlnki 

Wouldn't you be gezink 
If you had no 3.?h<>jl3 to teach 
You how to reach 
For the highest and best things? 
To give you wings 
To fiy with aibove th.j.se who crawl 
All over this terrestrial baJl? 
Do you want to dig 
And live iik.? a pig? 
Or do you want to fly 
And live on pi". 
And pull the plug 
In a big red chug-chug? 
Say. 

Are you built that way 
Or the other? Do you want 
The crown of effort or its cnxss'* 
Its gain or loss? 
What? 

You wauit the hot 
Stuff? 

That's enough? 
G«t after your boiiks! 
Sti.'k to them all day. 
And things, by and by. 
Will be coming your way 
— W. J. LAMPTON in' New 
World. 



New \ork Sun: Few girl.s are so hard-' -^" ">«' AlphaJu't. 

h'MrtPd that a diam.jnd won't make an B-^tsion Globe: Each of th-; f.)llow1ngr 
impression. ' .sentences contains all the letters of the 

You can learn a good d^Ml about wo- i'^'l''^*'^^'^- 
men by not trying to und.-rstand th<>m ^ '^"'^•' T-iick brown fox Jumps over the 

\V hen a girl won't deceive her father ^^''^ ''"*• 
about her beaux she hasn't any fath ^r I ^'^'^^ my box with five dozen liquor Jugs. 

Cooks are very useful t.) k.-.>n -neii J"hn quickly extemporized five toW 
from doing all th.-ir talking against th«i**^S3. 
government. » "^ ^i. ^"- 

The iivjuble with having money of 'lYouhlo l'«im!n^. 

your own is you can't be iiappy without Wa.shinston P.jst: A Chleago contem- 
o.ner people s, to.}. porary announces that "tight shoes are 

I f"v-. * ^^^'^ knows better than to to be in s'vle henceforth." People with 

P^u I. money so as not t-J lose all of eorns are n..t likely to develop a high re- 
n he has alr^adygone and done it. gani for lie- parly who has set this new 

~ — • trouble on foot. 

I^)inled Paratfraph.s. 
Chicago News; Much that passes for 
patiencp is merely lazine.ss. 

Some men resemblt; goats; they can't 
help butting In. 

Experience is the cream of life, but ag.» 
oft.m sours it. 



Mu.slcal Note. 

Chicago News; Anybody can play a 
hand organ, but there is no g-iod and suf- 

11 i'-ir r.';:son viiy ;i.nyh'"ly sh.)ulii 



the 



York 



Nature .Story. 

Algy met a bear. 

* • * 

The bear was bulgy; 
The bulge was Algy. 

—Fry's Magazine. 



When a horse stops suddenly in 
street it shows Its bringing up. 

What's the matter with the hands of a 
baseball player as a rly trap? i 

Man has faith in anything he has never i 
tried to reason out. 

When you hear anything that is too ' 
good to be true it is time to stand from 
under. 

Some women can turn a man down so 
gently that he doesn't know what struck 
him. 

A doctor tells a patient to put his tongu,-; 
out and expects his wife to keep her I 
tongue In. . j 

If it be true that a pretty girl attracts I 
only silly men, sensible nun are as scarce 
as hen's teeth. I 

When a thief has an opportunity to j 
steal he always steals something besides 
the opportunity. 

An average woman can get more real i 
enjoyment out of a funeral than a man 
can get out of his own wedding. i 

Until automobiles can be operated with ' 
one hand the old-fashioned h'os.' an.i ' 
buggy is good enough for a girl and her i 
best beau. I 



AMUSEMENTS. 



LYCEUm i TOWIGHT 

Tomorrow Nisrht and 'Wrilaemdmy 
Mntinee and >'iicht. 

MACK-LEONE PLAYERS 

In \MI,L.4I{IJ MACK'S 

"SAfiE BRUSH" 

Xlgli <» 10 . 25. BOc. Mat*., 10 and 2Sc. 
Thurwdnv, Friday and Sat. Mat. Sat. 

"IN 6LD KENrUuKY" 

Meht, 2i5o lo $1. Mat., 2:^0. to 75c. 



Two Tilings. 

Atlanta Constitution: The hills look 
mighty high, and that's why we want to 
go there; but getting to the t.jp is one 
thing, and rolling <J'>wn is another. 



Tlie Unbudted. 

While some delight to bark and bite. 
And get up a trust-busting fight. 

Has Mr. Baer 

For such a care? 
Well, no; not by an anthracite. 

—Indianapolis News. 



ETROPOLITAN 

"THE HOUSE OF .MIKTH.* 



Tonlf^lit and All TbU Week. In the 
Ueitt UurleMque .Show You Ever .Saw, 

THE ROLLICKERS 

XOTKi Thin In a «2 attraction, plar- 
lug at the Met'M popular prlcew. 
BAHGAI.V M.\T1XKE TOMORROW. 

Next Week — "THE JOI.LY CilRLS." 



\f 



-r\- 



DEFECTIVE PAGE 




THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD? TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1907. 



''Quality Better or prices Lower than elsewhere. With a 

V \ m LI 

226-228 W. SUPERIOR ST. -COMPLETE HOME, HOTEL, CLUB, LODGE, CHURCH, 





^f/^^T"^, 



Greater Assortment of Dependable Furniture to Select From! 









^^m^^^" THEATER FURNISHINGS - ESTIMATES FREE-226-228 WEST SUPERIOR ST 




Merit Always Wins! 



Mail 

Orders 

Prorrvptly 

Filled. 



O SELL cheap goods at a cheap price is no cause 
for a flourish of trumpets, but to sell depend- 
able merchandise at the prices we quote here is 
to give exactly what we say we will give, and in the 
largest variety too. This is achievement appreciated 
by a discerning public, and which enhances the pres- 
tige of this store for offering these inducements. 

There is no need of paying for what you buy now. 
Later on will do, just suit yourself as to what you 
want to pay each week or month, and remember 

"YOUR CREDIT IS GOOD AT KELLY'S." 








A SPECIAL SALE OF 

KITCHEN CABINETS 

Our line of Kitchen Cabinets has arrived, and we 
intend to close out our present line of samples at 
less than actual cost. Some of these Cabinets have 
been on our sample floor since spring, and they are 
shop worn to a certain extent. We have sold hun- 
dreds of Kitchen Cabinets from these samples. If 
you want a high grade Cabinet made of solid oak 
with a place for everything used about the kitchen, 
buy now and save money. Stewart Kitchen Cabinets 
are the finest on the market today. They are com- 
plete in every detail. You can prepare 
a meal in half the time by using one of 
these cabinets. Remember we are sell- 
ing them on easy payments. 





COMPARE THE PRICES 

We mention here but a few of the great price re- 
ductions on Stewart Kitchen Cabinets. Come in early 
and make your selection. Your credit is good. 

$25.00 KITCHEN CABINET ^-1;^ AA 
on sale at ^ILVV 

$28.00 KITCHEN CABINET (^1£ AA 

on sale at ^IW.WV 

$29.00 KITCHEN CABINET ^1Q IZA 

on sale at «plO.«IW 

$32.50 KITCHEN CABINET ^-IQ Or 
on sale at ^Ld*09 

$35.00 KITCHEN CABINET $9| AA 
on sale at ^^l.WV 

$36.00 KITCHEN CABINET Cftft CA 

on sale at ^UL.^V 



PARLOR ROCKER 

$$.d8 



This 
Rocker 
roomy, 
genuine 
seat i.s 




\?, an ideal Parlor 

as it is large and 
Made of oak with 
leather seat. The 

filled with the be=it 
spring.s and up- 
holstered in the 

': finest material. 
Frame is extra 
lieavy and wel! 
finished. We also 
have these rock- 
ers in mahogany 
finish. Others .sell 
them at $i8. the 
Kelly price is 



$S.98 




Here s another Kelly special. Bod Davenport similar to cut in Golden Oak. 
Karly English or Mahogany finish. Upholstered in red 
or green velvet with large biscuit tufting. Other stores 
advertise these at $J0 — our price 



L 111 ij'jiucil 1 /drv. 

$15.00 



DINING CHAIRS 

This Dining Chair is not to be 
classed with the cheap chairs 
that are being offered by the 
minor stores. It is made of solid 
oak with continuous back posts, 
has braces on arms, back panel is 
carved, has cobbler seat. This 
chair would be a splendid value 
at $3.00 — our price — 



$1.10 




THE STORE THAT SELLS IT FOR LESS ! 



"STEWART" 
HEATERS 



We know it's rather 
early to be talking 
about heaters, but the 
.signs of winter are 
appearing and you will 
need a heater that will 
save fuel and throw 
lots of heat. That's the 
Stewart. Come in and 
let us show them to 
you. Remember, we 
take your old stove as 
part payment on a new 
one and we can ar- 
range terms to suit you. 

$1.00 

Per Week 





THROWN AT 
HER^FEET 

Freaky Fate Brought 

Husband to Pretty 

Holland Maiden. 

Stumbling Horse Cast a 
Rich Lieutenant Be- 
fore the Girl. 



Mls*3 Wilhelmina Mustr^t. also a na- 
tive of Ht>Uand, who arrived in Red 
Lodgre with her parents from the old 
country but a wei?k ago. The cere- 
mony was performed in the Dutch 
lanaruago by Rev. Father J. M. Ver- 
niaat. a native of Holland. 

The weddingr was the culmination 
of a pretty romance, of which Lieut. 
Braat and his bride are the prin- 
cipals. The lieutenant comes of a 
rioh and aristocratic family of Hol- 
land. His ancestors figured con- 



Red Lodge, Mont., i^pl. 17.— Lieut. 
Peter Braat. an ex-offic.*r in the army 
of Holland, was married at St. Agnes 
Catholic churoh. ia thils town, to 



Diarrhoea 

When vou want a quick cure without 
any loss of time, and one that is followed 
by ivO bad results, use 

Chamberlain's 
Colic, Cholera and 
Diarrhoea Remedy 

It never fails and is pleasant to take. 
It is equally valuable for children. It is 
famous for its cures over a large part of 
the civil 'zed world. 



-spicuously in the I>utch army in the 
lung struggle against the oppressions 
of Spain, and ever smce a scion of 
thd family has been a member of 
the Dutch army. 

Miss Mustert's parents are well-to- 
do middle-olass people, but do not 
belong in the same cla.s3 of society 
as the aristocratic Braats. One day 
the pretty Wilhelmina was standing 
in a crowd watohmg the maneuvers 
I of the regiment to which young Braat 
j belonged, when the latter's horse 
became fracteous and tried to run 
' away. As the animal dashed through 
the street it stumbled and fell, and 
the gallant lieutenant was thrown off 
at the feet of the maiden. Quickly 
arising, he apologized for the occur- 
F'^nce, and an acquaintance was begun 
which rapidly ripened into love. 
YouJig Braat's family insisted upon 
I him weddir.g a girl in his own rank 
in society, whom they had chosen for 
him, but he possesst-d enough of the 
famous Dutch stubborness which had 
helped William of Orange to over- 
come difficulties aiH>arent!y insur- 
n^.ountabie, and he refused to give up 
his middle-clo.ss svveethe.irt for all the 
high-born daansels in Holland. 

As if the opposition of his family 
to the contemplated union was not 
enough. Braat's cup of .son-ow was 
filled to overflowing when the an- 
nounceanent was mad« by the parents 
of his sweetheart that they had de- 



termined to better their condition by | 
emigrating to America, to Montana. ', 
and would take Wllhedmina with j 
them. 1 

They lost no time in carrying out this ! 
design, and the lovers bade each other j 
a tearful farewell as the family em-. 

I barked on a steamer bound for the | 

; ifew world. Bui the lieutenant was a.\ 
man of resources, and not easily daunt- ' 

jed. He determined not to allow a; 

I continent to separate him from his, 

I chosen bride. 

I Enlisting the aid of influences power- ' 
ful at the Dutch court, he succeeded In 



Hunyadi 
Janos 

The Dest Nataral Laxattv* 
Water. Clears the system. 
Quickly relieves billoas- 
ness and stomach troubles. 
Acts (gently and enslly.Take 
half a glass on artsin|{ for 



CONST! P/VriON 



getting a speedy acceptance of his res- 
ignation aa a lieutenant in her ma- 
jesty's army, and hurrying to a port, 
was fortunate enough to catch a fast 
outgoing steamer, and he landed in 
New York a few hours before his sweet- 
heart and her parents, traveling on a 
slower steamer, reached there. 

The reunion of the lovers was as joy- 
ful as the parting had been sorrowful, 
and after discus.sing the matter with; 
Mr. and Mrs. Mustert. it was deter-; 
mined that the wedding should follow 
as soon as the party reached Lhoir 
destination. 

They came to Red Lodge last week 
In search of a location, and liked th.j 
prospects so well they have determined | 
to stay. Lieut. Braat busied himself ; 
In finding a house, large enough fori 
two, to rent, and this accomplished, the 
aid of the priest was invoked. Braat! 
is quite wealthy, and will familiarir.e j 
him.self for a year or two with Amer- 1 
lean custonis. after which he expects to 
engage in business in his adopted coun- 
try. 

One of the worst features of kidney 
trouble Is that it is in insidious dLsease 
and before the victim realizes his danger 
he may have a fatal malady. Take Fol- 
ey's Kidney Cure at the first sign of 
trouble as it corrects irregularities and 
prevents Bright's disease and diabetes. 
Sold by all druggists. 



MAY CHANGE 

ITS RATES 

Significant Announce- 
ment by Head of 
Woodmen Society. 

Local members of the Modern Wood- 
men of America, the fraternal in- 
surance organization which has a large 
membership at the Head of the Lakes, 
are much interested in the announce- 



ment made at the recent convntlon of 
th National Fraternal congress at 
Buffalo that the Woodmen rates will 
be adjusted upon an adequate basis be- 
fore the next annaul meeting of the 
congress. The announcement of the 
raise in rates was made by the head 
counsel of the Woodmen's organization. 
The declaration as to the proposed 
increase in rates was made during a 
heated di-scussion In the congress when 
the Modern Woodmen, the Heptasophs, 
and the Woodmen of the World re- 
sented what they believed was a re- 
solution to practically force them out 
of the congress. 



McMillans 



PURE KETTLE RENDERED 
LARD 

PARAGON HAM & BACON 



Cured Hay Fever aud Summer Gold. 

A. J. Nusbaum. Batesvile, Indiana, 
writes: "Last year I suffered for three 
I months with a summer cold so dlstress- 
\ ing that it interfered with my business. 
I had many of the symptoms of hay 
fever, and a doctor's prescription did 
not reach my ca.se, and I took several 
medicines which seemed to only ag- 
gravate my case. Fortunately I Insist- 
ed upon having Foley's Honey and 
Tar In the yellow package, and It 
quickly cured me. My wife has since 
used Foley's Honey and Tar with the 
same success." Sold by all druggists. 

It pays to eulvertise In The Herald. Ask 
IJ. M. Gidding & Co. 






10 



MINNESOTA GRADES. 



106 Flour Ex<hnnge, Minneapolis, 

Sepl. 1, 1907. 
In complinnce with the provisions of 

Section 2062. <hai)tor 28, Itevised 

Laws of 1905, tlie joint Minneapolis 
and Dulnth iirain Inspection Boards, 

(Board of Appeal) nut this day and 
establisiied tlic following CJRADES 
OF CiUAIX, whleli shall be known 
as MINNESOTA GRADES, the wime 
to talie elTeet and be in forte on 
and after the Ith day of Si>pteniber, 
1907. 

IV. F. KELSO, A. F. EVENSOX, 

General Sec'y. General Chairman. 



THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: TVES^^^'^^^^BEjlinm. 



MINNEAPOLIS GRAIN INSPEC- 

TION BOARD: 
A. F. Evrnson, Ch., 

S. P. Thorten, 

W. F. KELSO, Sec'y. 



DULUTH GRAIN INSPECTION 
BOARD: 
B. McManiis, Cli., 

Hans P. Bjorge, Sec'y. 
H. M. Gray, 
CHIEF INSPECTOR: 
F. W. Eva, St. Paul. 
CHIEF DEPl'TIES: 
N. Barncard, Minneapolis. 

H. E. Emerson, Dulnth. 



NORTHERN SPRING \VHEv\T. 
No. 1 Hard Sprints Wlient— Shall be 
Bouiul, bright, svvtti. cltiui and consist 
of over 50 pti Ltni of luird .Scotch life-, 
and- weigh not less than 5S pounds to 
the iJitasurtd bushel. 

No. 1 Nortlieru SpriDg Wheat-Shall 

be sound, sweet and clean, may con- 
Bist of the hard and t-olt varieties of 
spring wheat, but must contain a larger 
proportion of the hard varieties and 
■weigh not less than 57 pounds to the 
measured bushel. 

No. 2 Nortcivrn Spring Wheat-Shall 
be spring wheal not clean enough or 
Bound enough for No. 1. hut of good 
nulling «iuamy, and mu.«t not weigh 
less than 6t> pounds to the measured 
cusnel. 

No. 3 Northern Sprins Wheat-Shall 
be composed oi inferior, shrunken, 
spring wheat and weigh not less than 
M pounds to the measured bushel. 

No. 4 Northern »«prlnK Wheat— Shall 
include all inferior spring wheat that 
Is badly shrunken or damaged, and 
weigh not less tiian 49 pounds to tho 
irifasured bu.shel. 

Rejeeted S|>rius WTieat-Shall include 
ail arletits of spring wheat sprouted, 
badly bleached, or for any other cause 
unht for No 4. I 

NOTE-Hard. flinty wheat, of good ! 
color, c^ontaining no appreciable admix- I 
Jure of soft v.heat. may be admitted! 
into the gradts of No. 2 Northern 
Spring and No. 3 Northern Spring 
Wheat, provided weight of the same 
is not more than one pound less than 
the minimum test weight required by 
the existing rulea of said grades, and 
provided further for sucli wheat is In 
all other respects ciuali/ied for admis- 
sion into such grades. 



TIIIITE WINTER WHE.'VT. 

. ^?' . * .,^'''** Winter Wheat-Shall 
include all varieties of pure, soft white 
•winter wheat, sound, plump, dry" sweet 
and clean, and weigh not less than 6S 
pounds to the measured bushel 

No. 2 White Winter Wheat-Shall in- 
clude all varieties of soft, white, winter 
Wheat, dry. sound and clean, may con- 
tain not more than 6 per cent of soft red 
winter wheat, and weigh not less than 
t*> pounds to the mea^5ured bushel 

No. » White Winter Wheat-Shall In- 
clude all v;;iietieH of soft while winter 
wlieat, may contain 5 per cent of dam- 
aged grain other than mow-burnt 
Wheat, and may contain 10 per cent of 
Boft, red, winter wheat, and weigh not 
less thajv jd pounds to the measur.d 
bushel. 



RED WINTER W1IEAT. 

No. 1 Red Winter Wheat-Shall be 

pure, red winter wheat of both light 
and dark eolors, yound. sweet, plump 
and well cleaned, and weigh not less 
than bO pounds to the measured bushel 

No. 2 Red Winter Wheat-Shall be 
red winter wacat cf both lignt und 
dark colors; shall not contain more 
than 5 per cent of white winter; sound 
Bwcet and (lean, and weigh not less 
than fib pounds to tlit measured bushel 

No. 3 Red Winter Wheat-.Shall be 
sound, red wmttr wlieal not clean and 
plump enough for No. :;; shall not con- 
tain more than 5 i.er cent of white 
winter, and weigh not less than 65 
pounds to the measured bushel. 

WESTERN AmiTE AND RED 
WHEAT. 

xJT,"; * )^^?**J" ^Vhite-No. 1 Western 
White shall be sound, well cleaned 
plump and composed of the western 
varieties of wliite wheat 

No. 2 WeMtern White— No. 2 Western 
While shall be sound, reasonably cl'an 
and composed ol western varieties' of 
white wiieat. 

No. 3 >VeMern White-No 3 Western 
White shall be composed of all west- 
ern white wheat lit for wareliousiiiir 
weighing not less than 54 pounds to t/fe 
measured bushel and not sound cnoueli 

°''^^W^V\^^ ^"' ^^'^ '"J?*^^'- trades 
Rejected \\ evtern White— Re ucfed 
Wt stern White shall comprise all west- 
ern vvhite wheat fit for warehousing 
but unht for higher grades ""'"■•b 

^OT}i-W\-slcrn Red Wheat and West- 
ern Wneat sli.iU correspond in all re- 
B^tcts with tlie grades of Nos. 1. 2, 3 and 



DCRUM ( M ACA RON I ) WH EAT. 

No. I Durum Wheat-yhall be bright 
Bound, dry well cleaned and be com- 
posed of durum, commonly knowr is 
macaroni wheat, and weigh not less 
than to pouiuls to the measured bushel 

^o. 2 Durum Wheat-Sliall be drv 
-K^^'n ''"f^ ."^ ¥.°'\*^ nullli.g quality. It 
Shall include all durum wheat that for 
any rea.««on is not suitable for No 1 
durum, and weigh not less than' 68 
pounds to tne measured bushel 

No. 3 Durum Wlieat-.<:hall im hide all 
durum wheat blea, hed. shrunken, or 
for any cause unht for Ne\ 2 and 
weigh not less than 55 pounds to tile 
measurcfl bushel. 

No. 4 Durum Wheat-Shall include all 
durum wheat that is ba.!Iy bleached or 
for any eause unfit for No. 3. 

MIXED WHEAT. 

In case of any appreciable .admixture 
Of Durum. \\ esterii. Winter or West- 
ern grades of Northern Sprintr Wh. it 
or with each other. It shall be gra.ltfl 
accord ng to the quality thereof, and 
classed as Nos. 1, 2. ;;, etc. mIvfI) 
WHKAT, with inspector's notation de- 
scribing Its character. 

CORN. 

No. 1 Com— Shall be corn of various 
colors, sound, plump and well cleaned 
and should contain not more than 15 
per cent of moisture. 

No. 2 Corn-Shall be corn of various 
colors sweet, reasonably clean and 
Bhould not (ontain more than 1SV4 cer 
cent of moisture. 

No. 3 Corn— Shall be corn of various 
color.s. sweet, shall be roasonablv sound 
and re asonably clean, and should not I 
contain more than 19 per cent of mois- ' 
ture. 

No. 4 Corn-No. 4 Corn shall include 
all forn not wet and not in heating 
condition that is unfit for No. 3 



correspond in all respects with the 
grades of Nob. 1, 2and 8 Yellow Corn. 

OATS. 

h"?; ^ White Oata-No. 1 White Oats 
snail be white, dry, sweet, sound, clean 
anei tree from other grain and shall 
weigh not less than 3;i pounds to the 
measured bushel 
J^O; 2 White 6ati.-No. 2 White Oats 
Shall be seven-eights white, dry, sweet, 
sound; reasonably clean and practically 

, free from other grain, and snail weigh 

I not less than 31 pounds to the meas- 

i ured bushel. 

.^•- 3 White Oat»-No. 3 White Oats 
shall be seven-eighths white, dry, sweet, 

I sound, reasonably elean and practically 
free from other grain, and shall weigh 
not less than a> pounds to the measured 
bushel. 

No. 4 White Oats-Shall include all 
0''^ts not sufficiently sound and clean 
lor No. 3 White Oats and shall weigh 
not less than 24 pounds to the meas- 
ured bushel. 

\*"o'***,.**"*'*-'^^« grades of Nos. 1. 2, 
and 3. iellow Oats snail corresponel 
with the grades of Nos. 1. 2 and 3 White 
Oats, excepting that they shall be of tho 
yellow varieties. 

No. 1 Oatn-.No. 1 oats shall be dry, 
sweet, sound, clean and free from other 
gram and shall'^eigh not less than 32 
pounds to the measured bushel 

No, 2 Oats— No, 2 oats shall be dry, 
sweet, scund, reasonably clean and 
practically free from other grain and 
shall weigh not less than 31 pounds to 
the me.'isured bushel. 

No. 3 Oats— No. 3 oats shall be all oats 
that are merchantable and warehous- 
ablc, and not fit for the higher grades. 
No. 1 Clipped White Oats-No. J Clip- 
ped White Oats shall be white, dry, 
sweet, sound, clean and free from other 
grain, and shall not weigh less than 40 
pounds to the measureel bushel. 

No. 2 Clipped AVhitc Oats-No. 2 CIlp- 
pc'd White Oats sliall be seven-eighths 
white, dry, sweet, sound, reasonably 
clean and practically free from other 
grain and shall weigh not less than 38 
pounds to the measured bushel. 

No. 3 Clipped White Oats-No. 3 Clip- 
ped White Oats shall be seven-eighths 
white, dry, sweet, sound, reasonably 
clean and practically free from other 
grain, and shall weigh not less than 36 
pounds to the measured bushel. 

RvlT 

No. 1 Rye^No. 1 Rye shall be sound, 
plump and well cleaned, and shall 
weigh not less than 60 pounds to the 
measured bushel. 

No. 2 Rye-No. 2 Rye Bhall be sound, 
reasonably clean and reasonably free 
from other grain, and shall weigh not 
less than 54 pounds to the measured 
bushel. 

No. 3 Rye— All rye slightly damaged, 
sligntly musty, or from any other cause 
unnt lor No. 2 shall be graded as No. 3. 

BARLEY. 
No. 1 Barley— No. 1 Barley shall be 
plump, briglit, clean and free trom 
other grain, and shall weigh not less 
than 4)i pounds to the measured bushel. 
No. 2 Barley-No. 2 Barley shal' be 
sound and of healthy color, not plump 
enough for No. 1, reasonably clean and 
reasonably tree from other grain, and 
shall weigh not less than 4ti pounds to 

I the measured bushel. 

I No. 3 Barley— No. 3 barley shall In- 
clude all slightly shrunken and other- 
wise slightly damaged barley not good 
enough for No. 2 and shall weigh not 
less than 44 pounds to the measured 
bushel. 

No. 4 Barley-No. 4 Barley shall In- 
clude all barley fit for malting pur- 
poses, not good enough for No. 3. 

No. 1 Feed Barley— No. 1 Feed Barley 
must test not less than 40 pounds to the 
measured bushel and be reasonably 
sound and rea.sonably clean. 

No. 2 Feed Barley— No. 2 Feed Barley 
shall include all barley which is tor 
any cause unht for the grade of No. 1 
I Feed H.irley. 

Chevalier Bariey-Nos. 1. 2 and 3 Chcv- 

[aller Barley shall conform in all re- 

'spects to the grades of Nos. 1. 2 and i 

Barley, except that they shall be of a 

(Chevalier variety grown In Montana, 

[Oregon and on the Pacific coast 

1 No tirade— All Wheat, Barley, Oats, 

Rye and Corn that are m a heating con- 

elition, too musty or too damp to be 

safe for warehousing, of that Is badly 

bin-burnt, badly damaged, exceedingly 

dirty, or otiierwise unfit for store, shall 

be classed as No Grade with inspectors 

notation as to quality and condition. 

IXAXSEED. 
No. 1 Northvieslern Flaxseed- No. 1 

Northwestern sliall be mature, sound, 
dry and sweet. It shall be Northern Grown 
i he maximum quantity of field, stack, 
storage or other damaged seed inter- 
mixed shall not exceed twelve and one- 
half (UM) per Cent. The minimum [ 
weight shall be fifty-one (51) pounds to ' 
the measured bushel of commercial' 
pure seed. 

No. 1 Flaxseed— No. 1 Flaxseed sh.ill 
be northern gn wn, sound, dry and free 
Irom muMiness. and carrying not more 
than twenty-five (25t per cent of Im- 
mature or field, stack, storage or otner 
damaged flaxseed, and weighing not 
less than fifty (50) pounds to the meas- 
ureil bushel of commercially pure seed 

No. 2 Fla.itweed- Flaxseed that is bin- 
burnt, immature, field damaged or 
n.usty, and yet not to a degree to be 
unfit for storage and having a test 
weight of not less than forty-seven (47) 
pounds to the bushel of commercially 
pure seed shall be No. 2 Flaxseed. 

No tirade Flaxseed— Flaxseed that is 
damp, warm, mouldy, very musty or 
otherwise unfit for stor.ige, or having 
a Weight of less than fortv-seven (47) 
pounds to the measured bushel of com- 
mercially pure seed, shall be No Grade 

The following are abbreviations to be 
used by Inspectors in designating the 
grades: 
R. Wt.. for Red Winter 

Vv V'' Northern 

H. for Hard 

Wn. W. for Western White 

W n. R. for Western Red 

>v. for Winter 

W. W't foi White Winter 

Mx. .for Mixed 

}■ V,*^""" l^^ Yellow Corn 

W. forn for White Corn 

2; t^ f«Jr No Grade 

SV- ,for Barley 

FJ. for i.Yed 

L'"- for Durum 





Mme. Yale 



Hair Tonic 

FOR CHILDREN 
AND ADULTS 

ylniiseptic and Hygienic 

A Hair Invigorator — Just 
what its name implies. It 
supplies nourishment, tho 
Clements of growth, which, 
when absorbed by tho hair, 
strengthens and beautifies it 
In the game way that sap 
glorifies the foliage of a 
tree. Even where the folli- 
cles are seemingly dead, if 
the scalp is massaged daily 
with Mme. Yale's Hair 
Tonic a vigorous growth 
will be produced. It has 
hone.stly earned its title of 
"the great hair grower." It 
stimulates the most stunted 
growth and makes the hair 
magnificently healthy and 
beautiful. By its use women 
can provide them.selves with 
B trailing mantle of hair — 
jvoman's natural raiment, her 
birthright. 

Mme. Yale's Hair Tonic Is 

prized equally by men and 
women, particularly when the 
hair begins to weaken or 
fade. Cures baldness, gray- 
ness, splitting of the hair, 
dandruff and all diseases of 
1 the hair, scalp and beard. 
One applie-ation usually stops 
hair falling. A nursery re- 
quisite; no mother should 
neglect to use it for her 
boys and girls; when the hair 
Is made strong in childhood 
It remains proof against dis- 
ease and retains its vigor anJ 
youthfulness throughout life. 

Mme. Yale's Hair Tonic is 

a colorless, fragrant, delight- 
ful hair dre.ssing; neither 
sticky, gritty. nor greasy; 
makes the hair soft, fluffy 
and glossy. Contains no 

artificial coloring; would not 
eoil the whitest hair; restores 
original color by invigcratin^f 
the scalp and re-establishing 
normal circulation and 
proper distribution of the live 
coloring matter. Beautiful 
hair redeems the plainest 
countenance, and any one 
ran secure it by using Mme. 
Yale's Hair Tonic. Now in 
three sizes. Our special 
price 

89c, 43c and 22c 

fMTONspnifDNWNY 



LARGE RATS 
AFTER HIM 

Hubbard County Man 

Attacked by Swarm of 

Huge Rodents. 

Animals Beaten Off After 

Hundred Are Put 

to Death. 



{ WISCONSIN 



USES DYNAMITE 
TO SHIJFFLE OFF 

Lights Fuse Connected 

With the Explosive in 

His Pocket. 

Appleton. Wis., Sept. 17.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— Later development.? in 



DYNAMITE CAP 
CRIPPLES MINER 






Akeley, Minn., Sept. 17.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— Rats are becoming 
troublesome in the southern part of 
Hubbard county, and as they are al- 
most as large as muskrats, they are 
very dangerous. Many farmers have 
been unable to raise chickens this year 
because of the rats, and the financial 
loss has been great. On the Rudesill 
farm, south of Akeley, the rats were 
I so numerous that tliey have been fed 
on poisoned food, and scores have been 
killed. Joe Knute went into the grain 
shed to spread the poison when he en- 
countered a large horde of rats which 
immediately attacked him, and after 
fighting desperately for some time he 
was compelled to cry for help. The 
shed was covered with blood, and over 
100 rats were killed. 

Another farmer, Simeon Parks, found 
nearly fifty rats in a barrel trap in 
one night. 

Some of the farmers are going to 
import some ferrets to drive out the 
rodents from the farm buildings. 



Goes Off In His Hand, 

Tearing Limb to 

Shreds. 

WiUlston. N, D.. Sept. 17.-(Spe<lal to 
The Herald.)— Jfu?k Svkes a mln.ir 

fo a„lr « . , ",; "*° ""^ blown one of his hands while handling a dy- 

iiililii'lilliil 




weeks past. 

His wife is said to have stated last 
night that he deliberately laid a fuse 
connected with several sticks of dyna- 
mite in his pocket and calmly waited 
for the explosion. The district attorney 
IS investigating. 



DEATH CHANGES PLANS. 

RaiiroaQ Nan Killed as He Was About to 
Retire From Service. 

Altoona, Wis., Sept. 17.— (Special to 
The Herald.)- G. B. Downey, aged H, 
a switchman, employed in the Omaha 
yards here, was fatally injured Sunday 



lacerated and powder burned. 

The cap that exploded discharged tho 
balance in the box, 100 in number, and 
the terrible force of the charge was 
sufficient to injure him to the extent 
described. The injured man was taken 
to the Hagen hospital, where he is 
resting easily. 



MEETS AT^FARGO. 

Eighteenth Annual Convention of North 
DaKota W. C. T. l. 

Fargo, N. D., Sept. 17.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— Elaiborate preparations 
are being made for the entertainment 



FOR RENT 

Corner room (abc'Ut 20x40) 
on Lobby Floor of 

Hotel 
Superior 



This room is suif.-ihle (or Piiysi 
cian. Lawyer rr Denti^t and also 
lor any retail buslnrss. 

Frr further information apply to 

H. W. CULLYFORD 

MANAGER, HOTEL SUPERIOR 



i^^^!ilt*^l^^^^"^ °"^ ^■^''^' *^'^ ^^^ being; of the eighteenth annual convention 



caught In a frog. A car ran over both 
his legs and one arm. He died at 5 
p. m. in the hospital here. He leaves 
a widow and three sons. He was pre- 
paring to give up railroading and take 
his family to his old home in Con- 
necticut. 



MANNER OF TESTING, 

Wheat. Flax and Rye shall be tested 
after it has been cleaned. The test 
kettle thall be plaecd where It (an not' 
, be Jarred or shaken. From scoop, bag 
or pan, held two imhes from top of 
kettle, pour into middle of .same at a 
moderate speed until running ov>r. 
striking off in a zig-zag manner with 
the edge of beam held horizontally. 

NOTE— No grain shall in any case be 
gradfd above that of the poorest qual- 
ily found in that lot when it beafs 1 
*^\'/hii(;e of being plugged or doctored. 

NOTE— Wheat scoured or otherwise 
manlpuliittd. the test weight will not 
be considered in grading same i 

NOTE-The graden of "Purifled Oats" • 
or ••Purined Barley" shall correspond 
with the other grades of Oat.« and 
Barley, except that same shall be desig- 
nated as "Purified." 




BUSY COURT TERM 
IS ONATBEMIDJI 

Two Murder Cases Ainong 

Those to be 

Considered. 

Bemidji, Minn., Sept. 17. — (Special 
to The Herald ) — The fall term of dis- 
trict court began today. Judge Mc- 
Clenahan of Braintr^ presiding. The 
calendar shows there are sixty-six 
civil and six criminal cases to be con- 
sidered. 

The grand jury will be kept exceed- 
ingly busy considering the cases of a 
number of parties accused of crime. 

The most important of these cases 
are two for murder. 

One of the cases is that of the state 
against Peter Mathiason, who is bound 
over on the charge of murder in the 
first degree, for having killed John 
. John.son at Gull lake near Tenstrike 
' last February. Mathiason was cap- 
tured In the West aftor some clever 
work by Deputy Sheriff John Bailey 
and County Attorney Henry Funkley 
Mathia.son, since being captured, is 
.said to have confessed to the murder. 
The other murder charge Is against 
W. S. Munn. who shot and killed Aug- 
ust Franklin at Spooner early this 
summer. 

Munn has claimed self defense as 
ju.stificatioii of killing Franklin. The 
jury will also consider the case against 
Jennie Anderson, charged with ob- 
taining money in false person. Mrs 
Andcnson, it is claimed, obtained a 
check for $2,000 belonging to another 
Mrs. Jennie Anderson, wife of A E. ' 
Anderson, decea.sed; the money being j 
the premium of the policy held by Mr 
Anderson as a menib«r of the A O 
U. W. 

The other cases which are up for 
consideration are as follows- State 
vs. Albert Belke. forgery; state v.s. Ole 
rorgenson, assault in the second de- 
cree; state vs. Charles Peterson, burg- 
lary; state vs. J. J. Carter, grand lar- 
ceny. 



TAKES NEW LELANP. 

Ashland Hotel Has New Proprietor From 
City of Milwaukee. 

Ashland, Wis., Sept. 17.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— The New Leland hotel, 
which was sold recently to Emil H. 
Bauch of Chicago by Mr. and Mrs. 
I William Irish, has changed hands 
I again. A few days ago Mr. Bauch dis- 
, posed of tills well known property to 
: George Manegold of Milwaukee. The 
new proprietor has already arrived in 
the city and taken possession. He has 
had considerable experience in the ho- 
tel business in the Cream City, and in- 
tends to conduct the Leland in the 
same high class manner that it has 
been heretofore. 



of the North Dakota W. C. T. U., 
which will meet at the First Baptist 
church, Friday, Sipt. 20, and con- 
tinue in session until next Monday, 
Sept. 23. The delegates will be wel- 
comed for the state by Ldeutenant 
Governor R. S. Ltiwis, for the churches 
by Rev. Charles Adams, and for the 
unions by Mrs. May H. Tousley. The 
musical program will be unusually 
fine, about 150 children expecting to 
participate. 



YOU 

Should place your order new for a 

SUNBEAM PORTABLE 
LAMP 

We will have another lot in this 
week. Most of them arc spoken 
for already. 

WATCH OUR WINDOW. 

Northern Electric Co. 

210 West First St. 



FATHER SEEKS REVENGE. 

Attacks Assailant of Daughter With 
Pickhandle and Shotgun. 

Mott, N. D.. Sept. 17.— (Si)ecial to 
The Herald.) — Mike Cserney, who is 
alleged to have attacked the daughter 
of William Hansel, a neig'hbor, had 
a close call from being killed by the 
girl's Irate father, who went afttr him 
with a pick handle and shotgun, and 
is now nome dangej-ously Avounded. 
He-nsel aimed the gun at Cserney, 
but the shot went wild and killed 
one of the latter's horses. Later he 
was badly beaten up. 

Cserney owore out a warrant for 
Hensel on a charge of attempt to 
kill. Hensel has been arrested and 
his preliminary hearing has be-en set 
for Sept. 27. 1 



KILLED GETTING MAIL 



NO BIDS OFFERED. 

Ashland Fails to Receive Tenders for 
I Lighting Plant. 

I Ashland, Wis., .Sept. 17.— (Special to 
[The Herald.)— The expected bids for a 
jcity lighting plant failed to materialize 

I yesterday and the board of review, Mllbank, S. D., Sept. 17.— (ieorgc 
[Which had advertised for tenders had i Manning, a wealthy farmer living seven 
I to adjourn without doing anything m milet- south of this city, is dead from 

injuries received while getting mail 
from a rural mail box. Manning wa.^ 
reaching for his mail when his team 1 
started, and he fell uudti the wheels. 
He started for his house, but collapsed, 
his injuries resulting faially. 



FOlU fSllTS A MONTH. 

YOUR CLOTBES 

Cleaned, Repnired. PreMHed, D<>llverod» 

SL50 

A MONTH. 

Cleaning, Pressiiig ai.d Ropalrlnff. 
Fur lined Overcoats a SjH-ei.ilty 

THE 
9IAILOR: 



GRASSENGER 



Over GnHner'H liroeery. 
211 Wewt Kuperiur $>lreet. 



UPPER MICHIGAN 



that line 

It is expected that the offer of the 
White River Power company to fur- 
nish the city electricity at 2% cents 
per kilo watt hour, will be accepted. 




FOUR YEARS PA5T 
HUNDRED MARK 

Mrs. Marie Jackson Re- 
tained Her Faculties 
Almost to End. 

L'Anse. Mieh., Sept. 17.— (.Special to- 
, The Herald.)— Relaitiing her faculties 
Luuerwood. N. I).-il,e AleLeaii Coun- | almost until the sands of life had 
tair lo be held at UiKlerwfK^d, Sept. | gone out, Mrs. Maria Jacksor., who 

dl.'d here Sa.turday evening at tho 
great age of 104 was in many ra-- 
.spocts a most rcmakable woman. 

Mrs. J.ickson was born at .Suffolk,. 
Engl.^nd, in IfeOS, and resided in tho- 
mother country over sixty years. SJie 
came to Michigan about forty years- 
ago and resided in Hancock about ten. 
.vcai-s, moving to L'An»o after that 
tiirne. She toolt a prominent placi«- 
in the circles of the old settlers and 
pk'neers and was v/ell acqualntcdi 
with nearly all those who came to- 
thc copper region of L.ake Suix-rlor 
in the early days and helped build- 
lhl.'» rtg-ioiis destinies. 

Mrs. Jackson Is survived by four 
generations of descendants, incluOJng 
four sons and three daughters ant 



Racine-Adam B. Sanford, formerly I"!'"";;**' .'^*'P^- ''^ '' '"''^ ^^^'J',"! 

editor and proprietor of the Racine Advo- r*T/ "*'"& ** R^'"^^^. t^'gamzatlon 

catc and at that time one of the most' Fai'go, N. D.-More than seventy-live 

prominent newspaper men in the state is i.'V'^'"''*^'''^ .of the local order of the United 

in destitute circumstances In a httle to'vin \^*-^^^,'''lf^'tK lYavelers asseuibled at 
'near Portland Or "'"*='""" Loyal Knights hall Saturday evening In 

I Eau Clalre-Partlts of young marauders '■'''^"''\'',.,^'^^i'*^"-, Eight, en eandidates 

from the city have been robbing the melon i''*''*^ Initiated and six were unable to bo 

patches at the county asylum farm in a r wa?J,Uf,.., m r^ tv.^ n^y.,^. a 

most exasperating manner. Every morn- L,^^*'''?,^*V"' }^- ^-J^^ Richland county 

Ing of late about two wheelbar^w^oads f^'^ ^"'u''%^'it "■"^•^'; «^ attraction the 
I of unripe melons which had been cut in i ;?^ ^r"* ""S ^^^ '"^""^- A '*""**.''' V"' '""• — "' - - "-"» ' — 

two have been picked up. 1^ 1 "V f, , 'i,",i^'"''.'"«*^*^ . U'*" ***,'r ! a long list of grand and great grand 

I Marinette-William Riley, first mate .S'"^,^JJ'.V« '^'^^^ *^ ^^'^^^^^"> ^^-P*" ^*' children. The sons and daughters. 
I on the big frf-lght steauier Congo, did; Fargo N D -After heimr aw-iv fmm a-re: John Jackson of West Hough- 
llX'Zy''\altet%'^^^^^^^^ ^-^^'^P •^«^»^«'" "^ ""^^ Francisco,, 

'hcrna The boat on ir« w-,v to K«^.^? ^ J^-""*^" ^ ^"^''^ Jackson of LAn«e; 

pminatWash&ton Ha7b.fr and a^S^^ ^''^P^^f' ^^"^' ^^ In tht.. Ja^es Jackson of LAnse; Mrs. Wing 

i. ...„,,.., 1...T "'^-'^'.-'^ ?"u a "oc- , cay, returned durmg the past week loi j of Mount Clemens. Mich.; Mrs. Kemp^ 



tor was calkd, but arrived loo late. 



h 



J!JJIiJiS52Iii!155!SLl long auto journey. 



YKLLOW CORX. 

IVo. 1 Yellow Coru— .^hall he 98 per 
cent yellow, swfet. sound, plump and 
Well cl«a!i»d. and should .ontain no 
more than 15 per (fiit .f nutisturo 

No. 2 Yeilww torn— Shall be 90 per 
cent yellow, sweet, shall be reasonably 
clean and should not contain more than 
16*/i p» r 'eiit of muisf.ire 

No. 3 Yellow Corn-.'-'hall be 30 per 
cent yfllow. sweet, shall be reason- 
ably elean anfi rf nsonably sound, and 
ghould not foiitain more th.nn 19 per 
cent of moisture. 

NOTE-N08. 1. 2 and 3 White Corn shall 



ORr>ER OF HB.-VRING ON PETITION 
FOR LICENSE TO SELL. MORT- 
GAGE OR LEASE LAND- 
In Probiiie Court. 
State of Mume.vota, County of St. Ty0u'« 
In the matter of the estate of Juliet H 
\\ !iitci.inib. 

The petition of Frederick P. Whitcom') 
a." representative of the above named 
fn" tlS ^'- Whltconib. having been filed 
in this court, representing among othe- 
;»',?/i^'„ 'm'^L^^'" "'^'^ons sf.Tted in said 
F,fti ^' ",»« "«^<>ssary and for the best 

IvV.V^'^^k''^ ^^I ^'^'^^^ «f '^■'I'l Juliet H 
Whltcomb. and of all persons Interested 

Kt H VVhtconrb, In said petition de- 
.scribed, and praying that license be to 

,'i:;'^ifiNa^d''"^'^^"^'^ ^'•-'-^ 'o -» 

IT IS ORDERED. That said petition 
be heard before this court, at the P n. 
bate Court Rooms in the Cour House 
m Duluth in said County on Monday the 
a"" J''^' °l <>^«bfr. 1907. at ten o'clock 
A. M.. and all persons interestcnl in said 
heanng and in said mattf-r are herohv 
cited and required at said time and plaee 
to show cause, if any there be whv 
said petition should not be granted 

ORDERED FURTHER. Th^this ord, 
er be served by public.! t ion in The Du 
luth Evening Herald, according to law 

Dated at Duluth. Minn., Sept 9 lory? " 
By the Court. " 

J. B. MIDDLECOFF. 
„ , Judge of Probate 

(9i<-a]. Probate Court. St. Louis County 

Minn.) 
Duluth Evening Herald, Sept. 10-17-24. 



DEVEL0PIN6 AND 
PRINTING FOR 
AMATEURS 

For the Best Work in the City go to the 

ECLIPSE VIEW GO. 

30 Fourth Ave. West. 

Zenith Phone 993-X. 



House Cleaning 

llousfs thoroughly cleaned from 
basement to attic. Caipets and rugs 
also cleaned at fa.rtory and returned 
promptly. Will not injure the finest 
r.iliric. Old carpets made into hand- 
some new rugs. Take uo chances 
with cheap method.**, which prove 
very expensive. All our work ia 
gu.arnnteed. 

Interstate Comp. Air 
Cleaning & Rug Co. 

I.. SINOTTE, Proprietor. 
Boll* 'Phones. 1701 \V. Mioh. St. 



. Moorhead-Through tho efforts of As- 
sistant Postmaster Fay the government 
railway mall .serv;ice h^s madfaThange 

n the handling of the evening mail from 
the West and Southwest, so that it will 
reach the local postoffice two hours earl- 
ier than in the past. 

Stillwater- W. S. Graham died at hie 
home in Stillwater Minn.. Sunday, aged 
67 A severe attack of gastritis was the 
direct cause of his death. For over thirty 
years Mr. Graham had t^een a citizen of 
Stillwater, prominent in all the duties of 
a citizen and foremost In every enterprise 
of a public nature. 

Wheaton— The first annual county fair 
of Traverse county is to be held at 
Wheaton, Minn., Sept. la. 2<i and 21 Largf 
spacious grounds have been obtained 
Within the city limits and the buildings 
are nipidly nearing completion. 

Carlton — Mis. Samuel Clark of West 
Duluth. is visiting with her sister, Mrs. 
\\ illiiun Hare, who will soon join her 
husl>and at Virginia, where they will 
make their future home. 

East Grand Forks— Chief of Police 
Franklin received a message from J. H 
Lyon at Attica, Mich., who Is a brother 
to Otis Lyop. who was found dead at 
tne foot of the Northern Pacific 
bridge In East Grand Porks Saturday 
The message stated that It would be 
impossible to have the body shipped to 
Michigan and ordered the remains to be 
interred here. 

Isanti-Fire starting from the gaso- 
line lightirg plant destroyed the Mod- 
ern Woodman hall, causing a loss of 
about $2,000. with Insurance of |i,0(iO 
It was the finest hall in Isanti county, 
and will probably be rebuilt at onx.e. 

Litchfield — While workmen were 
clearing up at the mouth of the city 
sewer, the mail sack which was stolen i 
from the station on Aug. I'S was found. 1 
The pouch had been cm to pieces and 1 
all letters of value taken. No clue to 
the thieves has yet betn found. 

St. Paul— Mrs. Cathe^rine Zahn. this 
city, has received v/ord of the death at 
Fairbanks, Aaska. of lier son, Fred A 
Zahn. formerly of thi? city. Mr Zahn 
had lived in Alaska for several vear.s 
and his wife and tWo children "were 
with him at Fairbanks. His death oc- ■ 
curred July 27. Mr. Zahn was 4<3 years 
of age and was born; and brought up 
In St. Paul. 



a brief visit with friends. 1 ,„f t 'Aime> 

Aneta. N. D.-L. O. Dragl.-xnd of Field p,,„,"nd 
township. Nelson county. committed •^"s""'" 
suicide by hanging himself in Ills gran- 
ary. He had I < en a fhurch leader for 
yeais. He leaves a large ianiily. 

Watertown, .S. D.— Atur ciawllng on 

his hands and knees for half a mile, 

William Kinsman, a farmer residing 

.nine miles north of Henry, twenty 

17. — (Special to niiles west of this city, expired on tiie 

Tlie Herald.)— Mr. and Mr= A C ; ^.'^^esht Id of his home. He appears t.j 

a. Ml., ji.. \^. I hjivp been overcome by heat while 



and Sarah of London,. 



, Akeley Couple MaRe Trip From Minne 
apolls to Their Town. 

Akeley, Minn., Sept 



HEAD STRIKES BRIDGE. 



Chicago & Northwestern Braheman In- 
stantly Killed Near Stephenson. 

-— ^- I nave oeen overcome oy neat while 1 Stephenson, Micfi., .Sept. 17. — (.Sfjeci.oi 

Anderson and Mr. and Mrs. Bert Rod- J working in his hay field. [to The Herald.)-A8 he was looking- 

! man have arrived hom^ 'iff*.r a v*.rv Yankton, fc. D.-Tom Sharkey, a well- . , .1, - / , 

«rri\ea nome artei a verylt^.^o farmer, was kille<l .Saturday night |o"t of the window of a moving car to. 

Interesting automobile trip from Min- by driving into a twenty-five-luot cn.fk see how a hot box was working, Edward 
! neapolls in a new machine Mr Anr^ i bed. where the bridge had been washed j Fraker, a Chicago & Northwestcra 

erson h«d oniv «n h!..,.. m ^ !2!'^- J^ '^"'' V^^fitable de.-ithtrap. .ind ' brakeman. was instantly killed, by hl» 

^erson had only an hours practice, and .Sharkey and his team and buggy were head Rtrik = nif the «teel ur.nervvork^ ^r 
!he started home with the oartv. Owin. Ifound tightly wedged at the bottom. f tddge t!^^ tr-fir" wis cfJSg He 



he started home with the party Owing j found t'ightTy wedged at The r7o'ttom 
to Inclement weather Mrs Rodman Grand P\)rks, N. D.— .Samuel G. Clark, 
and Mrs. Ander.son left the automobile ' f^^o ^J''^^''?' an old soldier belonging 
at Fairif. R^,^H a'T.A ic*^ "'c ^uiuuiuuiic jq jij^. Twenty-third Oliio volunteer In- 
M,. t*^^ • ^l Ander.son and |fantry. died at the Deaconess hospital 
, Mr. Rodman came through without here. For the past fifteen years Mr 
much trouble. The distance is over - Clark has'lived in the vicinity of Emrr- 
200 mile.«, which speaks well for the ,'^*^^ '^'"' ^•"^'^ brought to this city about 
machine and the driver. '" 



I was about 28, and leaves a wife and. 
I one child at Bayfield, Wis. 



Hoalth 

Never Fails to 
RESTORE GRAY HAIR 
to its NATURAL COLOR 



two w« eks ago on the charge of in- 
sanity from the county poor farm at 
Arvilla. 




PENINSULA BRIEFS 



Sauit Ste. Marie— Hon. F. Cochrane, 
minister of mines, will arrive in the 
Canadian Soo this we*k with a p-Jirfy of 
Srome twenty newspapt r men, r* prest ntiuK 
the daily pn ."g of the dominion. Th< visit 
is attributed to the recent tiocm in mlnlnjr 
circles In the vicinity of the Soo. 

Houghton— The manual training wo k 
in the high school will begin this we< k. 
The delay in taking up the courses has 
(Special been largely due to the delay in the ar- 
rival of the tools ueed by the classes in 

ore car in shaft A of the Aurora; Calumet— Stephen Siminski and son 

Louis have been arrested on complaint of 



CRUSHED JY ORE. 

Two Miners Killed by Dump From Car 
in Aurora Mine. 

Ironwood, Mich., Sopt. 17. 
to The Herald.)— While unloading an j 



mine, here Monday afternoon. J. Sta- 
nick and T. Travials, two miners, were 
caught under a dump of ore and crush- 
ed to death. 



ROB POSTOFFICE. 



Bt 



I No matter how long it ha.s been 
gray or faded. Promotes a lux- 
uriant growth of healthy hair. 

Stops its falling out, and positively had its visit by yeggmenVthe'-s'tore and 
removes Dandruff. Keeps hair Pc^-toffice of George Harter here hav- 

soft and glossy. Is not a dye. ^"s,*'^t" ^^''^f-V 'f'^*" ^""^ '^^^' '" jewelry 

; PhiloHayS»ec Co Newark N j^\^^^ about JloO in government mon-y 

I " ay »pec. I.O., jvewark. N. J. j taken. The burglars considerately left 

jFor Sale By W. A. Abbctt i^^^ postage stamps alone. There is no 



officers of the Osrcol.'i Mining company, 

charged with stealing powder us(d f .r 

blasting in the mines. They were brought 

before Justice Fisher and demanded an 

examination. This was set for Sept. 19, 

both father and son furnishing bonds f<jr 

their appearance In court when wanted. 

South Range— The postm.asters on th« 

Faithnn \T'nh «cr.« it /o ■ , . range have received instructions from the 

1-aithon, M.ch Sept. 17.— (Special to po-^tofflce department similar to those re- 

ine Herald.)— Menominee county hasjceived at other offices In the county rela- 

' tive to the counting of mail matter In tho 
dieffrent clas.ses. 

Hancock— At the Baptist church hero 
Sunday the Rev. John S. Bridges preached 
his last sermon owing to his departure- 
this week for Chester, Pa., where he wiW 
do further theological study in one ot til*- 
seminaries there. 



\ 




MAYOR IS EARNEST ON 
SUNDAY CLOSING ORDER 



AsKs Council to Revoke 

Licenses of Convicted 

Saloon Men. 



Opposition Develops to 
the Central Park Hos- 
pital Site. 



% 

AT TIIE rorXCIL L-\ST * 
EVKMXG: * 

l»;irr!ia.so of I*riiulle gas mains ^ 
aiithi>ri'«'d. 

>'n><»r apiK'als for co-oi>era- 
tion ill pmiisliinsr violators of 
Siin'iay c'lt>.-.in{j laws. 

Civic l«'av:»ie opposes extension 
of patrol limits. 

Conleivnce conimitteo makes 
riT4Hiniit^n«latioiis. 

Opposition t«> use of Central 
parli lor hospiuil by nsidents 
nuuie known in petition. 

Ih.-.iMi |>ortrait for library pro- 
I)o-h.h1. 

Ameinlinent to bulklin,^ 

.-.uugestvd. -^ 



communication was received without 
comment or discussion. 

l'ureiia<»e of (ia^i Mains. \ 

A.s forecasted in The Herald last > 
ev'jiung, the city was authorized to 
purchase the Prhidle Gas company'3 
mains in First alley. First avenue east | 
and Michigan street for $8,017.50. The , 
board of water and light commission- 
ers at its last meeting discussed a 
proposition to be made to the gas 
company mentioned and tlie gas com- 
pany, it is understood, has accepted 
the proposition at the figures mention- 
ed. 

The price that the board voted to 
offer the ga.s company for the pipe in 
First alley, is liie manager's estimate 
oi the cost of laying pipes there under 
tiie present conditions of the material 
and lab.jr market. The price offered 
for the whole of the pipe m the alley, 
First avenue east and Michigan street, 
is said to be about one-half what it 
would cost to duplicate the system. 
From Conference Coiiunlttec. 

A certified copy of the conference 
committee's recommendations for 
amounts deemed necessary to run the 
city for the year I'JtW was received from 
the city clerk. These amounts have 
ben published previously in The Herald. 

The conference committee intimated 
that the controlling features in deter- 
mining the committee to allow the 
slight increase in tax levy were: Tiie 
demand for rebuilding and repair of j 
bridges on Grand avenue between i 
West Duluth and the site of the stf:;ei ; 



nance 



*-^f*#^-;.--;^A«^f^-;^,¥'-;(?*-;^-vi*'^^ i tund 



onll- ^ plant; the construction of a contagious 
disea.se hospital; and the extraordin- 
ary iL-vy of $37,000 for tl'.e sinking 



That the lid must stay on in Duluth 



meet maturing bonds. 
A I'ortrait of IbjH'ii. 

, The library board at its la.st meeting ! i 
and that violators of the .Sunday cloa- received a communication from gentle- 
ing law will be punished, not oniy by ' men proposing to present to the library 
fine but by having their licenses re- 1 ^ portrait of Henrik Ibsen, painted by 
, ., ' ,^ ,, u I- ; Mr. Gulliksen, a personal friend of 

mov.'d. If Mayor CuUum has his way, ■ ^j^^ author. A committee, composed of 
was manifest in a communication re- i jir. Farie and Mr. Knox was appointed 
ceiv^-d i.>y the council last evening Ini to insi>ect the portrait. 
which the mayor outlined hi.-» attitude! Ai»»-"^"»'»t ^ BuihUnK Ordinance. 
on the question of enforcing tlae liquor j 



An .ini':'ndment to the building ordi- ; 
j nance, whicii is intend-^d to avoid any j 
laws in decidedly terse and to-the-point more difficulty such as met the coun- | 
terms. ' cil in the permit for repairs of the j 

against ^'''""^^*^ building on East Superior 
, street, wa^J discu.sstd. The 
closing law 



Not alone was 



antagonism t...,^.....,^ ,. - , _, , „. 

^ , , , , , , street, was discu.sstd. The ajnend- 

violations of the .-sunday closing laWi^^yj^ provides that where a build- 
demonstrated but members of the Civic ing ha.-? been damaged, either by fire 
league- were present to opp<Jse the ex- ! or othor means, so that it deterior- 

amen.iment to extend the district Afty ; ^^^j^,^ ^j^j j^j^^i ,^ ^^.rn down. The 
feet beyond Twenty-fourth avenue west! ordinance now in force does not eon- 
met with decided oppo.sition emphaticai-i tain the word "deteriorate." which is 

ly ex.r»s.d by Secretary Ber. Whe.,er| ;^<-^^^^",,,','^«^«."-Sf">t,S'1Sfy 

Of 



expressed by Secretary Bert Wheeler j ^"'^'^"^''^^ij^ 
the v'ivic league, who was Pr-^sent. . ^^jj^, ^^.j^' 



ether the building btr dam- j 
tire, natural causes, or by ' 
It was referred to the 
prioper committee. 

Opi)o.sition to Hospital Plan. 
A petition from residents and pr.»p- | 
erty holders of C^jntral park was i 
read, in which notice was served that ] 
opposition, moral and. le^aJ, %viU i>e 
nif-t with in the plan of sotting aside 
a i>ortion of the park for the puri»se [ 
.jf locating a contagious disease hos- ; 
pdtal there. The communication | 
.states that the petitioners hope to see ' 
the park improved for the i>enefit 



It appears that the league officials i ^^.j ^^y 
liad If-.uned of the pr »position to extend ^^^j^^j, means 
the pair >l limits to the point mentioned 
and were on hand to put a decided 
damper on the movement. Alderman 
Mo<jre uppo.sed the exten.sion of patrol I 
limits •)n general principles and in this 
case in particular. ' 

In his opinion the limits should not ba! 
extended as it would place a saloon in 
immediate proximity to a number of; 
amall homes and tlats. "The homes are, 
there lirst. not the saloons, let the latter! ^ 

keep out," remarked the alderman wlthj-^j^^ ^^^.^ improved for the beneht of 
empha.sis. . »,, their children and coming generations. 

Secretary Wheeler addressed the ^'^^^"- ^^, ^^ ^^^^j^ ^^^^,,,, ^^e city 
council briefly .stating that the attention . , j ^ ^^e pur- 

of the I.ague had been, called to the ^.JlJIf.l:,'^,^ "*" '^ ' 

tireysoion lloati Work. 

A large aanount of rock has been 
encountered in the work of paving 
Greysolon road, and the contractors 
asked for more time to complete the 
They asked for an extension 
unMl S-^pt. 20. This was referred. 

Vice President Getchell actetl as 
pre.-vliont of the council in the absence 
of Pr>^sident Te^ssman, who is East 
at present. The coucll adjourne-d at 
10 o'clock, after a short but busy 
session. 



propo.s.>d extension and he hoped that i 
the council would recognize the .senti- 
ment of the people of that locality. 



which was against any such extension. 
"It is a menace to public welfare and I 
hope this council will not lend its aid , ^ 
In furthering the beastly work of theiJ^y^ 
saloon," remarked the secretary. ThO] 
matter was laid over until anothsr] 
meeting when the facts on l»oth sides 
will bii considered. 

Parlies owning the building where 
the salo m desires to locate, were r res- 
ent at the meeting last evening and 
6p)ke brielly in behalf of the extension, 
claiming that they can make sewer con- 
nections. to better advantage, if they are 
allowed to occupy the corner request- 
ed, wliile just acro.S3 the street, even 



Chamberlain's Cough Remedy One of 
the Best on tlie Market, 

For many years Chamberlain's Cough 
Re:ii'-dy ha.s constantly gained In favor 

■ one of 



though the patrol limits extend there, ; and popularity until it is now 
It vill be more expensive. the most staple medicines in use and 

The Mayor's Communication. has an enormous sale. It is intende l 

Mayor Cull'um, in hi.-< commu:iicatlon, : especially for acute throat and lung 
stated in substance that he wished to diseases, such as cough.s colds and 
call Mv attention of the council to the, croup, and can always be depende-l 
administration's attitude on the .Sunday , upon. It Is Pj'^a.sant and safe to take 
cl .sirg law and it-s enforcement. Tn and is undoubtedly the best in the mar- 
hls >piiiion, the police force la not larga , ket for the purpo.^es 



enough to permit of every side d.>ir to 
Sviloons of the city being closely watch- 
ed on Sunday without taking the police 
from their regular beats and neglecting 
sai I beats. . 

The co-operation of the council is 
d^^oid-dly necessary to make the viola- 
tion mans something to the saloon- 
li,^..j„.r nher than the payment of a 
smill fine. The revoking of licenses 
seamed the only satisfactory m inner of 
getting at the bottom of the matter 
and making such violations and the 
punishment therefor a serious matter. 
The mayor stated that saloon men 
had sent representatives to him. stat- 
ing that th^y are willing to comply 
with the ordinance, but tnat they ob- 
jected to a few apparently favored ones 
keep.ng open, and th it they knew that 
blind !>igs were being operated in 

the city. 

The mayor intimated that had he 
the power he would not appeal to 
council to revoke licenses, but that as 
he did not have It, he must appeal to 
that body to aid in carrying out the 
law and punishing the offenders. The 



intended. 



for which 
Sold by alt druggists. 



it IS 



TO DETERMINE 
NATUREOF LAND 

Contestants Claim Land 

is Not Swamp and 

Start Suit. 



THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: -TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1907. 



f)f 



n 




OUR NEW 
DOWN TOWN 
STORE 107 W. 
SUPERIOR ST. 

Located in the very heart 
of the downtown sliopplng 
district. Visitors always 
welcome. 



Moore's 
Stove 



'^!2l,^mm%(^ 



WE TRUST THE PEOPLE 



OUR WEST 

END STORE AT 

1828-30 and 32 

W. SUP. ST. 

Is 75x140 In size, with 
tmsement. Tlic stock car- 
ried liere Is lH-ii»g im- 
proved all tlie time. 




SUCCESS INSPIRES IN US A GREATER EFFORT! 

A Greater Ambition to serve you better, and to more fully merit your trade. It is our determination to do 
better for you than other stores can, or will. Yet we assure you our ambitions are not, and never will be so 

strong as to create within us a greedy [profit] 

appetite. Every piece of merchandise in this 

store is priced after a careful study of its 

Quality and Value, and priced just as hon- 

esdy as if we were talking to you "face-to-face." 



•^DEPENDABLE QUALITY. 

REASOiXABLE PRICES'' 

WE EMPHASIZE 

-REASONABLE PRICES" 



•^DEPENDABLE QUALITY. 

REASONABLE PRICES'' 

WE EMPHASIZE 

-DEPENDABLE QUALITY*' 




WE FURNISH YOUR HOME COMPLETE ON EASY PAYMENTS 





FINE NEW PEDESTAL DINING TABLES 




W^e can say without boasting 

that, we are displaying the 

greatest showing of medium 

and fine "PEDESTAL" Dining 

Tables it is possible for you to 

find in Duluth, and every one 

made of the finest solid quartered- 

sawed oak, and not imitation, yet our 

prices are lower than you can find in 

the city. If you want a new Dining 

Table do not fail to see ours. We 

make a specialty of 

DINING ROOM SETS 
COMPLETE 



FINE WARM COMFORT ROCKERS 



LANKETS 




Now is a good time to buy 
your winter bedding and here 
a good place. We have a 



IS 



To match and are showing some very handsome sets in Golden Oak, 
Wa.xed Oak, Weathered or Mission Oak, Early English and Solid Mahogany. 
Every piece we show you here is brand new, right from the factory, 
styles arc right and the prices are right. b - 



The 



NEWCARPETSI NEWRUQS! 

Many new Rugs have been added to our stocks at 
both stores during the past week and we have a show- 
ing of room-sized 
Rugs second to none 
in the city and 
at prices you cannot 
possibly find in other 
stores. We are also 
showing a very nice 
line of Portiere Cur- 
tains and Couch 
Covers. We guaran- 
tee the verv LOW- 
EST PRICES. 



very complete line of all kinds 
of bedding and call your spe- 
cial attention to a fine showing 
of blankets at 

A PAIR 48c AND UP 



We are showing one of 
the best lines of fine "Com- 
fort Rockers" shown in the 
city and at prices you will 
recognize at once 
as right. From 
the plainest up to 
the largest and 
finest Turkish 
Rockers. The 
prices are from 





$1.95 up 





ALL 
VALUES 
ADVER- 
TISED 
HERE ON 

SALE 

AT BOTH 

STORES. 

YOUR 

CREDIT 

IS GOOD 

FOR WHAT 

YOU WANT. 



SPECIAL VALUES IN IRON BEDS 




We are showing as cwnplcte 
a line of medium and fine Iron 
Beds, Springs and Mattresses 
as 3'ou will find in the city. 
We are able to save you money 
on iron beds and call your spe- 
cial attention to our line of 
medium fine beds at 

$5, $6, $7.50 
and $8.75 



$12.00 COTTON FELT MATTRESS $T.T5 

Again this week we run special, just 2b of these elegant 
Mattresses at this price. These Mattresses are full size and 
weight — fine pure white cotton felt — made in one or two parts — 
covered in fancy art ticking. Positively sells about dj^ 7^ 
the city at $12.' Special here this week, only h' "* • / O 




Piles Quickly 

Cured ai Home 

Instant Rellet Permanent Cure- 
Trial Packa§:e Mailed Free to all 
in Plain Wrapper. 

piles is a fearful di.'**'a3e, but easy to 
cure if y >u get at It right. 

An op-'ration with thf» knif<» 13 danger- 
ous crufl humiliating and unnecessary. 

Th(>ri' Is Just one otlier sure way to be 
cured-painksa. .safe and in the privacy 
of your own home— it Is Pyramid PUe 

W»« mail a trial package free to all who 
write. . ., 

It will sjive you instant relief, show you 
the harmUss, painless nature of this great 
reni'dy. and start you well on the way 
toward' a perfe<?t cure. 

Then you ran get a full-siaed !x>x from 
any druggist for 50 cents, and often one 
b<)X cures. 

In.si.st on having what you call for. 

If the druggist tries to sell you som-^- 
thing just as good, it is because he mak'ra 
more niom-y on the substitute. 

Th^ cure begins at once and continues 
rapidly until it Is complete and perma- 
nent. 

Yii'i can go right ahead with your work 
and be .asy and comfortable all the time. 

It is W"ll worth trying. 

Jusr s>nd your name and address to 
Pynirnid I>rug Co.. 92 Pyramid building. 
Mar.shail. Mich., and receive free by re- 
turn mail the trial package in a plain 
wrapp'^r 

Thousands have been cured in this easy, 
palnle.ss and inexpensive way, in the 
privacy of the home. 

No knlte and its torture. 

No duct'ir and his bills. 

All druggists. 50 cents. Write today for 
a free package. 



So-called "swamo lands" of Northern 
Minnesota are apparently in demand if 
the first of a series of contest cases 
the i started in the local land office carries any | i^'-^ ^o 
signlticance wUh it. 

Before Register Engel the Dells Paper 
& Pulp company of Eau Claire. Wis., 
commenced its suit against the state 
of Minnesota to get the title to sixteen 
4<)-aore tracts in sections 23. 24. 25. and 
26, In township 57. range 10. The land 
in question is aiboui fifteen mil-^s north 
of Beaver Bay on the north shore. 

Mary E. Coffin first secured the land 
in IW) and later .sold it to the present 
claimant.-*. The stale survey in W'Jo clas- 
sifled the land as "swamp lands" which 
under the land grant of l^W should re- 
vert back to the stale of Minne.s.>ta. 

If the claimants can prove that the 
land is timber or agricultural land the 
state will not have title to it. but if it 
la determined to be swamp land it will 1 
revert to the state. It Is said that much j 
of the testimony to be introduced is 1 
conflicting and the register will have a ^ 
difficult task to determine the nature of ; 
the land. I 

Peter L>ahl was the only wttnejis exam- | 
ineJ ye.sierday and he testified that in , 
his opinion the lands could not be classi- 
fied as swanvpy. He visited the lands la 
19'>3. 

The attorney for the state is William 
E. Oulkin. while 3. T. Harrison and P. 
H. Seymour are conducting the case for 
the Wisconsin people. 

There are several other like cases. 
which will come up before the local land 
office officials this month. 



through p->Utioal influ-^nce. At the 
close yi the address, Hallstrom arose 
an.i Inquireil whether President Ran- 
dal! had investigated the circumstan- 
ces of his appoint men t. 

"No. I have not." replied 
Randall. 

'By what authority do you 
the statement that the appointment 
was made for political reasons? 
quired Hallstrom. 

The presiding officer interrupted 
this point and advised Hallstrom 
take his grievance 
dens' committee, 
do. 



President 
make 



In- 



at 
to 
before the war- 
and this he prom- 



BACK GIVES OUT 



H. H. ROGERS 
IS EXCUSED 

From Attendance in Court 

on Account of 

Illness. 



Haven that the .Standard Oil finaji- during the summer, and at times he 
cier had l>een al>jut the streets, has appeared to be nervous, 
had participated in certain festivities. The townspeople who .see Mr. Rog- 
had enga«'>l in certain business in | ers occasionally say his general ap- 
Now B'Hitord and had been in fre- f pearance has not changed greatly, 
oonimun-lcation with his asso- ' They say he looks tired and like a 



the continual 



out — it aches and 



TO POLITICS 

Was the Appointment of North Dakota 
Warden Due, Says Randall. 

Chicago, Sept. 17.— President Frank 
L. RindiH of the- National Prison 
assfjciatton. who is superintendent 
of the Minnesota reformatory at 3t. 
Cloud, intimated in his annual address 
at the national prison congress, yes- 
terday, that Warden O. F. Hall-. 
Strom of the North EKakota state pini- 
tentiary obtained his appointrnent 



Plenty of Duluth R^'wlers Have TliU 
Kxpericnoe. 

You tax the kidneys— overwork 

them — 

They can't keep up 

strain. 

The back gives 
pains; 

Urinary troubles set in. 

Don't wait longer— take Doan's Kid- 
ney Pilla. 

Duluth people tell you how they act. 

Ernest Grotke of 926 Fourth avenue 
east. Duluth, Minn., mason, says: "I 
speak from experience when I say 
Doan's Kidney PlUs are a reliable and 
valuable remedy. I first heard of their 
merits from a friend who had received 
gratifying results in his own case, and 
I was then suffering from severe dull 
pains in the small of my back and 
loins and had become so bad that I 
was almost compelled to give up work. 
I procured a supply of Doan's Kidney 



Physicians Testify That 
Oil Magnate is Com- 
plete Wreck. 



Boston, Sept. 17.— Upon the evi- 
dence of members of the family of 
Henry H. Rogers and the family 
physioien, that Mr. Rogers suffered a 
stroke last July, and has since been 
unable to transact any business. 
Judge Hammond, tn the supreme 
ourt. yesterday, announced that it 
would be cruol to cvimpel hla atten- 
tion in court and dismissed a motion 
to that effect. The condition of Mr. 
Rogers was disclosed in the course of 
a hearing on a motion to show that 
he was In&ajpable of attending the 
trial of a suit against hun tor 5aU.- 
iWO.OOO. brought t>y C. M. Raymond 
of Somerville. for alleged conversion 
of certain royalties in connection 
with the production of petroleum. 

The hearing began Idst week at the 
testimony of Dr. Chafles P. Pratt of 
New Bedford, who stated 

fr<>m 



Pills and began using them. Although ' New Bedford, who 
other remedies had failed to help nn» | R,>g^rs had suffered 
I soon noticed the benefit and kept on 
using Doan's Kidney Pills until the 
pain and other symptoms gradually 
but surely disappeared until I was en- 
tirely free from the trouble." 

For sale by all dealers- Price 50 
cents. Foster-Milburn Co., Buffalo, 
New York, sole agents for the United 
States. 

Remember the name — Doan's — and 
take no other. 



that Mr. 
a stroke 
last July, and was unable to attend 
to business. The hearing was re- 
sumed yesterday and two sessions of 
the court were consun[ied In hearing 
the testimony. 

Counsel for Mr. Raymond sought to 
show by the testimony of personal 
and business friends ot 'Mr. Rogers 
in New Bedford and Fair Haven, 
and also by numerous telephone tick- 
eta giving a record of calls In FaJr 



uuent 

ciates in New York. 

President Windsor of the First Na- 
tional bank of New Bedford stated 
that he had conversed with Mr. Rog- 
ers xt the bank, but said that it was 
not up<>n business matters. 

Several witnesses stated that they 
had talked with Mr. Rogers within 
the past few weeks, but all declared 
that he was much (Changed. 

In support of the claim that Mr. 
Rogers waj too ill to appear, four 
witnesses were heard. The first was 
Urban H. Broughton, the son-in-law of i 
Mr. Rogers. Ho said that since July 
2, when Mr. Rogers was taken ill In 
New. York, his father-in-law had been 
unable to transact any business and 
that soon after that date Mr. Rogers 
told him that Broughton must pick 
up all the business and carry on the 
affairs to the best of his ability and 
knowledge and that he would not hold 
Mr. Broughton responsible for any mis- 
takes. At this time, Mr. Broughtou 
testified, the physicians had refused to 
! allow Mr. Rogers to see any members 
I of the family, not excepting his wife, 
i He admitted that once in August his 
1 father-in-law had talked with J. D. 
; Archbold of the Stanadrd Oil company. 
; but it was not on business. At pres- 
i ent, he testified. Mr. Rogers' face is 
1 distorted on the right side, that the 
■ left side of his body Is out of its 
' natural position, and his speech la af- 
! fected. 
j Henry Rogers. Jr., corroborated hts 

brother-in-law in many respects. He 
I said that there had been only a slight 
i Improvement in his father's condition 
' since July and that the only business 
I he had done was to sign three blank 

checks and gH'e a power of attorney 

to open a safe deposit vault in New 
I York. He refused to discuss anything 
I of importance and ordinary matters 

worried him. 
Norman W^ Nesblt, a New Bedford 

dentist, and Dr. Pratt also testied 

as to Rogers' condition. 
Judge Hammond then reviewed the 

evidence briefly and dismissed the 

motion. 



man run down physically. Several 
who have conversed with him have 
noticed no difference in his voice, and 
his mind appears to be as clear as 
ever. 



Of Interest to Many. 

Foley's Kidney Cure will cure any case 
of kidney or bladder trouble that is not 
beyond the reach of medicine. No medi- 
cine can do more. Sold by all druggists. 

PASTOR DIES llTciiiuRCH. 

Drops Dead as He Says Farewell, and 
Women Faint. 

New York, Sept. 17.— A Berlin cable 
to Th© Herald says: As he concluded 



the last sentence of his farewell ser- 
mon Rev. Albrecht .Stage, for mors 
than half a century pastor of th« 
Evangelical Holy Cros.s church, fell 
dead in his pulpit Sunday. A panic fol- 
lowed, in which more than thirty wom- 
en fainted and had to be carried from 
the church. 
The minister, who was 7S years old, 

delivered his oration to a crowd which 
packed the building, and included many 
dignitaries of state and representativoa 
of royalty. His hearers were In tears 
when he finished and said ■"amen." 

With a farewell gesture the aged 
minister was about to leave the pulpit 
when he fell to the floor. A trustee, 
who rushed to his pastor's aid. announc- 
ed that he was dead. Women became 
hysterical and a panic ensued. For 
hours the church could not be cleared. 

The pastor was a favorite of the 
empress and was chosen by her to pro- 
mote several benevolent societies In 
which she Is Interested. Death was due 
to heart disease. 



Fair Haven. Mass.. Sept. 17.— So far 
as can be learned there has been no 
noticeable change in the condition 
of Henry H. Rogers during the past 
few days. Mr. Rogers is upward of 
70 years of age and since July has tak- 
en no active part In business. His 
stomach has troubled him somewhat 



For the 
Small Pieces 

Women's delicate neckwear, dainty embroiderj 
work, fine shirt waists should always be white, bright, and 
fresh- looking, possess lustre that b subdued and dignified, 
be firm of body, yet pliable, without the slightest discolor- 
ation. In other words, they should be starched with the genuine 

KmCSFORD^S 
OSWEGO 

Silyer Gloss Starch 

This is the one starch chosen by careful laundresses for 
shirts, collars, cuffs, shirt-waists, skirts, lace-work of all 
sorts. Its purity makes it absolutely harmless. Costs 
no more than others but goes twice as far. 
BEST FOR ALL KINDS OF STARCHIHG. 

For cenerai nae boll a* directed. For 
llcht autrchlnc BBe«n«led ■• a c«ld 
water .Btareh, re«nirla« no bolllac 

Made for over fifty years at Oswego. 
All grocers, full weight packages. 

T. KIN6SF0BD ft SON, Osweg*, N.Y. 

NA-nONAL STABCH COMPANY. 






Sa< 



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STAF.CH 




T 






^ 



THE DULUTH EV^NfNG HERALD: TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 



1907. 



n 



w 



For the Athlete 



FOIRT: 





rli 



t/ 



A 



iOflti 



^ V 



r , 



^LL athletes Know that 
the element in any 
contest, upon which 
success most depends, is 
endurance; but few 
'realize that endurance is 
dependent more on a 
perfectly toned system 
than on muscle. 
The use of DlgesfO Malt 
Extract means a perfectly ton- 
ed system. Digest© is malt in 
'its most highly concentrated, 
iform. It is bottled energy.' 

AT ALL DRUG 
STORES 



=\ 



J 



-.i- m<~: 



TO GO EAST 
THJSWEEK 

Athletics Will be Attacked 
in Their Own Strong- 
hold. 



Pittsburg J. 133 


79 


54 


.r.94 


New York ..^.1. 136 
riiilftdtlphia T.!t. 130 


77 


68 


.570 


73 


57 


.r;2 


Brotkiyn 135 


62 


73 


.4r.9 


Cincinnati 132 


54 


78 


.409 


Boston 130 


60 


iiO 


.3-6 


St. lx)Uis .T 136 


41 


95 


.301 


PHILJ.1ES TAKE 


TWO. 





Tatfcf at food at BamiD's 

,ihc Beer ihai "Leads then 



AU' 



MALT EXTRACT 

^ MADE ONLY BY 

THEO. HAMM BREWING CO.. St. PACE 



Remainder of Schedule 

Plays No Favorites 

in Race. 




RINTING 



Are you In need o f a nything In this iint 
We can give you the vary best tervioe 



"RUSH ORDERS 
A PLEASURE." 



MERRITT & HECTOR 



BOTH PHONZS 
SO-32 W. Flnt St. 




LOOSE LEAF DEVICES 

AND SUPPLIES. 

See Our Line Before You Buy. 

F. H. Lounsberry & Co. 

Printers. Providence BiJg. 



As the season draws near Its end in- 
terest in the American leagrue pennant 
race is growing more intense all over 
the country, Including Duluth. Bets 
are being made in more number than 
on any sporting event In recent years. 
No fabulous sums are being wagered in 
Duluth, but nearly everybody with a 
little sporting blood is putting some- 
thing on his favorites and playing them 
to win against the held, or to finish 
ahead of some other team. 

In Duluth, the Chicago White .Sox are 
the favorites with Philadelphia and 
Detroit holding a good following, and 
a few still hanging to Cleveland, prac- 
tically a forlorn hope. 

The remainder tjf the schedule gives 
the leaders about an even break as far 
as opponents are concerned, although 
Philadelphia may have a little the bet- 
ter of it on account of fourteen of the 
eighteen remaining games the Athletics 
have, being scheduled for the home 
grounds. However, the Western teams 
liiive all season brf'ktn a little better 
tnan even on the Kastern fields, with 
the possible ex< cptlon of St. Louis, and 
Chicago, Detroit and Cleveland cannot 
be said to be greatly handicapped by 
the fact that they must play the Ath- 
letics at Philadelphia The four West- 
ern teams will meet Connie Mack's 
crowd in three games eaeh and if the 
Atliletics can get .away with a major- 
ity of the games, they will have earned 
tlie pennant. 

Detroit. Chicago and Cleveland each 
haA-e fourteen gan\es yet to play, but 
two of which are on the home grounds. 
They all meet Boston, New York and 
Washington fcr three games each and 
should fe able to boost thtir percentage 
on the weak easterners, altliough Jim 



Brooklyn, 'A', Y:, Sept. 17.— Philadelphia 
beat Brooklyn twjce yesterday. The first 
game, which wmt fourteen innings, was 
won on two giogles, a sacrifice and a 
double. The seecmd game was calltd at 
the end of the seventh inning, the visitors 
making the winning tallies in the sixth 
on a l>ase on balls and lliree singles. 
Score f : 

First game— R. H. E. 

Philaphia 1101000000000 2—5 7 1 
Brooklyn ..0 00 1002000 0-3 10 4 

Batteries— Sparks and Doom; Rucker 
and Bergen. Umpires— Carpenter and 
Johnstone . 

Second game— R. H. E. 

Philadelphia 2 0—2 3 

Brooklyn 0-0 2 

Batteries— Richie and Jackliisch; Scan- 
Ion and Bergen. 



GIANTS DROP TWO GAMES. 

Boston, Sept. 17.— Errors gave the locals 
the first of two games here yesterda,v, 6 
to 1. The second game was arranged for 
seven innings, but another inning was 
played in which Boston scored, and there- 
by won 3 to 2, hitting McGinnity sharply. 
Scores: 

First game— R. H. E. 

Boston 10 000 00 2X-3 6 2 

New York 10 0—1 8 2 

Batteries— Young and Needham; Taylor 
and Bowerman. Umpire— O'Day. ♦■ 

Second game— R. H. E. 

Boston 10000 10 1—3 11 1 

New York 10 10—2 11 2 

Batt« lies— Domer and Needham; Ames, 
McGinnity and Bowerman. 



DIVIDE DOUBLE-HEADER. 

St. Louis, Sept. 17.-The St. Louis Na- 
tionals and Pittsburg divided yesterday's 
double-header, Pittsburg winning the first, 
4 to 2, and St. Louis the second, 5 to 1. 
Scores: 

First game— R. H. E. 

Pittsburg 10 2 10-4 10 

St. Louis 110 0—2 8 4 

Batteries— Karger and Hostetter; Mad- 
dox and Gibson. Umpires— RIgler and 
Klem. 

Second game— • R. H. E. 

Pittsburg 10—1 2 1 

! St. Louis 3 1 1 x-5 8 2 

Batteries— Lush and Hostetter; Walsh 
and Phelps. Umpires— Klem and Rigler. 



American Association. 

STANDING. 

Played. Won. Lost. Pet. 

Columbus 154 90 54 .584 

Toledo 1.53 88 65 .675 

Minneapolis 162 79 73 .520 

Kansas City 1.S4 78 76 .506 

Louisville 1.54 77 77 .f«0 

Indianapolis 153 73 80 .477 

Milwaukee 154 71 83 .461 

St. Paul 154 68 96 .377 



f^ 






^Al 



CIGARETTES 

Just try them and you'll understand 
why they have always been and are 

today the largest-selling Turkish cigarettes 

in this or any other country. 

Other cigarettes as sfood cost twice 
as much. 

lOc for 10 

Why Pay More? 



b' 



8. ANARGYROS, Manufacturer 
New York 



C; ST. PAT'L, 4. 



MINNEAPOLIS. 
Minneapolis. Minn., Sept. 17.— Minneapo- 

McGuires Boston Pilgrims VvTh "not" be j !*« won the last Kanie of her 1907 season 

'yesterday when she defeated St. Paul by 



CO FOR THE GOPHER 

m FOR YOUR ■■ 

SHOE REPAIRING. 

WE DO IT WHILE YOU WAIT. 

Two Shops: Xilo^Xi'Jt^^nuT^^i*^ 





BODY MANGLED 
BY ORE TRAIN 



/ A. L. 



Tragic 



Mekell Meets 
Death Near 
Proctor. 



The mangled remains of A. L. 
Mekell, employed as track walker for 
the Missabe road at Proctor were 
brought to the city last evening and 
removed to the Stewart undertaking 
rooms. 

Mekell met a tragic death at Proc- 
tor last night. W'hile walking along 
the tracks with a companion, he was 
run dc»wn by an engine, the entire 
train j.a.=.sing over hi.s body, mangling 
It fearfully. Both legs were cut off 
at the knee, and the body otherwise 
disfigured by the heavy wheels. His 
companion heard the approaching 
train in time to spring from the 
track and escape. 

De<'ease<l lived at New Duluth, and 
Is survived by a wife. He w:us 45 
years old. The funeral arrangejneats 
will V>e announced later. 

OUTLOOK BRIGHT, 
SAYS JUDGE GARY 

StccI Corporation Chair- 
man Takes Optimistic 
View of Situation. 



future, he added, the public will realize 
that not in ten years has it had such 
a chance to pick up good securities. 
When that time comes, he said, com- 
panies will be enabled to raise funds 
for renewals, improvements and ex- 
tensions. Mr. Gary continued: 

"To me the general situation is this: 
The country was in need of between 
$500.CH)O.00O and $1,000,000,000 additional 
capital and could not get it. The next 
best thing happened— a slowing dowii. 
If the favorable weather continues for 
the next two or three weeks we will 
get $7,000,000,000 for our crops. That 

will keep the railroads busy and to keep I '— 

ahead the railroads must order new iPhiladelphia at.. 

cars and rails. A general quickening l'^'"'i*^8^o "t 3 

of business will follow. 



easy pickings by any nuans. They 
iiuve sprung some surprises before. 
Chicago and Detroit play two more 
games, St. Louis and Iietioit two. Cleve- 
land and .St. Louis two, Cleveland and 
Chicago two. 

Chicago is now in Detroit and St. 
Louis at Cleveland. The series will end 
tomorrow, when all four teams will 
go east. Chicago will open at Wash- 
ington Friday. Detroit at New Y<irk, 
Cleveland at Boston and St. Louis at 
Philadelphia. After three games, they 
switch. Chicago to Piilladelphia, t'leve- 
Innd to New York, St. I>ouis to Wash- 
ington and Detroit to Boston. Three 
games more and then Chlcigo to Bos- 
ton, St. Louis to New Y'ork. Cleveland 
to Washington and Detroit to Philadel- 
phia. The Eastern trip is completed 
with Chicago at New York. Cleveland 
at Philadelphia, Detroit at Washington 
and St. Louis at Boston. 

On the return, Clevt land and Chicago 
close the season with two games, Oct. 
5 and 6 at Chicago, and Detroit plays 
on the same dates at St. Louis. Phila- 
delphia closes at Washington with 
three games and Boston closes at New 
York. 

Following is a table showing the re- 
maining games and where they ar© to 
be played: 

tJ O D 

XT V <t 



the score of 6 to 4. Score: R. H. E 

Minneapolis 2 2 2 x— 6 14 1 

St. Paul 02 10 00 100—4 13 3 

Batttrit.s- Edrnundson and Beulow; Le- 
roy and Laughlin. Umpire— Werden. 



KANSAS CITY HANDED TWO. 

Kansas City. Sept. 17.— The last games 
of the season were farces, Milwaukee 
presenting a double to Kansas City. 

First game— R. H. E. 

Kansas City 2 3 1 1 x— 7 12 3 

Milwaukee 2 1 2 0-5 12 1 

Batteries— Swan and Sullivan; Curtis 
and Bf>aville. Umpire— Hayes. 

Second game— R. H. E. 

Kansas City 6 10 7—14 14 

Milwaukee 10 2 2 1—6 14 2 

Batteries— Kltson and Leahy; Clarke 
and Roth. Umjdre- Hayes. 



n 






c 

o 



1 

o 









2. 

3 

a 



o 



r 

c 
c 



COLTON MAY 
COACHTEAM 

Former Northwestern and 

Dartmouth Star in 

Duiuth. 



;Detroit at 

"In my opinion the forthcoming pres- 1^,^^^*' y"^j^"^^j'"; 

idential election has been di.«eounted jyj.yton at ... 

earlier than usual and it has been re- gt. Louis at 



fleeted In the securities market. 



Washington at 



New Y.-rk, Sept. 17.— E. H. Gary, 
chairman of the board of directors of 
the United States Steel corporation, 
took an optimistic view of the outlook [ iiaving 



r 



There is more Catarrh in this section Games at home.. 14 
of the country than all otlier diseases I Games abroad ..4 
put together, and until the last few I — 

years was supposed to be incurable. For | Total all games.. 18 
a great many years doctors proiiouriced it 
a local disease and prescrii;ed local 
remedies, and by constantly falling to 
(ure with local treatment, pronouncwl It 
Incurable. Science has proven catarrh 
to be a constitutional ais^ease and there- 
fore requires constitutional treatment. 
Malls Catarrh Cure, manufactured by 
F. J. Cheney & <.'o.. Toledo. Ohio, is the 
only constitiuional cure on the market. 
It is taken Internally in doses from teij 
drops to a teaspoonful. It acts directly 
on the blood and mucous surf.ices of the Philadelphia 
system. They offer one hundred dollars jl'etriiit .. .. 
for any cate it fails to cure. Send for Chicago 
circulars and testimonials. 
Address: F. J. CHENEY & CO.. 

Toledo. Ohio. 

Sold bv druggists. 7.'.c. 

Take Halls Family Pills for 
pation. 




2 





2 
14 










2 




2 2 
14 14 



1 
3 
8 
3 

3 

3 


15 
2 




3 
3 
3 


3 


12 
5 



2 
14 



16 16 16 17 17 16 



American League. 

STANDING. 
Played. Won. 



const! - 



After Lingering Illness. 

After suffering for nearly seven- 
te-en months, as the result of an 
C'peration for appendicitis, Daniel 
Burke, aged 34 years,, passed away at 
his reside<nce at Thirty-sevenlh 
street. Park Point, Monday, Sept. 16. 
The funeral will be held Wednesday 
afttrnoon, at 2 o'clock, from the un- 
dertaking rooms of Durgan & Craw- 
ford, the Fraternal Order of Eagles 
the services in charge 



Cleveland .. 
New York .. 

Boston 

St. Louis ... 
Washington 



...131 
....133 
....135 
....134 
....133 
....13« 
....133 
....129 



«0 
79 

7y 

77 
62 

f6 

42 



lX)St. 

61 
54 
56 
67 
71 
7» 
7S 
87 



GRAND CIRCUIT 
AT COLUMBUS 

Krueger Beaten by Jen- 
nie W. in Board of 
Trade Stakes. 

Columbus. Ohio, Scot. 17. — Four of the 
Hve races on the first program of the 
Columbus Rr.ind circuit meetinc were for 
pacers that went eleven heals in all the 
way fi%.m 2:OH4 to 2:09^. 

Krueger, a positive hrst choice for the 
Board of Trade stakes, was given a real 
btatinK by Jennie W. and the record 
_ I for the event fell down to 2:04>/4. 
]9 I Leland C>naward and Hidalgo, first and 
I second choices for the Hotel Hartmaii 
_ stake, each took a heat and then had 
19 I a fierce duel in the third mile. The Ona- 
i ward horse had the most in reserve and 
.,,^ won bv a length. 

^. • Dana Patch, from Minneapolis made a 
" 1;itile try for .second. beinK beaten In the 
last half dozen strides bv HidalKo. 
Eighteen 2:11 pacers were eligible to 
start and thig race was split into di- 
visions. Eph Cindf^rs. about an eaual 
favorite with Miss Syracuse won the first 
divL^ion in straight heats. R. F. D. had 
all the speed of the second division oer- 
formers and pulled awav from the field 
in each of the two heats decided. 



Several Other Possibilities 

in Sight for 

School. 



J 



Pet. 

.611 

.51M 

.58. 

.675 

.46b 

.420 

.414 

.32o 



DETROIT, 7 
Detroit. Sept. 17 



In an interview yesterday. He declar-^d I cease<i is survived by 
that a general quickening of busines.s 
will follow the sale of $7.000.00o.0')0 
•worth of crops which he expects 'o 
take place in a few weeks, if the weath- 
er remains favorable. In the nt.ir 



De- 

his mother, two 
brothers, Mike and Chris, and a | 
sister, Mrs. Mc Combe, of this city, i 
Three brothers and two si.'^ters reside ! 
else-.vhere-, and will be unable to be i 
IMcsent a.t the funeral. 



CHICAGO, 0. 

-White was driven 
from the box '" less than one imiing, and ' 
i'ailerson was also hit freely. Cnicagc I 
reached second bate but twice. Score: 

R. H. E. 

Detroit 31 102 OCX— 7 14 1 

Chicago OOOOOOOCO— 8 4 

Batteries— Donovan and Payne; White, 
Patterson and Sullivan. Umpire— Connolly. 

WASHINGTON WINS TWO. 
Washington, Sept. 17.— Wat^hington hit 
the ball hard yesterday and deteateJ 

] Boston in both ganug of the double head- 
er 3 to 2. and 6 to 0. Scores' 

I First game— R- H. E. 

{Boston 01000 010-2 6 1 

Washington 3 x— 3 9 4 

I Battents — Glaze, Young, Pniitt and 

jcrigei: Smith and BlocK. Umpire— 
0-Ix.ugi:lin. „ ,j », 

I Second game— R- "• f^- 

Washington 4000020 x— 6 10 

Boston y 000 000 0—0 6 2 

Batteries — Falkenberg and Blanken- 
sl.ip, Steele, Pruitt and Shaw. 



S.S.S. 



PUMFIES 
THE BLOOD 

Bad blood is responsible for most of tbe ailments of mankind. "WTien 
Irom any cause this vital fluid becomes infected with impurities, humors or 



first <•! a uouoie-nea.ier wim c 
vesterday, the second going to a 
tie. C>wing to the injury ot l^mpii 
Players Bemhadt and Howelr < 



and Spencer, 
hadt. 



Umpires— Howell and Bern- 



CLEVELAND. 5-2; ST. LOUIS. 2-2. 
Clevtland, Sept. 17.— Cleveland won the 
first of a douide-header with St. Louis 

I 10-innin, 
ire Evans 
officiated 
and did splendid worK. Scores: 
1 First game — R. H. E. < 

'Cleveland 3 2 x-6 7 1 

j St. Louis 0100100OO-2 « 2| 

Batteries— Joss and Be mis; Dlneen and j 

poisons," disease in some form is sure to follow. Eczema, Acne, Tetter>tcphni^^. nnpires-Howeii and Be^rntuuit. , 

Boils, Pimples, etc., while they show on the skin, have an underlying cause ck-veiand ^ ® * ^ ** ^ n S n ?~v ^- i 

which is far deeper— an impure, humor- infected blood supply, and until this ^^Batfedts-Berger VnS ciark^ McGiii 
is corrected, and the blood purified, the distressing itching and burning 
eymptonis will remain. Rheumatism, Catarrh, Sores and Ulcers, Scrofula, 
Blood Poison and all other blood disorders, are the result of a vitiated, pol- 
luted circulation, and will continue to grow worse unless the poison is re- 
moved from the blood. In all blood and skin diseases S. S. S. has proved 
Itself a perfect remedy. It goes down into the circulation and removes all 
waste matter, humors or poisons, and makes the blood pure and health-sus- 
taining. Nothing reaches inherited tnints and old chronic troubles like 
S. S. S. ; it cures because it purifies the blood and restores lost properties to 
the impoverished circulation. Not only is S. S. S. a blood purifier of the 
highest order, but a tonic and appetizer without an equal. Book on the 
blood and aoy medical advice desired sent free to all who write. 

JHE SWIFT SPECIFIC CO., ATLANTA, GA. 



NEW YORK, 3; ATHLETICS, 2. 

Philadtlphia, Sept. 17.-Inability to hit 
Chesbro caused the defeat of the homo 
team by New York yesterday. Score^: 

R. H. E. 

New Y'ork 2 000 1000-3 X :: 

Phil.odelphia 2 0-2 5 2 

Batteries— Chesbro and Thomas: Plank 
and Schreck. Umpires — Sheridan and 
Hurst. 



National League. 



STANDING. 
Played. Won. 
Chicago 135 97 



Lost. 
88 



Pot. 
.71» 



When the World 
Looks Blue 

TRY A GLASS OF 

MOOSE 

BRAND 

BEER 

It is both cheering and invigor- 
ating. 

"ASK THE MAN" lor 

MOOSE BRAND 
BEER 

THE HOME PRODUCT 



A coach for the football team of the 
Duluth Central high school has not 
yet been selected, but it is expected in 
a few days arrangements will be made 
to put the squad in the hands of some 
competent man. There are several nos- 
sibillties in sight and any one of them 
would make an excellent coach. The 
management of the team Is not worry- 
ing, for by the time the boys are ready 
to get down to active practice, some- 
body will be secured.lo take charge ^f 
them. 

The lateat possibility is C. C. Colton, 
who played a star tackle on the North- 
western university team in 1905, and 
played for two years previously on the 
Dartmouth college eleven. Mr. Colton 
has arrived in Duluth to associate him- 
self with the law office of Alexander 
Marshall, and expects to locate per- 
manently In Duluth. If the proper ar- 
rangements can be made, he may be in- 
duced to coach the team and with him 
in charge, the boys would certainly 
be in good hands. 

Colton will be remembered by those 
who kept in close touch with Western 
fcKUball in 1905. He played a brilliant 
game with Northwestern, and undoubt- 
edly knows the game in all its points. 
He graduated from the Northwestern 
laws school in 1906, and practiced In 
Massachusetts last year, coaching a 
high school team al.so. With the teach- 
ings of Coach McCormick of North- 
western, and the Dartmouth coaches to 
hack him, Colton .should be able to 
turn a good eleven from the squad of 
the Central high school, should he be 
secured, and the boys are hoping he 
finds his way clear to take up the work. 

COLUMBUS TO 
PLAY TORONTO 

A. A and Eastern League 
Winners to Meet 






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An extra charge will be made for all bottles 

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INDEPENDENT BREWING ASS'N 

or CHICAGO 

DULUTH BRAIVCIl_Slzth Ave. West A Railroad Strret. 

Dulath Pboae 2055. 
Zeulth Pbon* 618. 



Duluth, Minn. 



that have been entered in the races 
to be pulled off here during the St. 
Louis County fair, bciginning Friday, 
Sept. 20, have been announced, as 
follows: 

Hill Baily, 2:09'4, owned by Pob 
.Salter of Minneapolis; George B. 
Hay, 2:1614, owned by Bob Salter; 
Billy Boggs, 2:12J^. ovvnod by Pete 
McCoy of Minnc^aiwlls; Baby Kid, 
2:10, owned by Mr. Champine of 
Minot; Bes.«ile Barolite, 2:21i/^. owned 
by Thomas Newby of Bemidjl; Dr. 
D., 2:12%, owned by Dr. Davis of 
Duluth; Dan D., 2:17»4, owned by 
Prank Loomis of Minneapolis; Mixer, 
2:l.'i%, ownc-d by W. S. LycAn of 
Crookston, and the following horses 
whose records and owntr.s are not 
known at this writing: State Pete. 
George Minto. Little Fayne, Hattle 
Ferguson. Kitty Roan and Little Jim. 

WINS KING'S CUP. 



O'wned by F. W. P'Ubyan of the Easter^ 
Yacht club. New York, whose oolnli 
were twelve, se-cond. 



SETS NEW RECORD. 



Dandelion Goes Mile and Quarter In 
2:04 2-5 at Gravesend. 

Gravesend. N. Y.. .S«i>t. 17.— Dandelion 
the 8 to 6 favorite, won the Oriental 
Handicap, one mile and a Quarter, th* 
feature of the oDenlnu dav of the Gravea- 
end fall meet. In winning. DandeIloi\ 
made a track rec<)rd for the distance by 
sleppine It in 2:M 2-5. which is one sec- 
ond faster than the best previf>ua time. 



Yacht Manhassett of New YorR Winner 
at Jamestown. 

Norfolk. Va.. Sept. 17.— The King's cud. 
in the international cud vacht races at 
the Jamestown exposillon was won yes- 
terday by the yacht Manhassett. owned 
by Clarence Robins of the Manha.-sett 
Bay Ya<iht club. New York, whose noiuls 
were fifteen, with the yacht Eleanor, 



FAVORITE IS WINNER. 

Convolo Sets New Track Record at 
Lexington. 

lypxington, Ky.. Sept. 17.— <^onvolo. from 
the sta.ble of J. C. Milan, established a 
new record for seven furlonjts at the 
j Kentucky association curb by winning 
'the fifth race here yesterday in 1:26 flat. 
'■■ He w.as heavily pl.ayed at 2 to 1. the 
i odds receding to 3 to 2 before the horecs 
I were called to the irast. 



Again. 



DULUTH BREWING 
& MALTING CO., 



Eltlirr 'Phone No. 241. 



DULUTB. MINN. 



The winners of the i>ennants in the 
two big Class A organizations will 
again come together this year, a 
sorles of seven games having been 
arranged between the Coliunbus team 
and Joe Kelly's Torunto team, win- 
ners of the pennant in the Eastern 

Three of the games will be played 
at Columbus, three at Toronto, arid 
if another game is necessaiy to de- 
cide the series, the place will be de- 
cided later. 

Columbus has a good team this 
year but Toronto may well be picked 
is a favorite for the series. Joe 
Kelly i" himself is a power, and he 
has an aggregation of stars. Last 
year Columbus and Buffalo came to- 
gether, and the Eaistern leaguers had 
a walkaway. The Toronto te:i.m of 
this year is a stronger aggregation 
than Buffalo had last year, and Bill 
Clymer's Senators will have to go 
at a rapid pace to reprieve the de- 
feat of last yean 

hIbbTng entries. 

Norses That Will Participate in Coming 
Racing. 

Nibbing, Minn., Sept. 17.— (Special 
to The Herald.)— Some of the horsea 




The 



Most 



MISTAKES 

Many a bright and promising career has 
been blighted by Injurious habits of folly 
before the age of knowledge and under- 
standing, and many have been cut short 
by the unfortunate contracting of some 
poisonous special disease, which, through 
neglect or Improper treatment, has com- 
pletely undermined and shattered thfc 
physical strength and mental faculties. No 
greater mistake can be made than to con- 
sider lightly the first evidence of the In- 
troduction of any disease Into your sys- 
tem or to neglect the first symptoms of 
weakened mind and approach of nervous 
debility caused by habits, dissipation, etc. 

Such indlfrerence and neglect of the 
first symptoms are responsible for thous- 
ands of human wrecks, failures In life and 
business, insanity suicide, etc. Why take 
Buch desperate chances? The manifesta- 
tions of the first Bymptoms of any dis- 
ease or weakness should be a warning for you to take prompt steps to 
safeguard your future life and happiness. You should earefuly avoid 
all experimental dangerous or half way treatment, for upon the success 
of the first treatment depends whether you will be promptly restored to 
health again, with all the taint of the poisonous disease removed from 
your system, or whether It be allowed to become chronic and Biib- 
ject you to future recurrences of the disease, with the various resulting 
complications, etc. We cure KIDNEY AND I'KINARV DISEASKS, 
SMALL. WEAK ORGANS. SKMIN.* I. E.MISSIOIVS STnUTlRE, DIS- 
CHARGES, VARICOCELE. NKUVO-gEXCAL DEBIMTV, < ONTACilOI 3 
BLOOD POISON and all diacaaeK and weakneMwi due to bnblta, dUalpa- 
tlon. or fbe rrault of ptpeolal di«en«es. Write for symptom blank if jrou 
cannot call. CONSULTATION FREE AND CONFIDENTIAU 

Office hours. 8 a. m. to 8 p. m. Sundays, 10 a. m. to 1 p. m. 

Progressive Medical Association, 

No. 1 Weat Superior Street, corner Lake Avennet Dulath, Minn. 



North Tvest*a 
Reliable 
SPECIALIST 
In the Dlaeaaea of Men. 



V 





I 



^ 



THE DULUTH EVENING HERAtth TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1907. 




KNOCK THE 



NEW LAW 



SHORTlE 
OF tABOR 



ifp 



Mortgage Tax Law is Conditions Arc Serious in 



The Kind You Hare Always Boaght, and which has been 
in use for over 30 years, has borne the signature of 

and has been made under his per- 
■^^•f-^ sonal supervision since its infancy. 
f<k/CcA<44 Allow no one to deceive you in this. 
All Counterl'eits, Imitations and *♦ Just-as-good'* aye but 
Experiments that trifle with and endanger the health of 
Infants and Children— Experience against Experiment* 

What is CASTORIA 

Castoria is a harmless substitute for Castor Oil, Pare- 
goric, Drops and Soothing Syrups. It is Pleasant. It 
contains neither Opium, Morphine nor other Narcotic 
substance. Its age is its guarantee. It destroys Worms 
aud allays Feverishness. It cures Diarrhoea and Wind 
Colic. It relieves Teething Troubles, cures Constipation 
and Flatulency. It assimilates the Food, regulates tlie 
Stomach and Bowels, giving healthy and natural sleep. 
The Children's Panacea— The Mother's Friend. 

GENUINE CASTORIA ALWAYS 

Bears the Signature of 



Claimed to be an Un- 
just Measure. 

Imposes Additional Bur- 
den on Those Who 
Get Loans. 




The Kind You Have Always Bought 

In Use For Over 30 Years, 



Duluth at Present 
Time. 

Many Contractors Are 
Facing Heavy Finan- 
cial Loss. - 




An Incre&se of 

over 25% in Dividends 

To Policy Holders 

The Mutual Life Insurance Company of New York 
has paid more in dividends to policy holders than any 
other company in the world. Since organization it has re- 
turned in dividends over $118,000,000. As a result chiefly 
of increased earnings and decreased expenses the annual 
dividends to policy holders this year, on policies issued in 
1905, will be Tb% to 30^ mo.-e than in 1906. 

The Mutual 

Life Insurance 

Company 

feels sure its policy-holders will be pleased v/ith this great re- 
duction in cost. The news may be doubly welcome now 
when increased cost in other lines seems everywhere the 
order of the day. If you have others for whose continued 
care you are concerned, you should learn for yourself 
how and how cheaply it can be guaranteed by the 
staunchest life insurance company in the world. 

The Time to Act is NOW. 

Tor the new forms of policies write to 

The Mutual Life Iniurance Company 

^ of New York. N. Y. ^^ 

or VVAITE H. SQllER. Manager, Burrows Building. Dulnth. Minn. 



Dissatisfaction over the mortgage tax 
law. which was passed by the last 
legislature is. apparently, increasing all 
over the state. Sentiment in this coun- 
ty is, so far as it has been expressed, 
strongly against the law and there are 
many here who claim that some effort 
will be made to have the next legis- 
lature repeal the law. 

The intention of the framers of the 
bill is claimed to have been all right, 
but the results are not quite what were 
expected. 

Tht; authors of the law. it is under- 
stood, thought they had a bill framed 
which would impose a lax o\\ tlioso 
holding mortgages and land contracts, 
they being ttie persons who would, 
generally speaking, be the best able 
to pay the tax. the same to be in lieu 
of all other per.sonal property ta.xes on 
the mortgages as personal properly. 

Instead of the tax being paid by 
the mortgagee, however, the burden 
falls on the mortgagor and on the per- 
sons who maJcc the land contracts in- 
stead of llio persons who own them. 

The law imposes a tax ol 50 cents 
per $100 before the papers can be re- 
corded. The mortgagee, however, be- 
fore offering the papers for rcord. im- 
poses this tax on the mortgagor in the 
way of additional interest, and the 
burden falls heavier on those who 
make the loan. In other words, per- 
sons are being taxed for the privilege 
ot borrowing money. 

The injustice of the law is more ap- 
parent in the land contract business 
Cor there are a great many people who 
cannot afford to buy land except on 
llie contract plan. In order to get Uie 
contract recorded, the state tax must 
pay for that privilege while the party 
holding the conlracl, .something that 
represents a value, evades the payment 
ot any personal property tax on its 

account. ^ .„„ 

It is claimed that the mortgage tax 
law has done much to discourage the 
buying of lands on contract because of 
the additional expense it entails to 
tho.se who are not in circumstances to 
buy the realty outright. , . » -« 

Where formerly it required but <5 
cents for a person making a land con- 
tract to get it recorded, he must riow 
pay from $25 to $30 for the same privl- 

*^fn the case of large mortgages, it 
is said that there has not been a 
payment of the tax. in any large 
amount in this county, but that pro- 
test has been made when the money 
was turned over to the counly tre^s- 

ur^r 

The magnitude of the proposition was 
illustrated the other day wh.m the 
St Croix Lumber company protested 
the payment of $5,0-30 tax on $1,000,000 
mortgage running to the Mmne.sota i 
Loan & Trust company. The record ' 
is necessary for the company loaning 
the money, but the burden of the debt 
falls on the company making the loan. 
Not long ago an Eastern corporation 
with a $:..000.(jOO mortgage sent the In- 
strument to this county for record be- 
cau.-»e some of the lands embraced In 
the descrijition were located in .St. 
Louis county. The tax o\\ the docu- 
, ment. before It could be recorded, was 
: $J5. '>')<). The papers were s^nt back 
East with the explanation of the re- 
(luirom.'iits of the law and they have ^ 
not yet been returned. It is doubtful 1 
if the mortg.Tgoi will ever consent to j 
pay a tax of that amount. 

THEY WILL BE 
HERE SATURDAY 



At the present time Duluth is facing 
one of the greatest labor famines in j 

her history. «,,,., , _ 1 

With contractors of all kinds clam- \ 
oring for help, the employment agents 1 
are powerless to till the orders, and ! 
the contractors are fa<-lng serious ; 
financial loss and some of them almost j 

Going down on the Omaha train ] 
Saturday evening, a party of three i 
railroad contractors were discussing 
labor conditions. | 

"I started out from Duluth the 
other day with nineteen men," said • 
one of the contractors. 'They were 
for work on the new Wisconsin Cen- : 
tral extension. I arrived on the job " 
with sixteen, the other three having 
jumped en route. Only nine of the 
sixteen, went to work, the other seven ' 
deserting to other camps. because ; 
they did not want to work out their j 
railroad fare which had been ad-; 
vanced them. Out of the nine, five 
left me after the first day, and only 
four are left I dori't know what min- j 
ute these four will <lti,U." I 

"Yes," said a traveler for a whole ! 
sale grocery concern, who was going ; 
home to Solon Spring.s for Sunday, ] 
"and It Isn't becaus-.; thy aren't well ' 
fed. 1 would rather' hat a meal In al 
lumber camp right now than at som« i 
of the $2 a day hotels I stop at. Some 
of them set as g.ttKl' a table as the ' 
Lenox and McKay. :hotels in Duluth, 
and that's not meant for a slam at ; 
the Lenox and McKay either. I know 
what kind of goods the contractors 
buy. and it's of the very best." \ 

"I tried to g(ft a crew of seventy- 
five men for a job I had," chipped In 
a second contractor. "I had just 483 
men on my time book during the 
first two weeks, and out of th»^se 1 
could get a crew of only .sixty-three 
men to stick. I don't know how long 



SERIES OF 
LECTURES 

By the Y. M. C A. 
Not be Given This 



(arranged for this fall and winter 

Owing to the fact that the Mack- 
Leone Stock company is at the Lyceum 
and generally gives Sunday perf'jnn- 

lances, it i.^ impossible for tho Y. .Vl. 
C. A. to have the u.se of the auditorium 
for the big m«'etings and this makoj 
the contoinplated series of lectures im- 
possible. The Y. M. C A. people have 
been informed by the Lyceum manage- 

• ment that they could not have Iha 

' Lyceum this year 



they will stay." 

"I have found," said a third mem- 
ber of the party, who was also in the 
contracting business, "that my men , 
average less than two weeks with me. 
In the old days men used to go into the 
woods In the fall and never think of 
coming out until spring. But now 
they go in, stay about a week or ten 
days and then Jump the job." 

"Why don't you go after them when 
they jump on you. and leave you to 
pay the railroad fare?" asked an in- 
terested list-ener. 

"What's thi' use?" re.nponded the 
first c )ntractor. "You might manage 
t ) g3t one or two of them .sent up for 
ten day.s. but that doe.^n't give you 
your money back. I had a collection 
of old 'turkcys'.^Uiil v.<>a^l-cien's satch- 
els this .spring t1ia\ woura till a 'box, 
car and I wouldn't - 've $25 for the 
whole outfit. They were all I had for 
the railroad fares 1 ffa^ paid out and 
been unable to collect "from the men- 
One of the satchels was stutTed full of 
.'?aw(iust. The man took his railroad 
fare friim me. like all the others, and 
the first day he juriiped to a neigh- 
boring camp so he wouldn't have to 
work out hi.s railroad fare. 

"It Isn't that there Is such a great 
.shortage of men, if they were all 
working. The trouble is that only 
about two-thi.ds of them are working, 
and the other third are taking a va- 
cation and spending their money. 
When they change as often as th'-y 
do, it keeps about one-third or more 
of thorn out of work all the time." 



m f ROM FEEI 




Year. 



Prop 



cr Auditorium Can- 
not be Secured by the 
Association. 



Some preparation for the .series hr.d 
all ready been made. Secretary Lip- 
pold had vv-ritten to a numljer of ex- 
cellent speakers and had received fav- 
orable replies and it looked promisn'3 
for an excellent series during the com 



be addressed by local pastors and are 

very beneficial and interesting to tho 

men." 

^». . , , ... . .,,„«» ^ Last year the lectures were given 

Officials of the local Y. M. C. A. have! nearly every Sunday and a number 

given it out that it is not likely th.it ' of needed speakers of the country were 

" including President Northrop 

., - - _.inno.sota university and others. 

will be give.n this year. Last year the i The crowds at these meetings averaged 
meetings were given at the Lyceum ; from 700 to over a thousand, and no 
theater and drew l)ig crowds, sometimes other place that can be secured by tho 
over a thousand, and it had been un-;Y. M. C. A. management would accom- 
derstood tha* anntlier series would bo niodate such numbers. 



the big .Sunday afternoon meetings for . secured, ii 
men which were so popular last year, 'of the Min 

•«■ «__ __:.. ~. At.:.'. ■■..nn T.in* **.n_> it«>^' mi. . ...-..^...J 



RISING 
BREAST 



Rivers and Harbors Com- 
mittee Members Left 
Buffalo Monday. 

The congr^>esional rivers and har- 
bors committee left Buffalo yesterday 
on the steamer Juniata, which is 
'due to arrive in Duluth .Saturday 
I morning. The pre.>*ent plan is for 
: committee members to return on the 
I same boat Sunday night. Nine men 
Ing Season, but und'r the circumstances and seven ladies make up tne pariy. 
they can not be given. I ^g follows: Earnest F. Acheson and 

-We have had a number of inquirieaj Pennsylvania. De Alva S. 

from local business men and others I ^"'^ ui * j , v x-^-i.- 

concerning these meetings and they all Alexander and wife of New York. 

seemed to favor another series," siidjjames H. Davidson and wife of Wis- 
Mr. Lippold "but without the Iheaterj ^^^ Edga-r C. Eil.s and wife of 

we will have to get along with only ' , ,. . q, 

the smaller meetings here at the a.sso- ; Missouri, iir. Moon and u ft, of len 
ciation building. The.se meetings w ill ; r.essee, Jos-ph R. Kansded ami wire 

of Ljuisiana. Stephen M. Sparkman 
of Florida. George F. Burgess of 
Te.\.as. and J. Adam Bede and wife. 

Chairman Theodore Burton will 
come on the Juniata, but the inland 
waterways c<5nimisi>ion. of w^hich he 
is also chairman, will not arrive in 
Duluth until .Sept. 25 or 26. It will 
meet in Cleveland Saturday, and pro- 
ceed to the Head of the Lakes on an 
ore boat, after the meeting. 

This commission of seven includes 
Theodore E. Burton, Chief FJngine.er 
Alexander McKenzie, aifford Pinchot, 
chief forester. Senator Bankhead of 
Alabama. Senator Newlands of Ne- 
vada ami the United States geologist. 
The rep<irt of the waterways com- 
mission will cover ge:ieral rec .mmen- 
dations to congress, and the rivers 
and harbors committee will take up 
details of har(>i>r improveaients. 



And many other painful and serious 
ailments from which most mothers 
suffer, can be avoided by the use of i 
"Mother's Friend/' This great remedy j 
is a g^odsend to women, carrying j 
them through their most critical or- 1 
deal with safety and no pain. No woman who uses ; 
"Mother's Friend" need fear the suffering and danger inci- j 
dent to birth for it robs the ordeal of its horror and in- j 
Bures safety to life of mother and child, and leaves her j 

In a condition more favorable to speedy recovery. The child is also j 
healthy, strong and good natured. M M/VfTIWI I ^1^9^ 
Our book, "Motherhood," is worth |1f||l| || T K ^ I 



With Eczema— When Indoors, Itch- 
ing Was Fearful — Prescription 
Did No Good — Followed Friend's 
Advice and Found Speedy Relief. 

A PERFECT CURE BY USE 

OF CUTICURA REMEDIES 

■ 

" I was raw from mr shoulders down 
to my feet. As sen as I went into a 
warm room I could not stand the itch- 
ing sensation. I tried several remedies 
with no relief, and I consulted a doctor 
who told me that I had eczema and 
gave me a box ol ointment. I used it 
about two week*-- and got no benefit. I 
then tried another ointment with the 
eame result. Then I was advised to 
trv the Cuticura Remedies. 1 got a 
cake of Cuticura Soap, a box of Cuti- 
cura Ointment and a bottle of Cuticura 
Resolvent and commenced to use them. 
By the time I had used about half of 
each of them I could see an improve- 
ment. After that 1 csontinued to use 
them until I had used four cakes of 
Soap, three large boxes of Ointment, 
and two large bottie.'^ of Resolvent in 
four or five weeks* time. At the end 
of this period, my skin was as clear as 
it could be. It is now three or four 
years since I used them and I wish to 
state that the Cutiaura Remedies are 
the greatest in the world not only for 
eczema but for female trouble, from 
which my wife has h^^rv a sufferer for 
years. Cuticura Remedies, used in 
connection with one of the Cuticura 
svringes have done wonders for her. 
Fred E. Baker, 1-1 Grotto St., Water- 
vUet,N.Y..Nov.30.'06,andJan.20.'07. ' 



its weight in gold to every woman, 
and will be sent free in 
by addressing application to 

Bradfield Regulator Co.. Atlanta. Ga. 



plain envelope 



FRIEND 



TRANSPORT STEAMER 
BUFFETEOY TYPHONE. 

San Francisco, .Sept. 17.— In the grasp 
of a terrific typhoon, which ra.?ed un- \ 
ceasingly for five days and nights, the 1 
United States army transport .Sherman, 
which arrived here yesterday, received 
a terrilile buffeting during the voyage 
from Nagasaki. .Shortly after leaving 
the latter port the ve.ssel ran into thfl 
tail end of a typhoon and was tossed 
about like a cork. Heavy seas swept 
over the .Sherman's bow, and but small 
progress was made during the four 
days of the voyage that followed. 



CUTICURA 

The Great 5kin Qitre and Pure«t 
and Sweetest irf Emollients. 

A single anointin^^ith Cuticura Oint- 
ment, preceded by SSot bath with Cuti- 
cura Soap, and folI<iwed in the severer 
cases bv a dose of Cuticura Pills, is often 
BufBcieht to afford irnhdediate relief in 
the mo!3t distressing forms of torturing, 
disfiguring, itching, burning, and scaly 
humors, eczemas, rashes, and irritations, 
permit rest and slefc- 'knd point to a 
spf^dy cure, in theTnajority of cases, 
when all else fails, y 

Cuticura Remfldlea areWl^fcronsrhotit rtetrorM. 
Cutkura r«oap (J5c ) Cuticura 01nun«nt laOc ) Cjiti- 
cum Resolvent i50c.). (oUa.lfce tocin of Cnprotftte 

Soaled Mils. 25c. per via! of 60). Potter DruK 4 
bem Corp , Sole Props, SnaXaa. Maaf 

tar Mailed tree. CuUcura Book on SUn DImbbm 



I 

-r- 



WHOLESALE 



Jobbers and 
Manufacturers 

OF DULUTH, MINNESOTA, 

Reliable and Up-to-Date Concerns Who Do a Strictly 
Jobbing antS Manufacturing Business. 



ASBESTOS. 

A. H. Krieger. 



BAKERS AND ICE CREAM 

MANUFACTURERS. 

Crescent Bakery. 



BLAST FURNACE. 
Zenith Furnace Co. 



BREWERS. 

Duluth Brewing & Malting Co. 
Fitger Browing Co. 



BUTTER AND ICE CREAM 
MANUFACTURERS. 

Bridgeman-Russell Co. 



GLASS, PAINTS AND BUILD- 
ING MATERIALS. 

Paine & Nixon Co. 




GROCERS. 

Gowan-Peyton-Twohy Co. 

Stone-Ordean-VVelLs Co. 

Wright-Ciarkson Mercantile Co. 

HARDWARE. 

Kellcy-How-Thomson Co. 
Marshall-Wells Hdw. Co. 



HATS AND FURS. 

Biake & Wane Co. 



CEMEN TAND PLASTER. 
D. G. Cutler Co. 



CIGAR MANUFACTUI CRS. 

Duluth Cigar Co. 

Ron Fernandez Cigar Co. 

Tom Reed Cigar Co. 



CONFECTIONERY. 

Duluth Candy Co. 
John Wahi Factory. 



LIQUORS. 

Frerker Bros. & Co. 



LUMBER, SASH & DOOR MAN- 
UFACTURERS. 
Scott-Graff Lumber Co. 



MATCH MANUFACTURERS. 

Union Match Co. 



MEATS. 

Elliott & Co. 



CORNICE MANUFACTURERS. 

Deetz & Co. 
Duluth Corrugating & Roofing Co. 



CROCKERY. 

Duluth Crockery Co. 



DRUGS. 
L. W. Lcithhead Drug Co. 



DRY GOODS. 
F. A. Patrick & Co. 



FOUNDERS and MACHINISTS. 

Clydo Iron Works. 
National Iron Co. 



MEN'S FURNISHINGS AND 
MAN'F'RS. CLOTHING. 

Christensen-Mendenhall- 
Graham Co. 



FURNITURI 
DeWitt-Seitx Company. 



PAPER. 

Duluth Paper & Stationery Co. 

Bemis Bag & Paper Co 

Zenith Paper Co. 

PLUMBING SUPPLIES. 

Crane & Ordway Co. 

PRODUCE AND COMMISSION 

Fitzsimmons-Palmer Co. 
Haugsrud & Markkanen. 
Knudsen Fruit Company. 
Thomas Thompson Co. 

SADDLERY, LEATHER AND 

FINDINGS. 

Schulze Brothers Co 



SHOE MANUFACTURERS. 
Northern Shoe Co. 



For space under this heading apply to F. H. Green, Secretary Jobbers 
and Manufacturers' Association, Duluth, Minn. 



A Law of the Land 



known 
vides 



■^M 



^^, 



as the Bottling in Bond Act, pro- 
the public with a certain method 
of distinguishing: REAL whiskey 
from adulterated or impure 

whiskies. 
Over the 
neck of 
each bot- 
tle of 



ui - a'-fca «.■ 



HE PURE FOOD 



FOOK 



V. 



will b« loua<rtlie Bollicd In Bond Green Slemp upon which the Qoverfl* 
ment ha« bad printed the cx(ct Afre. Strentth and Quantity cf whiskey in 
the bcttle. This Green Slamp is only found en whlslcsy that has b««a bot- 
tled uiiJ ^r the direct superviiiloa of t'. S. latemal Sevcnac OUiccra. 
When In noed of a stimulant, demand 5uany Brook, because then you will 

■NOW that rou are (Cttlng pure, Mtural whitkey, disUlied. aired and mellowed tn tba gQ«4 

old Kcatucky way. 

Sold By All Ftrst-Class Dealers 




"BREVITY IS THE SOUL OF WIT." GOOD 
W IFE. YOU NEED. 

SAPOLIO 



The oldest known remedy for 

Dysentery, Diarrhea, Cholera- 

Morbus, Cholera-Infantum, 

Colic and Cramps — speedy, safe 

and reliable in its action — is 

DR. D. JAYNES 

CARMINATIVE 

BALSAM 

Per 77 years this remedy haa t>«<>o 
•uccessfuUy employed for the relief 
and cure of all complaints of thit 
nature. Many thousands of families 
are never without a bottle of this in- 
valuable s{}eciBc. For Summer Com- 
plaint, OripiiiK Pains, Sour Stomach, 
Vomiting, Wind in the Stomach and 
Bowels, Sea Sickness, all Bowel Af- 
fections, and Headache, Hysterics 
and Nervousness due to stomach 
and bowel derangement, Jayne's Car- 
minative Balsam will be found to 
possess wonderful curative an4 
soothing properties. 

Sold ky aU ttnggitta h 25e. b«MM 

JATHI'S lOSlO VFKMITTTOK I? a splendid 

tnnr: to tmili ii;> tl i- sysleiii I'.cr the weaker.in|j 
ctfp' 's of L>>»eatccy. Foi U>tb adults via 
childtea. 




NOTICE TO MEN 

Men, Go Where You Are 
Sure of getting a Cure. 

The best place In the No'th- 
wer.t wtiere yo'i oan (ret eureil 
tlie qiiiolteht aiiJ cbea|>e!it is 
at the^Ttiat HeliieiberK Meili 
fal Institute, .St. faul. Hon- 
est, inltiiful service, new, a4- 
var.feci tiuatiiient, expert 
iiiiill rapid cuies, reasouable 
c!iai.$es. 

We will cure you Secretly 
and Cheaply— a visit will 
convince you. 

Years 'of experience In treating Nen-Dtis, Blood and 
'Jliroiiio Ui.seases, gvie* us inauv advantage* over 
ottier dootors. We cure Nervoun Uehillty, Dlsobarget 
from paiuful sweiliiit^n, pus sores. Ul.roil Poison. Kup 
tore, Hvdrocele, Varicose Veins, Kidney, Bladder and 
I'rostat'ic Troubles, Piles, Vistula and Uect.tl Affectiona 
Rtieunmtisin. Bad Habits, Catarrli, Kczenia, Scrofuis 
and otber utiibbom chronic maladies of &ien. Wrlt( 
describing your case if you cannot call. Over UO,M( 
men have applied to us for treatment. 

Consultation, Examination and Advice FREE ! 

Heidelberg Medical Institute 

Cor. Fifth and Robert St. ST. PAUL, MINN. 

{lOu.OOO Capital, luuorp >rated under thib Slat* 
' Lawa of Minnesota, 




The Best S|iecialisl in tti* 
Northwest for Men 



Disease 
kand Health 




REVIVO 

RESTORES ViTAUTY 



"Made a 
Well Man 
of Me." 



produces iiiic results In 30 days. It acts 

powerfully ami quickly. Cures wht- ri others fail. 
Voun;,' men can ro;r,*iin their lost manhood, and 
oli men ni.iy rerovor thoir j'outbful vigor by 
using IlEVIVO. It quickly and quietly re- 
inovt's Nervousness, Lo.st Vitality. Sexual 
Weakness such as Lost Power, Failinsr Munory, 
Wasting Dlseasos, and eiTects of self-almse or 
excess and Uidlscretion, which unfits one for 
study, business or marriaRe. It not only cures 
by .startinf? al tt:e soat of disease, but is a great 
nerve tonlr and blood builder, bringinR 
back the pink glow to uale cheeks and re- 
siorin? the lire of youtn. It wards off ap- 
proaching disease. Insist ou ha vinK KEVIVO, 
no other It can be carried in vest pocket. By 
mall, ?1.00 per packa-'o. or six for $6.00. We 
alvf' fff'e advice and counsel to all who wish It, 
with gnarantee. Circulars free. Address 
ROYAL MEDICINE CO., Marin? Bicia.. Chicago. III. 
For sale in Duluth. Minn., by S. F. 
IJoj'fc ami Max Wiitli. 



How do you 



—I 
feel? 



Depressed ? 
Irritable ? 

Palmo Tablets SOOthe 
the nerves and dis- 
pel depression. 
They make you look 
and feel younger. 

50 cents. Guaranteed, Book free. 
For sale by Max Wlrtli. Druggist. 




' U«HA Vaii Sore Throat. Pimples, CopperColoredBMtB, 

I n8V6 TOU A.hes.OUl sore?, rioe^.m the M.uth,H<ar 

Falllncl «'rlte for proofs of prfrmanent oures of '^ orM 

Siies of Sj-ph I ;itlc blood poison. CaplUI •SwO.OOO. 100- 

pape book FKEE. Ko branch Officea. 

COOK REMEDY CO. «• '^^^^ "^r?* 



N( 



Chieaco. Uk. 



ULCERINE. SALVE 



Is a aii-e cure for Clironio L'lcers, Bone Ulcers, 
Bcr<77ulo 118 Ulcers, Varicose Ulcers.Mercur- 
IhI L'loeiK, Fever SoreB,GanBreijf,Blcod Fol- 
Bonin(f,\Vhite.Swellinir, Poisoned \> oundB, 

all sorsH of long Bta'.<ltn>f.Pc8lUvely ri.-yer falls Cures 
E'.3'> Cuts, Burns, BoiU. Felon^TTaVbunclea, 
Abscesses For sale by driigglels. Ma!! 2Br and 50c. 
J V ALLKN MEDICINE CO . St. PArt. MlWW, 



SCHOOL BUILDING, EVELETH, MIN- 
NESOTA.- . ^ ^ , 
S.alt-d bids will be received up to 8 
o'clock P. M.. .Sept. 30. 1907. at the office 
of the Boapl of Education at Eveleth. 
Minn for the erection of a brick :iChool 
buildiiig. Plans and ept-citicatione may 
be seen at the office of the Architects, 
Bray & Nyslrom, Duluth. Minn., and at 
the Builders' Exchange. Duluth. Minn. 

All bids must be addressed to J. H. 
Hearding. director of the Board of Edu- 
cation and each bid must be accompani- 
ed by a certified check for J&)0.00 made 
payable to Q«orge H. Dormer. Treasurer, 
as a guarantee of good faith that the 
successful bidder will ent<'r into a con- 
tract and fuml.s'h a surety bond to bo 
approved by the Board of Education, 
for the full amount of the contract price, 
said certified chock to be returned upon 
the approval of tho contract and bond. 

The Board of Education reserves the 
right to reject any or all bids. By order 
of the Board of Education of School 
District No. 39. Stat.; of Minnesota. 

Dated at Eveleth, Minn.. S"pt. 9. 1907. 
Duluth Evening Herald, Sept. 10-17-24. 



\ 





I 



^ 



American Wheat Market. 



AN ADVANCE 



MarKct Rather Quiet on 

Account of Holiday in 

Chicago. 



Minne- 
apolis. 



51.C4%A 
1.06 
l.l>4% 

1.(6% 



for 



Flax Closes High, 
the More Active 
Options. 



Duluth Board of Trade. Sept. 17.— Wheat 
was strongtr in the Amtricun markets 
today, principally on further bullish re- 
ports from North Dakota and the Cana- 
dian Northwtst and a big decrease in the 
wdrld'b visible supply of wheat. Car re- 
ceipts at L'uluth, while increasing this 
wtek, are about half what they were at 
the same time a year ago. There was no 
session of the Chicago board of trade to- 
day, on account of a special flection there, 
and that made trading rather yuiet in 
the other American markets. It also 
makes The Herald's market report look 
rather thin. The telegraphers' strike con- 
tinues to make comiiiunication with the 
outside markets difficult, too. Livcipool 
closetl Vfed to =Sd lc)Wtr, lierlin %c iugiier 
und Budapest '/4c higher. 

The Sepui..ber option closed %-%c high- 
er in I'ufuih and Minneapolis. 'I'he i>e- 
cember option closed ^^v higlur in Du- 
luth and Minneapolis. The May option 
closed %i: higher in Duluth and V&-%e in 
Minneapolis. 



Du 
luth. 

December- 
Open J1.07A 

High l.l»7% 

Low l.*^^^ 

Close 1.07% 

Close 16 l-07»4 

May- 
Open J1.10%A J1.09 

High 1 11% l-W'Ti. 

Low 1.10% l.O-V^ 

Clo.-ie 1.11% A l.W%.-^^ 

Close 16 1-11 l<»y'/4 

No ses.sion in Chicago en account ot 
election. 

L2ver|K»ol Grain. 

Liverpool, Sept. 17. — Closing: Wheat, 
spot nominal; lulurts easy; September, 
i7h x-^d; December, 7s lO^^d; March, la \ 

Lorn, spot firm; American mixed, 5s S%. j 
futures quiet; September, nominal; Oe 
tober, 5s 6%d. 



Dulutli i'ar In.'siK'ctlon. 

Wlic-tt— No, 1 hard, 3; No. 1 northern, 
WJ; No. 2 northern. 34; No. 3 spring, 11; 
No. 4 spring. 5; rejected, 'Z; no grade, 6; 
western red, 1; durum. No. 1, 123; durum 
No. :;, 50; durun.. No. 3, 6; rejected and 
no gradf' durum, 2; tola] of durum, 181, 
mixed, 1; total of wheal, 330, last year, 

"76. „ , . 

Flax-No. 1, 17; total of flax, 17, last 

yc a r, 80. ^ 

C^orn. 5; oats, 17; rye, 4; barley, 100. 

Total of all ears, 473. Cars on track 

today, 275. 



New York Grain. 

New York, Sept. IT.— Butter firm, un- 
changed, receipts, 17,256. Cheese steady. 
uiK hanged; receipts, 4,:«0. Eggb hrni, 
unchanged; receipts, 12,076. 



Minneapolis ^lieat. 

Minneapolis. Sept. 17.— Close: Wheat. 
$1.07%; December, $1.05''/<,; May. Jl.OW^''^. 

THE COPPER STOCKS. 

The following are the closing quotations 
of copper stoc^ks at Boston today, report- 
ed by Paine, Webber & Co., Room A, 
Torrey building: 



Stocks- 



American 
Atlantic . 
Arcadian 
Aliouez . 
Ash Bed 
Arnold .. 



1, 



Broomhall cabled from Liverpool: 

"There was a steady undertone to the 
■peculative wheat market, although 
values showed a decline of %d. The 
weaker American cables yesterday, 
prompted some liquidation among small 
traders and this together with the 
holiday at Chi(agi> caused buyers to 
hold off, which resulted in an ixtremely iAlimeeK 
dull market. Prices at mid-day were 
unchanged from the opening with nar- 
row fluctuations during the morning. 

"Corn was steady in lone duiing tne 
early dealings with values unchanged. 
During the morning September was 
well supported, due to the firmness in 
spot, while October was neglected and 
uni hanKed." 

Car receipts at Duluth were 330 against 
776 last year, and at Minneapolis, 191, 
against l.'iU last year, making a total for 
the Noithwe-st of 521 against "JOO last year. 
Winnipeg received 43, against 49J last 
year. 

Bradstreet report a decrease of 3,ta2,- 
OOO bus., in the world's visible supply of 
wheat. East of the Rockies there was a 
decrease of 1,010,000 bus.; in Canada, a de- 
crease of l,ti:2,()00 bus.; and in Europe and 
atloat. a decrease of 1.000,000 bus. 

The world's visible supply of corn in- 
creased 31,000 bus. 

Trading was quiet in the Duluth mar- 
ket during the session today, the holi- 
day in Chicago having its effe-ct on the 
other American markets. There was a 
little Hurry after the hrst lialf hour, 
but it was short-lived. However, the 
toiu was stronger tnroughoul the day. 
except iit the opening, which was a 
little off. 

September wheat opened '/^e lower at 
$1.0t>»4. advanced to $l.<i'.M% and closed at 
that price, a gain of '/it over yestei- 
da 
at 

at that price-, a gain of '■sc over yester- 
day. May wheat opened '4e lower at 
Jl.10%, declined to $1.10%, rallied 



Bid. I Asked. 



Saginaw 



ly. Dece iisber wheat opened "^c lower 
; $1,013%, advanced to $107% and closed 



$1.11% and dosed at that price, a gain 
of %c over yesterday. 

Cash si»/inK wluat wai^ selling: on a b;i- 
sis ol Ic over SeptenilH i for No. 1 north- 
ern and diirum wheat closed '/*c higher. 
Flax wa;- rather 'miei during the da v. 
Heavy selling bv longs put the Sciileni- 
ber option C'.f, but the others were firm. 
September flax opened late at $1.2:'. ad- 
vanced to $1 25V4. slumped to $1.24 and 
dosed at $1.24%. a loss of '*«c from yes- 
terday. Octol»er flax opened '^c lower 
at $1,21. advanced to »i.22, declined to 
$1.21% and rallied bv the close to $1.22, a 
gam of %e over yesterday. 

November fhuc opened unchanged at 
fl.20:^. advanced to $1-21, declined to $1.20% 
and rallied tiy the close to $l-21i4, a gain 
of '/4c over yesterday. Deeeinbei llax 
opened %c lower at $1.17, advanced to 
$1.17'«fe and closed at $l.lT'/i, unchanged 
from yesterday. May h.tx opened 
higher "t $l-21'*i, advajieed to $1.1:3 
clo.-ed at $i.22!/«, a gam of Ic over 
terday. 

Barley sold at from 72c to l<7c and 
was marked iJp to 7S-84c. Oalt wtie 
changed. 
Following were the closing prices: 
Wheat— No. 1 hard i>n track, $1.11%. To 
arrive: No. 1 noithern. $1.10',^; No. 2 
northern, $l.t*%. On track: No. 1 north- 
ern, $1.10%; No. 2 norttiem, $l.i*%; Sep- 
tember, $l.ol"'b; December, $1.07%; May, 
$1.11%; September durum. No. 1, 87'4c; 
No. Z, t(7%c; (ictober durum, 87%c; No- 
vember dunim, K7%c; duium on track. 
No. 1, }*%c; No. 2, 80140. Flax to ar- 
rive in October, $1.22; flax on track. 
11.24%: SeptenU.er, $1.24»4; October, $1.22; 
Novemher, $1.21',^; December. $1.17'/4; 
May, li:j2\. Oats to arrive, 4t>c; oats on 
track. 4itc; rye. 78-S4c; bailey, 72 -87c. 

Cars insjected: Wheat, 330; last year, 
776; corn, 5; eats, IT; 1 ye, 4; barley, 100; 
flax 17; last year, 80. 

Receipts: Wheat, 169,097; oats, 5,!)lli; 
barley. 5«i.4tiO; rye, 3.725; llax, 10,086. 
SiJlpments: Wheat. 25,000. 



Arizona Commercial 
(Biilaklala 

B:iigham 

Black Mountain 

Butte & Superior 

Butte & London 

Bcston Consolidated 

Butte Coalition 

Copper Range 

Calumet & Arizona .. 
I Calumet & Heela 

Carman 

I Cumberland-Ely .. .. 

C'ori.anche 

1 Copper Queen 

I Centennial 

I I lav is- Daly 

I Daly West 

I Kast Butte 

Franklin 

Granby 

tireene-Cananea 

Globe' Cons 

Helvetia 

Isle Royale 

Keweenaw 

Mass. Gas 

Mi; higan 

iVIasri 

-Mercur 

.Mohawk 

NipiissinE 

North Butte 

Nevada Consolidated 

Nevada Utah 

Old Dominion 

0.«eeola 

Old Colony 

PhcKnix 

to I parrott 




ti 



pfd. 



14c 
and 
yts- 

rye 
un- 



Pneu. Ser. 
Pneu. Ser. 
Qiiincy ... 

Raven 

Rhode Island 

Santii Fe 

Shalt uck 

Shannon 

Superior & Boston 

Superior & Pittsburg ... 

Tamarack 

Trinity 

United Copper 

Ihiion Land 

Utah Cons 

United States Mining... 

do preferred 

Victoria 

Warren 

Winona 

Wolverine 

Wolverine & Arizona.. 

Wyandot 

Amalgamated 

Anaconda 



m 

18% 

16 

57% 
114 
610 
3'/4 
6'4 

26e 
1 

19 
7% 

12 
6% 
7M8 

85 
9% 
1% 
2% 

15 
6 

51 V4 
K% 
3% 

37c 

57Vfe 
7% 

4<;% 

9% 

3% 
24Vfe 
94 



7% 
10 

4 
31 

1 

1 
70 

i3y4 

6% 
9 

4'A 
2 

1^ 
19 
16'^ 
58^ 
115 
615 
4 

6^ 
28e 



20 

8 
12>/s 

6% 

8 



!J^ 



The tone of the beef market is exceed- 
ngly firm and although prices in Duluia 
from one to two ctiits oer Dound. 
Twin Cities show an upward trend of 
from one to two cents per pound. 

Locally, an advance in price is not an- 
ticipaUrt for a time at least. Texas cat- 
tle which have supohed the market tor 
some months are about through arriviuK 
and native stock of a better <iuality is 
coming in. This is corn fed stock from 
the ranges and wnile the oualllv is con- 
sidere'd worth the advance ol two cents 
quote a ill St. I'aul, oriees in Duluth will 
rtniain about the same. The consumer 
will benefit by a better grade of t>ee£, at 
the previuiing prices, lor a lime at least. 

The Texas cattle are grass fed while 
the range and native slock art corn fed. 
producing tirmer and belter uuaiiiy ol 
beef, 

• • • 

The butter and egg market continues 
firm with no advance but cheese, if Quo- 
tations continue flrm. must advance in 
the near future. Eggs are not very 
plentiful and the housewife mav hv ore- 
pared for ;in advance in prices in the 
near future. Butler coiiliiiues to be a 
luxury With the price away uo and there 
seems nothing to encourage a hope for 
a drop at present. 

• « * 

This is about the last week of the 
lierry season there being a lew black- 
berries in the market today but the 
supply is about exnausted. Blue-berries 
are a thing of the oast and all of the 
early fail and mid-summer berries have 
about had their day. 

• • « 

Tomatoes, crab-apples and cucumbers 
for preserving and pickling have taken 
the place of fruit and the markets are 
well supplied with them. Shipments con- 
iiiiue to arrive daily. 

The products of the vineyard are ar- 
riving and will have their day next. 
Concord grapes are selling at ten cent.-? 
less than last week, and other varieties 
have taken a diop as may be noted from 
today's quotations. 

The loliowmg prices are quoted up to 
noon today, the list being supplied by the 
secretary of tne exchange; 

BUTTER. 

Creamery prints 29 © 30 

Tubs 28 (0* 29 

Renovated i!4 da* 26 

LaUles 21 

Packing ,. 18 

EGGS. 
Fresh 19 & 20 

CHEESE. 

Full cream, twins 15 ® 16 

Wi^consin Hats 16 (g, 16^ 

Block and wheel Swiss 18 ftf 19 

Brick cheese 14 (ft 15 

Limberger, lull cream 16 

Priinosi 10 

HONEY. 
New fancy white clover .... 18 ® 20 
Iviaple syrup, lo-lb cans .... 1 35 
NUTS. 

Filberts, per lb 

Soft-shell walnuts, per lb . 



ADVANCES 
IITSTOCKS 



Better F^eeling Prevailed 

and B^ars Not So 

Aggressive. 

Market Strong in After- 
noon and Closed at 
^ Highest Prices. 



New York, Sept. 17.— FMrst prices of 
stocks showed sharp gains over last 
night, the copper securities sharing fully 
in the strength of the Hill and Harrlmaii 
stocks, and Reading, American Smelting 
gained I'/fe; Amalgamated Copper, Union 
Pacific and Great Northern preferred 
about 1 point; Southern Pacific, St. Paul 
and Reading, %, and Kansas & Texas, 
% Iowa Central fell % and Wisconsin 
Central preferred 1 point. 

Slight additions were made to the open- 
ing advances before the buying com- 
menced to weaken. The traders then be- 
gan to take profits, but there was little 
selling, and the market steadied before 
rise had been cancelled. At 11 o'clock 



Zen. 'Phone. £60. Dul. 'Phone, Oil. 

Oy||lb©ihts®ini 

BROKER 

410 ■WEST SUPERIOR STREET, 
DVLL'TH, MINN. 



iUILiyiTIH 
OOPP'EIK STSlOllCi 



PRIVATE WIREi. 

In all leading mar- 



Correspondents 
kets. 



Boston correspondents; 
Stone & Co. 



DULUTH COPPER CURB MARKET. 


WALTER W. CARR 


202-204 MANHATTAN Dl ILDI.NG. 


RKKKRKNCE: 


Private Wlren. CJty .NatiuanI Bank. Prlvnle I.onR ni,«lnnc« 


City 'Pboneti. 1805. Duluth, .Minn. 'PboEen, 1«5T-180."?. 


Sept. 17, 1905. 


1 Bid.l 


Ask. 


1 Bid.,' A^k. 1 


Anier. Saginaw 1 7.0(» 


7.25 


Fa«t Butte 


5.751 6.00 


Black Mountain. . . , . . 4.00 


4.12 


GloluCiiis 


7.00] 7.25 


Butte Coalition..... .. 


16.00 


16.25 


Greene Cananea 


9.501 9.06 


Butte & London 


1.00 


1.12 


Haiifoi'k Cons 


6.00; 6.25 


Butte & .Superior.. . . 


1.86 


2.00 1 


Ke\\eennA%- 


6.00 6.25 


C'al. & .Arizona.. . . . 


l.lli 1.12 


Nipi»i.siug. 


7.25 7.50 


Calumet & Montana. . . . 


.35 .40 


National 


.551 .60 


Cmnherland-Kly j 6..50( «.7,5 


North Butte 


46.25146.7 5 


Cal. & Globe . . .95i 1.05 


North Butte Ex 


l..%0 1.06 


Cal. & Sonora ' 10.50 10.75 

Carman Cons ', 3.251 3.75 


Old Dominion 


24.75125.25 


Sup. ^t Pittsburg 


10.50i 10.66 


Cliff j 1.00! 1.12 


Hup. & Boston 


3.501 3.75 


Ct^manclie j ,24 


.25 1 


Tonapah Common 


10.501 11.00 


i Ciijiper Gulf ; 


8.00 
1.12 


\Vol\erine-Arizona. . . . . 
Shattuck-Arizona 


8.00 

22.00 


Cop|x>r Queen 1.00 


Denn-.\rizona 6.25 


6.50 


Warren 


4,75 5.00 


Duluth Exploration. 


2.50 


1 



Hayden, 



....1 



10 




Cocoanuts. dozen 

Brazils, per lb 

Hickory nuts, per bus 

Mixed nuts, per lb 

Peanuts, per lb 

Pecans, per lb 

Chestnuts, per lb 

MAPLE SUGAR, 

Vermont, per ib 

FRUITS. 

Dutchess apples, per box ... 

Apples, per bbl 

Transcendent crabs, per bus 

Bananas, per lb 

Dates, hard, lii-lb box 

Dales, sugar walnut 10-lb 
box 

Figs, Smyrna, W-lb box 

Fifs, Cal., lU-lb box 

l\k;..y grapes, per four bas- 
ket crate 

Malagas, per four basket 
crate 

Rose perne, per four basket 
crate 

Grapes. Concord, per basket 

Grape fruit, per case 

Lemons, Cal 

Limes, pel box 

Valencia oranges 

80s to Libs 

150's to 2Ws 

Pineapples, ptr crate 

Blueberries, Iti yuarls 

Red raspberries, i4 pints. 



13 
15 
50 
15 

uo 



n 
11 

15 



((i 



9V4 
14 



00 

5U @ 4 75 
75 
4V4 
10 

10 
25 
bO 



the 

the market was rising briskly in spots, 
American Smelting getting up :; points. 
Great Northern preferred and Anaconda, 
1%; Northern Pacific, 1%, and Union Pa- 
cific and Amalgamated Copper, 1%. 

Business shrank to nominal proportions 
after midday and fiuctuatioiis were trl- 
I vial. 

The advance continued with consider- 
able vigor, ti.e notable gains being Dela- 
Iware & Hudson and Stetl foundries pre- 
jferred, 3; Anurican Smelting, :;%; Amal- 
gamated Copper and Distillers Securities, 
|i^/i; Northern Pacific, 2%; Anaconda, 2; 
jB. R. T., 1>4; St. Paul, 1%: Great North- 
lern Ore certificates and Kansas and Vlr- 
jginia - Carolina Chemical preferred. 
1 Granby Mining recovered 10 points ot yes- 
I terday 's 17-point decline. The market was 
dull and slightly feverish at noon. Bonds 
were irregular. 

Prices were shaded and the demand 
died out and thc-e were a number of 
reactions of a sort in tne metal groups 
and western railroads. 

The market closed active. Northern 
Pacific extended its gain to 4, but the 
rest of the market was more or less 
Irrtgular, influenced by realizing. Rock 
Island preferred rose 1%, American Lo- 
comotive 1%, Great Northern preferred 
2%, Missouri Pacific 'Z^ and Anaconda 
3>^, Minneapolis, St. Paul & Sault St«. 
Marie fell 2\. 



BANKERS AND BROKERS. 



Members New York and 
Boston Stock Exctianges 



DULUTH OFFICE— 
Room A, Torrey Building, 

816 West Superior Street. 



ZENITH 1464. 



DVLUTH 1871. 



mmim m%mmnu 



COPPSR STOCK B!<OKSR.. 

414 WEST SUPERIOR STREET. 102 MA.NHATTAN BlILDINQ. 

Refereneei City National Bank. Duluth, Minn. 



Plionca, 200s. 



CAPITAl.. «.%0,<HK). 



BaalneMa Couflilontial. 



COPPER AND MINING STOCK BROKERS. 

PRIA'ATE \%IRES TO AM- LEADI.NG MARKETS. 
Offlcea — Pboonix Block, Duluth, and 321 Central Ave., Weat Duluth. 



2 00 
2 26 

1 50 
30 
6 50 
5 50 
1 50 



5 25 

6 00 

4 25 
2 00 

2 25 



GREEN VEGETABLES. 



Spinach, 
TomaToe 



l.OU 



No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No 



tash Salt's 'Ihicstlay. 

1 hard wheat. 1 ear , 

1 mrtlierii wlniit, 12 ears 

mrtheiii, l,W^l bus, to arrive. 



1 

1 no! th« in. 
1 northern, 
1 northtrn, 
1 n<-rthern, 
1 nc-rthern. 
1 iKirther:i, 
1 n<>rthtrn, 

1 northern, 

2 northern 
2 nirthem, 
2 ni:i thern, 
2 northern, 
2 northern, 
2 nortliein. 
2 ncrtlurn, 

spring 

spring, 

spring. 

Hpring. 

spring, 

SI ring 
Durum wh«'at, 13 
Durum. l.^Hi bus, 
I)urum. 1,C"(* bus. 



cars 

S.f'OO bus 

■'.,000 bus. to arrive. 

4 cars 

4,(K>() lius, to arrive.. 

1 car 

1 car to arrive 

2«K},(i(Ki bus. to arrive 



to arrive... 



whiat, 3 ciirs 
1 car, 

1 car 

6.010 bu.s. . 

1 car 

1 car, old.. 

1 car 

wh'-at, 1 car. 

c ears 

2 ca rs 

1 car 

1 car 

wheat. 1 ^iiT. 
cars. No. 
No. 1, to 
No. 1, 



arrive, 
to arrive 



.$1.K!7^ 

. i.«><% 

. 1.10^ 
. I.I014 

1.101^ 

1.10 

l.ioVi, 

l.l(M/i 
l.lCVi 
1.1("4 
1.0^% 

l.OTf'^ 
l.'i>^ 
l.(fr>> 

l.('T% 

1 It;* 

l.OvM/i 

1 (trM-4 
l.Oti'i 

i(tr.'* 

1.0-5^ 

l.Ot^^v 
1.0.".'* 

.»% 



October {.*% 



Durum, 6 cars. No. 1. 
Durum, fi.WtO bus. No. 
Durum, 13 cars. No. 1 
Durum, fi0(> l;us. No. 1, 
Durum, f- cars. No. 1, 
Durum, 2.0<iO bus. No. 

October 

l)uruiii wheat. 6 cars. 
Durum, 2 cars, No 2. 
I»urum, f.,00(' bus, No. 

Durum. IT car. No. 3 

Oats. 1 car. .no. 2 wh;te, 
Oals. 1 car. No. 3 white.. 

1 car. feed 

4 cars 

1 ear. feed 

1 car 

1 car 

ca r 

car 

car, to arrive 

cars 



to arrive... 
to arrive... 

1, to arrive 

No.'jj";'.".".'.'. 

2, to arrive. 



in 



Barley 
Barley. 4 

Barky. 1 
Barley. 1 
Biiriey, 1 
B*irley, 1 
Barkv. 1 
Flax, 1 
Flax, ? 



Flax, 2.000 bus, to arrive. 



,89 

.88%; 

•8^% I 
.88V4I 

.87 

.86 I 
.8:.% 

.49^i : 

.76 i 
.86 i 
.77 
.87 '4 ' 

.86M:i 

.8S j 

.77 

1.2."^ 

l.l'4Si • 

1.25 '■ 



<V>|)IH'r CiOSKip. 

Boston to Paine, Webber & Co.: The 
50 per cent curtailment on the part of 
the Amalgamated and Cole-Ryan prop- 
eities should cut off copper production 
at the rate of 15,0t>0,000 pounds per 
month. The Pelphs, Dodge interests 
will make no such drastic curtailment. 
They will reduce the production of the 
Copper Queen 2,0(K>,000 pounds per 
month, but neither the Detroit Copp.?r 
company, piodacing 1.700,000 pounds nor 
the Old Dominion producing 6,500,000 
pounds jier month will curtail, except 
in si. far as they will require the treat- 
ment of custom ores beyond such sul- 
phides are necessary for smelting oper- 
aiions. It Is quite possible that the 
Bigtlovv properties at the Lake will 
curtail, as Mr. Kyan has been active in 
the endeavor to secure the adoption i^f 
a general curtailment plan by other 
Lake mining companies, but so far no 

orders have been given to this effeci. 

• • * 

Boston to "Gay & Sturgis: The best 
that c;tn be said regarding the mar- 
ket today was that is l)ecarne nervous. 
There was no more liquidation than 
could be taktn care of. and prices 
closed reasonably steady. The news 
was rather non-committal, but it seem- 
ed as though a little better feeling 
existed. Report was current that large 
a.in(t>unts of copptr were sold, bu: 
without confirmation. The best thing 
in sight was the strength of the rail- 
road list. It was a tower of strength 
and she-wed absolutely no liquidation. 
Alter all, it seems as though one day of 
comparative yuiet is a start in right 
Girection. 

Barrin.a: further bad news, the mar- 
ket should do some better. 

• • • 

; Boston to Paine, Webber A Co. 
I say: The actic>ii of the market was 
' encouraging today again. Forced 
liquidation is about over, and the 
stocks iiave parsed into new hands 
that will be able to take c^are of 
them. Steels are loaning at 1-32 pre- 
mium, and nioi^t of the coppers are 
loaning flat, showing a large short 
interest and a .sold-out condition. 
New buyers are scarce, but money is 
a little easier, and we will have 
plenty of s]:>eculative buying when 
people feel sure the turn has come. 
Small lots of copper sold today at 
14% cents, and 16 cents was bid for 
other small lots. Probably the whole 
surplus could be disposeci of around 
1.') cents, and the situation would be 
much improved. 



Asparagus, per dozen 

Wax beans, per bus 

New beets, per dozen 

Cucumbers, bush 

New cabbage, per crate .... 

Caulifiower, per basket 

Celery 

New carrots, per dozen ... 

Endives, per bus 

Lettuce, per bus 

Parsley, per dozen 

I'eas, per bus 

Pieplant, per 50- lb l>ox 

Oyster plant, per dozen 

Radishes, xound, per dozen.. 
Long radishes, per dozen .. 

pel' box 

oes. per bus 

crate 

Fancy Italian plums 

Fancy Washington Bartlett 

pears 

Fancy Washington peaches 
Fancy Washington peaches, 

five box lots 

VEGETABLES. 

Horseradish, per bbl 

Onions, Spanish, per crate .. 
Red Giobe onions, new, per 

100 lbs • 

Sweet potatoes, per bbl — 

New pot.itoes 

Navy beans 

Brov/n beans 

Beets, per bus 

jCarrots, per bus 

, Bagas, per bus 

POP CORN. 

[choice, per lb 

I Rice cum, shelled 

! NEW CIDER. 

Clarified, 16-gallon iceg 

Orange, cherry or i>ear 

Black rasi lerry juice 



65 
bO 
75 
65 
50 
25 

ao 
75 
00 

60 
40 
00 
00 
75 
20 
16 
40 
25 
00 
60 



^'10 00 
(b 6 00 



lit. 2 60 
O 75 



® 76 
^ 2 UO 

<ii 40 



Quotations furnished by Gay & Sturgis, 
brokers, 326 West Superior street: 



CouKreaa 



BoMton. 



Members of 
Boston Stock Exchange. 

Dir«rt and ExelunlTe 

Private Wirea to 

BOSTON, NEW YORK, fHlCAGO, 

CALIMET nnd HOI GHTON. MICH. 



FOR SALtE:* 

i7,000 City of Dnlath, Minn.. Water and I.lsht 6'a. Due July 1. 19K Intereaf 
payable. January and July jst, New York City. Denomination $1000 Vnc^ 
110^ and Interest, yielding 4.20 per cent. ", * 

A. R. macfarlane: ^ CO., 

210 .\l,WORTH BflUDlNG. 



A. B. L. Co. 



Duluth Office I 328 W. Superior 

Old 'Phone, 1K67. 
^ R. G. UI'BBELL, Manager. 



St. 



Telephonca — Zenith 121Bt Duluth OSl. 



8 14-8 IS Palladlo BuUdinv. 



Vnllated Coppera 
a Specialty. 



D'\alxath, MInrk. 



Private Wirea to All 
Principal Murkcta. 



Stocks— 



jHighlLowlClose 



Co'pper 



3 50 
1 60 

1 40 

9 00 

2 00 



76 
50 
70 
IV 
00 
60 
76 
60 

4 

6 

2 75 

3 50 
5 50 



6 00 

75 
2 25 
2 ib 



Transit! 
li-on ..I 



Atchison 

Amalgamated 

Smelting 

Brooklyn Rapid 
Colorado Fuel & 
Canadian Pacific .... 
Chesapeake & Ohio .., 

Erie 

Anaconda 

Missouri Piicific 

New York Central ... 
Ontario & Western .. 

People's Gas 

Pennsylvania Rallwa.v 
Reading 

St. Paul 

Sc>uthern Pacific 

Sugar 

United States Steel ... 

do pfd 

Union I'aciflc 

M. K. & T 

Northern Pacific 

Great Northern 



86% I 

61% I 
90«^l 
46 I 
22M«I 
166 I 

20% I 
3it»,il 
707^1 

11«>AI 
33% 1 
86 I 

120U.: 
96% 

120»^ 

112 I 
28%1 

M%i 

129%! 

3«»4l 



85'4l 



45 I 

22 I 

166% I 

33% I 

20% I 

37MiI 

70 1 

106^1 

33% I 

86 I 

119% I 

119>4| 

86^1 

111 I 

27%! 

W,^ 

1281/2, 

3."'^ 

133141 129%! 

129>^i 127 I 



86'/i 
61 ',4 
90>^ 
451,7 
22'/, 

165% 
33% 
20% 
39 
70% 

1061^ 
33% 
86 

120 
^6% 

120% 

8C14 
112 

28% 

91% 
129H 

36% 
133^ 
128Mi 



imOIHIELL 

COPPER STOCKS. 

AU TRANSACTIONS CONFIDENTIAL 
204 FIRST NATlONAr BANK 
Bril.DING. DlILl'TH. 
Zenith. 1»S0 PHONES Duluth, 1028. 



Duluth. 



Bllaneapolla. 



Duluth 380. Zenith tK>7. 

J. Q. ifaughton & Co, 

BROKBRS 

Mate*] and I'nllsted Copper Stoclca. 

BSU-Sl-Sa Manhattan Buildlngr, 

Dulutti, Minn. 




Sira 



©IT©® 




LiyiaoiFF 



STOCKS AND BONDS. 

All orders Prouiptly and Confiden- 
tially Executed. 

SOS 1.0\^D.\I.E BL'ILDI.NG. 
Old 'Phone 1625. 



BROKERS 

Zenith >phone 700. 

Duluth 'phone ISOfi. 
Main Floor— Palladlo Buildln«. 




Buy 

Goldfield 

Stock of us 

cheap, now. 

E. H. V 1707. 



por 
flrr 



@i 300 



IiRESSED 

Springs, per lb 

Hens, per Ih 

[spinig ducks, jer lb 

iTuikeys. per lb 

! Geese, per lb 



P'UULiTRY. 



14 
10 
14 
17 
13 






16 
U 



<ii u 



FISH. 



lb 



Pike, per lb . 

Perch, per lb 

Fresh salmon, per 

[Halibut, per lb 

: Trout, per lb 

I'.ckerel, per lb 

White, per lb 

HAY. 
I Timothy, per ton 

Upland. No. 1, per ton . 
1 FEED. 
; Shorts, per ton 

Bran, per ton 

Oats, per bus 



iBeef 

Mutton .. 

Lard 

Perk loins 
A'eal 



ME.A.TS. 



10 
10 
15 
10 
10 
7 
12^ 

12 50 
11 00 

27 50 

25 00 

66 

8 
10 

9% 
12i^4.i; 

9 <(i 



l?(CK*k Ciosslp. 

New York, Logan Hi Bryan to Paine, 
Webber & Co.: .\ better feel'iig prevailed 
in New York today and advances were 
scored all along the list. The buying, 
however, was mostly from the short in- 
terest. There was not much news of im- 
rlance, but call money was somewhat 

rmer. The copper metal situation has 
not been clarified to any great extent, 
but it is rumored that arrangements are 
being made to curtail production in order 
to dccret.se the surplus, which eventually 
will have the effect of strensthenlng the 
metal position. We would not be at all 
suri)ri.«ed to see the market rally further 
under the leadership of Northern Pachlc, 
on which considfrnible talk is heard, but 
we advise caution in loading i;p with 
stocks on an advance, as c<jnditions do 
not warrant a sustained upward move- 
ment. 

• • • 

New York. Walker Brothers, to Paine. 
Webber & Co.: The niicrket today acted 
very well and the rails made KCHid ad- 
vancc-s. .Shorts were covered and the 
bear party were not ncarlv so aggres- 
sive. The advar.ce in Northern Pacillc 
had good effect. New Y'ork Central was 
bid up. The markt-t wa.s strong in the 
afternoon and closed at liighest prices. 
We look lor further covering tomorrow. 

Tlio C«tt<»n .^farkot. 

New York, Sept. 17.— The clton market 
opened tirm a; an advance ot 11 to 18 
points in response to higher cables anJ 
active covering. During the early ses- 
sion the market lost a few points of the 
gain with the undertone very nervous 
and fluctuations irreguhir. Price.- djrine 
the middle of the morning were about 10 
to 11 points net higher. 

Spot cotton closed 5 points higher; mid- 
dling gulf. 11.50. Kales, ICio bales. Futures 
ck>sed steady. Clo.sing bids: September, 
11.02; October, ILW; November, 11.15: De- 
cember. 11.22; January. 11. .'O; Februarv. 
11.34; March. 11.3«<: April, 11.43; May, 11.48; 
June, 11.50; July, HSl- 



MRS. HARRIS CONTINUES. 
Chicago. Sept. 17.— Mrs. Emma Harris, 
former wife of Dr. Benjamin Harris, 
killed last December by Amasa C, Camp- 
bell, was on the witness stand today in 
the Campbell trial. She wap sub.iected to 
a searching cross-examination, particular- 
ly in relation to her claims cif relations 
between her former husband and Mrs. 
Campbell. 



It pays to advertise 
. Freimuth. 



In The Herald. Ask 



TO ^LMSOFY 

One CVnt a Weird Fach Insertion — Xo 
Ailvertisenunt ljt'8s Than 15 Cent*. 

WE GUARANTEE OUR SCALP TREAT- 
ment to give saiisfavtion and if you 
have sculp trouble of any description, 
you should consult us at or.ce. Only 
experienced operators in attendance. 
We- give the best shampoo in the world. 
No charge for t -in.^ultation. Miss Hor- 
rigan, over Gidding's. 



MASSAGE - MISS MARIA GRINDER- 
tiig. pradiiated ma.'^seu.se from Dr. 
Arvedsons institute, Stockholm. Swe- 
den, Burrows Bldg.. Rm. 300. Zenith 
phone, 1736-X. 

. I , 

Fashionable hair dressing, manicuring, 
Bcalp and face treatments. Miss Kelly, 
opposite Glass Block, upstairs. 






10 

12 

13 
10 



St. Paul Llvcstoek. 

St. Paul, Se-pt. 17.- Cattle, receipts. i.WQ; 
steady and unchanfred. Hogp, 2,0tO: lishts, 
Ittc higher: other steady; rangre, $5.:x>''((e;.30; 
bv.iK, $5.7r.'ififj.85. Sheep, 7,00u; steady and 
unchanged. 



W.\NTED TO RENT-ROOM V^ITH 
alcove, for two gentlemen; centra ly 
located: state rates: references ex- 
changed. Address- K 22, Herald. 

SITUATION WANTED-POSITION AS 
assistant bartender, by young man de- 
sirous of liarning ttie business. Address 
C 11, Herald. 



GOOD TONE 
TO MARKET 

Copper Stocks Close at 

High Prices for 

Day. 

The copper stocks acted very well 
today. 

The opening was fairly strong, and 
after a decline during the early part 
of the session, prices went up, closing 
at the hi^h marks of the day. 

London Biot c<>pi>eT was oft at the 
ojtening, but haxl a splendid rally 

during the day. 

T^t brokers' wires were warm with 
gossip about the shutting down of 
different ct^pper minea, but they hati 
no effect on the market, there lacing 
nothing ntw about the infe^nna- 
tion. These shut-downs are hut a 
ciirrying out of Uie plans of curtail- 
ment announced last week, which so 
weakened the market. 

North Eutte opened at $4 7, sold off 
to $46, rallied to $47 and closed at 
$47 a.sked. AiTialga- 
at $59.75. opened as 
and clo.sed at $61.25 



I first two or three weeks of the term Is 
always much under the averaKe for the 

(year, as many of the pupils are late In 
beginning their studies. It is i)robHl)ljr 

I that the total attendance will be consid- 

1 erably over 11,000 before the first of tho 

• month. 



AMENDMENT TO ARTICLES 
OF [NCORPORATiON. 



I 



Send Us Samples of Barley and Oats for Grade and I*rices. 



0. 0. WYlIi 

DULUTH. GRAIN COMiMISSION. MINNEAPOLIS. 



THOSE WHO HAVE 
PASSED BEYOND 



Washington, Sept. 17.— Maj. James Car- 
roll, surgeon. United States army, who 

I was a member of the cennmission which 

I was sent to Cuba to study Just after 
the close of the Spanish-American war, 

•died at his home here yesterday. 

i Montgomery, Ala., Sept. 17.— Judge 
Terry M. Richardson was found dead 

'in bed at a hotel at Luverne yester- 
day, having been overroiiie by chloro- 
form whkh he had taken to .illay head- 
ache. Judge Richarcison liud gone to 
Luverne to appear in a murder case. He 
was a prominent attorney and fer 
years served on the circuit bench of 
this state. 

St. Paul, Minn., Sept. 17.— Paul Quehl. 
president of the Adam Decker Hard- 
wiire company, died yesterday at his 

I home. 241 F2ast Robie street. Mr. Quehl 
was <>^ years old and had been a resi- 
dent of St. Paul for thirty years. He 
Was formerly a mtinber eif the board of 
county commissioners. He is survived 
by a wife find eleven children. 



>e\v \ork Money, 

New York, Sept. 17.— Close: Money on 
call strong. 'i\6iQ j.er cent; ruling rate, 
4^^ per cent; closing bid. 4 per cent; of- 
fered at 5 per cent. Time loans slightly 
strong; 60 days 5%, per cent, and t*0 days 
5\ per cent to H per cent; six months, 6 
per cent. Prime niercantile paper, 6Vi<&7 
per cent; sterling exchange easy with 
actual business in liankc rs" bills at 
$4.8ii. 40^1 4.85.45 for demand and .it $4.81.70 
iii.Sl.75 for t't-day bills; commercial bills, 
$4.8oli 4.5*0. Bar silver, 67%c. Mexican 
52Hc- Government bonds 

railroad bonds irregular. 



FOR RENT-FURNISHED ROOM, 131 
I West F'ourih street. 

ORIGINAL SWEE'ISH M.^SSAGE Giv- 
en bv Mrs. C. Van Vick, 431 East Second 
I stret't. Zenith, S35. 

SITUATION WANTED - EXPERI- 
enc< d bookkeeper and general ofilce 
man; maii'.rd; best of references. Box 
F, 8S, Herald. 

FOR RENT — FOUR-ROOM HOUSE, 
with hath: all modem improvements at 
Lester Park, on Lf>ndon ro.nd: possession 
Oct. 15; %\^ to desirable tenant. 



I dollars, 
steady; 



Midway Horse Market. 

Minnesota Transfer. St. Paul. 
Sept. 17.— Barrett & Zimmerman 
Market eiuiet in tone. Receipts moderate. 
Numerous small sales were reported, but 
heavy buyers were few and f;ir between. 
George Lydick of Cass Lake, Minn., 
shipped out a nice selection which he 
bought during the day. Livery 
in demand. A'nlues remain lejwer 

Drafters, extra 

Drafters, choice 

Drafters, common to good 

Farm mares, extra 

Farm mares, choice 

Farm mares, common to good .. 

Iielivery, choice 

Drivers 

iMules, according to size 



Minn., 
report: 



stock is 

'..ini>'-fi-x> 

.. 12or';i70 

. . 71 1'u 12.' 

. . 15.'>1»2;rj 

.. 12r.'<n'J5 

. . (;i'irl25 

.. lM>'■u•S^'a 

.. 145 'f( 245 

.. 145(&i225 



WANTED-GOOD ALL AROUND TAIL- 
or; good wages and steady job to rig.it 
man. 214 East Superior stre-et. 

LADIES^ TURKISH BATH AND HAIR 
dressing parlors. 24 West Superior 
gtreef. upstairs. Knauf Sisters. 

THE SPALDING TOILET PARLORa 
Manicuring. massage. shampooing 
Room Ptnd 'phone 19. 



MARRIAGE LICENSES. 

Charles Firoved and Bessie Landgren. 
Frank Barton and Emma Bush, both 
of Kansas City. 
Thoin.'iS J. Rooncy and Eir. ma Murphy. 



$4€.T5 bid and 
mated opened 
higii as $61.25 
bid. 

Butte Coalition opened at $15.75. 
advanced to $16.12 1^ and closed at 
$16 bid and $16- 12'^ asked. Calumet 
& Arizona c pened at $112, advanced 
to $1j4 and clot-ed at $114 bid and 
$115 asked. Anaconda epeiied at 
$37.50 advanced to $39 aiid closed 
at $39 bid. 

Greene-C'ananea sold at $9.3.^ — 
there beiiig much trading in the stock 
at that price — advanced to $9.62 i/fe 
and closed at i'.KZl^^ bid and $9.62 i/^ 
asked. Superior & Pittsburg sold at 
$10.37 i/i. advanced to $10.75 and 
clC'sed at SlO.f.O bid and $10.75 asked. 

Globe Consoiidated sold at $7, ad- 
vanced to $7.25 and closed at $7 bid 
and $7.50 asked; Denn- Arizona sold 
at $5.87>/^, advanced to $6.12i/4 and 
closed at $6 bid and $6,373^ asked; 
Calumet & Sonora at $10.50 and closed 
at $10.50 bid and $11 asked; Butte & 
Superior at $1.87»^ and closed at $1.8714 
bid and $2 a.^ked, and Cliff at $1 and 
closed at $1 bid and $1.12i>4 asked. Nip- 
issing sold at $7.37V^ and closed at 
$7.12'/^ bid and $7.50 asked. 

Keweenaw closed at $5.75 bid and $6.25 
asked, Hancock at $5.75 bid and $6.25 
asked and Carman at $3.25 bid and $3.75 
asked. Copper Queen of Idaho closed 
at $1 bid and $1.05 asked. 

Black Mountain sold at $4 and closed 
at $3.87'/i hid and $4 asked. 



State of Minnesota, County of St. Louta 

— ss. 

We, the undersigned, Roy M. P'rytz, 
I'ltsident, and Wiilard B. Cro.Hs, Secre- 
tary, of the Gujcr-Prytz Comiuiny, a 
Coiptiration duly created, organized and 
existing undei and by virtue ol the Laws 
ot the Stale ol Minnesota, do hereby 
certify that at a special meeting of the 
siockiiolders of said Corporation duly 
called for the expressly stat<d purpose, 
and held at the oltice of said company In 
the City ol Luluth, County of St. Louis 
and State ol Minnesc4a. on the T-tli day of 
September, 1M>7, wlieieat all the issu d 
and ciutstaiiding sliures of the capilai 
stC'c k of siiid Corporation were represent- 
ed and voted, the loUowing resolution 
amending the Articles of liiccirporation of 
said Gujer-Prylz Company was duy 
adc>pttd by tlie unanimous vote of all the 
issued and outstandiiig shares of the 
cajiital slock of the said Corporation, to- 
wn : 

RESOLVEI>, That Article I of sale* 
Articles of lncc»rporatiori be and the 
same hereby is amended by striKinK out 
the following word.'--; "Guje r-Pryiz Com- 
pany " and inseriing in lieu ihereol tho 
following Wilds: Roy M. 
pa!iy," s(i that said Article 1 
shall read as fellows: 

ARTICLE I. 

The name of this Cc>rporation s-hall be 
Ri.>y M. I'rytz Compniuy, and the term of 
its existence shall be thirty (30) years. 

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, We, the 
above named Pretident and Seci'elary, 
have .hereunto .'-el our bands and affixed 
the seal ol sad tVirporatum at the City of 
Duluth, County of St. Louiy anj State 
of Minnejiota, this :.th day of Sepiember, 
li07. 

ROY M. PRYTZ. 

t're.sident. 
WILLARD B. CROSS, 

Sec relary. 

(Corporate Seal, Gujer-Prylz Co,> 
In Presence of: 

G. W. SCHWARTZ. 
F. T. HOFFMAN. 



I'rytz Com- 
as amended 




ROiSING TO REGAIN HEALTH. 
St. Paul. Sept, 17.— (Special to The Her- 
ald.)— A. L. Rosing, a menvber of the 
state board of control, who has been in 
ill health for some time, has been order- 



I Cljica^o Livestock. 

Chicago, Sept. 17. — Cattle receipts 
i about IS.OOO. steady; beeves, $4'ci7.25; cows, 

$1 2f4ir>.50: Texas steers. $3.7ri"S5; cah-es. 

$f,.50(iff7.75; western cattle, $4fi6.10; stock- 
(trs and feeders, $2.(iO<^i5. Hogs, receipts 
I about 15.000; market steady: light. $«.i;Ofi' 
16.65; mixed. S.V6W»-«.62i4; heavy. $5.30(fi6.25: 
I rough. $5.:'0ru«.r*; p:gs, $5.50^"6.40; bulk of 
i.«aleB, $6.fiO<fi«.20. Sheep, receipts about 22.- 



DEATHS. 

RUEB— Helen Rueb. age 3 years and] 
3 months, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. I 
Casper M. Rueb. died Sept. 14. at 471 1 
Mesaba avenue. 

BX'NETA— Frank Bunela. age 20 vears, 
died Sept. 16. at St. Mary's hispltal. 



The meeting of the 
recto.'-s was not held in 
as was planned. 



Anaconda 11- 
Boston today, 



State of Minnesota, County of St. Loul» 

— faS. 

On this 5th day of September. 1907, be- 
fore me, a Notary Pul>;ic in and fer the 
County of St. Louis and State of Minne- 
sota, piersonally r.ppeared Roy M. I'ryis 
and \\ ill.-^rd B. Cress, to me known to be 
the persons described in and who executed 
the foiegeing instMiment, and .severally 
acknowledged the same to be Jiis free 
act and deed: and who. being by me first 
severally and duly sworn, each for him- 
self did say that he, the .said Roy M. 
Prytz, is Pres;d< nt, and he, the> said 
Willard B. Cross, i.^ Secretary of the said 
atKive named Corjiorallcm, and that he 
has read the forepoinj? instrument arid 
knows the cntents thereof, and that the 
facts therein stated are true of his own 
knowled:je. 

J. E. MACGRE<;OR, 

Notary Public, 
St. Louis Co., Minn. 
(Notarial Seal, St. Louis County, Minn.> 

My commission expires Jan. 5, 1913. 



FUNERAL DIRECTOR. 

M J. Filiatrault. Both "phones. W. Dul. 



10.150 



ed by his doctors to leave all business jOOO: market. lOc lower; native, $5.2o(ii'5 76; 
and devote all his time to regaining h.s western. $^.25@6.86; yearlings, $5.ti0(&)6.40; 
bealtb. llambs, $5^.60; western, $5^7.25. 



; FLORISTS AND DECORATORS. 



SLIGHT INCREASE. 

Duluth Schools Accommodate 
Pupils at Present Time. 

Just 10.750 Duplls were In attendance at 
the Duluth schctols yesterday, accordi.ng 
to the figures at the office of the board 
I of education. 

This Is an increase of fifty-two dudHs 
I over the corresponding period last year, 
when 10.698 pupils were registered. 
The attendance at school durms the 



State of Minnesota. Department of State. 
I hereby certify that the within instru- 
ment was filed for record In this office on 
the llth day of Sept., A. I). 1507, at » 
o'clock A. M., and wa.s duly recorded In 
Book O 3 of IncorfKirations, on page 610. 
JULILS A. SCHMAHL, 

Secretary of State. 



OFFICE OF REGISTER OF DEEDS. 
State of Minnesota, County of St. Louis 
— ss. 

I hereby certify that the within instru- 
ment was filed in this office- for record 
Sept. 16. 1907, at 3:15 P. M., and was- dulr 
recorded In Book 4 of Misc., page 515. 
M. C. PALMER, 

Re::ister of Deeds. 
By THOS. CLARK, 
Deputy. 



f 



-.^ » 






N 



v 



1 — 



A, 







Vfp 



THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1907. 



IB 



Central Avenue— West Duluth 

The most desirable vacant lot near Ramsey street, ^21C^O 

An 11% Net Investment 

A two-story, stone foundation, double dwelling, upper side Third stree^ 
in center of city in best of repair, all conveniences, nice Q||^nll 
yard and shade trees. First payment $3,000, balance long time. . |P"^UV 

Wm. G. Sargent & Go. 

GENERAL INSURANCE. 106-7-8 Providence Bldg. 



ADDITIONAL WANTS 

1 »AHi n«AE- *St 



FROIN PAGE 16. 



HELP WANTED— MALE 
(Continued.) 

WANTED-FINLANDER CLERK FOR 
eniployniein uftioe; good wage.s; sit?ady 
position to right man, no dead ones need 
apply. Meagher-Johnson company. -WJ 

I West Miciiigan Blreel. 



\<n 




Fire Insurance 

"MILUOI^AIRE COMPA.\IES ONLY" 

Stephenson 
Insurance 
;ency 

WOLVIN BUILDING 



EVERY ONE ARE 
BARGALNS. 

S3500 



Sooner or Later 

You wm Need 

a Home 

Here are a few splendid residence 
lot3 at very low prices. They will 
be worth double their present price 
within a year: 

Lots in Highland Park, facing Eigh- 
teenth avenue east. All Improve- 
ments made. Each 

$1200 to $1500 

Lots in Endion addition from— 



I WANTED — CAPABLE BELL BOYS, 

food salary. Apply to G. A. Habner, 
raiding liotel. 



WANTED 

must be ra 
Apply D 



EXPERIENCED CLERKS; 
id and Liccurate at figures. 
A N. ore docks. 



^i 



WANTED— CHECK 
Louis tiolel. 



ROOM BOY. ST. 



WANTED— BUNDLE 

Knox & Co.. 5o and 



BOY AT 
1(K' store. 



S. H. 



$1500 Up 



Better look at these. 

Clarkc-Bcpworth Co., 

Fire Iiisuranre, Real Kstate, 

223 MANHATTAN BLDG. 

DULUTH. 



HELP WANTED— FEMALE. 
(Continued.) 



CKKHXKKHKHJIKKHKHXKKHKKKKKK 



SITUATIONS WANTED— 
FEMALE. 



SITUATION 
keeper; city 



WANTED 
preferred. 



W 



AS 

!4. 



HOUSE- 
rierald. 



SECOND 



WANTED TO RENT. 

WANTEl^ - BY RESPECTABLE WOM- 
an employed during tlie day, room in 
strictly private family to apply on 
sewing done. Address S. E., Herald. 



SITUATION WA^'^'TED - AS 
cook; city preferred. Z. W, Heiaia. 



S 



WANTED 
Competent and experienced seam- 
stresses and tailors. Apply at once 
J. M. GIDDING & CO. 



ao{KJ<KK>oo<}o<><KH:H>o<H5o<Kap<K>a 



WANTED - GIRL 
liou.=ewuik; family 
First sireet. 



FOR 
of two. 



GENERAL 

1417 Eaat 



WANTED— COMPETENT 
wagtis. Mrs. H^-pwortli, 

streiit. 



COOK; GOOD 
1721 Eaiit First 



. '-ICXPEUIENCED CLt-KK Al 
the Duluth Candy Kiioiitn, 307 West 
Superior street. 



toil-t 
av •T.' 



$3000 



3 rooms, for two families 

or oiu . Water, sower. 

tf Third strc-et. m^ar Lake 

R.M\t, $3*i.<J0 per month. 

3 houses, lot 5«vxli0 feel, 

upper side First street, 

ne ir 1 w Ifth avenue west. This is 

#14 A A 5 rooms, water, nice lot. 

«lftUU AVest End 

8 rooms, large lot on ave- 
nue, between First and 

S.M ->:i ! -itri-et west. 

Corner lot West end. near 
Fir.st street. 

<'hoicest residence lots at 
West End. 
• fJ1|*|*Ntw house of 10 rooms, 

)0 I UU Writer, sewer, bath on 
both floors, for two families. Rents. 
$47.(10 per month. Very Central, at 
West End, 

T. Q. VAU6HAN 

6t7 l.onMciHie nullding. 



s2ooa 

S.M -.:i ! -it 

SI250 
SI5G0 



GET BVSYI 

$3700 

Buys a •^hoi'^e home In Lakeside. 
Corner lot House strictly modern 
and up-to-date. Just the place to 
make your wife happy. 

Coolcy & Underbill, 

2u9 E.vchange Building 



Fire Insurance. 

ACtlDKNT INSIRANCE. 

altumobike: i>'si uance. 

LAl'XCH IIVSI R.VNCE. 

LIABILITY INSIRANCE. 

PLATE fil>ASS I>SIR.\.\CE. 

SIRETV BONDS. 

EVERYTHING I.> INSl RANCE. 

HARTMAN-O'DONNELL 
AGENCY. 

205 LONSDALE BLDG. 




WANTED-A NORMAL GIRL TO HELP 
care for children and go to school. 1710 
L<JiiJon road. 



WANTED-A GIRL OR WOMAN FOR 

working housekeeper; smull family. 
4i>l West Fourth street, Superior Wis. 
Old 'phone 3J5o-M. Apply S to 10 a. m., 
or evenings. 

HOUSE- 
•s. L. W. 



WAKTEI-)— A 
maid . best 
Leithtiead, 
east. 



COMPETENT 
of wages. M 



WANTS 

BRING 



^-SUVV 



PERSONAL. 

PURE, SAFE AND SURE! 

Dr. Roger's Taney Pennyroyal 
aDd Cotton Root Pilg. A test o( 
forty year, in France hat proved 
them id I'osiHvelu curesUPPKE> 
SION OF THE KENSES. Special 
price reduc«<i to Jioo p«r box 
am wrapper. Iinr>.>rted direct irom 

_ _. by W .\. ABBETT, Dnjgs»«t. 

Dulutb, Mian., aoi W**t Superior Street. 

PERSONA L-A \OUNG L.VDY WOULD 
like a roommate. pl.?asant home, every 
convenience, central. A. 95, Herald. 

LADIES-ASK TOUR DRUGGIST FOR 
Chichester's Pills. the Diamond 
Brand. For 26 years known as best, 
safest, always reliable. Buy of your 
druggist; take no other. Chichester's 
Diamond Brand Pills are sold by 
druggists everywhere. 

WANTED— CHILD TO BOARD; $5 PER 
month. Mrs. Elmer Mills. Grand Rap- 
ids, Minn. 

NEW METHOD-COPYRIGHTED IN- 
formation free. Stttrts now growth of 
hair m thirty days. Write Dr. Oliver 
K. Chance, scalp specialist. 3i»6 .Syndi- 
cate aroaUu, Mianeu.pulis, Minu. 



SITUATION WANTED-POdlTION BY 
stenographer with i months experi- 
ence, can lurnisu references, a. i«. 
Herald. 



W-ANTED TO RENT— 6 OR d-ROOM 
modern flat, East end, before Dec. L 
B. 4. Herald. 



SITUATION WANTED-WORK BY 

uhc day washing aaid cleaning. ZenilH 
'paone, ii77-D. ^ _^__ 



WANTED TO RENT-A HOUSE WITH- 
In ten blocks of depot; 5 or 6 rooms. 
Address W. H. J., care of St. James 
hotel. 



SI 0.000 

xl40. very 

SI 0.500 



For 9-room house In 
East end, corner lot 60 
modern. 

For 8-rooni house in 
one of the best loca- 
tions In East end, handsomely decor- 
ated and modern In every particular. 
Sixty-one lots at Lakeside ranging 
In price from jaOO to $700 on very easy 
terms. 

Four modern flats for rent at Elev- 
enth avenue west, Oct. 1st. 

C. H. Graves & Co. 

Suite 220 FlrHt Nntional Bank Bldg. 



8TRBBT CARS. 

NOTICE TO THE PT'BLIC. 
company operates a .street railway 



SITUATION WANT12.D - BY 
lady; position as sienograpuer 
Herald. 



YOUNG 
F. 17, 



WANTED TO RENT-A 10 or 12-ROOM 
modern house, preferably in East end 
of the city; will take long time lease. 
Address O. H. Clarke, care of Clarke- 
Hepworth company. 



WANTED - POSITION B\ COOK IN 
private famuy. iillia West Third street. 




SITUATION WANTED-BY A WOMAN 
to do wtrk by tne da.y. 3ii Ursi ave- 
nue eeifit, downstairs. _ 

SITUATION WANTED - COMPETENT 
stenographer desires work evenings 
from 0:ao p. m. to s:ao p. m. or 1 p. m. 
to a p. ui. A. ai. Herald. 



I W' ANTED TO RENT - TWO UNFUR- 
1 nished rooms for light housekeeping; 
I centrally located; by mother and daugh- 
. ter. W. 21, Herald. 



PICTURE 

DECKERS. 16 SECOND 



FRAMING. 

AVE>rUE 



GUSTAVE HENECKE. 211 E. SUP. ST. 



ilai.ed 
Paris. 



Fraoce 



1 SITUATION WANTED - EXPER- 
ienced stenographer wants perman-ut 

\ position, *-iLn reaaole Arm; can lurnida 
uest of references. Addr«ss. ^- i-. ""^r- 
ald. 



SITUATION WANTED - 
warns to go out waiumg 
' Address, B. S. Herald. 



by 



OMAN 
the day. 



ASHES AND GARBAGE. 

Removed Gust Holmgren, 428 S. Twenty- 
first avenue east. Old phone, 7S4-K. 



LOST AND FOUND. 



t SITUATION WANTliD-BY "5^'<>pNG 

1 lady typewriter, and experienced in 

general office woik. Call d.i. i/uce, ^en- 

1 i;a yhoiie, i5«i4. ^ 

! SITUATION V\- ANTED— BOuKKKEPEiK | 
\ and dteuographer. witii two years ex- 
I pcrience, desnj* pertnauenl posilioii. 
I Can luruisU good rciercncos. 
Herald. 



LOST-DARK BROWN BRINDLE DOG; 
French bull, fat ears, short tail, .s!ii«l! 
wiilte spot on breast, small bra.ss nail- 
head collar; name •■Ha!l-Bo!=ton." Re- 
turn to 1515 East Superior street, for re- 
ward. 



This ... 

line In the city of Duluth between Third 
avenue east and the end of Rice's Point, 
and another street railway line in the city 
of .Sui>erior between Twenty-first street 
and the end of Connor'.* Poir.t. These 
lines arc separated by the waters of St. 
Louis bay. and are operated as two dis- 
tinct and separate lines. 

The fare for a continuous ride In one 
direction between any two points on 
either one of tlieso lines is 5c. 

The public is hereby noiified that this 
company does not, by undertaking to 
carry any pass< nger, or by accepting fare 
for such carriage, assume any responsibi- 
lity beyond that of carrying such pas- 
senger safely between points on the above 
^' mentioned lines 

' This company Is not responsible for 
close connections, nor safe transportation, 
between the above mentioned lines by any 
ferryboat or other means of transporta- 
tion While th- employes of this com- 
pany have been Instructed to keep them- 
selves posted and give upon request all 
the information they can a.s 'o the prob- 
ability of connectioiis being mad'' with 
other transportation lines, the • company 
has no better mean.** of foreseeing unex- 
lu'cted interruptioii.s in the service of such 
lint's iior of telliiij^ h.iw lotig such inter- 
ruptions will continue, than the public 
has, and, therefore, cannot bt; responsible 
for notice of such interruptions. 

DULUTH STREET RAILWAY CO. 
Bv HERBERT W.\RREN, Gen. ilgr. 
Dpcember 10, 19<X;. 



11. 



SITUATION WANTED-LADY W1SHL& 
p^ace 10 take care ol rooms. B. 10, 
Hwru-ld. 



16 South Eighteenth avenue 



SITUATION WANTEU-KXPEKIENCED 
dressmaker wauLs sewing by me day. 
can give relereuccs. iuiiiiirc al aiO \^ ciii. 
l-uurtU sireeet. 



LOST-GIRL'S GOLD BRACELET, RED 
stone setting, between Presbyterian 
church and "Tenth avenue east, or on 
East Fourth street; reward, Catherine 
Sherwood, 427 Tenth avenue east. 

LOST - ON VERMILION ROAD. GRAY 
mare. 4 years old. Reward of $Ui for 
return to W. Kaner. 1227 East Seventh 
s'ret"'. . 



WANTED-A GOOD WET NURSE. 
Call at room 4u5, Burrows building. 10 to 
11 or i! 10 i. 



WANTED - GIRL 
housework; small 

First street. 



FOR 

family. 



GENERAL 
142<> B&at 



WA.NTED - COMPETENT CO<DK, 4"j2 

\^'est Second street, near posloffioe. 



PRIVATE HOME FOR I^VDIES BE- 

fore and during confinement; expert ] SITUATION 
care; evcrythtng confidential, infants | 
cared for. Ida Paleison, M. D., at4 
Harrison avenue, St. Paul. 



ENGRAVING - JEWELRY AND SIL- 
verware. Duluth Eiigraviiig Bureau, 9 
Wlnthrop block. Zenith "phone. 2166-D. 



WANTED— TO OO OUT 
washing or uouse-Cieaauig. iVi Lake 
avenue liuuiii. 



VVANTLD-PLAIN SEWING AND CHIL- 
dren's work. iL, iW Herald. 



OLD GOLD BOUGHT. 

OLD GOLD "and SILVER BOUGHT 
by the M. Henricksen Jewelry com- 
pany, 334 West Superior street. Provi- 
dence building. 



WANTED - 
hou.-jework, 
ond street. 



PERSON.\L - WANT TO BREED 

French poodle bilcli with thorougli- 
bred poodle dog- 114 First avenue ea«t, 
fiat 1. 



SITUATION WANTED— MIDDLE-AGED 
lady wishes places as houseKecper for 
wiaower. call over Cox s meat market, 

1 First avenue east and Superior streeu 



E. E. Esterley, 
Spalding hotel, 
'Phouc, lytti-X. 



manufacturing jeweler, 
428 West Superior street. 



Duluthft Iron Range RR 

Effective June S. IdOT. 
Dally Except Sunday : Daiiy Except 



Norttibouna SoutiiL 

'^A^AOi J.ibpiu Lv.. Duluth ..Ar I2xx>ai 

t.jiiiui 4:iOiiai .-Vr K.n:f<-k!ver Lv ii.ioani 

^.-S5aul 4.a5].iu Ar.TwoHLir$ Lv io;)5am 

ij£caui c.3oi.'n] .A r.. Allen Jet.. Lv ^-^^.m 

ii.20puj 745pai .Al.. bveleth . Lv 743301 

i.iacpoi 7;4Cpui Ar.. Virginia. .Lv 74Sam 

ii:^^aui 7-2fpnj .^t Tower ..Lv o»7ain 

2 4^;,ui B.2oi,ni Ar Ely Lv 7:i$i>m 



undaj 

aal 



^.4rP3» 

a :30pm 
a^Spm 
a»opm 



&Pi;CIA.I^-SVNDA.Y ONLT. 



A GIRL FOR GENERAL! -— -7—777777 

small family. 40» West Sec- i PERSON AL^SPA^ I &H 



i WANTED— Cook and second girl. 

or girl for general housework; three In 
family ; best of wages. Mrs 
King. Io03 Loudon road. 



coiupelelil leachci 
od Address B. 14, 



LESSONS 

commercial 
Herald. 



BY A 

meth- 



SITUATION WANTED-EXPEBiENCED 
sicuograpner wants position, compe- 
tent tor law work. Address B. IJ, 
Herald. 



jDR. BtlR.NETT. 
! rows building. 



DENTISTS. 



TOP FLOOR. BUR- 



Arthur C. 



WANTED-BABY TO BOARD; BE,ST 
of care, board reasonable. R IS. Heraid. 



WANTED — girl FOR 

hoixsework. 416 West Superior street 



-IBed springs tightened, 

ENER.\L i \^m. Peterson, laal W 



upholstering, etc. 

. bat St. 10?HJ-A 



^lOnA A good. 6-room house. 
w&wUU clo-sets and bath, 2-story, 
three h'edrooms, bar i wood floors, 
llr.st floor; V>uilt two ye.irs ago, dou- 
ble boarded, newly painted and plas- 
tered-wood shed, coal bin; v«ry 
warmly built-Park Point, near Aer- 
i.il l>rids?e 

A J ft A f; A fine 6-room house, stone 
W^UUtl ;ind roment basement; 

furn L ^. brtth, eleetrlo llght.s.. Hou.se 
couldn t be built f>r %\t*)0. on Nine- 
teenth avenue east, above Londuii 
road. 



WANTED TO BUY. 

W.\NTED TO BUY— WHITE IRON 

Lake stock bought and sold. 225 Man- 
hattan building. 

WANTED TO BUY-SECOND-HAND 
tent axl2 or larger. A. &6, Heraid. 

WANTED TO BUY— GENTLEMAN S 
second-iiand trunk. B 12, Herald. 

WANTED TO BUY-OLD CLOTHES 
bought. G. Shapiro. Zenith, 1652-X. 

WANTED TO BUY-A SECOND HAND 
triple mirror, suitable for vlock de- 
p.iitiuent. Roy .M. Prytz C o. 

FARM LANDS. 

•00<HCH>CH>OOi>0<H>0<>CKH>0<H><K^ 

FOR SALE-»500 WILL BUY 40 
acres of well-Improved land on 
Missabe road, five tninutes' walk 
from Burnett. Improvements alone 
cost over $6<J0. This is a snap and 
must be «old at once. 

STEPHEN J McCarthy. 

No. 22J Maniiattan Rldg. 



OLD MIRRORS KESILVERED - ST. 
Germain Bros., 121 First avenue west. 



SITUATION WANTED-YOUNG L.'VDY 
desires position in music company, 
can assist In stenography, bookkeep- 
ing, eierk. biLer, etc., musically xn- 
cilued. Address W. 2A Herald. 

~ " S PLAIN 

1018 West 



SCIENTIFK^ PAINLESS DENTISTRY. 
Lee & Turley. 114-110 West Sui>erior St. 



MUSICAL. 



! SITU .\TION W A N I ED-MEN 

1 washing and mending, ai 

Michigan street, upstairs. 



SWEDISH MASSAGE— A. E. HANSON, 
40'J-402 New Jersey building. Duluta 
■phone, l!i2ii-K. 

Central Bath Parlor, 24 W. Superior street. 

Su'.isfa'-ior>- tailonng, Stol'-z,.52a E. 4tli 3t_. 



I SITUATION WANTED-EXPERIENCED 
dressmaker wants sewing by the day or 
pie<.e. Inquire, SIO Wesi Fourth street. 

SITUATION WANTED-LADY S'rENt>G^ 
. rapher. experienced in general oince 
' work; can luruisn references. 
I Herald. 



.MUsiC ANu 




.Vi..;Dii_.n^ .Vir.KLH.^.NDiSc. OI" 
evtry description. Edi' 
son phoDograph*, hand 
and orches'ra tnctru 

fien!s, pianos & organs 
ntvaid WESTGA AKD 
7 aiid 9 First Ave. Weat 



AM 

7:46 Lv 

S;40 Lv 

•):20 Ar 

;i:-in Ar 

.l:10Lv 

'.1:50 .\r 



PM 



AM 



Duluth 

..Two Harbors.., 
.AU.^n Juiioiion.. 

Eveleth , 

Tuwer 

Ely 



Ar 

Lv 
Lv 
Lv 
Lv 



PM 
4:4ft 
S:oO 
2:20 
1:00 
1:27 



Lv 13:45 



No rth-Western Iin e 



I.caTc Superior 
Anitc E»u CUin 
.* rri\c MaJ!,.oo 
/.rrl\c N!ilwauk«« 
Arrive JmcsviiU 
.*rttTt Qiicajd 



;s»P" 

:• sspci 
:4c am 
igoan 

73-. am 



aDal->. bEac^pt Suuday. 



Lv DuluUi \A 4c aic as 4) pm 

I. r Superior (ocam 4 00 pa 

I Ar St. Paul < jc pra f o pis 

I Ar Mpla 5 os'pm f Jj P<a 

PuUtnan >lc«pm aod clvaU 

(ar> to Qiica^. Parlor ani 

cafe cars tcTwii Citi«». OfHc* 

— joa ^^'. Superior St.. Du.uth 



MINES AND MINING. 



NORTHERN PACIFIC RAILWAY 



It. 



PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS. 

Leonaid, homeopathist, Providence Bldg. 



SITUATION WANTED - FIRST-CLASS 
dressmaker wlsnes work by the day. 
Zcu:tli phone, 2j;i5-Y. 



UPHOLSTERING & REPAIRING. 

KUlToTT. l::i W. Isc St. Both •phones. 



Ghas. P. Craig d Go. 

220 W. SI PERIOR ST. 



g 
o 
.0 

io 

o 



MOVING AND STORAGE. 

Peoples Moving A SLoiage Co. Every- 
thing moved, packed and stored, au.^i 
West Superior street, either 'phone, tnJl. 

COM- 



DULUTH 

I pa uy, 210 



VAN &. STORAGE 
VVesl Superior str«et. 



' SITUATIONS WANTED — MALE. 

i SITUATION WANTED— YOUNG MAN. 
20 years of age, would like to obtain a 
position ot any kind, outside work pre- 

I ferred; city references. A. !>3, Herald. 

SITUATION WANTED _ BY YOUNG 
I Swedish man, where he can learn a 
I trade or business. A. Herald. 



IRON AND 
ch'-ap; well 
Iowa, 



COPPER — 
located. Box 



MOUNTAIN 
4o2, Sibley, 



CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

DULCriri^NGrNElKRTNG^ 
Patlon. Mgr., t513 Palladio building. 
Specirtcations and superintendence. 

MINNESOTA ENGINEERING CO. - D. 
A. Reed, consulting engineer. Surveys, 
plans, estimates, specifications, super- 
intendence. Zenith, 633. 408-409 Provi- 
dence building. 



CLAIRVOYANTS. 



Von can 
to g' 




Oecurity=i5t morlgages 
on city homes. 

ClimaxBuuding VLoain 



MEDICAL. 

LADIES - Dtt- LA FRANCO'S CUM- 
ouud, safe, speedy regulator. \Lo cents, 
uggi-sts or mall. BooKlel free. Di. 
La i-ranco, Ph:laaelph;a, Pa. 



1)0 u 

Lru 



This is a 7-room house at Lakeside. 
Corner 42nd Ave E. and M. Culloch 
street. House all modern except 
h-at .Small cash p.iyment. balance 
$"i'> per month. This is your oppor- 
tunity if you want a home. 

Must be sold by Oct. 1. 



A3 



5Socia.Lion. 

'•CC Tc rrev Bia; 



_J 



W. C. Sherwood & Co. 

1|W Manbiittsiu ituiUUiiK. 



AinAAA Buys a store and flat 
vIvUUU Iniibiins: on corner lot 
in WfSt end til. it pays 14 per cent 



tiet 



S1300 



usti retjuireu. 

Buys improved corner in 
the P-ast «^nd that pays 
t on cash reguired. 



SHOO 



Buys a 6-room house, just 
built. ;ind ready to move 
ii'.io 0:1 Eleventh avenue east. You 
tan buy this with a small citsh pay- 
ment, balance monthly. 



E3Y d GRIDLEY, 



B^'ll Phone 1190-L 510 
n«nl Kstate, l.onu* 



Palladio Bids; 
nrid lu>«uriiuee. 



LOANS 

On real estate at lowest rates. All 
privileges given. No delay. 

G.G.Dickerman& 

LONSDALE BLDG. 



FOR SALE-THIRTY MILES FROM 
the Twin Cities and close to new elec- 
tric road, about 14<J acres on fine lake, 
50 under plow, good meadow, t>alance i 
covered with hard wood. A nice house, 
large barn, corn crib, granary, and 1 
wagon shed. Pretty yard and nice or- ■ 
chard. One of prettiest places in this I 
section. $3,0«)0, $l,00u cash, balance easy j 
terms. Buildings can't be built for that 
price. S. A. Carlisle. Wyoming, Minn. 

FOR SALE - LAND IN LARGE AND 
small tracts at wholesale prices. L. A. 
Larseii company. 215 Providence Bldg. 

A FAR.M FOR SALE-lfiO ACRES WITH 
buildings and impr.ivements, ^ mile <o 
station; caus- for sale. po«)r health. 
For particulars, write Masiinili Danial, 
Brule. Wis.. Box 31. 

FOR SALE-LOTS AT PRINCE RU- 
pert, British C'dumbia, the terminus of 
the Grand Trunk Pacific railway, now 
building. Big money makers. Fir.st 
iud-dr.ision. White. C. B Enkema, 
Faiilield building. Vancouver, B. C. 

WILL TRADE i-'O ACRES OF LAND IN 
section 29. 'iiwn.ship 53, range 11. for im- 
proved Duluth property. Thomas Olaf- 
son, 402 Central avenue, W. Duluth. 
Zenith 'phone, 3t'13-D. 

FOR SALE — LANDS IN SM.-VLL 

tracts to actual settlers; small pay- 
I ments down and balance on Hfteen 
I years' time, on or before privilege. 
I Call or address, land department. D. & 
I I. R. Railway company, 512 Wolvln 
I building. Duluth. Minn. 



DYE WORKS. 

ZENllH CliY DYE WORKS— LARG- 
fcst and most reliable. All work done 
III Dulutn. work called tor and deliv- 
ered. Phones; Old, 1154-K, new, IbaS. 
Z!u East Superior street. 



DULUTH DYE WORKS - FRENCH 

dry cleaning, fancy dyemg. Old phone, 
IMl-K, new. Uai-A. 330 East Superior 
street. Suits prcsaed by the niontn. 



EMPLOYMENT OFFICES. 



OLUND & KNGBKKG. iOoV, 
Mii.nigau street. 'Pnone, 1436. 



WEST 



iW. J. FEDDEUS. BII4 W. MICH. ST. 



MUSIC. 



PIANOS. PHuNUGKAPHS 
everj llimg m tiie line 01 music, 
the popular songs and two-steps, 
us your ordens. Zenith Music company 
No. 0. East Superior street, Dukilti^^^ 



AND 

Ail of 
Send 



FOR RENT— FLATS. 

FOR RENT-NEW PAPERED EIGHT- 
room tlat. possesion at once. Ingaila 
Flats, :ilt> East Fourth street. 



IFOR REJ^T-ONE FIVE-R'X)M FLAT. 
i m Eighteenth avenue west. Zeuitii 
■phone, liii. 



;LANDS-LAR<5E 
i J. G. Naughton 
1 building. 



OR SMALI 
&. Co., 531 



, TRACTS, 
Manhattan 



FOR RENT - THREE-ROOM. STEAM 

I heated tlat, furnished tor iiousekeep.ng. 
I aij West Fourth street. 



OPTICIANS. 

!c. C. STAACKE, Sco NEW^ JERSEY 

! building. 10*5 West Superior street. 

OPTICIANS-WBNNERLUNP & NEL- 
.son. li:S West Superior street. 



FIRE INSURANCE. 



WANTED - A YOUNG MAN BOOK- 
keeper and stenographer would like 
work of some kind in the evening, 
from 7 to 10 or 11. Have experience as 
a store clerk. B. 46, Herald. 

! SITUATION WANTED-A YOUNG MAN, 
19 years of age, would like inside posi- 
tion, will run elevator or other cKan 
woric- have good education. B 11, He-- 
ald. 

SITUATION WANTED — BOY OF 19 
wants evening work of some kind; 
\ printing preferred. 3 years' experi- 
ence. Address A. 91. Herald. 

SITUATION WANTED - BY EXPER- 
ienced meat cutter in market. K. 21. 
Herald. 

SITUATION WANTED— POSITION BY 
a young man. 18 years of age, in a 
soda fountain; has had three moni.'is" 
experien'^e; or any kind of work. Can 
furnish beat ol" references. Z. IS. Her- 
ald. 

SITUATION WANTED - BOOKKEEP- 
er and general office man at pnsent em- 
ployed, wants to better position. Land, 
brokerage or railway office preferred. 
A. 1 references. B. A., Herald. 

SITUATION WANTED-B«>)K KEEPER 
and stenographer, with two years' ex- 
perience, desires permanent position. 
Can furnish good references. J. 11, 
Herald. 

SITUATION W.ANTED — POSITION IN 
office where there is a chance of pro- 
motion, by a fiist-ciass man; best of 
i references given. Address A 100, Her- 
ald. 

SITUATION WANTED - A POSITION 
with .son'.e good firm offering chances 

I for advancement, by a young man with ; 

I part college education. Address, Jack • 
Connelly, 505 East Second street, city. j 

SITUATION WANTED - BY YOUNG I 
married man, position as sleamfitter. or i 
I can handle any kmd of steam machin- , 
I erv and keep same In repair; must be 
' non-union. Addre.ss. U. 10»J, Herald. 



ROSCOE. CL.\IRN"OYANT, 
room 315. Superi-T. 



1026 TOWER, 



BUSINESS SCHOOL. 

CUNDY auilN ESS SCHOOL? LESSONS 
' at any hour. 2615 West Third street. 



• 4:00 p.m .'\&Uland and East 

• 8:00 a.m .^shhdid and East 

• 7:30 p.m Minn, and Daltota Express 

• e:30a.ml. ..Nortli C.ast LinuteJ... 

Leave j 
'f 9:00a. in 

• 1:53 p.m 
*II:I0p.ml 



Du.uth Short Line.' 

ST. PAUL 
. MIHIfEAPOLIS .. 



.■\rrive 

*II:l5a.m 

• t.:30p.m 

• 7:55 am 

• fe:25pm 

,\rrive 

• 6:30 a.m 

t 2:05 p.m 

• 7:00 p.m 



»Dai 



ly. tDaiiv 



Except Su.nday. 

n.i -u Vi^-vt v,„,-r ■ 



Pliones 214 



DULUTH, SOUTH SHORE A ATLAWT IO 

No. 7. No.X 



A. 

a 
a 
P 
a 
a 



6. NO. 8 . 

M.,P. M.| 
7.26'b 6:20iLv.. 
7:40ib 6;35i 

M.tA. M.| 
7:15;b 5:40iAr. 
S:00:b 6:30; 



. Duluth .. 
Superior 

Hou«hton. 

Caiumet 



a 6:15 b 4;1'» Ishpemlng 

a 7;46'b 4;50J.... Marquette 

;bl0;l5, e. S. Mane 

b fc;O0i Montreal bl0:l5 

b &.i5l Boston jblUtoO 



lA. M jP. M. 
AriblOiSOla 6:06 
....lblO:15ja 6:40 

IP. M. 
LviblO:20 
....|b 9:30i 

jP. M.iA. M. 
....|bll:6V<ja 7:58 
....lbU:15a 6:45 
b 5:30 



MUSICAL INSTRUCTION. ^^ 

JTHE EAts'T END .SCHOOL OF MUSIC 
' and language.-*. 505 East .Second street. 
Principal, Claude P. Landi, L. R. A. M. 
Eng., organist and choirmaster at Trin- 
ity Pro-<2!athedral, teacher of the 
Freuch language in the Central high 
school. Thorough instruction provided 
in the following subjects: Music, (or- 
gan, planaforle, singing, theory); Mod- 
ern languages: (French. Italian, Span- 
ish, grammatically and conversation- 
ally). Terms on application. Interviews 
by appointment. 



A. MP. M.j 

a 8:50'b 7 :10|Lv... Montreal.. .Ar|b 
P. M.jA. M.i IP 

■ 7:lS;Ar..New York-.Lvjb 



,A._M. 



a fe:00:b 
b Dally 



a Daily except Sunday. 
car on Trains Nos. 7 and 8. 



P. M. 

i :rj| alO 16 
M jA M. 

7:00ia »:4S 

Dining 



DULUTH, MISSABE & NORTHERN RY 



FOR SALE— COWS. 

FOR SALE-J. E. JOHNSON ARRIVES 
with a carload of fr»^sh milch cows, 
Thursday, Sept. la 701 South Twenty- 
third avenue east, near lake. Zenith 

'phone, 18.j3-X. 

FOR SALE - GOOD YOUNG FRESH 
cows, $30 and $35 apiece; al.so cows that 
are coming in this fall at $40. Call quick 
for a bargain. J. H. Markeson. 230 
North Fifty-sixth avenue west. 

FOR SALE— E. CARLSON ARRIVES 

with a carload of fiesh milch cows 

Tuesday. Sept. 17. Twelfth street and 

Twenty-se<'ond avenue west. Zenith 

; 'phone 1654-D. 

s! M KANER HAS JUST ARRIVED 
with another car of fre.sh milch cows; 

I some Jers<»ys among them. 1213 East 
Seventh street. Zenith 'phone. 13S7. 



WRITTEN 
Cooley & 



IN BEST 
Under hill, 207 



COMPANIES. 
Exchange Bldg. 



Pulford & How, 309 Exchange building^ 



WE WANT 

GOOD LOANS 

ON CITY PROPERTY 

• Ou or betorc" Privilege. 
See us 

F. I. SALTER CO., 

Tklrd Floor Lonsdak- Bldg, 



Someone owns — but has no use for — a 
piece of machinery that would be a 
monev-maKer for you. And a Herald 
want ad. will And this "someone." 



East and West End Lots 

$750, $950. $1000 and $1200 

Buy.s . h'>lr.^ E i.st .-rid l.>ts. suitable 
for cottages and nobby homes re- 
quiring J(> bv UO-f'iiit lots. 
WEST EKI> LOrS 
In great variety, and Hazelwood 
Park lots still are it because t.iey 
are located away from all noise and 
dirt. 

Apply for maps, giving prices and 
location.^. 

We have some i^hoice farm land 
with timber upon It for sale, close In. 

L> A. Larsen Co. 

215 I.O\.«<D.\LE BLDG. 




MRS. 

wife 
ave. 



PRIVATE HOSPITAL. 
""Hanson^ grad u ate m i d - 

; fetnale complaints. 413 Seventh 
east. Old phwiie l.^&4. Z.-nitn. 1225. 



MILLINERY. 



I TIMBER LANDS BOUGHT. 

I \VE'''^BUY''^MBER'^i>rTlAR^ OR 
! small tracts; also cut-over lands. See 
I us for quick deal. Hopkins & Ebert, 300 
Torrey building. 

i I BUY S'TANDING TIMBER; ALSO 
cut-over land. George Rupley. 4M Ly- 
ceum building. 



BOARD OFFERED. 

BOARD AND R<)Om'7nT^TvATE FAM- 
ily; also table board: centrally lo- 
cated. Zenith' phone 2246- Y. 



BOARD AND ROOM-$5.00 PER WEEKj 
niod^rn conveniences. The Dakota, lli 
West Second street. New 'phonf-, 1445. 



M. A. COX, m EAST FOURTH STREET. 



301 East Third street. Old "phone, 1744-L. 
BOARD AND ROOM- 



E FIRST ST. 



E. D. Field Co. 

RE.\L. ESTATE. 

in all parts of the city. 
INSIRAACE. 

MONEY TO LOAN. 
803 ExehBBKe Building:. 



A BARGAIN 

A 50 foot lot in the fashionable 
quarter on East Superior St. 

$1200 

R. B. Knox & Go. 

Room 1. Excbanse Bnlldlnx. 



I BUY TIMBER IN LAKE OR C«X)K 
counties. AUo furnish abstracts of tiUe. 
Alex McBean, 400 Burrows building. ' 

TIMBER CO., 510 
Dul. phone. 1591. 



STENOGRAPHERS. 

'i^^^^Xc^^P^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ BLDG. 



SHELDON-MATHER 
First National bank. 



BOARD WANTED. 

BOARD WANTED — BOARD AND 
room for the members of faculty of the 
normal school. Address, president a of- 
fice. \' 



CLOTHES CLEANED & PRESSED 

1st St.. La Roy, manager. 



Clark. 113 W 

ioHN MUELLER, 202 WEST FIRST ST 




P.M. 

3:50 
4:05 
4:20 



7:10 
6:33 



6:56 



A. M.I bT.-KTUJNS A. M. 

r:40Lv Duluth.. Arj 10:30 
7:55Lv.57thAv.W.Lv'lO:15 
8:15 Lv.. Proctor. Lv 
\Z:M\ \\.r. Coleraine Lv 
10:40 Ar. M't'n.lron.Lv 
10:37 Ar. Virginia .Lv 
10:29, Ar.. Eveleth. Lv 
10:56, Ar.. Sparta. .Lv 
ll:20;Ar..Biwabik.Lv 
10:561Ar..Hibbinj?.Lv 



10:00 
61J0 

7:00 
7:42 



7:15 



r. M. 

330 
3:1$ 

3:00 

12:20 
12:40 
12:47 
12:24 
12:02 
12:17 



Daily exct.pt Sunday. 

Mornins train irom Dulutn maices direct coa- 
nection at Kainr Junction with D. V. & R. L. Ry 
(or .^shawa and points north of Viri^inia. 



THE GREAT NORTHERN. 



Leave 
'i 6:2}a.m ) 

• 3:35 p.m f 
•n:15p.in) -- ^^ , 

* 9:00 a.ID I Crookston.Orand Forks. 
8:3& p.m i Montana and Coast 



ST. PAUL AND 
.MmilEAFOLU . 



.\rr've 
9:50 p.m 
1:55 p.m 
6:02 a.m 
6:20 p.m 
7:13 a.m 



2:20 p.m. .'"»»'' R'^" H-.ut>inj. Viryimi»„tI2:I5p. 

) St. CioiiJ. Wilraa: and /+«.»«_ — 
*J2S a.m \ sionx aty ^t»;50f^ 



T«1i. C«t- 



•Daily. TDaily Except buuday 

. e«'..?n rrxo) a: ^V-^^ OAc« Spalding Hot«l 



HOTi:Lr LrENOX 

Most thoroughly equlpp'-d In the 
Northwf^st. Sanitation perft-ct. 
European, 11.00 and up. American, 

$2.00 and up. 



»w Builiilne. Xfw Equipment. 
RA'I'ES — «2.00 AND $2.50. 

HOTEL McKAY 



Cor. First 



.Street 
West. 



and Fifth 
Duluth. 



A venue 



BOARD AND ROOM WANTED-IN 
private family, by respectable young 
lady. B. 15, Hersdd. 



GARMENT CUTTING. 

BEST, NEWEST BETHOD GARMENT 
cutting, easily steamed. Miss Gray, 
third floor, Qr^j^^allant company. 



Will Be Sold 
At a Bargain. 

Block on London Road at Fortieth Ave- 
nue Ea«t. For further particulars call 
at 131 Weat Superior Street. 



AT YOUR DEALER'S 

Men's Fine Shoes $3.50 and $4 

MADE IN DULUTH BY 

NORTHERN SHOE CO. 

MAHEBS OF MOD SHOES 



FOR RENT 



BSO per mooth— No. 81 
teenth avenue ea»t' 
hardwood lloorp hot 
nlfmti fine ronditlon. 

LITTLE A NOLTB. 



South S«Ten- 
— elsht rooma, 
¥«^«ter beatlns 



The Miller 

222-224 W. Superior SC 

American and European Plan 

Fifty Homelike Rooma. 

JOHX W. MILLER, Prop. 



Hotel Superior 



Superior, 

eadiav bot«l oi iIm 
improved. 

Aai«rle«B Pima, 
BuropMUi Plaa, 



Wlaeonsln. 



city, Modcraixed 
Bus meets all tralus. 



and 



•2.50 
• l.OO 



rp. 
i>p. 



S 



A 
•t 




-h 



-». 



>w 





DULUTH EVENING HERALD 



TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1907. 



> 



I- 



f 




Herald* 



One Cent a Word Each Insertion — No 
Advertisement Liess Tlian 15 Cents. 

'shopping 
by telephone. 

Old New 
'Phone. 'Phone. 

li£AT MAKRETS — 

B. J. Toben 22 22 

Mcrk Bros BOI-M 1&> 

liAUN DRIES — 

Yale Laundry 479 479 

Lulee' Laundry 447 44^ 

Troy Laundry 257 25i 

DRLiCililSTSs — 

Boyce 163 163 

FlAHtlSTS — 

W. W Seeklns 133^ ^356 

BAREKIES — 

The Bon Ton 17'J9-L U66 

RVBBEK STA.MP WOKKi; — 

Con. Stamp .fe Print. Co 102;K 765 

PLUMBING AND IlEATlNd — 

McGurrin & Co "5 983 

P G. Pa.«toret 1754 6V»^ 

Archie McL>ous.'i.n 1723 916 



One Cent a Word Each Insertion — No 
Advertisement Liess TTian 15 Cents. 

''^'^'hELP^WANTED— MALE 



One Cent a Word Eacli Insertion — No 
Advertisement Less Tlian 15 Cents. 

"^^H^LP^W^Al5rfED^^^FEMAI^^ 



WANTED! $!i,> 

o 



Boy over 16 years 
willing and ambitious; 
for right boy. 



old, 
good 



bright, 
chance 



O GRAY-TALLANT CO. 



WANTED - EXPERIENCED 
sales ladies in the following depart- 
ments: cloaks and suits; dress 
goods, silks, wash goods and hosi- 
ery. Apply at once, wUU refer- 
ences, Johnson & Moe, Twenty-first 
avenue west and Superior street. 



8 



At once. 
furniture 
tion. Apply 



WANTED! 
WANTED! 

experienced packer for 
warehouse, steady posi- 



FRENCH 
FRENCH 



& 
& 



BASSETT. 
BASSETT. 




WANTED. O 





One Cent a Word Each Iryertiov — No 
Advertisement Less ITian 15 Cents. 

wmis 
m PI6E 1 



Girl for general housework; good 
-wages; no washing. CaJl, ^401 
East Third street. 



ki 



REAL ESTATE, FIRE 

INSURANCE AND 
RENTAL AGENCIES. 



<HKV&^:HD<HKH:HKHKH>Oi:H>tH^ 



I WANTED. 



BUNDLE BOYS. 



FREIMUTH'S. 



Q 



John A Stephenson, WoKin building. 

E D Field Co., 203 Exchange bailding. 

L. A Larsen & Co., 215 Providence Bldg. ^^^^^^^.^^ 

chariea P. . crai g_&Lco,._::;;o_W:_ « ^p-^gj I Q<>iycyCiii<><i<y<><><><>^^ 



MONEY TO LOAN. 

CHATTEL LOANS-SALARIED LOANS. 
DO YOU NEED MONEY? 

We have money constantly on hand to 
loan to salaried people and others wuh 
or wifiiout security; also on pianos, 
furniture. honses, etc. Weekly or 
monthly payments, to suit your own 
convenience. If you want the loweti 






WANTED-TAILORESS. 

In our bushellng department; 
steady work; highest wages. 

OAK HALL CLOTHING CO., 

Superior St. at Fourth Ave. W. 



FOR RENT— HOUSES. 

FOR RENT— NEW. MODERN, SEVEN- 
room house, heated. 4331 East i?upe- 
rlor street. $38.00 per month. lutjuire 
next door. 

FOR RENT-FROM OCT. 1 TO MAY 1, 
coni'fortaWi' furnished five-room col- 
lage on tixrii. Point, within walking 
dibiance to central i>art of city. In- 
q\nre 11^ Minnesota avenue, Old phone, 
121-L. 

P^OR RENT-OCT. 1 TO COUPLE WITH 
no children small furnished cottage 
half a block from car line. Inquire 18 
Orange street, Duluth Heights. 



One Cent a Word Each Insertion — No 
Advertisement Less limn 15 Cents. 

^FOR'RENT^lROdMSr 

FOR r'eNT^THREE ROOM; NO CHIL- 
dren. Apply C2t) West Third street. 



FOR RENT- WANTED-YOUNG LADY 
roommate; references exchanged. Call 
2U6 West Third street after b p. m. 



FOR RENT — TWO NICELK FUR- 
nished rooms In private family; central; 
hot water heat; old 'phone 1»61-M. 



FOR RENT-FURNISHED 
Second avenue east. 



ROOM. 217 



FOR RENT - LARGE FURNISHED 
front room, hot water heat, electric 
light; board, if desired. Old 'phone, 
524-K. 120 Ninth avenue east. 

FOR RENT — FRONT ROOM. FUR- 
nished, hot water heat, bath. tele- 
phone, gentlemen preferred. Central 
location on the car line. D. 22, Herald. 



One Cent a Word Each Insertion — No 
Advertisement Less llian 15 Cents. 

FOR''SALE^^^^nilSCELLANEOUS. 

For Sal©— Boilers and Radiators. Repairs 
promptly made. H. Gazett, 321 E. Sup. 



FOR SALE-A FINE SEAPI RUG 9^x 
121/4; cost $40(1; only used two months 
at a much reduced price. Call at Du- 
luth Van ii Stonige company ware- 
house, 610 Eiist Superior street. 




FOR RENT - FURNISHED ROOM, 

light housekeeping allowed. 210 East 
Second street. 



WANTED-EVERY WOMAN TO TRY 
Dr LeGran'b Female Regulator, guar- 
anteed. Kugler, Your Druggist. 10» 
West Superior street. 



o 
o 



WANTED - SPECIAL BOY TO 
run errands and make himself gen- 
erally useful; must be bright, of 
neat appearance and about 16 years 
of age. Apply, at once, J. M. Oid- 
ding & Co. 



WANTED - EVERY WOMAN, MAN 
and child that has rough skin or chaps 
to use Kugler'a Karnalion Kold Kreaiii. 
tr.c great skin food, 2oc. Kugler, 
Druggist. 108 West Sui>erior street. 



Your 



rates, call on us and we guarantee \" , ort0i*K>rtno<HCK?<H><^ 

save you money. lK)ans made prompt- ■ vvvn.,'vri.'%~>.r'>,^>.-v>.-N-«.. 



ly without delay or red lape. All busi- 
ness strictly confidential. 

WkSSTEKN LOAN COMPANY. 

521 Manual tan Bldg.. 

New 'phone. 'Jli6. Old piione, 759-R. 



WANTBr>-COAT-MAKER AT ONCE. 
H. J. Broeker, Cass Lake. Minn. 



t«KKKWMWl>aCHKHCK>OCK>CH«H>0- 

Q MONEY LOANED ON FURNI- O 
O lure and pianos at 2t>u Palladio. D 

gMlNNtiSoTA LOAN CO. Q 

O 

MONEY TO LOAN-ON FURNITURE, 
and all kinds of personal propemy; also 
buy notes and second mortgages, Union 
Loan company. 210 I'ailadio building. 

MONEY TO IXDAN-ON DIAMONDS, 
wale ties, furs, rifles, etc.. and all goods 
of value, $1 to $1,*.<R». Keystone lioan £; 
Meriaiiiile Co.. lo West Superior street. 



WANTED-FOUR PLASTERERS AT C. 
A CONGDON'S NEW RESIDENCE, 
THIRTY-THIRD AVENUE EAST AND 
LONDON ROAD. 



MBS. BOMERS' EMPLOYMENT OF- 
ftce, 17 Second avenue east. Both phones 



;>iXj<H>a<H><H>iKK>aa<>o<K>CK>0<K>ao 



{>{>l><H>CH>O<H>CK><K>0<HKH>iKH>l>i>O 



a 

a 

s 
% 



WANTED-SPECIAL DELIVERY 



boys and cash girls. Apply to man- 
ager, Silberstein & Bondy Co. 



WANTED - EXPERIENCED 
saleslady for underwear depart- 
ment, good wages to competent 
party. 

WANTED - BRIGHT, ACTIVE 
saltslady for jewelry dopt. 



WANTED - MILLINERY 
prentice. Freimulh's. 



AP- 



FOR RENT — FOUR-ROOM COTTAGE 
on I'ark Point. Apply, 16 Phoenix 
block. 

FOR RENT-FURNISHED NINE-ROOM 
house, four rooms bringing rent. East, 
central and among the best locations in 
the city. Call, Old 'phone, Ihltt-K, or 
write, B. 7, Herald. 



FOR RENT - TWO NICELY FUR- 
nlshed rooms; all modern conveniences. 
Old 'phone, 600y-L. 



FOR RENT - FURNISHED ROOMS. 
420 Third avenue east. 



FOR SALE - WH HAVE FOR SALE 
four choice draft Teams; acclimated and 
good action. Duluth Log company, 214 
Palladio building. 

FOR SALE— WALNUT PIANO, USED 
three months, in fine condition, $l5,i; 
sold on terms of $10 cash and $5 per 
month. French & Bassctt, First street 
and Third avenue west. 




FOR SALE-IRON AND WOOD WORK- 
ing machinery and supplies, pulleys, 
shafting, hangers, boxes, etc., new and 
second-hand. Northern Machinery com- 
pany, Minneapolis. ^ 



FOR SALE-ONE MAHOGANY PIANO, 
slightly shop worn, at $126; terms $10 
cash and $f per month. French & Bas- 
set, First street and Third avenue 
west. 



FOR RENT- FOUR 

Sixth street. 



ROOMS. 2324 WEST 



FOR RENT - SEVEN-ROOM FUR- 
nlshed house, gas and electricity; rent 
rea.soiiable to right party S. D. Will- 
iamstn, 515 Torrey building. Zenith 
plione 1136. Old phone 1309. 



FOR RENT— ONE DOUBLE UNFURN- 
ished room. 218 West Superior street. 

FOR RENT-TWO FUftNISHED OR 
unfurnished rttoma, for liglii lioust- 
keeping; no children. 427 Seventh ave- 
nue east. 

FOR RENT — NEWLY FURNISHED 
rooms for two tjentlemen. 113 Second 
avenue east. Zenith phone, 1250-D. 



FOR RENT — MISCELLANEOUS. 

FoiT RENT - HIG-HLAND DAIRY, 
house and ten lots, good barn for twen- 
ty-two cows. Water running in the 
barn. Inquire, J. J. Laureman. 503 
North Fifiy-eighlli avenue. 



CK>a<KXHKH:JO<K>OiKl<H>0<K><K><K>^ 



FOR RENT - HOTEL, THIRTY-SIX 
rooms; newly relit texJ; best location in 
city. Apply to Louis McCuiiougu, Clo- 
uuet. 



FOR RENT — FURNISHED ROOMS 
with or without board. All modern con- 
veniences. Call tJlO Eiist L'econd street. 



FOR SALE— ONE FINE OAK VOSE 
piano, used less than a year; beautiful 
tone and action; a rare bargain at $275; 
sold on terms of $15 cash and tH per 
month. French & Bassett. First street 
and Third avenue west. 

FOR SALE-l'PRIGHT STONE & CO. 
piano, mahogany case; good condition, 
$1.'{5; $10 down, $6 per moniii. Howard. 
Farwfcll & Co., 120 East Superior street. 

I 

{for SALE-SMALL HEATER, $4; COT, 

I mattress and other household goods. 
j 1907 West Second street. 

'|FOR SALE-ENGLISH BULL TERRIER. 
] 1 year old, brindle and wliite. AFk fef 
I coacnnian, 11Z3 East Superior street. 



SECRET SOCIETIES. 

I^ASONICT' 
PALESTINE lodge:: NO. 7S, A. F. A 
A. M.— Regular meeting flr«t 
and third Monday evening* 
of each month at S u'clocic. 
Next meeting, Sept. 80, 1907. 
Work.— Third degree. Jam«« 
A. Crawford, W. M.; H. N©»- 
bitt, secretary. 

IONIC LODGE, NO. n&. A. F. A A. M.— 

Regular meetings second and 
fourth Monday evenings of 
each month, at 8 o'clock. 
Next meeting, Sept. 23, 1907. 
Work— Second Degree. James 
L. Cromwell, W. M.; H. 8. 
Newell, secretary. 

KEYSTONE CHAPTER. NO. 20, R. A. M. 
—Stated convocations second 
and fourth Wednesday even- 
ings of each month, at 8 
:> clock. Next convocation, 
Sept. 25. Smoker. Henry L 
Pineo, H. P.; Alfred Le Rlch- 
eux, secretary. 

DULUTH COMMANDERY, NO. 18, K. T. 
—Stated conclave, firEt Tues- 
day of each month. Next eon- 
clave, Tuesday, Sepl- 17th. Or- 
der of Red Cross. Sojourn- 
ing sir knights are es- 
pecially Invited. William A. 
Abbett. eminent commander; 

Alfred Le Richeux, recorder. 



SCOTTISH RITE. 
Regular meetings every Thurs- 
day evening of each week at 
S o'clock. Next meeting. Sept, 
26, 1907. Work— Entertainment. 
J. E. Coc>ley. secretary. 

ZENITH CHARTER. NO ^. 
Order Eastern Star.— Regu- 
lar meetings at Masonlo 
Temple, second and fourth 
Friday evenings of each 
montli at 8 o clock. Next 
meeting, Sept. 13. Work— 
CUntral business. Harriett 
W.; Ella F. Gearhart, secre- 






FC>R RENT — TWO AND 
rooms. 620 W'est Third street. 



THREE 



FOR SALE— TWO 
pups. 17 Seventh 



FRENCH POODLE 
avenue west. 



Hoover, 
tari'. 



o<3s>oaH2iCHao-iK>0'ao<^CH>!XK>oo<KKK> 



MONEY SUPPLIED— TO SALARIED; 
people and others, upon their own ' 
notes without security; easy payments. 
Offices in sixty-three cities. Tolman's , 



o 



WANTED. 



bob i'ailadio building. 



FOR SALE— HOUSES. 

FOR SALE-A NEW NINE-ROOM 
house, located in a most desirable 
part of tlie East end; tne house is 
modern in every respect; i>rice, $8,500. 
Address for furllier information. A 106, 
Herald. 

FOR SALE-FIVE-ROOM HOUSE AND 
lot 37-foot front. Inquire on premises. 
126 West Palmetto sireet, Dulata 
Heights. 



Special delivery 
after school and 
ply at once to 



boy to 
Saturdays. 



■work 

Ap- 



J. M. GIDDINO & CO. 



O 
O 
O 

O 

Q 



o 



NOTIONS SALESLADY. 
We have a position tor an exper- 
ienced notions saleswoman, an ex- 
ceptional opportunity for a lady ot 
abilitv with plenty of experience 
no'tions and who can come well 
Apply at once, to 

& WHITE CO. 



in 

recommended. 

superintendent 

PANTON 



i3<)<H>C<HKXKH>OO<KtO<Kl/0-C> CH>0^^ 

CH>O<K>iKKH>O<H«K><H>CH>CH>0<H>0i^ 

•Ct ^ 

Q WANTED BRIGHT, ACTIVE 



WANTED-AN OFFICE GIRL, KNOW- 
ledge of stenography not necessary. 
Bradstreefs, tlt> Torrey building. 



'WANTED-COOK AT 1231 EAST THIRD 
street, good wages. 



SURGEON CHIROPODIST. 

DR. WhXlLEY^ ia)OT''^ECLuIlST? 
Hi) Mesaba avenue. Zenith 'phone, Wb-Y. 



BUSINESS CHANCES. 

BUSINESS CHANCES— LARGE BOARD- 
Ing house, furniture and two lots in 
good location near business center of 
Virginia, Minn. Address Z. J. Perrault, 

Viigiiila, Minn. 

BUSINESS CHANCES - B.^RBER 
wanting to buy a paying barber shop. 
Apjily, Box 73, Rainy River, Ont. 



FOR RENT — SECOND FLOOR MIS- 
sabe avenue, three rooms and alcove; 

$13. 

FOR RENT - THREE NICE UNFUR- 
nished rooms; all modern conveniences. 
Apply 10, Mason flat. 



FOR SALE-^ TAKES FINE UPRIGHT 
piano, worth $200, can be seen at room 
il. Phoenix block. 

FOR SALE — ROLL-TOP DESK AND 
typewriter. CaJ! 27 Mesaba bloek. 



EUCLID 




LODGE, NO. 198, A. F. & A. 
M.— Regular meetings first and 
third Wednef^^day evenings of 
oath month at 7:30 o'clock. 
Next meeting, Sept. 18. Sec- 
ond degree. J. H. Opperman, 
W. M. ; A. Dunleavy, secre- 



FOR RENT-ONE FURNISHED ROOM; 
suitable for a gentleman. 202. West 
Second utreet. 



FOR SALE - 
ing stove, 
street. 



SELF-FEEDING HEAT- 
Apply 312 Eitst Fourth 



tary. 



DULUTH 



FOR RENT - FURNISHED ROOM 
with board for 2. with all modern 
conveniences. 211 Fifth avenue west. 



FOR SALE-SOME HOUSEHOLD FUR- 
niture cheap. Call at 90^ London Road. 

jFOR SALE— TWO LEATHER ROCKING 
chairs and gasoline stove. 225 Fifteenth 
avenues east. 



FOR RENT — ONE STEAM-HEATED 
furnshed room. 206 E:a»t First street. 




CHAF'TER NO. 59. R. A. M.— 
Meets at We.sl Duluth tec- 
end and fourth Tue.-days of 
each month, at 7:3J p. m. 
Next meeting, Sept. 10. Work 
—Regular business. E. Q. 
Wallinder, H. P.; A. Dunleavy, 
secretary. 



FOR RENT - THREE FURNISHED 
rooms for light housekeeping; also 
large front bedroom. Aliedena terrace, 
706'/^ West Second sireet. 



IFOR RENT-THREE UNFURNISHED 
I rooms for light housekeeping. W. 3U. 
Herald. 






BUNDLE BOY. APPLY MAN- 
AGER HARDWARE DEPT. 

FREIMUTH'S. 



O 
Q 



i,HKH><H><K30<HXH>CH:KK><H><}<KH>CK^ 



WANTED-GIRLS TO STRIP TOBAC- 
CO. Apply Ron-Fernandez Cigar com- 
pany^ 

WANTED— GIRLS FOR BOTTLING DE- 
partment. over 16 years old. Duluih 
Brewing & Mailing Co. 



FOR SALE RE3STArRANT-€I'LEJ>IDID 
kK.ation. Cheap rent, best lr.i.de in] 
t«»wn. Will repay purchase price In 
four months. Gc»od reason for selling. 
J. A. Scott. 31fi Central avenue. West 
Duluth, Mmn. ^ 

BUSINESS CHANCES— BARBER SHOP; 
two chair-shop; bai-gain if taken at ouoc 
338 East Superior street. 



FOR SALE 
house in 
foot lots, 
from car 
& Co. 



-$2,<^i00 WILL BUY A 9-ROOM 

good npalr wlln two 50- 

at Hunter's Park, one block 

line. Apply O. C. Hartman 



WANTED— TAILOR AT ONCE; HIGH- 
est ot wages. KKJ First avenue west. 



FOR .SALE- VERY NEAT. FOUR-ROOM 
cottage. Park Point; corner lot, largj 
porch, line location; very rea.^onable. 
If sold at once. Apply 2602 Minnesota 
avenue. 

FOR SALE— NICE LITTLE FIVE-ROOM 
cottage at Proctor, $1,21R»; easy terms. 
205 Palladio building. 

FOR SALE — NEW 8- ROOM HOUSE, 
electric lights and ?as, city water. 
Stone foundation, lot 50x100. 322 West 
Vernon street. 

FOR BALE - FINE SEVEN-ROOM 

house on car line at Le.^^ter Park; hard- 
wood n<.«ors downstairs, white enamel 
finish up.slalrs: lot 100 by 140 feel; cement 
Sidewalk. Address B. H: F., care ol 
Herald. 



WANTED — ERRAND BOY. APPLY 
Christie Lithograph & Printing com- 
pany, ISO West Michigan street. 



WANTED — EXPERIENCED COOK, 
Oct. 1. House has all modern conven- 
iences; best wages paid; must have 
references. Call, or address Room 613 
Lyceum building. 



WANTED-MAN TO TAKE CARE OF 
horses and cow and make himself 
generally useful. Apply Christie 
Lithograph & Printing company, 130 
West Michigan street. 

WANTED— MEN TO LEARN BARBER 
trade; short time required by our 
method; great demand for barbers. 
Call or wnlf for beautiful "free ' illus- 
trated catalog; have stood the test for 
sixteen vears; only institution of its 
kind in the Northwest. Moler Barber 
Col., 27 Nic. ave.. Minneapolis. 

HAVE YOU OVER- 

the fall rush starts. 
new linings put in. 
on. Frank Popkins 
W. Superior St. 



WANTED-A LADY COOK AT CLAR- 
endon restaurant, Garheld avenue and 
Superior street. 



WANTED - FIRST-CLASS GIRL FOR 
general houseworK; no washing. 1515 
East Superior sireet. 

WORK IN BAK- 
Apply to baker 



BUSINESS CHANCES - STATE PROS- 
pecting lease, nwVi of nw'^ section 4, 
township 57, range 21, lor sale. J. R. H., 
Box 183, Virginia, Minn. 



BUSINESS CHANCES-WANTED— $3,000 
on real estate security; will pay good 
Interest. Address A 101, Herald. 



WANTED — GIRL TO 
ery, St. Louis hotel, 
at hotel. 



WANTED - GIRL FOR GEJ^BRAL 
housework. Apply 403 Went Third 
street. Mrs. J. T. Hughes. 



FOR SALE— HORSES. 

s 
g 



WANTED — MEN 
coats fixed before 
Cleaned, repaired, 
velvet collars; put 
tailor shop, No. 1 



WANTED - COMPETENT GIRL FOR 

fcneral housework; two in family. 524 
Third street. 



tener 
last 



WANTED-FOR THE U. 
corps— Men between ages 
opportunity to see the 



S. MARINE 

21 and 35. An 
world. For full 



WANTED-SKIRTMAKER 

finisher. Miss AJtCoy, 131 
street. 



AND WAIST 
West Superior 



BUSINESS CHANCBS-FOR SALE, 
twenty acres In fine locality: beautiful 
six-room cottage; well, barns; two 
miles from car line: will sell in five or 
ten acre lots. F. Quandt, Arnold, Minn. 



FOR RENT - LARGE FURNISHED 
room with alcove; modern conveniences, 
with board or without. 226 Fifth avenue 
east. 



FOR SALE— CANARY BIRDS. SING- 
ers, $2; females 50c. 717 West Second 
street, flat 6. 

FOR SALE— CHILD'S IRON BED, I^SED 
only short time. 307 Sixth avenue 
west. 

FOR SALE— FINE UPRIGHT PIANO. 
almost new. at less than half cost. 213 
East Third street. 



FOR RENT— FURNISHED ROOM. ALL 
modern conveniences, references re- 
quired. 314 Ninth avenue east. 



FOR SALE— FURNITURE. SIX RCKiMS 
complete. 717 West Second sireet, flat 5. 

FOR SAI^E— 5C<-FOOT LOT. UPPER SIDE 
of Vernon street, near school and ciir 
line, $600; 1-3 cash; cheap. Btrt N. 
Wheeler, 408 Burrows building. 



DULUTH LODGE, NO. 28, I. O. O, F.— 
Meets everv Friday evening 
at Odd F^ellows' hall, 16 Lak.9 
avenue north. N«xt meeting, 
Sept. 13. First degree. D. J. 
r>orsey. noble grand; R. S. Forgy, record- 
ing Btcretary. 

i 

K. O. T. M. 

DIU.UTH TENT. NO. 1. meets 
every Wednesday evening at 8 
p. m. at Maccabeo h-ill, 224 
West First street. Visiting sir 
knights welcome. C. J. Hec- 
tor, commander; J. B. Gelin- 
.aa, record keeper. Offlce lo 
10 a. m. to 1 p. m. daily. 




hours 



FOR RENT - FURNISHED FRONT 
room and alcove; steam heat, 24 West 
First street, third fiat. 



FOR SALE— BARGAINS 
slightly used shot guns 
or rent. J. W. Nelson, 
perlor street. 



IN NEW AND 

and refles; sale 
No. 6, East Su- 



FOR RENT 
board. 517 



-FURNISHED ROOMS AND 
West First street. 



FOR 
two 



RENT- FURNISHED 
gentlemen. 20 West 



ROOM FOR 

Third street. 



FOR RENT — FURNISHED ROOMS; 
steam heat; hot and cold water. 16 
Mason flats. 



FOR RENT-A NICELY FURNISHED 
room; $5 per month. 1520 Minnesota ave- 
nue. 



FOR SAIjE CHEAP - DUCK BOAT. 
whole camping outfit. Inquire 28 Sev- 
enth avenue east. 

!F0R SALE, CHEAP-ONE HEAVY DE- 
Uvery wagon. Johns<.m & Moe, Twrnty- 
I first avenue west and Superior sireet. 

j FOR SALE CHEAP-HOUSEHOLD 

i furniture. Call after 6 p. m. No. 8. 
East Fifth street. Flat A. 



MODERN BAMARITANS. 

ALPHA COUNCIL, NO. 1, 
meets at Elks' hall every 
Thursday evening at 8 
(.clock Beneficent degree 

first and second Thursdays 
Samaritan degree second and 
fourth Thursdays. F. A. 

Noble, G. S.'; Lucy Purdy, L. G. S.; 

lace Welbanks, scribe; T. 

cial scribe. 




A. Gall. 



Wal- 
finan- 



BUSINE^S CHANCBS-FOR SALE, 
confectionery store and ice cream par- 
lor; cheap, if taken at once. 2002 West 
First street 



BUSINESS CHANCE»— ON ACCOUNT 
of sickness, must be sold, at a bargain, 
grocery, confectionery, ice creaJn par- 
lor, all fixtures complete; horse, har- 
ness and light delivery wagon; party 
leaving city. Call 11^6 West Michigan 
street. 



BARRE'rr 
The largesrt 
America, liave 
Lff all cla.sses 
ly on hand. 

BARRETT 
Midway 



& ZIMMEIUL\N. 

horse dealers in 
from 500 to 800 head 
of horses conslant- 

& ZIM.MERMAN, 
Horse Market. 



St. Paul, Minn. 



a 

o 

o 
o 



o 
o 
o 
o 



Information apply In person or by letter 



to 5 South 
Minn. 



Fitth avenue west 



by I 
. Du 



WANTED - EXPERIENCED COOK, 
Vienna Bakery, 202 West Superior Btreel. 



lulh. 



WANTED - YOUNG MAN TO LEARN 
shoe business: good chance for advance- 
ment. Waldorf Shoe store. 



WANTED — DINING ROOM GIRL AND 
dish washer. Omaha Cafe, 623 West 
Superior street. 



BUSINESS 
Nora hotel 
Duluth. In 
and has at 
steady boarders. 
Ill health. 



CHANCBS-FOR SALE, 
at 1913 West First street, 
a rapidly growing district. 
all times no less than 130 
Reason for selling. 



FOR RENT— TWO 
feeventh street. 



ROOMS AT 302 EAST 



FOR 
er. 



SALE-RADIANT HO. ME 
1511 East South street. 



HEAT- 




1(B, 
hall 
at 8 



A. O U. W. 
FIDELITY LODGE. NO. 
meet.«! at new Maccabee 
ever>' Thursday evening 
• clock. H. E. Simons, M. 
\V • W W. Fensttrmacher, 
recorder; O. J. Murvoid, finan- 
cier. 217 East Fifth street. 



FOR RENT— LARGE, 
with board for two. 
street. 



FRONT ROOM. 
117 East Thud 



[FOR SALE— GOOD 
heater. Call at 
west. 



COAL STOVE AND 
126 Eleventh avenue 



FOR RENT - FOUR UNFURNISHED 
rooms. 1414 Jefferson street. 



FOR RENT-TWO OR THREE FURN- 
Ished rooms, as preferred, for liglit 
housekeeping. $8 per month. Oct. 1. 
Address Z. 11. Herald. 



i;HKKJ<H3<KH>O<>a<KKH>lKKXHK^CH30 

FOR SALE — GOOD. SOU.XD. NINE- 
year-old horse, weight about l.ioO, | 
color black. A^iply A. Rasmusson's, | 
Grand Lake Station, Minn. 

FOR SALE— BAY MARE. WEIGHT 1.800 
Ibh.. 5 years old: also ano-.her l>ig horse, 
weight about 1,400 lbs.. 5 years old; 
guaranteed sound. 1219 East Seventh 
street. 



WANTED— A 
typewriter, 
short- tiaiid. 
box. 773, 



GOOD MAN TO RUN 

not nectssary to know 
Address Whohsale, lock 



[WANTED — GIRL FOR GENERAL, 

I housework; high wages, small family. 
2402 East Fifth street. 



W.J^NTED— A GOOD LAUNDRESS FOR 
Wednesday morning. Apply, llllO East 
Third street. 



WANTED-A TA11X>R TO PRESS 
clothes, steady work; good wages. Mel- 
lin & Co.. 404 West Superior sireet. 



WANTED-A COMI'ETENT 
2028 East Superior street. 



GIRL AT 



WANTED— OFFICE BOY. 
grade graduate. Address 
lock box, 773. 



EIGHTH 
Wholesale, 



WANTED— HOUSEKEEPER FOR WID- 
OW and one child, middle-aged lady 
preferred. 2824 West Third street. Ze- 
nith phone 886. 



FOR SALE - CHE.VP. BIG HORSE, 
weight 1,500; bargain, if taken at once. 
2211' West Michigan street. 

O L. il\.mmi:l CO.. o 

Dealers in O 

<} Horses, Wago:is and Buggies. O 

<j r>uUith. Minn. O 



ELEVATOR OPERATOR. 






We want an experienced electric 
passenger elevator operator, one 
who can furnish references. Ap- 
plv at once to superintendent 
Panton & White company. 




WANTED-COMPETENT COOK. MRS. 
J. T. Hale, 1208 East First street. 



Wanted - dish washer. 

! Nineteenth avenue west. 



NO. 6 



PIANO TUNING. 

C' A cmFxH^RACzENUTH "PHONE, 606. 



TRUNKS AND VALISES. 

BAVE mTdDLEMEN^s'^ PROFITS-DU- | 
lulh Trunk factory, 220 West Superior 
street. 



PRINTING AND BOOKBINDING. 

Prompt and up-to-date; prices right. 
Thwing-Stewart Co.. 116 W. First St. 

QUICK AND GOOD PRINTING. CALL 
16t»4 old I'hone Trade News Pub. Co. 



O 

■0 
{>Ck>chCh>Ck>O<k><hXh:h>O0O<h«^0 

WANTED-MAN OR WOMAN W^HO IS 
able to make a house to house canvas. 
Nothing to sell; chance to travel. Ap- 
ply. D. Stewart. 17 West Seventh ave- 
nue, ground floor. 

WANTED— BOOKBINDERS AT JUDD'S 
printing office, 30 East Superior street. 

i WANTED-A MAN TO WORK ON A 
dairy farm at once. 2215 West Twelfth 
street. 

\rANTKD-EVERY MAN AND WOMAN 
to try Nero Tablets, the great nerve 
regenerator; $1 per box. Kugler. Y^our 
Druggist, 108 West Superior street. 



VVANTEI'— COMPETENT GIRL FOR 
general houisework. 1603 East Fourth 
street. 



'WANTED - EXPERIENCED SALES- 
lady for millinery. La Ferte's, 24 West 
Superior street. 



i WANTED IMMEDIATELY - COMPET- 

ent girl for kitchen work; good wages. 

j 910 East First s treet. 

lWANTEt>-WOMAN TO DQ IRONING 
! and clean house one day each week. 
i Mrs. G. A. Sherwood, 4z7 Tenth avenue 
east. 



ARCHITECTS. 

SUPERINTENI;ENT OP CON8TRUC- 
tion R G. Borland, 410 Burrows build- 
ing. Old 'phone. 1083-K. 



W. R. Parsons & Sons Co., 614 Manhattan 
Bldg. All classes of buildings solicited. 

FRANK L. YOUNG & CO., 201 Pal. Bldg. 



FOR RENT-FURNISHED ROOM: ALL 
modern Apply, 5'A East Fifth sireet. 



SAW REPAIRING. 

SAW REPAIRING ^^HiRING YOUR 
saws to the Duluth Lumber company, 
Duluth, Minn., for repairs; circular, 
band, cross-cut and hand saws sharp- 
ened and straightened. Out-of-town 
work promptly attendtd to. 



TENTS AND AWNINuS. 

^^TfRlElT&'caTToe East Superior street. 



HOW 

WHEN 

WHERE 



TO 

PURCHASE 

BY MAIL 



FOR SALE-MOTOR BICYCLE IN 
good order at a bargain. Apply base- 
ment. Hammond block, Superior, Wis. 

FOR SALE— NEW ITPRIGHT PIANO. ! 
mahogany case, $148; $10 down and $6 ptr 1 
' month. Howard, Farwell & Co., 120 
I East Superior street. 

! FOR SALE— HOUSEHOLD FURNI- 
! lure, 220 West Fourth street. 

jFOR SALE - ONE WALNUT PIANO, 
used a few months; In excellent condi- 
tion, good as new; former price $4C<); our 
special price $300- sold on terms of $15 
I and $8 per month. French & Bassett, 
; First street and Third avenue west. 

!FOR SALE-ONE MAHOGANY PIANO, 
slightly used, $200; sold on terms of $10 
cash and $7 per month. French & 
Bassett. First street and Third avenue 
west. 

FOR SALE— AUTOMOBILE TIRES. $10 
up; carriage tires, $3 up; bicycle tires, 
$1.50 up. We vulcanize and retreat all 
makes of tires. Northwestern agents 
for international tires. J. N. Johnson 
Co., 915 Nicollet avenue, Minneai)olis, 
Minn. 




I O. F. 
f'OUR'T COMMERCE, NO 
3283, Independent Order of 
Foresters, meets first ana 
third Friday evenings at » 
o'clock at Rowley's hall, No. 
m West First street. Next 
regular meeting, Sept. 1.0, 1907. 
Tupper, C. H.; W. W. Hoopes, R. S. 




IMPERIAL CAMP. NO. 220^ 
meets at Maccabee hall, 224 
West First street, second and 
fourth Tuesdays of , each 
month. J. W. Wood, V. C; 
P. Earl, clerk. Box 411. 



NORTH STAR LODGE. NO. 
35, Knights ot Pylhias, meets 
.-It 8 (; clock every Tuesday 
nlKht at 118 West Superior 
street William H. I^mson, 
C. C"; H. McKenzie, K. R. 
and 6." 



CLAN 



WA.NTED — COMPETENT COOK. MRS. 
C. A. Luster, 1619 East First street. 



CARPET CLEANING. 

cTtY CAltPET'"7^LEA>nNG'"c^ 
Lake avenue south; clean with com- 

§ressed air: Oriental rugs a specialty. 
• Van Norman, manager. Zenith, 
1365-X; old phone, 1259-R. 



DANCING ACADEMY. 

COFFIN'S "^^PEN DAY AND EVEN- 
Ing. Private lessons by appointment. 
Class meets Mond.iy and Friday, 'M 
p. m. Both 'phones. 18 Lake avenue 
north. 



WANTED— TRACKLAYERS, $2.50 PER 
day; teamsters. $45 per month, for Ida- 
ho. Washington and Montana; also 
twenty-five bridge carpenters for Ida- 
ho. $3.50 per day. Free fare W. J. Fed- 1 WANTED — A 
ders. 511V» W. Michigan St.. Duluth. .^>-^^>^«' - 



WANTED - GIRL W^HO HAS HAD A 
little experience in bookkeeping and 
who can do a little sewing work. Apply 
to room 10, over Gldding's. Call after 
6 p. m. 



HOW 



Watch the advertisements in The Herald each 
day. Write your order plainly and make clear the 
goods you want. Give the date of the issue 
which the advertisement appeared. 



in 



WHEN 



WANTED - 
liousew'ork. 



GIRL FOR GENERAL 
314 East Second street. 



Write to the advertiser at once. Prompt re- 
sponse will give you as good a chance to 
"pick up" bargains as the shopper who lives 
in Duluth. Do not wait. 




TYPEWRITERS 

for sale, $^ up 
perior street. 



FOR RENT — ALSO 
Edmont, 410 West Su- 




SATIN SKIN SPECIALTIES. 



Blemishes, pimples, eruptions, rashes, 
medicated by Satin skin cream, soon dis- 
appear. 25c. 



STEWART, NO. 50, O. S C. 
mecAs fli-st and third Wednes- 
days of each month at 8 p. m., 
in Folz hall, West Superior 
street John G. Ross, chief; 
Alex G. McKnight. secretary; 
John Burnett, financial secre- 
tary 413 First National Bank 
Next 'meeting. Sept. IS. Report 
delegate^ ^ 

rnVAT GUARD, SUBORDINATE DIVI- 
LOYAL t.LA^J^^.^,^ ^^2, meets first and 

third Wednesdays of each 
month. H. B. McKinhy, cap- 
tain gtn'ral; H .V. Hoimes, 
paymaster, 415 Fifteenth ave- 
nue east; E. F. Heller, re- 
corder. :.:^0 ^Vfst Fifth. An 

ice cream social will be given Wednesday 

evening, Sept. 18. 



building 
of royal 



IF YOU WILL BRING 



Suit to 10 Fourth avenue 
it for 50c; pants, 15c. J. 



west, we press 
Oreckovsky. 




STOVE REPAIRING. 

REPAIRS FOR OVER lO.COO DIFFER- 
ent stoves in stock. Duluth Stove Re- 
pair works. 'Phones. 217 East Superior 
street. 



C. H. Looinis, 
street. 



MODERN MACCABEES. 

ZENITH CITY TENT, NO. 
1044, meets every fiist ana 
third Friday ot the month 
at Kalamazoo hall B. Com- 
mander Charles E. Noiman 
1610 Minnesota avenue, record 
keeper and finance keeper, 
residence 504 East Fourth 



COURT 



WANTED— BOY TO LB-A.RN DRUG | 
business. A. C. LeRicheux Drug com- 
pany. 405 East Fourth street. j 

WANTED SALESMEN - TWO GOOD 
men for local work. We want only 
those capable of approaching the best 
families in the city; good money to 
the right men. 18 Third avenue west. 



GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework. Mrs. H. B. Eva. 2135 Wood- 
land avenue, Hunter's Park. 



WANTED — COMPETENT NURSE, 
with good references, for a baby 1 year 
old. 516 East Second street. 



RELIABLE HELP ALWAYS TO BE 
had at Mrs. Callahan's Employment of- 
fice, 15 Lake avenue north. 



W-^NTED-A SAWMILL FIREMAN. 
Apply at sawmill. Twenty-thud avenue 

west. 



(Continued on page 15.) 



WANTED — COMPETENT GIRL FOR 
general housework: family of two: $20. 
Apply Mrs. K. N. McLeod, 305 South 
Twenty-first avenue east. 



(Continued on Page 15.) 



WHERE 



Buy of the merchants who advertise— they 
are reliable— there is no risk. They have 
departments whose entire attention is 
given to mail orders. Experts 

selections and oversee the packing of 

Delivery is prompt and sure. 



make the 
the goods. 



J. A. BECKIR STOVE REPAIR 
works, 323 Central avenue north. Re- 
pairs for heaters, stoves and ranges. 



WATC H THE HE RALD 

PURCHASE BY MAIL 




A. O. U. W. 

DULUTH LODGE, NO. 10, 
meets at Odd Fellows' hall 
every Tuesday evening at 8 
o clock. R. R. Delchsel, M 
W.; R. G. Foote. recorder; 
r. J. St. Germain, financier. 
121 First avenue west. 




U. O. F. 
EASTERN STAR, 
meets every first 
Tuesday of each 
.Maccabee hall. 



NO. 
and third 
month, at 
224 West 



Harry 



First street. Next meeting, 
S< pt 17. J. Wilde, secretary; 
l.'i2 Mesaba avenue; J. B. Gel- 
ineau, C. R., 116 West Fourth 
Milnes. treasurer. Office at 



MODERN MACCABEES. 

ST. LOUIS BAY TENT, NO. 
K*45, meets every first and 
third Mondays, at Gllley's, 1 
West Duluth. Matthew El- 1 
linger, commander, 308 Eigh- 
teenth and One-half avenue 
west. New 'phone. 3099-X. 

[Finance keeper, Edward Shanks, 23 North i 
Fifty-eighth avenue west; recordkeeper, 1 
C C. Low. 5712 Wadena street | 





WOODMEN OF THE WORLD. 
VVKVTH CITY CAMP, NO. 5, MEETS 
Z.b.r's 1 1 n ^^,^ry second and fourth Mon- 
dav at old Masonic Temple, 
fifth fioor. H. H. Saxton, C. 
C.; J. H. Larkin, banker, 201 
West Superior sireet; James 
Blackwood, clerk, 412 Laks 
avenue south. 



ROYAL LEAGUE. 
ZENITH COUNCIL, NO. 161 
Royal league, meets in Elks' 
hall first and third Monday 
evenings, at 8 o clock. James 
A. Wharton archon, court- 
house; Andrew Nelscn. 4U 
First National Bank buUiinS. 




\ 



mtm^tm 






^^ JL. 



,>:- 



* .. 






I 

'"I 











:> 



M- 



JlMDULUTH EVENING iHER A 



TWENTY-FIFTH YEAR. 



SPECIAL MAIL EDITION FOR: THURSDAY MORNING, SEPTEMBER ]J», 1907. 



(ON TRAINS. FIVE 




6 PAGES 



O CENTS. 



PROFITS OF OVER 1,000 PER 
CENT PER YEAR MADE BY 
STANDARD OIL OF INDIANA 

CITY OF CHICAGO TURNS 
DOWN ITS NEW CHARTER 
AT SPECIAL ELECTION 



The Company's Profits 

for Year 1906 Were 

$10,516,082. 

This is Corporation Sen- 
tenced to Pay Fine 
of $29,240,000. 

Examination of Octopus 

Continued in New YorR 

by Kellogg. 

New York. Sept. IS.— Profits of more 
than l.WO per cent per year are made 
by the Standard Oil Company of In- 
diana, the carpuration sentenced to p:>y 
a fine of $29,240.0<X) by Judge Landis in 
Chicago. The company's profits for 
1906 were $10,516,082 and in 1903 they 
were $8,753,410, a total for two years' 
business of $18.2651,492. The Standard 
Oil Company of New Jersey owns 9,990 
shares of the Indiana company's stock. 
The Indiana company Is capitalized at 
$1,000,000. The dividends paid by the 
Standard Oil Company of Indiana last 
year uKgKgaled $4,495,500, or a little 
more than $6,000,000 less than the 
profits. The figures were presented 
today in the federal proceedings 
against the Standard Oil Company of 
New Jersey. The dividends and profits 
of sixteen other subsidary corporutioiu-= 
were given. 

New York, Sept. 18.— Further efforts 
to obtain the rtcerds ol the liiiuidati'ig 
trustees of the Standard Oil trust, 
which effected the dissolution of ti'.e 
trust and formed the present Standard 
Oil Company of New Jersey, was made 
by Frank B. Kellogg, who Is conduct- 
ing the government's suit against the 
company, when the hearing before 
Special Master Ferries was resumed to- 
day. Mr. Kellogg issued a subpoena 
six weeks ago for these records, but so 
far has been unable lo obtain them. 
py lhtse_ J^t^J'dS Mr. Keil"gg expcet.'? 
to show the lurmaiive piutess of the 
Standard f.)ii Lempany of New Jersey 
and prove the gravamen of the govern- 
ment b charge that the company Is 
an Illegal combination. 

Clarence G. Fay, assistant comp- 
troller of the Standard, was recalled 
to the stand ana iiuestioned about the 
income on the Pratt Investment com- 
pany. He said that the income from 
this source in 1902 was $lo7,400 and 
thai thi money was paid over to the 
Standard Oil company by C. M. Pratt. 




But Little More Than 

Half Usual Vote 

Was Cast 



The Provision for Strict 

Sunday Closing Was 

Objectionable. 

Fear That Taxes Would 

be Raised Also a 

Bugbear. 



FIRE NOT 
QUQCHED 

Heavy Smoke Still Pours 

From Shaft of 

Malta Mine. 

Fate of Three Impris- 
oned Miners is Still 
Unknown. 



Sparta, Minn., Sept. 18.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— Fire that started in the 
main drift of Shaft No. 1 of the Malta 
mine here between 6 and 7 o'clock last 
night, at a point about 200 feet from 
the shaft, burned fiercely all night and 
is still burning, regardless of the ef- 
forts of the mine's fire fighting force, 
aided by the Sparta firemen. Charles 
Smith, pumpman, and Joseph Mesnik 
and John Mailer, timbermen, who were 
cut off from escape by the flames, are 
believed to have perished. Repeate<l 
tappings on the pipes Ipading to the 
place in the drift where the men would 
naturaly st-ek refuge do not bring back 
a responsive knock, which leads to the 
fear the men have -either lost their 
lives In making a da.sh through the 
flames or have succumbed to the 
smoke and bad air. 

The fire fighters hiive been trying In 
vain to get in behind the fire, but liave 
found the undertaking exteremely 
hazardous on account of the smoke and 
foul air. The timbering appears to be 
burning firecely, the volume of water 



WARRANTS FOR ARREST 
OF FOURTEEN PROMINENT 
PENNSYLVANIANS ISSUED 

Charged With Defrauding 

State in Building 

Capitol. 

VERY URGE MAJORITY X ^tZ'^T" 

eral Todd. 



OKLAHOMA ADOPTS ITS 
NEW CONSTITUTION BY A 



MAYOR BUSSE 
Of Chicago, Who Says the People of 
His City Have Made a Mistake in 
Rejecting the New Charter. 



AL WIFE 
IDENTIFIED 




(Continued on page li, seventh coluu.n.) 

PEOPIELIKE^DONOVAN. 

Practically Ousted From Office He is 
Rc-eiccted by big Vote. i 

Marquetie, Mich., Sept. l^.-(^peeial to 
Tlie lleralil).— Priutically ousted frori 
the office two mom lis ago because of I 
alleged neglect of duty, Daniel S. Don- I 
ovan reet jvtd a noteworthy popular 
vindication yjsterday by being re- 
elected city rectirder by an overwntlin- 
Ing majority. With hve eandiiluUs In 
the field he received 450 votes out of 
1,1U) last. 

CAUGHT INJSHLAND. 

Lumber Cam? CooK Charged With Kill- 
ing Hogan In Marquette. 

Maniueite. Mieh.. Sept. IS.— (Special to 
The HemUli.— With a rewind of tlOO 
hanging over Ins luud, Chai les Worl, 
a lumber camp cook, was arrested at 
Asiilund. Wis., ytsterday. He is want- 
ed hue for siaM>i:ig Wallace Hogan 
to (leatli a ferliiiglil ago. 



POPULATION CENTER 
IN STATd Of WISCONSIN. 



Discovery of Mrs. Klimo- 
vlcz Solves the ' 
Mystery. 

Two Women Had Claimed 

Chicago Girl as Their 

Daughter. 

Chicago. Sept. 18.— The "real Mrs. 
Klimovicz" has been found. The dis- 
covery today sets at rest all question 
as to the identity of Miss Tillie Tolan, 
the Chicago girl, who was claimed a 
few days ago in Judge Cleland's court 
by John Klimovicz as his wife and , 
identified by Mrs. Mary Zematis of ; 
Grand Rapids, Mich., as her daughter, j 

Klimovicz had been arrested on a j 
charge of disorderly conduct, the war- 
rant being secured by Miss Tolan, who 
claimed that KlimoviCz had been an- 
noying her by his attentions. 
1 Mrs. Klimovicz offered to furnish 
! proof of her identiy but her resem- 
! blance to her published pictures and 

(Continued on page 6. fifth column. j 

SAVED INCOME; 
! LEFT FORTUNE 

George C. Taylor Dies 

at a Ripe Old 

Age. 



(Continued on pagoi 6, fifth column.) 

LONDON HAS ITS 
DISMAL SWAMP 

In Comparison With Chi- 
cago's Jungle, Says 
Physician. 

London, Sept. 18.— Sir James Crlch- 
I ton-Brown, in delivering the presidcn- 
j tial address at the annual meeting of 
I the Sanitary Inspectors' association at 



Chicago, Sept. 18.— The new charter 
authorized by the state legislature at 
Its last session for the city of Chicago 
was rejected by the voters at yester- 
day's special election, by a majority 
of over 62,000. Little more than half 
of the registered vote was cast, final 
ligures. unofficial, showing 5iJ,446 bal- 
lots for the charter and U2Mi against 
it The total vote polled was 181,51*0, 
out of a registered vote of 361,%8. The 
light vote was due to some extent to 
the fact that the election was special, 
and that the granting of time off for 
the punK»se of voting was optional 
with employers, and in the majority 
of cases voters were obliged to go 
to the polls going to work, ur not at 

all. " , , , 

Mayor Busse issued the following 

statement last night: 

"It is evident from the result to- 
day that a great majority of the 

people of Chicago either do not want I Landino referred to the English meat 
a charter or are not sufficiently m- , . , , , ,,,. . 

ferested in a new charter to go to «upply, and urged ne aoo: tion of 
thP r^ma ajid vote The light vote private slaughter JtiQ; -.ee and the pro- 
pofler an? the majority against i viding of abattoirs a-S a central office 
adoption clearly proves that. 1 think ; for meat inspection. Then people no 



this indifference on the part of the 
public has been a mistake. While 
the charter contained some provi- 
sions that were disagreeable to this, 
that or the other special interest or 
element in the cK»mmunity, yet on 
the whole., it was a gocnl thing for 
Chicago. Its adoption would have 
enabled the administration to do 
many things in the way of public 
improvements which would have been 
of lasting benefit to the city and its 
people."' 

An analysis of the vote shows that 
the defeat of the charter was due 
I in a large measure to th« contention 
'■ of its opponents that taxes would be 
I raised, and that strict Sunday clos- 
ing laws would become efft<!tive. 



longer would find "prize Christmas fat 
beef absolutely filled with generalized 
tuberculosis." He added: "If Chicago 
has Its iungie, London has its dismal 
swamp." 

In another part of his address the 
eminent, physician denounced what he 
described as the prevailant craze for 
getting thin. 

On all hands, he said, the cry Is that 
we eat too much. So fierce in some 
quarters is the propaganda of dietetic 
ascetism that in dread of being sus- 
pected of gluttony people only Indulge 
their healthy appetite In secret. 

This craze. Sir James declared, was 
producing a debility which sufferers 
therefrom were seeking to combat by 
Indulgence in alcohol and narcotics. 



Prohibition Clause Also 

Receives Sanction of 

the People. 

C. N. Haskell, Democrat, 

is Probably Elected 

Governor. 

The Republicans May Get 

Congressmen From 

Two Districts. 



Oklahoma City, Sept. 18.— Heturns 
received from the larger cities and 
ccyuntit'S of Oklahoma and Indian Ter- 
ritory indicate that the constitution 
of the proposed new state has been 
adopted by a large majority; that the 
piHDhibition clause of the constitution, 
which was voted on separately, has 
also been ratified, and that the Dem- 
ocratic state ticket, headed by C. N. 
Haskell for governor, has been elected 
over the Rt publican state ticket, head- 
ed by Frank Frantz, the present ter- 
ritorial governor of Oklahoma. The 
voting was very heavy. Several days 
will elapse before complete returns 
are in. The new state elects five 
! congressmen. The Third, Fourth and 
Fifth district have been conceded 
1 to the Democrats. The convention 
that framed the state constitution 
w&» Jiifc*vHy^ Democratic, and the 
I cor.oi'>t«tion, "e.s complett^, was ob- 
r,C!x!ouAi to the Republicans. Secre- 
i tary Taft, speaking recently at Okla- 
' homa Cliy. advised Republicans to 
1 vote against the constitution. How- 
ever, the Republican party did not 
i attempt to defeat tiie constitution. 
I The lit w- state must await the con- 
\ stitution's endorsement by President 
' Roosevelt. 

i Tho Democratic state committee 
'claims the election of Haskell, Denio- 
I crat for governor by 40,(i00, and tne 
iRtpublican state committee claims 
■ the election for Frantz, Republican, 
' bv lO.tKK). Frantz is running fai 




FRANK FRANZ, 
Present Territorial Governor, Who 
Has Undoubtedly Been Defeated for 
Executive of the New State of Okla- 
homa. 



A HUNDRED 
LIVES^LOST 

By Burning of a Jap- 
anese Steamer Near 
NanKlnl 



ahead 
of his ticket., but otherwise"' the Demo- 
crats of both territories wem to be 
polling the majority of 1906. 
B. S. McGuire, Republican, is prob- 

"K'^ntliiued on page G, fifth column.) 



The Tafoo Maru De- 
stroyed on Yangtse 
Kiang River. 



SUCCESS I 

H. H. Rogers, the Standard Oil Magnate, is declared by physicians to be a physical wreck. 



%.}i.:i^?ii^9^-^?:^t^x-^-^^^i:^.ii^i^ 



Madison, Wis., Stpt. 18.— The secre- 
tary i>f state has discovered that since 
18h5 the center of population of the 
state has remained within the bounds 
ol eight s«iuare miles in Grt-en Lake 
county, arid although the point had 
Tnovid aliiiost to the northern bound- 
arj of Green Lakf town in 1895, at 
thf state census taken two years ago 
it had returned southward to within 
two miles o^f the point at which it 
was fixed twenty years previous. 

Ten years ago the census compilers 
locatid it in Green Lake county, 1.t>'> 
south of the north line and 4.2 west 
of the east line of Green Lake town. 
In section 8. In 1S85 it had been lo- 
cated three miles south in section 29. 
As the result of the fife'ures gathered 
In ll/0:». the point has been locatt-d in 
Bcction 24, Green Lake town, it hav- 
ing taken' a westv.ard course in ten 
years of 2.2 miles to the south and 
1.8 miles to the west. 



THIRTEEN-YEAR-OLD 

BOY KILLS HIMSELF. 

Moose Lake, Mmn., Sept. lS.-(SpecU»l 
to Thf Herald.)— A K^-year-old boy taking 
his Uff- by blowing hiiiseif to pieces with 
a y\u\i ot dvnaiiiit. is the harrowing story 
that loints here from the home of Law- 
rence Stiusta. living feurteen miles west 
of iMoo.«e Lake. His son Josepli, a mere 
Btrirrlin?, in a fit of anser bf cause hi 
had bet n threHtened with punishment, 
protured a stick of the explosive Uv:^\ u 



New York, Sept. 19.— George C. 
Taylor, son of Moses Taylor, who 
was considered one of the wealthiest 
merchants o-f his -time, is dead at 
his home at Great River, L. I., after 
being in feeble health s*fveral years. 
He was about 72 years old. He had 
lived in strict retirement at Great 
River for nearly twenty years, hav- 
ing moved there from this city, where 
his father had accumulated his for- 
tune. The Taylor place i3 one of the 
hnest on the island. 

By his fathers will Mr. Taylor re- 
ceived the income from $20,000,000. 
The principal wa-s held in trust, how- 
ever, and the son was not allowed 
to touch it. Though the »>n never 
was engaged in active business, it is 
thought that before he died he had 
aicumulatd by saving, a fortune, 
ecjual if not superior to that left him 
by his father. In President Lincoln's 
administration Mr. Taylor was in the 
con<»ular service, and was stationed in 
London. There he met Mrs. Betsy 
Head, an Englis.h woman, and engaged 
her as housekeeper and conlideniial 
fetcretary Sue came with him when 
he returned to this country, and she 
was in charge ot his home at Great 
Kiver until June 13 of this year, 
when she died. leaving property 
valued at $3»15,0O0. 

Mr. Taylor Incame the guardian of 
Mrs. H**-'i's daughter, Leija. Five 
cr six years ago th:s daughter mar- 
William Bodley, Mr. 



»,..,. ...... ^ ...v^ ... ...^ ...».„ -,ried Frederick William Bodley, 

ne!::hbor un<ltr the pretense of wanting j 'p^yior's gardner. . She was disin- 
It for his fathtr to blow up stumps, and > j^erlted bv ner mother, whose will left 
then is .said to have lighted the fuse and _, ,=; . ^^^.j. daughter. It is ex- 

te;.*'blown\'raVorls ''"""''* '"' ''"■^''' pc-c-ted that Mr. Taylor, in his will. 
The tr.ig'c affair U being investigated may have made some provision for 
bH the coroner. j his ward. 




Shanghai, Sept. 18.— A Japanese 
sleamt>r, said to be the Tafoo Maru,' 
has been burned three miles off Ching 
Kiang, on the right bank of the 
Yangtse Kiang, forty-five miles from 
Nanking. It is reported that 100 lives 
were lost. 

The Tafoo Maru is still on fire as 
this dispatch is forwarded, and the 
loss of life or extent of the damage 
done have not been ascertained, bat 
it is known that many of the passen- 
gers and crew are missing, and it is 
estimated that 100 lives were lost. 

The Tafoo Maru, formerly the 
Tahung Maru, is <»f 1.758 tons regis- 
ter, was built in Japan, was launched 
in ;»1900, and belongs to the Osaka 
Shosen Kabushiki company of Osaka. 
She is 299 feet long, has 40 feet beam 
and draws 11',^ feet of water. 



Civil Suits to Recover 

Money Will Follow 

Prosecution. 



Harrisburg, Pa., Sept. 18.— Warrant* 
for the arrest of fourteen persons in- 
volved in the state capitol scandal 
were issue-d today by two Harrisburg 
aldermen, on information furnished 
by Attorney General Todd. Each of 
the defendants are charged on sev- 
eral counts with conspiiacy to cheat 
and defraud the state by making 
false invoices, and four of them are 
also chargt^d with ol»talning money 
under false pretenses. 

Following is a list of the men for 
v*-hom warrants were issued: 
Joseph M. Huston, architect, ami 

I his active assistant, Stanford B. 

i Lewis, both of Philadelphia. 

John H. Sanderson, Philadelfrtiia, 
chief contractor of furnishings. 

Congrcfcisman H. Burd Cassell, Mari- 
etta, Pa., treasurer and executive offi- 
cer of the Pennsylvania Construction 
company, contractors for steel filing 
cases. 

James" H. Shumaker, Johnstown, 
I-a., former supei-iiitendent of publlo 
grounds and buildings, who receipted 
for the furnishings. 

G'orge F. Payne and his partner, 
Charles G. Wetter, both of Philadel- 
phia, buil'iers of the ca.piie>l and con- 
tiacltrs for the $S03,00<J attic. 

William P. Snydtr, Spring City, Pa., 
former auditor general, who approved 
the warrants ot the contractors. 

WilHam L. Mathues, Media. Pa., 
former state treasurer, who paid iho 
bills of the eonti actors. 

Charles F. Kiiisnian. Wallis Boleau, 
John G. Nelderer and George K. 
I Storm, all of Philadelphia, stockhold- 
ers in the Pennsylvania Bronze com- 
pany, organized by Sanderson for 
the manufacture of the $2,000,000 light- 
ing fixtures. 

Frank Irvine, auditor in the audi- 
tor general's office, who audited the 
accounts of the contractors. 

The men for whom warrants were 
issued include all of the eighteen 
person.s and firms mentioned by the 
invistigation commission, in its re- 
port to Governor Stuart as being In- 
volved in the capitol contracts, with 
the excj'ption of Frank G. Harris, 
former state lre«,surer, and Edward 
B. Hardenborg, former auditor gen- 



(Continued on page 6, fifth column.) 



TROUBLE IN SIGHT. 

United States Refuses to Give L'p Mur- 
derer of American Woman. 

Victoria, B. C, Sept. 18.— Trouble has j 
arisen v.ith regard to the extradition of 
W. H. Adsell, arrested at Chefoo and ^ 
taken on the United States steamship 
Galveston, for the murder of Gertrude 
Dayton, an American woman, in a 
Hongkong hotel. He afterward crowd- \ 
ed the remains into a trunk and placed 
them on the steamer Monieagle. The : 
British authorities are endeavoring to ; 
secure the extradition of the accused . 
to Hongkong tor trial, but the United | 
States government refuses to give him ; 
up, and has notified the United States 
consul general at Chefoo to proceed 
against him. 

SCHOOL CHILDREN 

Of New York City Number 637,387, a 
Gain of Over 20.000. 

New York. Sept. 18.— Six hundred and 
thirty-seven thousand three hunditd 
and eighty-seven eluKlren are enrolled 
in the schools of New York this fall 
according to the ligures eomplled by 
the superintendent, William- H. Max- 
well. This is an increase of more than 
lO.iy.i) over last year. - | 

The figures show that in three bor- I 
oughs there are te.WO pupils who are i 
on part time, owing to Jack of room. 



MARRIED FOR 
. FOIJR nODRS 

New York Woman Nurse, 

Bride and Widow in 

Short Time. 

New York, Sept. 18.— To have been a 
nurse and bride and a widow, all 
within a fev.' hours, is the unusual ex- 
perience of Mrs. Alfred Adler of this 
city. Mr. Adler was a wealthy glove 
maiiufactur* r. He was taken with 
typhc»id fever on his way tack from a 
trip through Yellowstone park with 
his fiancee, who was Miss Johanna M. 
D. Hartung of this city, and a party 
of friends. On his being taken to 
Mount Sinai hospital Miss Hartung to 
whom he had been engaged eight 
years, became his nurse. He succumbed 
lo the disease, but before his death 
he and Miss Hartung were married. 
The weddnig took place at 6:40 o'clock 
in the nn^rning, and he expired at 10 
(.'clock. For th){e nights previous to 
his death Miss Hartung did not ieav* 
his bedside. 



BOY DROPS LANTERN. 

Yoalli's Act, While Helping Hired Man, 
Costs His Father's Barn. 

Freeman, S. D., Sept. 18.— The desire 
of a little son of F. B. Walter, a farm- 
er, to aid the hired man in his work, 
about the barn, resulted in a heavy- 
loss to Mr. Walter. The hired man 
left a lantern in the barn, forgetting to 
blow it out. The little boy noticed this, 
and picked it up with the intention of 
carrying it to the house, but dropped 
it and the flames were soon com- 
municated to the barn, destroying it 



'this is a decrease 'of 12,544 since Sep': | and several adjoining buildings, 
tember, I'JttC. This number will be low- | property was insured for ?7i»0. 
ered in a month, when 5,000 extra sit- 
tings will be available through the 
conipletion of several schools. 



The 



STRIKEBREAKERS. 



ORDER ARREST 

Of Conductor and Engineer of Wrecked 
Train on Canadian Pacific. 

Toronto. Ont.. Sept. Ifc.— The coroner's 

jury investigating the leeent wreck 

t on the Canadian Pac ific railway at 

bYu^'^i^^An!," oTi?!.r« In^ured^'^^made'' ul oers from other pomis on the system are 
r.nort todtv an< dire" e5 Jne ^rre^st of on duty at the shops night and day. 
En'^^inee? Hodge and Condu-tlrGrim^ ' Ten boilermakons and forty-five h. Ipers 
'rhf Canadian Pacific Railway eon.pany ireporttd here, but how manfcare at work 
was atso blamed for putting inexperi- cannot be learn.d. ^ i^ ^uar^ra 

enced men la charge of Passenger WJ-J^J^i^ge St. Paul, ia in char^^ 



Two Carloads Reach Bralnerd and Are 
Being Guarded In Shops. 

Braincrd, .Minn., Sept. 18.— (Si^ciul to 

The Herald.)— Two carloads of boiier- 

j makers and helpers were put in the ship* 

: last night. Boarding cars are provided 

land sixteen of the company's special offl 



DEFECTIVE PAGE 








DULUTH EVENING HER AI 



TWENTY-FIFTH YEAR. 



SPECIAL MAIL EDITION FOR: THURSDAY MORNING, SEPTEMBER Ifi, 1907. 



(ON TRAINS, FIVE 




:i TWO CENTS. 



PROFITS OF OVER 1,000 PER 
CENT PER YEAR MADE BY 
STANDARD OIL OF INDIA NA 



"'^ T''^ w::f''CITY OF CHICAGO TURNS 

for Vcar 1900 Were 
$10,516,082. 

This is Corporation Sen- 
tenced to Pay Fine 
of $29,240,000. 

Examination of Octopus 

Continued in New YorK 

by Kellogg. 




DOWN ITS NEW CHART 
AT SPECIAL ELECTION 



But Little More Than 

Half Usual Vote 

Was Cast 



New Turk, yti>t. IS.— Profits of more 
than l."00 per ctnt ptr year are made 
by the Standard Oil Company of In- 
diana, the corp.iration sentenced to p:iy 
a fine of $29,240,UW by Judge Landis in 
Chicago. The company's profits for 
190« were $10,Glo.082 and in 1903 they 
were $b,To3,410, a total for two years' 
business of $lS,L6"r>.4S2. The Standard 
Oil Company of New Jersey owns 9,'J»0 
shares of the Indiana company's stock. 
The Indiana cun.pany Is capitalized at 
$1,0(K»,000. The dividends paid by the 
Standard i>il Company of Indiana last 
year aggi.gated $4,49o,500, or a little 
more than $6,000,000 less than the 




The Provision for Strict 

Sunday Closing Was 

Objectionable. 

Fear That Taxes Would 

be Raised Also a 

Bugbear. 



FIRE NOT 
QIH^CHED 

Heavy Smoke Still Pours 

From Shaft of 

Malta Mine. 

Fate of Three Impris- 
oned Miners is Still 
Unknown. 



Sparta, Minn., Sept. 18.— (Special to 

The Herald.)— Fire that started in the 
main drift of Shaft No. 1 of the Malta 
mine here between 6 and 7 o'clock last 
night, at a point about 200 feet from 
the shaft, burned fiercely all night and 
is stjli burning, regardkss of the ef- 
forts of the mine's flrt fighting force, 
aided by the Sparta firemen. Charles 
Smith, pumpman, and Joseph Mesnik 
and John Mailer, timbermen, who were 
cut off from escape by the flames, are 
believed to have perished. Repeated 
tappings on the pipes leading to the 
place in the drift where the men would 
iialuraly seek refuge do not bring back 
a resjionsive knock, which leads to the 
fear the men have either lost their 
lives in making a dash through tlic 
flames or have succumbed to the 
smoke and bad air. 

The fire fightirs huve been trying In 
Viiin to get in behind the fire, but have 
found the uiukrtaking exter< mely 
hazardous on account li tl.e smoki- and 
foul air. The timbering appears to be 
burning firecely, the volume of water 



WARRANTS FOR ARREST 
OF FOURTEEN PROMINENT 
PENNSYLVANIANS ISSUED 

Charged With Defrauding 

State in Building 

Capitol. 



OKUHOMA ADOPTS ITS 
NEW CONSTITUTION BY A 



VERY LARGE MAJORITY «- m:;fT 

eral Todd. 



MAYOR BUSSE 



profits. The figures were presented .„„ . ^xv ^ ^ , I f % ^.,r" «■> 0(kt T til 

today in the federal Proceedings j Of Chicago. Who Says the Peopk of | -^ o^er^^^^^^^^^ 

agaii..si the Standard Uil Company of | His City rfaveMade a Mistake m , j^^^^^^^ unofficial, si 



New Jtrscy. The dividends and profits 
of sixteen other subsidary corporation.- 
were given. 

New York, Sept. 18.— Furthtr efforts 
to obtain the records ot the liciuidatiMg 
trustees of the Standard Oil trust, 
which effected the dissolution of li.e 
trust and formed the present Standard 
Oil Company of New Jersey, was made 
by Frank B. Keilogg. who Is conduct- 
ing the government's suit against the 
company, when the hearing before 
Special Master Ferries was resumed to- 
day. Mr. Ktiiogg issued a subpoena 
Bix weeks ago for these records, but so 
far has been unable to obtain tht m. 
py Ih^se^ J^cord^ Mr. Keil"gg exj^eet.^ 
to show the lonaaiive pi...cess ol tlic 
Standard Oil CcmiK.ny of New Jersey 
and piove the gravamen of the govern- 
ment ^ charge that the company Is 
an Illegal combraation. 

Clarence G. Fuy. assistant comp- 
troller of the standard, was recaiUd 
to the stand aiiu questioned about the 
income on the Pratt Investment com- 
pany. He said that the income from 
this source in l»0;i was $loT,400 and 
that tht inonty was paid over to the 
Standard Oil ciunpany by C. M. Pratt, 

"(Continued on luige t. seventh coli^n.n.; 

PEOPlFlIKE DONOVAN. 



Rejecting the New Charter. 



AL WIFE 




IDENTIFIED 



Chicago, Sept. 18.— The new charter 
authorized by the state legislature at 
Its last session for the cUy of Chicago 
was rejected by the voters at ye.ster- 
dav's sp>.<-ial election, by a majority 
Litiie more than half 

^^ te was cast, tmal 

ligures. unofficial, sh(-wing r>H,446 bal- 
lots for the charter and 12ZMhi against 
it. The total vote polled was 181,ra«0, 
out of a registertKi vote of 361, %S. The 
light vote was due to some extent to 
the fact that the election was special, 
and that the granting of time off for 
the purpose of voting was optional 
with emplt'yers, and in the majority 
of cases voters were obliged to go 
I to the polls going to work, or not at 

all. ■ . ., . 

Mayor Busse issued the following 

statement last night: 
"It is evident from the result to- 



(Coniinued on page. 6, fifth column.) 

LONDON HAS ITS 
DISMAL SWAMP 

In Comparison With Chi- 
cago's Jungle, Says 
Physician. 

London, Sept. 18.— Sir James Crlch- 
ton-Brown, in delivering the presiden- 
tial address at the annual meeting of 



Prohibition Clause Also 

Receives Sanction of 

the People. 

C. N. Haskell, Democrat, 

is Probably Elected 

Governor. 



day that a great majority of the i the Sanitary Inspictors' association at I Fifth uiscrict 



The Republicans May Get 

Congressmen From 

Two Districts. 



Oklahoma City, Sept. 18.— Returns 
received from the larger cities and 
co'untit'S of Oklahoma and Indian Ter- 
ritory indicate that the constitution 
of the proposed new state has been 
adopted by a large majority; that the 
prohibition clause of the constitution, 
which was voted on separately, has 
also been ratified, and that the Dem- 
ocratic state ticket, headed by C. N. 
Haskell for governor, has been elected 
over the Republican state ticket, head- 
ed by Frank Frant^ the present ter- 
ritorial governor of Oklahoma. The 
voting wais very heavy. Several days 
will elapse before complete returns 
are in. The new slate elects five 
congre.s.smen. The Third. Fourth and 




by 



Civil 



FRANK FRANZ, 
Present Terntorial Governor, Who 
Has Undoubtedly Been Defeated lor 
Executive of the Nev/ State of Okla- 
homa. 



AHUND 





day that a great majoruy uj. m^; i me oanuary inspiciors associaiion airiiiu iwo-c^.. 

[\:^^rv..^».> «,P Mn^ UUwiTkr, r^P-e of Chicago either do not want j ^ar.dino referred to tlie English meat ■ ^^ }^% ^'^T'Th.* 

IlKrnVPrV nr Wlr^ Klimn-'a charter or are not sufficiently m- , ^ ^ ._ T ...• ^ i^'^t framed the 

UI>tUVCiJ^ VI if|l3. l\!llilU if^,^4YjVa new charter to go to ^'^PPb". f ^^V^'^^^VV- f . . i ' iTr.r.''^ ^^>» bi*vi.iy. P^- 

r I aL the r^^lls arul vote The light vote I Pnvate slaughter hii' es and the pro- t ^.^^r-Stlttetlon, as ( 

ViCZ Solves the >l^uJ ^,.f t^:^ •«.nw;tv«.P.i>:nst!viding of abattoirs ar-S a central office „,.^,ou.s to the 1 

Mystery. 

Two Women Had Claimed 

Chicago Girl as Their 

Daughter. 



have been conceded 
s. The convention 
state constitution 
mocratic, and the | 
completed, was ob- i 
Secre- : 



By Burning of a Jap- 
anese Steamer Near 
Nanklnl 



The nev,- state must await the con 
stitution's endorstment by Piesident 
Roosevelt. . 

Tho Democratic state committee 
claims the election of Haskell, Deniu- 



that or the other special interest or ] swamp. ^ .- v.. jj 

elemem in the fcmmunity. yet on In another part of his address the 
the w^hole it was a gcK:Hl thing for eminent physician denounred what he 
Chicago Its adoption would have I described as the prevailant craze for 

;;;^'thi^ i?f"tS^w^""of ^2ubM? l^^in'^/h^ds. he said, the cry is that ; ^-V:'^fc:;'^go^^^nor by "40 (.00. a.id tlie 
[mprovemenls which would have been | we eat too much. So fierce In some ; kc publican state committee calms 
5 last ng l.enefit to the city a.nd its ' Quart.-rs is tht propaganda of dietetic j the election for Frantz. R';Pubjican 
neoTile" lascetism that in uread of being sus- U.^ i(),w>0. Frantz is running far anead 

An .analvsis of the vote shows that pected of gluttony people only Indulge I of his ticket, but otherwise the Demo- 
the defeat of the charter was due their healthy appetite in secret. 

This craze. Sir Jame* dtclared. was 

producing a debility which sufferers 

therefrom were seeking to combat by 

indulgence in alcohol and narcotics. 



The Tafoo Maru De- 
stroyed on Yangtse 
iang River. 



Chicago, Sept. 18.— The "real Mrs. , |^- .^ -^j:^^ measure to th« contention 
Klimoviez' has been found. The dis- ! ^f jjs opponents that taxes would be 
coviiv today sets at rest all question I raised, and that strict Sunday clos- 

. \v. ■/ .-. f TLfioo Tiiiiu Toi-in ilng laws would become etlective. 
as to the identity of Miss Tune loian, ""k 



Shanghai, Sept. 18.— A Japanese 

wci^t^ .7^ • " I steamer, said to be the Tafoo Mariu 

crats of both tenitories s< em to be ^as been burned three miles off Ching 



polling the majority of 1906. 
B. S. McOuire, Republican, is prob- 

"Tc'oruhuied on page C, fifth column.) 



. the Chicago girl, who was claimed a | 
Practically Ousted From Office He is few days ago in judge Clelands court I 
Hi'.i'ifftpd bv bi2 Vote i ^'^ •^"''" Klimovlcz as his wife and , 

Ke-eiaiea oy Dig Yoie. .^^ . ^^^^ ^^^^ ^ematis ot; 

.rX;:^>";tlu:^ny";;:.u.d 'flo" Orand Rapids, Mich., as her daughter.! 

Klimovlcz had been arrested on a ; 
charge of disorderly conduct, the war- j 



tho offiie two nionihs ago because of 

alU-Ked negkit of duty, Daniel S. Don- „. ^_ 

ov:.n revived a noteworthy popular '; rant being secured by Miss Tolan. who 

viiKiRiilioii y»sttrii;iy by being le- 

t-lnttd my rtioidtr by an ov«rw»itlin- 

Inti iiuijcrity. ^\ ith nve eanUnialis in 

111. luhl no received 450 volts out ot 

1,10U last. 



I SUCCESS 

I H. H. Rogers, the Standard Oil Magnate, is declared by physicians to be a physical wreck. 



CAUGHT INj^SHLAND. j 

Lumber Cam? CooK Charged With Kill- 
ing liogan in Marquette. 

Marquelte. MWh.. Sept. lS).-(Siecial to j 
Tht- Utiiihh.— With a reward of JlOO ', 
hanging i)V*T liis htuil, Chai Ics Worl, | 
a iunib<.r camp cook, was arrested at | 
Ashlaiui. Wis.. yest< rday. He is wanl- 
nl litie for .stablMMK \V'alliice Jriogun 
to tleatli a fortiiigtit ago. 

POPULATION cYnTER 
IN iiAfc 0^ HlSCOJiSI.?^. 



: claimed that KlimoviCZ had been an- 
noying her by his attentions. 

Mrs. Klimovlcz offered to furnish 
proof of her identiy but her resem- 

I blance to her published pictures and 

I (Continued on page <!, fifth column. i 

SAVED INCOME; 
LEFT FORTDNE 

George C. Taylor Dies 

at a Ripe Old 

Age. 



Maslison, Wis.. Stpt. 18.— The s?cre- 
tary of state has discovertd that since 
lh»n thi- center of jKtpulation ot the 
8tati' has remained within the bounds 
ol eight siiuare miles in Green Lake 

county, and although the point had: . . « ^ > ,^ v,*.aith .anvpral vears 

inovtd almost to the- northern bound- 1 b^-'^ig m feeble health several years, 
ary of Green L.akv- town in 1895, at > He was about 72 years old. He had 
the state census taken two years ago ' jj^.j^ ;„ strict retirement at Great 
it had returntd southward to within ; ^^.^.^^ - ^ _„_,.. .„.,ntv vtars. hav- 



New York, Sept. 19.— George C. 
Taylor, sou of Moses Taylor, who 
was considered one of the wea-lthiest 
merchants <yf his -time, is dead at 
his home at Great River, L.. I., after 



two miles of the point at whicli it 
was fixed twenty years previous. 

Ten years ago the census compilers 
located it in Green Lake county, I.'m 
south «'f the north line and 4.2 west 
of the east line of Green Lake town. 
In section 8. In 18}<o it had been lo- 
cated three miles south in section 29. 
As the result of the figures gathered 
In i;.OJ, the point has been located in 
gectior 24 Green Lake town, it hav- 
ing taken' a westward course in ten 
years of 2.2 miles to the south and 
1.8 miles to the west. 



THiRTEEN-YEAR-OLD 

BOY KILLS HIMSELF. 



Moosf Lake, Minn., Sept. 18.-(Sreclnl 
to Th- Hera Ml— A l^;-yeur-old buy takniji 
his hfi- hy blowing hiii.-elf to piiees with 
a stitk ot (ivuauiite is the harrowing stury 
that e<»ioi s lier>- Jrom tin, iiomt of Law- 
riMic-p Stuista. liv ns fi'iateeii miles west 
of Mf.o.«e Lake. Hs son Josepii. a mere 
Btririiin;.'. m a fit of anji* r bfca.i.'^e h.' 
had bt-n threat* nod with punishment, 
prt-eured a sti< k nf the exp'osive tio:ii ujiied 



ne!::hhoi- unri»r the pretense of wanting 
It lor his father to blow up siunips'. and 
then is saa) to have lighted the fuse and 
phieed t!i' dynamite across his breast, 
bein^ blown to atoms. 

The tr.iKif' affair is being investigatca 
\>j( the coroner. 



River for nearly twtnty years, hav- 
ing moved there from this city, where 
his father had accumulated his for- 
tune. The Taylor place is one of the 
hnest on the island. 

Bv his fathers will Mr. Taylor re- 
ceived the income from $200!0,000. 
The principal wa.s held in trust, how- 
ever, and the scm was not allowed 
to touch it. Though the son never 
was engaged in a^-tive business, it is 
thought that before he died he had 
aecumulatd by saving, a fortune, 
etiual if not superior to that left him 
by his father. In President Lincoln's 
admiiiist ration Mr. Taylor was in the 
consular service, and was stationed in 
London. There he met Mrs. Betsy 
Head, an Englis.h woman, and engaged 
her as housekeeper and conlidential 
secretary Sne c-ame with him when 
he returned to this country, and she 
was in charge of his home at Great 
River until June 13 of this year, 
when she died. leaving pr(>perty 
valued at ?363,1>00. 

Mr. Taylor l>t<-ame the guardian of 
Mr!=. Hfja-'i's daughter. Lei) a. Five 
cr six y-.ars ago th.s daughter mar- 
Frederick" William Botllvy, Mr. 



Taylor'.^ gardner. She was disin- 
herited bv ner mother, whose w-ill left 
e.nlv $5 to her daughter. It is ex- 
I'C-cted that Mr. Taylor, in his will, 
may have made some provision for 
his ward. 




Kiang, on the right bank of the 
Yangtse Kiang, forty-five miles from 
Nanking. It is reported that 1(^0 lives 
were lost. 

The Tai'oo Maru is still on fire as 
this dispatch is forwarded, and the 
loss of life or extent of the damage 
done have not been ascertained, bat 
it is known that many of the passen- 
gers and crew are missing, and it is 
estimated that 1(»0 live^ were lost. 

The Tafoo Maiu, formerly the j 
Tahung Maru. is of 1,758 tons regis- | 
ter. was l>uilt in Japan, wa« launched 
in .»19(K), and Ixlongs to the Osaka 
Shoseii Kabushiki company of Osaka. 
She is 299 feet long, has 40 feet beam 
and draws IP.^ feet of water. 



Suits to Recover 
Money Will Follow 
Prosecution. 



Harrisburg, Pa., Sept. 18.— Warrant* 
for the arrest of fourteen persons in- 
volved in the state capito! scandal 
were Issued today by two Harrisburg 
aldermen, on inft»rriiation furnlsheJ 
by Attorney General Todd. Each of 
the defendants are cliarged on sev- 
eral counts with conspiiacy to cheat 
and defraud the state by making 
lalse invoices, and four of them are 
also charged with oiitaining money 
under false pretenses. 

Following is a list of the men for 
whom warrants were issued: 

Jostph M. Huston, architect, and 
ills active assistant, Stanford B. 
Lewis, both of Philadeipiiia. 

Joiiii H. Sanderson, Philadelphia, 
chitf contractor of furnishings. 

Congrei-wman H. Burd Ca^sell, Marl- 
■etta, I'a., treasurer and executive offi- 
cer of the Pennsylvania Construction 
company, contractors f;ir steel filniff 
ca.ses. 

James* H. Shumaker, Johnstown, 
la. former superintendent of publlo 
giounds and building.-^, who receipted 
for the furnishings. 

(J'orge F. Payne and his partner, 
Charles G. Vv'etter, both of Philadel- 
I>liia, buil'lers of the ca.pitol and con- 
iractt rs for tiie $203, OW attic. 

William P. Snydtr. Spiing City. Pa., 
former auditor gen/ral, who apiimved 
liie Wiiiranls ot the contractors. 

WilHam L. Mathues, Media. Pa., 
former state treasurer, who paid the 
bi;iK of the contiaotors. 

Charles F. Kinsman, Wallis Boleau. 
John G. Neldirer and George K. 
Storm, all of Philadeli'liia. stockhold- 
■ trs in the Pennsylvania Bronze com- 
pany, organlztd by Sanderson for 
the manufacture of the f2,0l>0.000 light- 
iiig fixtures. 

Frank iivine. auditor in the audi- 
tor general's office, who audited the 
aec(!unts of the contractors. 

The men for whom warrants were 
issued include all of the eighteen 
per.«f>n.s and firms mentioneO by the 
inv-stigation commis.^ion, in its re- 
port to Governor Stup.rt as being in- 
volved in the capitol contracts, with 
the excv'ptioin of Frank G. Harris, 
former slate tre«.surer, and Edward 
B. Hardenborg, former auditor gen- 

(Conliniicd on page 6, fifth column.) 



TROUBLE iN SIGHT. 



I^ARRIED FOR 
. FmJR HOURS 

New York Woman Nurse, 

Bride and Widow in 

Short Time. 

New York, Sij)!. 18.— To have been a 
nurse and bride and a widow, all 
within a fev.- hours, is the unusual ex- 
perience of Mrs. Alfred Adler of this 
city. Mr. Adler was a wealthy glove 
maiiufactun r. He was taken with 
typhoid ftver on his way back from a 

park with 



United States Refuses to Give Up Mur 
derer of American Woman. 

Victoria, B. C, Sept. 18.— Trouble has 'trip through Yeliowstone . 

, . . . ,»■ „r ' his fiancee, who was Miss Jf)hanna M. 

arisen with regard to the extradition of ^ Hartunk of tiiis city, and a party 
W. H. Adsell, arrested at Chefoo and , f,f friends. On his being taken to 
taken on the United States steamship Mount Sinai hospital Miss Hartung to 
Galveston, for the murder of Gertrude whom he had been engaged eight 
Dayton, an American woman, in a years, became his nurse. He succumbed 
Hongkong hotel. He afterward crowd- to the disease, but before his death 
ed the remains into a trunk and placed he and Miss Hartung were married, 
them on the steamer Monteagle. The The weddnig took place at 6:40 o'clock 
British authorities are endeavoring to ; in the morning, and he expired at 10 
secure the extradition of the accused ' " ' .. - -^.u,.- 

to Hongkong loi trial, but the United 
States government relusrs to give him 
up, and has notified tht United Slates 
consul general at Chefoo to proceed 
against him. 



SCHOOL CHILDREN 



o'clock. For t!ii<e nights previous to 
hi.s death .Miss Hartung did not leav* 
his bedside. 

BOY DROPS LANTERN. 



Youth's Act, While Helping Hired Man» 
Costs His Father's Barn. 

Of New York City Number 637,387, a , Freeman, S. D , Sept. IS.-The desire 
Gain of Over 20,000. j ^f a nttle son of F. B. waiter, a farm- 

New York, Sept. IK-Six hundred and ' er, to aid the hired man in his work 
thirty-seven thousand tiiree hunditd about the barn, resulted in a heavy 
jarid eighty-seven ehUdreo are eniolle^^ ^.^ Walter. The hired man 

U'ec .^ding"t'o'^he b^^'res ^'co,..\''led'- by | lef t a lantern in the barn, forgetting to 
the suptrintendtnt V.'illiari> H. Max- | blow it out. The little boy noticed this, 
well. This is an increase of more than 2nd picked it Up v.ith the intention of 
j(),(Hi) over last year. ; carrying it to the house, but dropi>ed 

The figures show that in three bor- ^ ^^^ ^y,^ flames were soon com- 
oiighs there are 68.ti40 pupils ;'^-ho are , , ^^ i^, t^e barn, destroying It 

^J''[: ^'Zir^^^V'^^^^^^^'i^'v- ^na several adjomii^ buildings. Th. 
teinbei IWm). Tnis number will be low- ! property was insured for ti'JO. 

ered in a month, when i\(M extra sit- 1 ^ 

tings will be available tlirough the 



completion of several schools. 

ORDER ARREST 



Of Conductor and Engineer of Wrecked 
Train on Canadian Pacific. 



STRIKEBREAKERS. 

Two Carloads Reach Brainerd and Arc 
Being Guarded In Shops. 



Toronto. Ont., Sept. Its 
i jury invesliKatiiig the 
Sun the Canarlian Paeitic 



yW'^y^ 



Brainerd, .Minn., Sept. IS.— (Si^cial to 

The Herald."— Two carloads of boil^r- 

The coroner's ; makt-rs and helpers were put in the .'■hop* 

leicnt wreck I last night. Boarding cars are provided 

v/.. w..- - railway at j^j,j sixteen of the company's .special offl- 

uill^^^'^And' .m'u-.^ 1njur.cf' m^o"us >er. from oiher pomts on the sy..»em ar* 
•*' I .^Hmv- In iMireeted the arrest of <>n dmv at the shops night and day. 
i^^port today .inddireced toe arrest ^n boiKrmakers and forty-five helpers 

was also Warned for putting mexperi- 1 cannot be learntU ig in charco 

enced men in charge of P^Hsenger 1 ^\. -^ J.^Mcn t .^ge. St. Paul, is in charj.(» 



INTENTIONAL DUPLICATE EXPOSURE^ 



DEFECTIVE PAGE 



\ 








»! 



i 



\o 



f 



THE DULUTH EVENING 



HERALD 



WEDNliiSDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 1907. 



WEATHRR FORECAST— Probably showers and slightly cooler to- 
night; Thursday partly cloudy and cooler. 



COLLEGE STYLES IN 

Youths' Fine Clothing 

The exactlnc^ requirements of college 
boys have been critically studied in the 
development of our exclusive styles. The 
lines of the Coats especially embody the 
newest of this season's individual features 
— especially the new lengths and the shap- 
ing of the back. The preferred materials 

the new brown striped tweeds, chev- 



WEAKER AT 
THE^LOSE 

Coppers Slump After 

Showing Strength at 

the Opening. 

Comparisons Show Big 

Loss in the Favorite 

Shares. 



are 

iots and cassimeres. 
I 5 to 2 I years at 
Sio.oo to $2 5.00. 



We fit all sizes 
prices ranging 



from 
from 



HOME OF THE KNOX HAT 



SUPERIOR STREET AT FOURTH AVENUE WEST 



from a visTT to-the Jnmestown exposi- 
tion and E;ist*rn points. 

C. A. Chkis- Jijpii, of the J|innpapolis 
grain firm 1 of |McHugrh, Christenson & 
Co., id a vfciiowin the city today. 

J. B. Gllnian^Jr.. of Minneapuli.s, wa." 
in th.> city to.liy. Mr. Giltillan i.s a 
in-uiber of gh^-kKiain tirni of Freemler. 

William tJodrlrh. a prominent lin.seetl 
nil dealer ol Milvaukeu, was in the city 
today. ■* *^ 

Mr.s. D. H. Spray of Minneapolis, wh) 
ha.s b'Vn rtSitiTTg htrr sister, Mrs. J. J 
Fisch.-r. 91112 East Fifth street, return 
ed .home today 



tist Fi 





J. W. pgTON RETURNS. 

Enthusiastic/ 0>^r Properties of Calumet 
and Sonora Mining Co. 

J. W. Narton, president and man- 
ager of the Mexican coiporation of 
Calumet & Sonora Mining conii>any, 
who has been absent in Cananea and 
other parts of M'ixico for the las: 
month, returned today on the Grea*^ 
Northern. To"' a Hei'ald reporter Mr. 
Norton .^aid: •'The Calum-t & So- 
nora Mining convpany is the tirsl of 

Out.=5ide of those who have been put- ^'l ''•^»« "^'w corporations at Cana- 
. , ,_ i nea to snip ore. From i.'ie Cataliua 

tmg up ihe margms. not many people j^^jj^jj^ ^^ [,^^ Catalina Group, being 

reali:^e just hov/ far down the recent • the new properties, we have been 



slump carried the price of coppii" 
stocks. 

Since last winter the prices of near- 
ly all of the favorite curb and listed 



shares have been cut in two, and some | on 
of them are selling Cor less than a 
tliird of their market value last winter. 
For instance. North Butte, which last 

week went the lowest it has ever gone 
since it tlrst struck the $1*^0 mark, fell 
off to J45. It was more than twice as 

I high last winter. So far, in the big 



hoisting lead and silver ores for some 
time. On my return trip, aiTanged 
for the smelting of our output. We 
are mining an eight-foot vein t\-hich 
We discovered over six months ago. 



the Catalina Claim. 



would 
before 
claims 



We 
have been shipping ore long 
this, but there were other 
which I had not secured. 

'On my last trip I paid the balance i] 
due and seeured titles to the claim.< 
Sultana, Chivera, Morena and Topo 
Chieo. These, with the other claims 




previously closed upon, to wit — Nor- 
stooks that are favorites in DulULhjton. Catalina. Zenith and with the 
there has been no shrinkage in tlie Piamonte, make in all 630 acres of 
matter of dividends, so that the share- | ground and from the Catalina claim 
liolders who hold the slocita merely j of the new )>ioperties we shall make 
for dividends have not lost anything i the first shipment of ore. The lead 
in that direction yet, but a cutting ! or^ in this vein a.ssays as high as 86. ti 
down of dividends is a natural seiiuence per cent lead, 205 ounces of silver and 

$S gold. The ore is found at the 
nineteen-foot |evel and at the forty 




I to tiie decline in tlie metal prices and 
[the curtailment of the copper mines' 
j production. 

if copper metal could have been main- 
I tained on an 18-cent level this com- 
I ing year, the chances of higiier prices 
I in the share market would have been 
I quite good, but the price has fallen 
i below that. The consumers them- 



tcrday afternoon. He is employed as 

driver for the Duluth Ice company and 

in .alighting from the wagon his foot 

slipped on the hub of the whiel and he 

ft li lieavilv to the ground, his leg being , j .. » , • ■ » 

broken 1)V tlie fall. He was taken home selves bid the metal prices up last year 

in an ambulance and l3 doing as well as and they are the ones who are bea - 



Krlegcr I'liiKl UW^. 

Juno Fvelyn Krieger. a^.d 4. the eldest 
Slaughter of Mr. and Mr.^. Andrew F. 
iKrieger, died at 1 p. ni., today of diph- 
Xherlu at the residence, 931 E:a3t Sixth 
'Btr«ot, The funeral will be held at 3 
O'clock Thursday 



can be expected. 

Give Up the Search. 



ing the market now, by l>eing just as 
(ftary of their purchases of copper as 
they were anxious to buy a year ago 



The .search for the relatives of the 1 when prices were much higher, 
late Frank Kelly, whose deatii occurred | The following table sliows the drop 
on the night of the 10th by drowning at taken by six leading stocks in which 
the ore docks, has been abandoned and j i^,,,,,,,,,.^ ,,^ .^^^ ir,u.,-^at^,\ «inpp last 



the funeral was held this afternoon 
from Stewart's undrrlaking rooms. In- 
ternment was madt> at Park Hill ceme- 
tery. Relatives supposed to reside in 
Chicago have not been located. 



iDuluthians are interested, since 



One Recruit Secured. 

At the Duluth marine recruiting of- 
fice one application for enlistment w;is 

received today. William Wriglit wa^ the Look for the Twin City 

man and he was examined by Sergeant i ^ Lake Superior Railway company's 
Hutchin.s. He will lie sworn in by L-'t'ut^ j notice of advance in price of stock pub- , 
Bouih. who will be up from St. Paul i [j.^;,,.,] ,„ today's p.iper. It is a revcia- i 
about tlie hist of the week, and will bejtion and will start the business man 
eent to Mare Island. i to thinking:. 



wmter: 



Look for the Twin City 
& Lake Superior Railway cwnpany's 1 
notice of advance in price of stock pub- ; 
'Ushed in today's paper. It is a revela- 
'tlon and will start the business man 
to thinking. 



ALEX ENNA 

VOCAL INSTRUCTOR 

Announces the opening of his studio at 
studio F., 224 West First street. 



Ka\«l lUeruitiug Ol'ecet Itetnrns 

O-Mi-gc V'enzf^l, gimnwr.s' fnate,' United 
States navv, has returned to Duluth 



We Always Have 

A few good second-hind sttM^l raneres that 
can be bought cheap. Kelley Hardware 
company. 

lj<M)ks for lUMler Prices. 
C. A. Wolf, the well-known dealer in 
black diamonds toy mining purposes, is 
In the city on busin-.-^s. He siys that 

feneral business conditions were never 'and will continue to assist Chief Yeo- 
ettei in the country and declares tliat j^xnn Shaw in the recruilins business 
the alarmists have really iu)thing j ji^re. Until alwut a month ago Ms. 
tangible to howl about. He looks for a vV'etizel was on duty, here but wis as- 
tcactioii in the eopper metal market signed to Minneapolis to assist during 
and a subsequent bulge in the share the busy season during the stale fair. 
market in a comparatively short time. ! ho was' in charge of a recruiting sta- 

Ition at the fair and reports a success- 

The Round Oak ! f ul week, having landed several proiu- 

And Jewell Steel Ranges are a=i good as 1 sing men for enlistment, 
nioney can make. Jl a week takes the 
best we 
pany. 



North Butto 

Amalgamated 

Butte Coalition 

Greene-Cahanea .... 
Calumet & Arizona 
Superior & Pittsburg. 



High 

Price. 

1907. 

,..$121.IM) 

... 121.25 



Low 

Price. 

l;t:J7. 

$45.0<J 

'58.50 



seven-foot leVii^l. running into black 
sulphide aasayihg better than 21 per 
cent coppef. High grade copper ore 
has been uncovered on the Morena, 
Chivera, Zenith and Norton claims. 
The other pioperlies of the Calumet 
& Sonora Minii>|: company are showing 
up .good." 

Mr. Norton expects to return to 
Mexico within ten days. 

EVERY WUKftK and ANYWHERE— 
that's where yoor can get WHITE LILY, 
"the SOAP I)! soaps." 



As ••asmssU ii^It On the door Is better 
tl an n'One ai Pl^ ' so evfii a very sina!! 
ad. of a stpr^ in The Herald is better 

than none .'ar'' nil. For "none at all" 



have. Kelley Hardware com- 



liook for the Twin CUy 

A Lake Superior Railway company's 
notice of Hdvance in price of stock pub- 
lished in todays pai>er. It is a revela- 
tion and will start the business man 
to thinking. 



.... 3'.».12Vi l-'KiiO 

2r..00 8.75 

.... 19S.0') 10.">.00 

.... 29.00 9.25 1 

• • • I 

Copper stocks weakened after a j 
strong opening today. Some of the j 
leading shares slumped two points or j 
so from the opening. There was no 
particular news, but it was a lislle.'ss 
session and some ot the stocks fell off 
merely for lack of support. I 

North Butte opened at $47, declined ! 
to $45.50 and closed at $46 bid and 
$46.50 asked- Amalgamated opened 
at $61, advanced to $62.12 V2. declined 
to $59.62 V3 and closed at $G0.25 bid. 

Butte Coalition opened at $16.12 ^^ 
declined to $16, rallied to $16.12^2 and 
closed'at $15.75 bid and $16 asked. 
Calumet <fe Arizona opened at $114, 
declined: to $110, reacted to |112.25 
and closed at $112 bid and rll2.50 
asked. Anaconda opened at $40, ad- 
vanced to $40.1212, declined to $38.75 
and closed at $39.25 bid 

Groene-Cananea .sold at $9.50, ad- 
vanced to $9.62Vi and clos?d al>out 
unchanged at $9.37Va bid and $9.62Vi 
asked. 

Superior & Pittsburg s >ld at $10.50. 
advanc'Xl to $10.75, d^-o'dned to $tP.37V8 



T 



TO ©L^SSOFY 



at $10.37i-i bid and $10.50